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The In-Between Places

Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
 
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malingerer

samarkand
Year of past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
Once I win the lottery my Camino ambition is to start from St. Jean early in the year and do no more than 10kms per day. I will be using GITLITZ'S BOOK and gawp at every stone that has a symbol on it:) I too have been fed up with myself at passing by all the "in-between places" with people in them aware of the local history . This would take me at least 80 days and well into summer. I would of course stop at the very finest paradors for my rest days :) Dream on eh? But then as I was typing this I saw my first pair of Swifts arrive ! Bliss. Buen Camino and the very best of luck.

Samarkand.
 

Sean Lad

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2010 to 2019 walked total of 31 caminos
There is no such place as in between places
you start and you finish walking on the daily slog to end
you walk 5 or 10 or 15 km or none or bus taxi train to you next sleep
Buen camino to all whenever you walk
whereever in the world you walk
wild athletic way (waw) on west coast of Ireland quite lovely today
20 km walked started sunrise from darkness to light
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I made a point on my last time on the Frances to stay in both San Anton and the Ermita San Nicolas, having passed both by previous times. So I hurried to get to SA early in the afternoon, thinking there would not be space later...only to find only three others there that night, while the steady stream of people marched past on their way to Castrojerez. The next day at San Nicolas it was the same, and this time I was more relaxed getting there, knowing there'd be no hurry.

It was definitely a different experience to stop 'early' and watch the grass grow and the world go by. It could definitely be addictive. What you said, @Stroller , is something many of us can probably relate to. It can feel like an almost compulsive need, to just keep going - or to cover a certain number of kms per day.

(And those two simple old shelters (without frills, but with hospitaleros full of heart)? So special!)
 
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Isca-camigo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Various ones.
I have 24/25 days this year to walk if I step on the Iberian peninsula, I was planning two Caminos, 1 from Braga and another(?) , but such is my lockdown frame of mind that I just want to plant my feet somewhere, start walking and take my time. Anywhere on a Camino would be nice, I have not gone further than 30 miles from Exeter since January of last year and I am feeling that constraint. Here is to dwaddling, sauntering, mooching* Caminos.🍻

*British use of Mooching😉
 
Last edited:
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017); Camino a Muxia (2017)
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
Four years ago I had 8 weeks to spend walking the Camino and I had great ambitions - the Frances and on to Finisterre, the English Camino, and who knows what after that. Well, that didn't happen! I hobbled into Santiago with a foot injury having skipped major sections of the Frances (but walking the last 100 km).

This year I am planning to return to the Frances to walk from Burgos to Santiago, averaging just a hair over 8 miles per day. This includes two layover days and 3 days of walking less than 5 miles. I'm excited about the idea of ambling along, having time to stop if I'm so inclined to sip on a cafe con leche or a beer, talk with fellow pilgrims and locals, soak in the coolness and quiet of a small church, what ever.

I understand this is a luxury many pilgrims don't have what with time constraints and all - having to get the most out of the little time they have to devote to the Camino. Given the choice though, I'm going for the leisurely pace this time around.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Once I win the lottery my Camino ambition is to start from St. Jean early in the year and do no more than 10kms per day. I will be using GITLITZ'S BOOK and gawp at every stone that has a symbol on it:) I too have been fed up with myself at passing by all the "in-between places" with people in them aware of the local history . This would take me at least 80 days and well into summer. I would of course stop at the very finest paradors for my rest days :) Dream on eh? But then as I was typing this I saw my first pair of Swifts arrive ! Bliss. Buen Camino and the very best of luck.

Samarkand.
Great book. There is more than something for everyone and all our varied interests found within their book.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I made a point on my last time on the Frances to stay in both San Anton and the Ermita San Nicolas, having passed both by previous times. So I hurried to get to SA early in the afternoon, thinking there would not be space later...only to find only three others there that night, while the steady stream of people marched past on their way to Castrojerez. The next day at San Nicolas it was the same, and this time I was more relaxed getting there, knowing there'd be no hurry.

It was definitely a different experience to stop 'early' and watch the grass grow and the world go by. It could definitely be addictive. What you said, @Stroller , is something many of us can probably relate to. It can feel like an almost compulsive need, to just keep going - or to cover a certain number of kms per day.

(And those two simple old shelters (without frills, but with hospitaleros full of heart)? So special!)
VN,
Indeed it is "hospitaleros full of heart" who make a place so special.
Especially in winter.

