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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

The good, the bad & the ugly. Part 2

Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#1
Part one from my walk two years ago is here (for reference):
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-good-the-bad-the-ugly.46053/

I went along the Camino Frances again, almost exactly two years to the date of last time. Funny how little has changed really, maybe a bit more of the ugly this time? Still mostly good though.

Some of the pictures I took are here:
https://www.instagram.com/austriannomad/


Fellow pilgrims top the good again, with no exception I met the nicest crowds over the 32 days I spent on the Camino. I chose to be even more independent than two years ago while walking, but the evenings catching up with familar faces along the way was very nice.
One of my changes to my first Camino was an upgrade in my lodging budget which allowed me to get a few more private rooms as well as stay at privately run hostels this time than last. It does one good to just every few nights have a good, private sleep, sans interruption. Not that there were summer size hoards of people, but especially in smaller towns, when many Albergues are closed, 30 people is a crowd when they all sleep at the Municipal place.....Overall I think there is a new breed of Albergues cropping up? Though maybe sterile and too modern for some, I can;t help but say they are a huge improvement over some of the out of date "old school cool" ones? La Casa Del Peregrino in El Acebo would be an example. I mean, who built this thing?? In the middle of nowhere, such a large, yet perfectly designed place. There were only five of us that night, which made it even nicer.

Let me point out a few of the great places that stood out this time:

-The Stone Boat in Rabanal. A Camino Cocoon. From Kim, the very caring host, to perfect bedding, this is my top pick this year. And if you love your stamps collected along the way, wait for the surprise you get here as a stamp.....Rabanal del Camino as a whole has had more of an impact on me than Foncebadon last time. The evening mass with Gregorian chants, outstanding food at El Refugio and this top shelve B&B made for a perfect package.
https://www.thestoneboat.com/

-Estrella Guia in Puente La Reina. Brazilian hospitality!! Joyful place to sleep at. Plenty of personal touches. Great set up with smaller rooms, functional kitchen. A fantastic terrace overlooking the roof tops and gardens of the neighborhood. CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN.
I really did not like the Muni place two years ago and knew I'd need a better place in this town.
https://www.facebook.com/Albergue-Estrella-Guia-723219327760570/

-Albergue San Marcos in Palas de Rei. I'd like to add this one as an example of the present and future of lodging on the Camino. While it may feel institutional to the hard core Camino fan, with staff instead of a hospitalero who tends to your wounded knee, one can't deny the every increasing nubers of pilgrims and for that, you need new ideas in lodging. Some of them may seem interchangable with Albergues the next town over (Casona de Ponte in Porto Marin for example.....), but yes, keep opening them.
http://alberguesanmarcos.com/

Caloric intake along the Camino was a highlight again, at the top of this (too long) post you can see a link to my Instagram where you'll find plenty of images, food included.

Best small town eatery: https://elrefugiohosteria.com/ in Rabanal
Such a small town, so full of surprises. Even the cakes are home made here. And they stand up to Austrian ones....

Best big town eatery: http://www.otobodolobo.com/ in Melide. Forget Pulpo, really. Stop the cliché and go eat here.
Their 40 day dry aged Entrecote was maybe the best steak I have ever had, including Morton's in the US. Chef owned, honest and pure cooking. Affordable private rooms for a good night's sleep are an added bonus. Yes, STOP IT with the Pulpo in this town. I've had better in La Coruna at much lower prices.

Other good things:
My shoes. Lidl special, 19.99 trail runners. NOT ONE BLISTER. No shin splint, no pain at all. Compared to my last shoes for which I paid around 150.00.....what a surprise.
The spiritual. Evening mass in Rabanal (can you see why this is my favorite stop on the Camino). Not too much telling, just stay overnight and experience it.
Locals along the way. A couple of times, deep in thought, I was stopped by ordinary folks to point out that I am off track. The backpacks sure do give us away. Or is it the smell? One time on my way out of town a very nice couple walked with me to get me back on the very well marked Camino.
Finisterre by bus. Two years ago, for no reason I refused to even consider going on to there, but I had time this go around and took the bus to the end of the world from where I walked to Muxia before heading back to Santiago for good (by bus). I am glad I did, with glorious weather it was a magical day.



The bad:
Weather in November. Not much to moan about, it is a gamble. Two years ago it paid off, not so in 2018. More rain and snow (twice, Roncesvalles & Alto do Poio) than I wanted, but that is something we can't change.

