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Camping Tent camping the whole Camino

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
Camino Frances that is
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
If you do a search here you will discover that there are already a lot of thread dealing with that. The short answer is that wild camping is forbidden in many places the Camino passes and if you want to camp on private ground you will need to ask permission from the owner first (if you can find him). Official camp site are few and far between, a tent adds weight to your backpack and the albergues are plenty, affordable and the main place of social interaction. Hope that helps, Buen Camino! SY
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
There was quite a long and complete thread about this topic during the past Christmas break - Camping on the Camino Frances. Told you where you could camp and under what conditions, and in which parts of Spain. Not as liberal as your parents may have told you.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/camping-on-the-camino-frances.30433/#post-260462
 
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Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
But....plenty albergues will let you pitch your tent in their garden (if they have one:))

If you have a lightweight tent, max 1 to maybe 1,5kg, you could just bring it and see how it goes. If, after 2 weeks or so, it bothers you, you can always ship it ahead to Santiago and pick it up when you arrive there.

There a always people who tent a large portion of the camino, but hardly ever 100% of it.
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
Thanks guys. I'm gonna do my homework. Looking forward to the social aspect. Maybe a 50/50 split or something. Weight isn't an issue for me SYates. My system is very light
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
But....plenty albergues will let you pitch your tent in their garden (if they have one:))

If you have a lightweight tent, max 1 to maybe 1,5kg, you could just bring it and see how it goes. If, after 2 weeks or so, it bothers you, you can always ship it ahead to Santiago and pick it up when you arrive there.

There a always people who tent a large portion of the camino, but hardly ever 100% of it.
Thanks Dutch
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I saw a tent camper rousted in Portomarin one morning, but I don't think there is a lot of law enforcement on camping. Commercial campgrounds charge about the same as an albergue, and the albergues that allow camping probably will charge for using the facilities there. Cities and villages usually prohibit camping. The law prohibits camping within some distance, 2km comes to mind, of a commercial campground. If the campground owner's cousin is the police, you may find yourself on the receiving end of selective law enforcement!

Another aspect to consider is "what if everyone did it?" Imagine 200,000 pilgrims all wild camping. Parts of the Camino already are ten-acre latrines, and that is just from urgent needs along the trail. If all the needs were outside of rest rooms, the result is staggering to contemplate. The impact of one camper, however, would be less, but that might be a rather self-serving way to think of it.

Albergues
can be only 5E per day for most of the Camino (shop around a bit in each town). That gets a bed, shower, restroom, water, hand laundry, relaxing chair, picnic bench, and possibly heat and a kitchen. That is close to the very first Frommer publication "Europe on $5 a Day." You may have several reasons for wanting to camp, but monetary savings should be a minor one.

Buen camino!
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
Another aspect to consider is "what if everyone did it?" Imagine 200,000 pilgrims all wild camping.

Buen camino!
Wow, and if a good handfull bring a guitar, we would have a moving music festival. Glastonbury roadtrip. Yeah baby!:D
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Someone posted the times are changing since the 60's.
Yes, The Times They are a Changin'
Yes, The Times They are a Changin'
On the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunny.
 
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D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Another aspect to consider is "what if everyone did it?" Imagine 200,000 pilgrims all wild camping.

Wow, and if a good handful bring a guitar, we would have a moving music festival.
Not all aggregation is bad. What if everyone picked up five pieces of litter each day? The result would be much better than everyone camping...
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
In return for a music festival on the go, i would pick up 10 pieces of litter each day :)
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
In the thread 'Camping in France & Spain' our member Fint71 writes that he camped for 70 days on the Camino Frances - every single night ( Far beyond my capabilities ) - also that he will kindly answer any questions.:)
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
In the thread 'Camping in France & Spain' our member Fint71 writes that he camped for 70 days on the Camino Frances - every single night ( Far beyond my capabilities ) - also that he will kindly answer any questions.:)
Renshaw, some people claim they have walk the CF in 25 to 35 days. My question is what was he doing that caused him to camp for 70 days? Was this on a walk from Le Puy?
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
Renshaw, some people claim they have walk the CF in 25 to 35 days. My question is what was he doing that caused him to camp for 70 days? Was this on a walk from Le Puy?
Correct , Le Puy to Santiago to Finister then Muxia.
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
Thanks for the info. The idea of camping isn't just to be standoffish or unique or even monetary (ok maybe a little). It's just what I'm use to. I'm comfortable going two to three weeks fully unsupported. I still have plenty of time to nail down a good itinerary. And this being my first trip to Europe, I'm gonna try to throw some TDF in there too. Maybe yo-yo back to Paris from Santiago. From what I've read so far there will be lots of people, so I understand the "what if everybody did it" comment. I'm thinking I'll probably end up doing my journey like I treat the rest of my life. Take it one day at a time. Sometimes one footstep at a time
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2008 09 14
Del Norte 2011. Portuguese 2015, 2017Ingles 2015 Fisterre 2015.
Under the category of "I'm just sayin"...I ran into an American soldier in SJPP who was intent on camping the entire route. This was on my second Camino. He appeared to be in top shape. I had a glass of wine with him the night before leaving SJPP and tried to delicately advise him that he was carrying too much stuff. He had pots, pans, a coffee press, a two burner stove, 4 man tent, lantern with fuel, hatchet, and heaven knows what else. During our conversation I sensed that he was a bit annoyed that I would suggest he was overly ambitious so I changed the subject to routing and departure times etc. finished my vino and headed back to the albergue.