November 2014 trudging from Sahagun to El Burgo Ranero was COLD, bleak and solitary.

With great relief I finally arrived at the simple adobe albergue Domenico Laffi and met the friendly hospitalera named Alicia "like Alice in Wonderland!" as she said.

Wonderland indeed! Alice who had just arrived herself would be resident hospitalera for the next two weeks but already had an open fire warming the downstairs common room (there was no other heat) and her lunch was cooking in the kitchen. One other soaked cold pilgrim, Carlos from Madrid, came in. Since it was Sunday and both bars and the village shop apparently closed Alice immediately set the table for three and graciously invited us both to share her meal.

Thus the delicious HOT rice, vegs and salad were stretched with his cheese and my biscuits/bananas. In the spirit of Wonderland we all drank several steaming mugs of HOT sugared tea. Alice enjoyed recounting her many camino memories. I sensed that wherever she might be it would quickly be her 'home'; across the years the camino had become her way of life....

Across the years this visit remains another unforgetable winter memory for me.
 
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Pia Valbak Schmidt

Pilgrim, DK, Caminos 2007,09,11,12,13,14.15,16,18
Year of past OR future Camino
2007,2009,2011,2012,2013,2014.2015,2016,2018. Hospitalera 2012,2013,2014,2016,2017
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
Sounds wonderful, I wish I could do that :) 🍀 🍀 🍀
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I have 24/25 days this year to walk if I step on the Iberian peninsula, I was planning two Caminos, 1 from Braga and another(?) , but such is my lockdown frame of mind that I just want to plant my feet somewhere, start walking and take my time. Anywhere on a Camino would be nice, I have not gone further than 30 miles from Exeter since January of last year and I am feeling that constraint. Here is to dwaddling, sauntering, mooching* Caminos.🍻

*British use of Mooching😉
I lived in Braga 2 years while working for Habitat for Humanity and would definitely suggest spending some time there. One thing to do is to go to the shrine of Bom Jesus. Local pilgrims walk up the steps, or there is a funicular to the top. There are 4 cathedrals around one of the grand plazas; the oldest has elements built in roman days. One cafe has glass blocks in the floor so it's possible to see some Roman ruins. And there is the modern part of the city complete with shopping mall...
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances & to Finisterre (2009), Camino Podiensis (2011), Aussie Camino (2018)
Maybe we were ahead of the game.
In 2009 my wife and I (she not a strong walker) took 50 days for the Camino Francis from St Jean Pied de Port. On 3 occasions we only walked 5 kms for the day. From Trinadad de Arre (to stay in the Basilica de Arre convent) to Pamplona - then from Pamplona to Cizur Menor (to say in the refuge run by the Roncal family - where our daughter had stayed in 2002). We arrived at Pamplona about 10 am and checked straight in to Casa Paderborn so had the rest of the day in Pamplona. The next day we didn't leave Pamplona till about 4pm for the short walk to Cizur Menor. A bonus was that we experienced Palm Sunday with the attendant procession and church service in Pamplona.
Much further on we deliberately stayed in Monte del Gozo (as I thought it was to be 'free') then walked the 5kms or so to Santiago de Compostela - received our Compostela then attended the noon mass - with the botafumeiro being swung.
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
That is exactly what I was planning to do in 2020. Hope to do so when allowed.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2023
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
I think it's a great idea. Would jump at the chance to do a similar Camino if circumstances permitted. Go for it!
 
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Roland49

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Sound like a great plan!

For my next CF I will do it in 3 parts of 14-20 days each.
I found so many attractive places on my 27 day CF in 2019 that are worth a longer stay or that are a bit off the CF.
Like Pamplona, Sta. Maria de Eunate, the Museo Würth near Logroño, Santo Domingo, Atapuercas digging site, Burgos, Castrojeriz, Carrion, Vila Romana La Tejada, Astorga, Ponferrada, Las Medulas, the many Bodegas in the Bierzo, Melide.

After arriving in SdC I would like to walk on to Finisterre.

BC
Roland
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
Well, since it was my post in another thread that triggered this thread, I'll chime in:

There has been times (I have walked many Caminos; more than in my list), when I have arrived in front of the Cathedral, and thought (like many others, no doubt): "Oh, no, it is over!"