The ugly:
Fun fact: Parochial Albergues and donativos are excempt from mandatory bedbug disinfection as well as legionaires disease testing (unconfirmed, please correct me if info is wrong)
I had ZERO problems with bugs, maybe it's my attitude of not caring, or they do not like my blood type. Not one incident. In Santiago though, three pilgrims showed me their bites and it can be ugly. They all narrowed it down to the places they think or know it happened and well, what do you want me to say.....duh. I really think time has come to put some of those hostels out to pasture.
Let's take Astorga as an example. This time of year your two budget sleeping options are ugly one and uglier two. Hear me out, this may take a while. My issues with basic cleanliness or incapable volunteers aside, not much has changed within the hierachy of the Catholic church in the last couple hundred years? On the one side you have one impressive place of worship (for which you have to pay to see???), on the other side, the peasants (us) who helped build those places with financial or manual contribution, are still being treated as such when on Pilgrimage in 2018. Those Albergues should be tented up and fumigated for a month then renoed from ground up before letting any more pilgrims stay there. And get some better volunteer training while you are at it. 12 people cannot sleep in a room with only 10 beds. The Pope's annual travel budget is higher than what it would cost to renovate and clean up those places.

Pilgrims menu: By far my biggest pet peeve last time and even more so this go around. I am just not sure where to point the finger, it really is a chicken or the egg sort of question. Is it lazy and unimaginative chefs who came up with it, or are Pilgrims on a Salvation Army budget to blame for this culinary disaster. Seriously, if you moan with joy while eating your frozen, microwaved Lasagna and tell me how good it is, what in the world are you eating at home? Canned Spam? You can;t be that exhausted from walking 25 km to not taste the crap they feed you?

Mansilla de las Mulas. THAT restaurant. Albergue recommended. Oh boy. Walking in, seeing all the newspaper clippings and really nice decor, oh how misleading of an entry.
We were presented with a specky, grubby menu that listed the typical four choices per course, except here, the only two appetizers available were canned asparagus with Mayo and mixed salad. Not very imaginative. Main course got worse, not one traditional Spanish dish to be had. Eggs with bacon does not dinner maketh just because you add undercooked fries to it. The owner insisted there is no other menu to be had. Maybe it is seasonal, but screw me if you got all those glorious reviews on canned veggies and frozen entrees.
Needless to say, I paid for the vinegarish wine and left. At the entrance I prevented a group of unsuspecting pilgrims from being ripped, took them me to the gas station where we made sad but tasty Bocadillos with the help of freshly baked baguettes and any cold cuts they had. Still a better and more memorable meal than that sad sack restaurant.
And really, that's just one of many observations I have about this issue. Walking makes you think. And this is the one I thought about a bit. How to change this or just let it go.
Clever industrial food suppliers have come up with frozen food options in many nations, I know. It takes the heat off labor cost as well as cost of goods on your balance sheet, but I am sure as consumers we could change that trend. But until we care enough to get proper food......I see a worsening of it all.
Feel free to snark if you have a different opinion, just don;t ask for a dinner invite at my house....

To sum it up, a really great Camino again, with minor first world lodging and foodie issues.
Here is my Instagram feed:
https://www.instagram.com/austriannomad/




 

John Finn

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances - Sarria to Santiago (2013), Burgos to Leon (2014), St Jean Pied de Port to Logrono (2015), Logrono to Burgos (2016), Leon to Sarria (May 2017).
#2
Well done on completing your second Camino!

I can't agree about foregoing the pulpo in Melide. I have fond memories of arriving there at midday after a long few hot hours walking and experiencing, for the first time, the delicious octopus in Pulperia Ezequiel washed down by a couple of bottles of beer. It certainly made for a refreshing change from the usual unexciting fare one gets at the typical menu del peregrino places.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2006 (Camino Francés)
2007 (Camino Francés)
2017 (SJPdP - Belorado)
2018 SJPdP-Fisterra/Muxía
#3
The spiritual. Evening mass in Rabanal (can you see why this is my favorite stop on the Camino). Not too much telling, just stay overnight and experience it.
This was a huge highlight for me too, I have never experienced anything like it and it was beautiful. The tiny crumbling church was also probably my favourite on the whole route. I loved how plain it was. The place just had an atmosphere thelt special and spiritual.

I got to chat to one of the monks after the mass. He was from Germany and very friendly and interesting to talk to.