I never saw him again until Pamplona. Both his knees were wrapped and he was absolutely done in after three days. He told me he had been to the hospital and the doctor recommended he pack it in or wait 7-10 days before continuing. He unwrapped one knee and I almost tossed up.

My point isn't to scare you off of camping. I am an experienced camper and I am sure it could be done with a little more planning and better equipment choices. You need to assess your equipment and your ability to carry it in relation to the distance you plan to travel and the speed you have to cover the ground at. There are plenty of opportunities to have a cooked meal at reasonable prices so consider not bearing the load of the cooking equipment. Buy an appropriate sized shelter and sleeping equipment. Prepare yourself physically and mentally to carry the load you have determined is required. Its all downhill after that!

You are braver by far than I! An albergue is "roughing it" enough for me!

Buen Camino

Jim
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
If you have a good lightweight approach, you can bring all you need incl tent, sleepingbag, pad, small stove (jetboil or similar, but why would you) and still not end up with more then 10-12kg. It has all to do with common sense, just like soooo many other things.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
The thing is, it's so inexpensive to stay in albergues if you are selective, it's silly (to me) to carry more than a nysil tarp for camping. Use your poles to put it up. I have carried a screen tent and used it also. I do it because of my chemical sensitivities. When I'm in the middle of a reaction to somebody's perfume or fabric softener, I can't tolerate more fragrance, so I sleep outdoors. But if it wasn't for that, I wouldn't consider carrying a tent. That said, I've seen and used excellent camping spots all along the Camino, you just to have ask permission, be stealthy, and clean up after yourself. And as someone mentioned, many albergues will allow you to camp in the yard. Roncesvalles and Zubiri come to mind off the top of my head.
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
Under the category of "I'm just sayin"...I ran into an American soldier in SJPP who was intent on camping the entire route. This was on my second Camino. He appeared to be in top shape. I had a glass of wine with him the night before leaving SJPP and tried to delicately advise him that he was carrying too much stuff. He had pots, pans, a coffee press, a two burner stove, 4 man tent, lantern with fuel, hatchet, and heaven knows what else. During our conversation I sensed that he was a bit annoyed that I would suggest he was overly ambitious so I changed the subject to routing and departure times etc. finished my vino and headed back to the albergue.

I never saw him again until Pamplona. Both his knees were wrapped and he was absolutely done in after three days. He told me he had been to the hospital and the doctor recommended he pack it in or wait 7-10 days before continuing. He unwrapped one knee and I almost tossed up.

My point isn't to scare you off of camping. I am an experienced camper and I am sure it could be done with a little more planning and better equipment choices. You need to assess your equipment and your ability to carry it in relation to the distance you plan to travel and the speed you have to cover the ground at. There are plenty of opportunities to have a cooked meal at reasonable prices so consider not bearing the load of the cooking equipment. Buy an appropriate sized shelter and sleeping equipment. Prepare yourself physically and mentally to carry the load you have determined is required. Its all downhill after that!

You are braver by far than I! An albergue is "roughing it" enough for me!

