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The Top Ten Things I've Learned from this Forum


2018 edition Camino Guides

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#1
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
 

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RobertS26

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Oct 2013
Camino Frances, Aug 2014
Camino Frances, Apr 2015
#6
Excellent list. If I may, could I add a few others?

11. Cash is king on the Camino. Albergues, small grocery stores, and family run restaurants do not accept credit card or debit cards.
12. You will pass at least one ATM almost every day.
13. You are rarely an hour away from the next restaurant/bed/source of water
14. Drink more water than you think you need to drink.
15. Donativo does not mean "free".
16. If you are young, take the top bunk.
17. If you want to alienate an entire albergue, rustle plastic bags/turn on lights/sing out loud/whistle out loud/use your cell phone at 4:30 am.
18. Have an open mind and embrace spontaneity.
19. Never forget to encourage others.
20. The people of Spain have hosted millions of pilgrims over the past 1200 years. They want you to have a good time. They are prepared for you.
 
Last edited:

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#10
What a great list. You are well prepared indeed.

And what a great testament to the value this Forum provides and the support of the community who reside in it.... :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
(Sept 2018 planned)
#13
Great list, sabbott. I am also learning so much from the forum, and appreciate everyone sharing their experiences as I recover from illness and plan my Camino in 2018.

Point of clarity (I'm guessing someone out there knows!). These types of lists often seem to be specific to the Frances... eg RobertS26's indicates that ATMs are available at least once a day, and you're rarely more than one hour away from... It is my understanding that while this may be true for the Frances, it is not necessarily for other trails. Anyone? On the other hand, his "cash is king" and "donativo does not mean free" are really good reminders!
 

TaijiPilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017)
#14
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
You have learned well and are ready. May your expectations be met and may you accept what the Camino provides. Been camino!
 

Angie94

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016 www.angie-carter.com/camino
https://youtu.be/PtE_hvREZc4
#15
Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake.
that is certainly the truth...at least for me it is! ;) What a wonderful post ~ love it.
I think one of the greatest things this forum has given me is the inspiration and the courage to DO IT!
When I read of people in their 70's and 80's doing the camino not only does it let me know I can do this trek, but it also lets me know that just because I am getting older there doesn't have to be a lack of experiences, adventures, fun and continued learning...

19. Never forget to encourage others.
20. The people of Spain have hosted millions of pilgrims over the past 1200 years. They want you to have a good time. They are prepared for you.
good additions Robert, love the last two!
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#16
Wonderful post Sabbott. I am one of the 80-yr old(s) and I can tell you the wonderful folks on this forum family offered me everything I needed as if I were their youngest child. I do wish you a heartfelt Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#18
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Wonderful post Sabbott. I am one of the 80-yr old(s) and I can tell you the wonderful folks on this forum family offered me everything I needed as if I were their youngest child. I do wish you a heartfelt Buen Camino.
Excellent summary! I'm planning to walk in mid May of this year. Buen Camino!
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#22
Excellent list. If I may, could I add a few others?

11. Cash is king on the Camino. Albergues, small grocery stores, and family run restaurants do not accept credit card or debit cards.
12. You will pass at least one ATM almost every day.
13. You are rarely an hour away from the next restaurant/bed/source of water
14. Drink more water than you think you need to drink.
15. Donativo does not mean "free".
16. If you are young, take the top bunk.
17. If you want to alienate an entire albergue, rustle plastic bags/turn on lights/sing out loud/whistle out loud/use your cell phone at 4:30 am.
18. Have an open mind and embrace spontaneity.
19. Never forget to encourage others.
20. The people of Spain have hosted millions of pilgrims over the past 1200 years. They want you to have a good time. They are prepared for you.
I can't stop myself!

21. Don't leave anything behind on the trail: no toilet paper, no tissue, no map, no chewing gum wrapper.

22. Try not to "one up" or bed-race others.

23. Always thank people, even if you think they have fallen short.

24. The journey is the destination. Look up and notice.

25. Try to stay unplugged when you can. It really does let you hear the birdsong and enjoy some conversation.

26. It's okay to walk alone. Respect it when others seem to want to as well.

27. Do try the food without hesitation. Pulpo is delicious!

Enjoy---Buen Camino.
 