The albergue run by the CSJ in Rabanal was also one of my favourites. Maybe that‘s because I‘m from the UK and they gave all pilgrims afternoon tea and biscuits.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#4
Estrella Guia in Puente La Reina. Brazilian hospitality!! Joyful place to sleep at. Plenty of personal touches.
I totally agree. The hospitalera (I can't remember her name) is what makes this place special. It's really just a flat set up as an albergue, and only has one bathroom, but it it's the warmth and special touches - like a homemade cake at breakfast that make me recommend it.
 

Latecomer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
VDLP (Sept 2015)

CF SJPDP-SdC+
(Sept/Oct 2018)
#5
Mansilla de las Mulas. THAT restaurant. Albergue recommended. Oh boy. Walking in, seeing all the newspaper clippings and really nice decor, oh how misleading of an entry.
We were presented with a specky, grubby menu that listed the typical four choices per course, except here, the only two appetizers available were canned asparagus with Mayo and mixed salad. Not very imaginative. Main course got worse, not one traditional Spanish dish to be had. .....
Feel free to snark if you have a different opinion, just don;t ask for a dinner invite at my house....
Not snarking, but if you are talking about Hostal Alberguería Del Camino, I had a completely different experience at lunch there on October 1 this year. Every course (Salmorejo, Stewed Lamb, and Lemon Cream) was excellent, service was friendly and unrushed.
¡Buen Camino!

LND_DADA0CEC-C4D1-4D96-8737-7CB07F8B52CF-COLLAGE.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#6
Part one from my walk two years ago is here (for reference):
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-good-the-bad-the-ugly.46053/

I went along the Camino Frances again, almost exactly two years to the date of last time. Funny how little has changed really, maybe a bit more of the ugly this time? Still mostly good though.

Some of the pictures I took are here:
https://www.instagram.com/austriannomad/


Fellow pilgrims top the good again, with no exception I met the nicest crowds over the 32 days I spent on the Camino. I chose to be even more independent than two years ago while walking, but the evenings catching up with familar faces along the way was very nice.
One of my changes to my first Camino was an upgrade in my lodging budget which allowed me to get a few more private rooms as well as stay at privately run hostels this time than last. It does one good to just every few nights have a good, private sleep, sans interruption. Not that there were summer size hoards of people, but especially in smaller towns, when many Albergues are closed, 30 people is a crowd when they all sleep at the Municipal place.....Overall I think there is a new breed of Albergues cropping up? Though maybe sterile and too modern for some, I can;t help but say they are a huge improvement over some of the out of date "old school cool" ones? La Casa Del Peregrino in El Acebo would be an example. I mean, who built this thing?? In the middle of nowhere, such a large, yet perfectly designed place. There were only five of us that night, which made it even nicer.

Let me point out a few of the great places that stood out this time:

-The Stone Boat in Rabanal. A Camino Cocoon. From Kim, the very caring host, to perfect bedding, this is my top pick this year. And if you love your stamps collected along the way, wait for the surprise you get here as a stamp.....Rabanal del Camino as a whole has had more of an impact on me than Foncebadon last time. The evening mass with Gregorian chants, outstanding food at El Refugio and this top shelve B&B made for a perfect package.
https://www.thestoneboat.com/

-Estrella Guia in Puente La Reina. Brazilian hospitality!! Joyful place to sleep at. Plenty of personal touches. Great set up with smaller rooms, functional kitchen. A fantastic terrace overlooking the roof tops and gardens of the neighborhood. CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN.
I really did not like the Muni place two years ago and knew I'd need a better place in this town.
https://www.facebook.com/Albergue-Estrella-Guia-723219327760570/

-Albergue San Marcos in Palas de Rei. I'd like to add this one as an example of the present and future of lodging on the Camino. While it may feel institutional to the hard core Camino fan, with staff instead of a hospitalero who tends to your wounded knee, one can't deny the every increasing nubers of pilgrims and for that, you need new ideas in lodging. Some of them may seem interchangable with Albergues the next town over (Casona de Ponte in Porto Marin for example.....), but yes, keep opening them.
http://alberguesanmarcos.com/

Caloric intake along the Camino was a highlight again, at the top of this (too long) post you can see a link to my Instagram where you'll find plenty of images, food included.

Best small town eatery: https://elrefugiohosteria.com/ in Rabanal
Such a small town, so full of surprises. Even the cakes are home made here. And they stand up to Austrian ones....