After the first days of walking, when I have entered my Zen-mode on the Way, days are just floating by, I'm living in the Camino bubble. And I want to end this manic thinking of "Just one more village/just 5 kms more today!".

Of course, this isn't for everybody, due to time/cost/family constraints. But for those of us who can, it is such a tempting idea. Living in Europe, the way to the Way :cool: is mostly easy and affordable, and receiving a healthy retirement pension (I actually have more money in my bank account when I return home than when I left), time/cost is irrelevant.

So for now, I am waiting for the final shot (in 2 weeks), and then for the EU/Schengen vaccine passport on my iPhone, & then I am off (when Spain says OK). I'm having a good time exploring with the Wise Pilgrim app, planning/dreaming. Well, too much planning is not a good thing, as many of us know that once on the ground, plans change: The best plan on the Camino is to not have a plan. Just my 0.02 Euros.

Buen Camino, all!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
1989
For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
To first answer your direct question, I like a relatively slow itinerary but 5 or 6 km a day might be a little slow for me unless there was a lot to see or do in at least one of the endpoints, either before I left for the day's walk or after I arrived or unless I felt in need of a rest. I might get a little impatient with such short distances day after day. For me, 20 km +/- 5 is the sweet spot, though I am certainly willing to go less to stay at a particularly nice town or village. On my two most recent Caminos, there were occasions where I did about 15 km a few days in a row. That seemed "taking it slow and easy" to me.

Next, on your itinerary, you write above "...Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca...." Are you sure you meant Ages there? I could have sworn Ages was before Burgos. Perhaps you meant El Acebo? Also, I might be tempted to stop in Trabadelo, if only for the chance to stay at Casa Susi. It wasn't open yet last time I passed through, but from all accounts it is really a special place.
 
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Chris Gi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
And I thought that I was the only one who thought that slow Camino of less than 10 miles a day, taking in the beautiful scenery, having a leisurely break mid day, and not making it into a road race was perfection.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
I have a similar plan for this coming October. There is a lot to see along "The Way". This time I'm starting in Pamplona and probably going as far as Burgos. For me, it is about the journey and all you learn along the way.
 

JMac TO

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2017)
Alexwalker over on the discussion about Camino physical preparation said:

"Here's throwing the torch into the conversation: I have all the time I want. I am retired and on a good pension (67). I am so determined to use my next Camino to the fullest: I have set aside 2 months (minimum/whatever) for my next CF. Too often, have I been "running" it, without paying enough attention to all the small villages.

The next time, I will walk some 15 kms/day (or whatever/don't care). I will stay in more small villages, just relaxing, reading, eating well, and watch the grass grow."