Buen Camino

Jim
Definitely not the type of gear I carry. But thanks for the advise
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
If you have a good lightweight approach, you can bring all you need incl tent, sleepingbag, pad, small stove (jetboil or similar, but why would you) and still not end up with more then 10-12kg. It has all to do with common sense, just like soooo many other things.
I'm definitely an. Ultralight backpacker. I'm planning on experiencing both sides of the Camino. Probably carry my tarp and trusted alcohol stove (1oz), summer sleeping bag, and pad. My coffee cup is also my pot
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPdP: 2015, June2020!) (Eng Way: 2015)
Under the category of "I'm just sayin"...I ran into an American soldier in SJPP who was intent on camping the entire route. This was on my second Camino. He appeared to be in top shape. I had a glass of wine with him the night before leaving SJPP and tried to delicately advise him that he was carrying too much stuff. He had pots, pans, a coffee press, a two burner stove, 4 man tent, lantern with fuel, hatchet, and heaven knows what else. During our conversation I sensed that he was a bit annoyed that I would suggest he was overly ambitious so I changed the subject to routing and departure times etc. finished my vino and headed back to the albergue.

I never saw him again until Pamplona. Both his knees were wrapped and he was absolutely done in after three days. He told me he had been to the hospital and the doctor recommended he pack it in or wait 7-10 days before continuing. He unwrapped one knee and I almost tossed up.

My point isn't to scare you off of camping. I am an experienced camper and I am sure it could be done with a little more planning and better equipment choices. You need to assess your equipment and your ability to carry it in relation to the distance you plan to travel and the speed you have to cover the ground at. There are plenty of opportunities to have a cooked meal at reasonable prices so consider not bearing the load of the cooking equipment. Buy an appropriate sized shelter and sleeping equipment. Prepare yourself physically and mentally to carry the load you have determined is required. Its all downhill after that!

You are braver by far than I! An albergue is "roughing it" enough for me!

Buen Camino

Jim
I am bringing my tent along because I am heading off to other Euro trips after + plan to camp some of the Camino. It's a 4 lb Ultra-light tent and I have a light sleeping bag, 15 degree.

Nothing major, no stoves or anything. The only other 'extravagant' thing I am bringing, IMO, are my binoculars.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
I know I could buy another tent but I already have this one and it doesn't pack too heavy :) Issue is it is a 3 person tent so it's a bit bigger.
https://www.bigagnes.com/Products/Detail/Tent/CopperSpurUL3
BA is the best!! I have an UL2. Truly you don't need it and probably won't use it if you are going on the Frances. If you are also packing to tour a bit afterwards you might want to explore utilizing the storage that Ivar has to offer. Bring stuff with you and then mail to SdC and pick up when you're ready to travel.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014) Camino Frances (2019)
Camino Frances (2015)
First a disclaimer: My experience on the Camino was limited to last spring. That being said, I am a long-time backpacker and used to carrying all my gear. I carried a Lightheart tent (a little under 2 lbs) for the entire Camino. I only used it a half-dozen times but it was wonderful. Snoring in the albergues can be epic. It was always nice to have both privacy and a quiet night's sleep. I did not stealth camp; I did not want to trespass or have a tractor drive over me in the middle of the night. I did stay at albergues that allowed me to pitch my tent. I paid the usual albergue fee (I was offered discounts); that way I did not feel guilty about using the facilities. I would have stayed in my tent more often but I had a "Camino family" and they wanted me to stay with them. On the Appalachian Trail I do not stay in shelters unless I know it is going to rain hard. Snoring in the shelters can be competitive with the Camino albergues. For a backpacker, the Camino is concierge backpacking: you do not have to carry days worth of food (at least on the Frances), you have access to showers daily (not always warm) and you can usually do laundry. The coffee is amazing and you do not have to carry a stove. Life is good on the Camino.
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
@cher99840 Do you have the BA fly creek ul2? Love that one. Was thinking about getting it, but i read alot of reviews saying that after a rainy night or with lots of condensation the water drops in when you open the zipper of the vestibule door.

Do you have that?

Now thinking about a Zpack. Weightwise the BA and Zpacks are two different worlds, eventhough both are UL
 

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
Yes @Dutch That is what I have. I've had no problem with water getting in even with a hard rain and the zippers open about an inch close to the bottom. That eliminates the condensation and allows me to breathe better.