Best big town eatery: http://www.otobodolobo.com/ in Melide. Forget Pulpo, really. Stop the cliché and go eat here.
Their 40 day dry aged Entrecote was maybe the best steak I have ever had, including Morton's in the US. Chef owned, honest and pure cooking. Affordable private rooms for a good night's sleep are an added bonus. Yes, STOP IT with the Pulpo in this town. I've had better in La Coruna at much lower prices.

Other good things:
My shoes. Lidl special, 19.99 trail runners. NOT ONE BLISTER. No shin splint, no pain at all. Compared to my last shoes for which I paid around 150.00.....what a surprise.
The spiritual. Evening mass in Rabanal (can you see why this is my favorite stop on the Camino). Not too much telling, just stay overnight and experience it.
Locals along the way. A couple of times, deep in thought, I was stopped by ordinary folks to point out that I am off track. The backpacks sure do give us away. Or is it the smell? One time on my way out of town a very nice couple walked with me to get me back on the very well marked Camino.
Finisterre by bus. Two years ago, for no reason I refused to even consider going on to there, but I had time this go around and took the bus to the end of the world from where I walked to Muxia before heading back to Santiago for good (by bus). I am glad I did, with glorious weather it was a magical day.



The bad:
Weather in November. Not much to moan about, it is a gamble. Two years ago it paid off, not so in 2018. More rain and snow (twice, Roncesvalles & Alto do Poio) than I wanted, but that is something we can't change.

The ugly:
Fun fact: Parochial Albergues and donativos are excempt from mandatory bedbug disinfection as well as legionaires disease testing (unconfirmed, please correct me if info is wrong)
I had ZERO problems with bugs, maybe it's my attitude of not caring, or they do not like my blood type. Not one incident. In Santiago though, three pilgrims showed me their bites and it can be ugly. They all narrowed it down to the places they think or know it happened and well, what do you want me to say.....duh. I really think time has come to put some of those hostels out to pasture.
Let's take Astorga as an example. This time of year your two budget sleeping options are ugly one and uglier two. Hear me out, this may take a while. My issues with basic cleanliness or incapable volunteers aside, not much has changed within the hierachy of the Catholic church in the last couple hundred years? On the one side you have one impressive place of worship (for which you have to pay to see???), on the other side, the peasants (us) who helped build those places with financial or manual contribution, are still being treated as such when on Pilgrimage in 2018. Those Albergues should be tented up and fumigated for a month then renoed from ground up before letting any more pilgrims stay there. And get some better volunteer training while you are at it. 12 people cannot sleep in a room with only 10 beds. The Pope's annual travel budget is higher than what it would cost to renovate and clean up those places.

Pilgrims menu: By far my biggest pet peeve last time and even more so this go around. I am just not sure where to point the finger, it really is a chicken or the egg sort of question. Is it lazy and unimaginative chefs who came up with it, or are Pilgrims on a Salvation Army budget to blame for this culinary disaster. Seriously, if you moan with joy while eating your frozen, microwaved Lasagna and tell me how good it is, what in the world are you eating at home? Canned Spam? You can;t be that exhausted from walking 25 km to not taste the crap they feed you?

Mansilla de las Mulas. THAT restaurant. Albergue recommended. Oh boy. Walking in, seeing all the newspaper clippings and really nice decor, oh how misleading of an entry.
We were presented with a specky, grubby menu that listed the typical four choices per course, except here, the only two appetizers available were canned asparagus with Mayo and mixed salad. Not very imaginative. Main course got worse, not one traditional Spanish dish to be had. Eggs with bacon does not dinner maketh just because you add undercooked fries to it. The owner insisted there is no other menu to be had. Maybe it is seasonal, but screw me if you got all those glorious reviews on canned veggies and frozen entrees.
Needless to say, I paid for the vinegarish wine and left. At the entrance I prevented a group of unsuspecting pilgrims from being ripped, took them me to the gas station where we made sad but tasty Bocadillos with the help of freshly baked baguettes and any cold cuts they had. Still a better and more memorable meal than that sad sack restaurant.
And really, that's just one of many observations I have about this issue. Walking makes you think. And this is the one I thought about a bit. How to change this or just let it go.
Clever industrial food suppliers have come up with frozen food options in many nations, I know. It takes the heat off labor cost as well as cost of goods on your balance sheet, but I am sure as consumers we could change that trend. But until we care enough to get proper food......I see a worsening of it all.
Feel free to snark if you have a different opinion, just don;t ask for a dinner invite at my house....