I have been thinking the same thing about a leisurely Camino. After two 30 day Caminos two years apart, I am going to slow down. I'm now thinking next Summer going over to Spain for the maximum 90 days, and just meander. One of my favorite sections of the Camino Frances is Astorga to O Cebreiro. Both times I have taken the typical Astorga-Fonceaddon-Ponferrada-Villafranca del Bierzo-O Cebreiro. This time I want to catch up on a bunch of places in-between, but also keep the original stops. Last year I posed a question on the forum about can't miss villages/towns. For 2022, my slow itinerary will be Astorga-Castrillo de los Polvazares-Rabanal-Foncebaddon-Ages-Molinseca-Ponferrada-Cacobelos-Villafranca del Bierzo-Vega del Valcarce-La Faba-O Cebreiro. My query then--what do you veterans think of, or maybe have experience with such a slow itinerary?
Great idea some of my favourite evenings and meals were in some of the smallest towns. I also spent an extra day or two in each of the big cities along the way. My last Camino was 32 days with 28 walking. The next will be closer to 40. I met a young lady from Quebec who only did 20 km a day. She saw a lot of these places but never formed the friendships along the way like a standard paced pilgrim does. I think that is the only downside.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
I was another person that got to St. Nikolas really early, like at 11:00. I sat outside and talked to every one that passed by and actually talked a few people into staying there overnight. It was just about my best night on the Camino (til I broke my wrist at 6 in the morning) Unique, great food, great hosts, fabulous setting.
Planning on staying there again as well as at St. Anton this time too.
My 1st Camino, after walking about 300km from Pamplona, decided to bus to Sarria and spent 9 days walking that last 100km to Santiago. Had some medical issues and this was a perfect way to walk for me.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I am finding it quite fun reading how other pilgrims plan their caminos. I spend much time in winter planning my next camino, and it never turns out the way I plan it. On my first camino, I planned for a day off each week, then found that I just wanted to walk, no days off and I arrived in Santiago more than a week before my flight home. I took buses to Muxia and Finisterre and just hung around until it was time to head for the airport. My second camino began with a major storm, putting out all power in Oloron Ste Marie and leaving travel the next day challenging. The next two had their major challenges as well.
Finally, I know that there is only one thing that I can rely on when planning: my average 20 km per day walking distance: sometimes more, seldom less. If I get far enough ahead, I sometimes (rarely) take a day off. This amount of planning has so far been adequate to get me to the airport for the flight home. But I am still recovering from knee surgery, which may make 20 k days either unattainable or too short. I don't know yet.
Many of the posters above plan as if giving themselves more time and shorter days and chosen stopping places will make their caminos go the way that they wish. This has not happened for me. For one thing, you may choose to stop in a particular place and find that it is not open, or that your time there was not what you expected. I have stopped at Eunate twice. The first time, I actually had about ten minutes of quiet meditation time before a woman arrived with a vacuum cleaner. The second, I had just entered when a noisy Spanish family drove up and trooped in after me. I left. I have stayed at Granon once, but my next time through it was closed and I had to go on to a noisy and crowded municipal albergue. I have planned to stay at San Nicolas twice: once it was full when I arrived and the second time it was closed to passing pilgrims, as a group event was going on. Twice that I remember I went into churches along the camino Frances, hoping to sit in quiet, and was soon disturbed by the behaviour of the other person present.
What I have learned from this is that my caminos are gifts. I never know what is in the package and it is seldom what I thought I wanted. But I am not in charge. I hope to go again soon.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Has anybody walked to and spent time in a village off to the side of a major camino? As in walking to the north of the camino and then east to a town to have lunch and then south to reconnect to the camino and its lodgings. If so please describe your experience(s).
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Has anybody walked to and spent time in a village off to the side of a major camino? As in walking to the north of the camino and then east to a town to have lunch and then south to reconnect to the camino and its lodgings. If so please describe your experience(s).
On a very rainy day on the VdlP, there was a sign pointing to a bar 500 m. off the Camino. I was in need of a comforting beer, so I followed the sign. It turned out to be a blessing: A very friendly bar. I got a free money pouch, which I used for years, and was pointed to a shortcut that saved me 5 kms. But where, I do not know.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
I think the least kms a day I would do would be 15-18. Most days 20-28. Because the rhythm of walking for me is important. And typically if you get anywhere too early nothing is open. If I had the time I would walk another Camino into Santiago, or would start further away. I seldom follow Brierly stages anyway, only if they actually suit me. And I usually do stay in Burgos and Leon for a break and a look around.
Not being from the EU though my time is always limited.
Detours off the Camino are an option as well. Last time we took a taxi from Sarria to Lugo and back, if I had time I would walk some of the detours if it was possible.
 

Richard Smith

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2016
Kumano Kodo 2014
We booked 10 weeks in europe (fly in Paris, fly out Madrid, from OZ) planning to walk the CF and go on to Finesterre, if we were enjoying it, and then act like tourists in Portugal.
And if we were not enjoying it we would stop and become backpack/budget tourists in Europe.
Ended up walking CF over 45 days, with one rest day per week on average and some very short days. Decided not to walk on to Finesterre, caught bus to Porto instead. Then went searching for the cork forests in Portugal and a specific cork product (cork fishing line cores that my Dad used and you cannot buy these days).
Final luxury day or three in Madrid and then the long fly home.
I thought we walked slow and meandered off the main trail once or twice but we still met up with Camino friends down the road.
And the "no planning mode" day to day changed my live forever.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
I hope to do an Irish Camino this year, even though I am not physically fit for it. Doing what I can, when I can is the only way it will happen. So, Bray to Dublin and A Coruña to Santiago will be the route. If I then choose, I will go to Muxia.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2018
In a similar way, I am taking the entire month of September to walk the Portugues Coastal from Porto as well as the Variante Espiritual. I have only 2 days that are over 20km. I even have a couple 9km days. On average, most days are 12-15km. I think that gives me ample time to saunter and enjoy over 30 days.
 

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