My only complaint is that the 2 is actually for 1 and if I regularly traveled with a companion I would get a 3. I've never been inside a 1, but I suspect I'd like it about as much as a mummy sleeping bag.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
MikeSass,
Just do it your way. You are your own boss. It is your Camino. The Way will give you needed feedback.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPdP: 2015, June2020!) (Eng Way: 2015)
BA is the best!! I have an UL2. Truly you don't need it and probably won't use it if you are going on the Frances. If you are also packing to tour a bit afterwards you might want to explore utilizing the storage that Ivar has to offer. Bring stuff with you and then mail to SdC and pick up when you're ready to travel.
Not just a bit i'm doing Hadrian's Wall, West Highland Way, Coast to Coast, Westweg Schwarzwald, Lycian Way after the Camino on a 5 month trek + will be camping in some places around Europe and will be rounding it off by doing the Camino English Way at the end of October.

I still think I'll get 4-5 nights out on the Camino :)
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Under the category of "I'm just sayin"...I ran into an American soldier in SJPP who was intent on camping the entire route. This was on my second Camino. He appeared to be in top shape. I had a glass of wine with him the night before leaving SJPP and tried to delicately advise him that he was carrying too much stuff. He had pots, pans, a coffee press, a two burner stove, 4 man tent, lantern with fuel, hatchet, and heaven knows what else. During our conversation I sensed that he was a bit annoyed that I would suggest he was overly ambitious so I changed the subject to routing and departure times etc. finished my vino and headed back to the albergue.

I never saw him again until Pamplona. Both his knees were wrapped and he was absolutely done in after three days. He told me he had been to the hospital and the doctor recommended he pack it in or wait 7-10 days before continuing. He unwrapped one knee and I almost tossed up.

My point isn't to scare you off of camping. I am an experienced camper and I am sure it could be done with a little more planning and better equipment choices. You need to assess your equipment and your ability to carry it in relation to the distance you plan to travel and the speed you have to cover the ground at. There are plenty of opportunities to have a cooked meal at reasonable prices so consider not bearing the load of the cooking equipment. Buy an appropriate sized shelter and sleeping equipment. Prepare yourself physically and mentally to carry the load you have determined is required. Its all downhill after that!

You are braver by far than I! An albergue is "roughing it" enough for me!

Buen Camino

Jim
Soldiers are the worst ones, I can carry XXX amount of gear is what you hear. I was a soldier once too, do you think I really wanted to carry all the gear and equipment? The military doesn't make them walk 12-15 miles a day, 5 days a week with 80lb + packs, if they did, the military would be spending big bucks on disability benefits for all the wrecked knees that will result.
You still need to be healthy long after the Camino, so don't destroy your body trying to carry too much and walk too far so quickly, this is supposed to be fun, not a forced march.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPdP: 2015, June2020!) (Eng Way: 2015)
Yes @Dutch That is what I have. I've had no problem with water getting in even with a hard rain and the zippers open about an inch close to the bottom. That eliminates the condensation and allows me to breathe better.

My only complaint is that the 2 is actually for 1 and if I regularly traveled with a companion I would get a 3. I've never been inside a 1, but I suspect I'd like it about as much as a mummy sleeping bag.
That's why I got the 3 as people say the 2 is more like for 1 person. I haven't tried the UL3 in rain yet but my brother took it out camping last summer and got hit with a downpour that he says was fine but he thinks the tent might have had a hard time if they didn't have a tarp up above them as well. Anyways, I guess i'll see lol.
 

amorfati1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014_Caminho Portuguese (Lisboa to Santiago_4 weeks in May)
Someone posted the times are changing since the 60's.
Yes, The Times They are a Changin'
Yes, The Times They are a Changin'
On the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunny.
hm ... when i read 'bloody sunday' i instantly thought of '72 in ireland - guess it shows i am indeed a euro-girl .
thanks for clueing me in that there was another 'bloody sunday/sunny' - sigh ... all this heartache of what humans doing to other humans -
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
My question is this, has anyone wild camped the entire Camino LEGALLY? Did you have permission from the land owner EVERY TIME you camped? How did you know if you were on public or private property?
I look at it like this, I have friends who are farmers and they wouldn't be keen on strangers camping on their farmland, Spanish farmers are probably no different, they have lots of foot traffic and have had to deal with pilgrims who trespass, leave trash, start fires, and pilfer their crops.
We are guests in Spain, if you wouldn't do this at home, you shouldn't do it in Spain.
 