To sum it up, a really great Camino again, with minor first world lodging and foodie issues.
Here is my Instagram feed:
https://www.instagram.com/austriannomad/
"Pilgrims on a Salvation Army menu"!!
Oh dear..

Indeed, many pilgrims ARE on a budget and many walk the Camino for spiritual reasons...not culinary ones

We enjoyed most of our pilgrim menus and many were served with care

And no...we don't eat canned spam at home!!
Best wishes
Annette
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#7
Well done on completing your second Camino!

I can't agree about foregoing the pulpo in Melide. I have fond memories of arriving there at midday after a long few hot hours walking and experiencing, for the first time, the delicious octopus in Pulperia Ezequiel washed down by a couple of bottles of beer. It certainly made for a refreshing change from the usual unexciting fare one gets at the typical menu del peregrino places.
I am with you on the Pulpo on the first go around actually. This time I enjoyed them twice, in Palas do Rei and La Coruna on a side trip. Both meals felt more authentic than Ezequiel or Garnacha. They do a great job though, very much in line what you read in all the posts or guide books.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#8
"Pilgrims on a Salvation Army menu"!!
Oh dear..

Indeed, many pilgrims ARE on a budget and many walk the Camino for spiritual reasons...not culinary ones

We enjoyed most of our pilgrim menus and many were served with care

And no...we don't eat canned spam at home!!
Best wishes
Annette
Hallo Annette, spiritual reasons should not exclude comfort in my books. Nor culinary pleasures. I am very happy to hear that you enjoyed the meals served along your many Caminos, you certainly have much more experience than i will ever gather. So. What is your favorite go to food at home?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#9
This was a huge highlight for me too, I have never experienced anything like it and it was beautiful. The tiny crumbling church was also probably my favourite on the whole route. I loved how plain it was. The place just had an atmosphere thelt special and spiritual.

I got to chat to one of the monks after the mass. He was from Germany and very friendly and interesting to talk to.

The albergue run by the CSJ in Rabanal was also one of my favourites. Maybe that‘s because I‘m from the UK and they gave all pilgrims afternoon tea and biscuits.
Yes, I am happy to heat you enjoyed it as much as I did. Tea & biscuits!! Love it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#10
I totally agree. The hospitalera (I can't remember her name) is what makes this place special. It's really just a flat set up as an albergue, and only has one bathroom, but it it's the warmth and special touches - like a homemade cake at breakfast that make me recommend it.
I think they had two bathrooms? One on the left, then mirror opposite the second? Not sure. There were only three of us on that floor. Also, on the ground floor, just off the kitchen, they had another bedroom which must have had a bathroom?

Natalia and Jose are the owners and they told me about a number of other places along the Camino owned and run by Brazilian pilgrims who settled in Spain. Well worth looking into next time?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#11
Not snarking, but if you are talking about Hostal Alberguería Del Camino, I had a completely different experience at lunch there on October 1 this year. Every course (Salmorejo, Stewed Lamb, and Lemon Cream) was excellent, service was friendly and unrushed.
¡Buen Camino!

View attachment 49675
All my crankiness side, I am actually happy to read they can do better than on my visit. Really glad actually. I mean, who wants to eat a gas station sandwich.......
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#12
I think they had two bathrooms? One on the left, then mirror opposite the second? Not sure. There were only three of us on that floor. Also, on the ground floor, just off the kitchen, they had another bedroom which must have had a bathroom?
Hmm, I wonder if they have a new location. When I was there last year the albergue was only one one floor.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2018 CF Jan-Feb, Roncesvalles - SdC - Muxia - Fisterra
#14
I don't have much to add but it just got me thinking about your comment on Legionnaires. It would seem to me that only larger, i.e. the accommodations that most of us don't stay at, along the camino that have industrial cooling units or large water systems or cisterns that would have any interest in possibly testing for Legionella. Curious.
 
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Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes, Aragones-Frances-Finisterre, Operation Sabre, Marin Ramble
#15
Just a note on churches “charging” to see them - you are actually wrong. It’s alwats free to visit a Catholic Church: DURING MASS!

If one goes to worship, there is no cost. However, if you are visiting the holy space as a tourist to a museum, then you are simply charged an admission charge the same way that a museum. Similarly, visitors who want the church illuminated with electric lighting often have to deposit a nominal fee to offset the added cost of their presence there. To me, it’s a fair request.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#17
I don't have much to add but it just got me thinking about your comment on Legionnaires. It would seem to me that only larger, i.e. the accommodations that most of us don't stay at, along the camino that have industrial cooling units or large water systems or cisterns that would have any interest in possibly testing for Legionnaires. Curious.
I was told those two tidbits of information by a Hospitalero who runs fairly small, fine Albergue. Maybe 30 beds. It is not confirmed yet if true or not.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#18
Just a note on churches “charging” to see them - you are actually wrong. It’s alwats free to visit a Catholic Church: DURING MASS!

If one goes to worship, there is no cost. However, if you are visiting the holy space as a tourist to a museum, then you are simply charged an admission charge the same way that a museum. Similarly, visitors who want the church illuminated with electric lighting often have to deposit a nominal fee to offset the added cost of their presence there. To me, it’s a fair request.
Not going to split hairs. I was brought up catholic and quite frankly nothing is free with the roman catholic church. Do I need mass to express my spiritualty, or should I be able to enter any house of worship, grand or chapel sized for free to give thanks? The context was also more towards that not much has changed in centuries as to how the church operates. Give/take.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#19
Hallo Annette, spiritual reasons should not exclude comfort in my books. Nor culinary pleasures. I am very happy to hear that you enjoyed the meals served along your many Caminos, you certainly have much more experience than i will ever gather. So. What is your favorite go to food at home?
Hi The Austrian,
Please excuse" the holier than thou" reply

Glad you enjoyed your Camino and I will keep in mind those places where you stayed
I do think that since our first Camino in 2005 the pilgrim menus have improved....back then it was pork and chips and more pork and chips every night ...the bottle of wine helped greatly though...hardly noticed what I was eating by the time I'd had half the bottle!!

I do agree with you re the accommodation....no more albergues for us if we can avoid them

Re the food.....and thank you for asking I will eat most things at home but love fish and steak and eggs when I do eat..However I often forget to eat until I am actually starving!!
Also, am more of a "picker" than a full meal person
Unfortunately I like everything that's sweet...and sweets...so watching the weight can be hard

Re the pulpo restaurants.....my husband loves the stuff......and I must be the only person in the restaurant eating a pork chop, whilst all around me tuck into Pulpo!!
Tried it once...thought I was chewing rubber ...first and last experience, but I do like to see people enjoying their food.
Best wishes
Annette
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#20
...
I do think that since our first Camino in 2005 the pilgrim menus have improved....back then it was pork and chips and more pork and chips every night ...the bottle of wine helped greatly though...hardly noticed what I was eating by the time I'd had half the bottle!!
...
They haven't improved one bit in my experience from 2009 to this year. And I doubt they ever will. But sometimes even pork and chips does the job to nourish tired pilgrim as you already said.

Buen provecho!
 
Camino(s) past & future
N/A
#21
I'm so glad you shared this information so thank you! I will save this info for my 1st Camino whenever I get around to doing one. I traveled the world for 19 years by myself and now that I'm a bit older, I totally care about my comfort and safety and the quality of food I eat.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#22
My strategy for pilgrim dinners is to ask for two first courses. Often the first course choices will be salad, lentil stew, pasta, or a few other items. It's the second course where you get a fried piece of meat, chicken, or fish and French fries. So I'll have the salad and a pasta dish or lentil stew from the first course offerings.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF Nov 11, 2016
CF Oct 31, 2018
#23
Hi The Austrian,
Please excuse" the holier than thou" reply

Glad you enjoyed your Camino and I will keep in mind those places where you stayed
I do think that since our first Camino in 2005 the pilgrim menus have improved....back then it was pork and chips and more pork and chips every night ...the bottle of wine helped greatly though...hardly noticed what I was eating by the time I'd had half the bottle!!

I do agree with you re the accommodation....no more albergues for us if we can avoid them

Re the food.....and thank you for asking I will eat most things at home but love fish and steak and eggs when I do eat..However I often forget to eat until I am actually starving!!
Also, am more of a "picker" than a full meal person
Unfortunately I like everything that's sweet...and sweets...so watching the weight can be hard

Re the pulpo restaurants.....my husband loves the stuff......and I must be the only person in the restaurant eating a pork chop, whilst all around me tuck into Pulpo!!
Tried it once...thought I was chewing rubber ...first and last experience, but I do like to see people enjoying their food.
Best wishes
Annette

No need for regrets. A good quip is always appreciated.
Sweets......Come to Paris!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#24
No need for regrets. A good quip is always appreciated.
Sweets......Come to Paris!!
Thanks
I love Paris...in the springtime as the song goes
Poor Paris right now
Best wishes
Annette
 

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