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MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
My question is this, has anyone wild camped the entire Camino LEGALLY? Did you have permission from the land owner EVERY TIME you camped? How did you know if you were on public or private property?
I look at it like this, I have friends who are farmers and they wouldn't be keen on strangers camping on their farmland, Spanish farmers are probably no different, they have lots of foot traffic and have had to deal with pilgrims who trespass, leave trash, start fires, and pilfer their crops.
We are guests in Spain, if you wouldn't do this at home, you shouldn't do it in Spain.
That's an excellent question bajaracer. I have no intentions on being a jerk and trespassing or camping without permission. Like you, my farmer friends don't take kindly to trespassers. And from what I've read so far, the Spanish farmers put up with a lot of garbage ( both literal and figurative). I'm gonna keep it legal. I'm gonna plan on using the designated campgrounds when I can. And the alberg
 

MikeSass

Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'm planning to walk he Camino in 2016 or2017
Albergues when I can. Sorry stupid computer kicked me off. I think a little of both would make the experience
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015 (SJPDP-Finisterre), planning Norte
My question is this, has anyone wild camped the entire Camino LEGALLY? Did you have permission from the land owner EVERY TIME you camped? How did you know if you were on public or private property?
I look at it like this, I have friends who are farmers and they wouldn't be keen on strangers camping on their farmland, Spanish farmers are probably no different, they have lots of foot traffic and have had to deal with pilgrims who trespass, leave trash, start fires, and pilfer their crops.
We are guests in Spain, if you wouldn't do this at home, you shouldn't do it in Spain.
On Spanish-to-Spanish Camino forums there are many threads about how people have used their tienda de campo all the way every night, especially those who walk with their dogs. True, they always stayed close to albergues or farms with farmers permission. There are many signs along the Camino (seen them even though I haven't walked the Camino ;))))) saying that this is a pasture, no camping allowed. I guess it would be easier to negotiate the camping issue with the farmer than with the bull.
 

Kimberly Helen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Leon-SdC (October 2014), Portugues Porto-SdC (June 2015), Norte/Primitivo (July/August 2015)
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
A friend and I stealth-camped from Leon to SdC last October, and we LOVED it. Waking up to the sun rising at 1405 m was almost a spiritual experience :) There are plenty of places to pitch a tent, though you might have to walk a few extra kilometers when coming out of larger towns/cities. It got chilly at night, but with our all-season sleeping bags and some merino wool, were generally comfortable (the trees in heavily-wooded areas will block a lot of the wind... the one night we were FREEZING was when we camped on the tree-less, expansive lawn of an albergue.) We did pass several albergues that have areas set up for tents, which is a great option for when you want to socialize and/or use the facilities (and let me tell you, you will never appreciate a hot shower or electricity as much as you do after 5 straight nights of sleeping in the Galician woods :D)

This year I will walk the entire CF and would love to camp out again, but without my friend on tent-carrying duty, looks like a no-go (though I do plan to bring a tarp and foam pad as Plan B for if/when albergues are full.) As long as you don't mind the extra weight of a tent, I say bring it and then use as desired :)
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
I am not sure if someone mentioned this but do it your way. You are the person that has to carry the extra pounds. But I will lay odds you will meet folks who will get or keep your attention. That may impact your decision on the tent/ pad. Ivar has a great warehouse you can ship it forward to Santiago if you find you need to reduce weight.
No one knows the toll this can take on each body. I saw some young folks along with others who were forced to call it quits. Stay fluid on your decisions & have a great time!
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
We did pass several albergues that have areas set up for tents, which is a great option for when you want to socialize and/or use the facilities (and let me tell you, you will never appreciate a hot shower or electricity as much as you do after 5 straight nights of sleeping in the Galician woods :D)
do you remember any of this albergues? I'm putting together a list.
 

PaulB Hayward

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finish the other half.......as soon as I think my iffy knee will be able.....I hope :)
I'm thinking about tenting the whole Camino. Or most of it. My parents told me tent camping in Europe was very liberal and they camped all over. But that was some years ago. I'm sure the times have changed. Has anyone done this?
My Daughter and I camped on both of our Camino's, and loved the freedom it gave. We sometimes envied those carrying little, or no weight; but, we so enjoyed not being drawn into that rushing wave of people, persuing a bed for the night. It's good to do both, camping, and staying in the odd albergue, I'm not one for being packed into small spaces, with a lot of people, but showers are good.
My most recent Camino, was done by bike, and camping; best experience yet! I'll be back to do more; I'm 63 now.
Be respectful, try not to be seen, leave no trace, and there should be no one you upset.
 

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