Annette london

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#23
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Thank you. Brought tears to my eyes--- after a little vodka-- yes only a little one. Thank you and bless your journey annette
 

Annette london

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#24
Excellent list. If I may, could I add a few others?

11. Cash is king on the Camino. Albergues, small grocery stores, and family run restaurants do not accept credit card or debit cards.
12. You will pass at least one ATM almost every day.
13. You are rarely an hour away from the next restaurant/bed/source of water
14. Drink more water than you think you need to drink.
15. Donativo does not mean "free".
16. If you are young, take the top bunk.
17. If you want to alienate an entire albergue, rustle plastic bags/turn on lights/sing out loud/whistle out loud/use your cell phone at 4:30 am.
18. Have an open mind and embrace spontaneity.
19. Never forget to encourage others.
20. The people of Spain have hosted millions of pilgrims over the past 1200 years. They want you to have a good time. They are prepared for you.
Thank you too Robert s26 as above with original post Annette
 
Camino(s) past & future
(Sept 2018 planned)
#25
If you'll indulge me, I'll add one more that I've read about:

28. Do not leave your clothes unattended in the washer or dryer. I read that someone who did that came back to find their clothes had been removed and put on a table, and nearly all had disappeared because other walkers thought it was the "give away pile"
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#26
If you'll indulge me, I'll add one more that I've read about:

28. Do not leave your clothes unattended in the washer or dryer. I read that someone who did that came back to find their clothes had been removed and put on a table, and nearly all had disappeared because other walkers thought it was the "give away pile"
And if they aren't just moved (or taken!), they take up space that others often really want to use.
 

Annette london

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#27
I can't stop myself!

21. Don't leave anything behind on the trail: no toilet paper, no tissue, no map, no chewing gum wrapper.

22. Try not to "one up" or bed-race others.

23. Always thank people, even if you think they have fallen short.

24. The journey is the destination. Look up and notice.

25. Try to stay unplugged when you can. It really does let you hear the birdsong and enjoy some conversation.

26. It's okay to walk alone. Respect it when others seem to want to as well.

27. Do try the food without hesitation. Pulpo is delicious!

Enjoy---Buen Camino.
Love no 21, don't get me started on the toilet paper however!!! Now about no 27! Try as I might, I just can't face the pulpo and god knows I have tried!! My husband loves it but I must be the only person in the pulpo restaurant having a pork chop!!
 

Ver

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino ingles 2014, planning Portugese or Norte in 2016/7
#29
Wonderful post sabbott. You brought out a true feeling. I have only done one Camino. Before going I was full of fears and questions. The friend I walked with introduced me to this forum which I, like you read and explored. I found it extremely encouraging and reassuring.

A big thank you to all who make it possible.

I am sure you will enjoy the experience. You sound like a very positive person. Buen Camino.
 

Jenyat53

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: September 2013 & April/ May 2014
CF: April/May 2016
#30
Great post sabbot.
I would only add that in meeting locals and fellow pilgrims ..........

"Assume nothing whilst allowing for everything".

Makes a great place from which to learn the most amazing things about people!

Buen Camino.
 

Seabird

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April/May (2016), starting in St. Palais, France
#32
Whew! What a list (plus additions). So well done. Now I can just rip up my notes.:rolleyes:

My only addition: Ask for grace from your Spiritual Source, and you will find strength when you most need it.

Ultreya!
 

MichaelSG

Retired member
Camino(s) past & future
Not enough
#33
Hmmmm... The things I have learned from the forum (rather than what I learned from walking various Caminos) include:
* think twice or three times before posting. Is my post really something that will help others or something that I really have to say or ask?
* there are lots of other fantastic pilgrimages out there, other than the famous one in the movie / book.
* I need to try hard to remember that not everyone is as fluent in American as I think they are and that makes a difference on how they understand what I say.
* Everyone gets to have an opinion, no matter how wrong it is. :p
* arguing any point with any person on the internet is almost always a complete waste of time and energy and usually leads to bad feelings.
* thanking someone for information or help is just as important in cyberspace as it is in a bar, library, petrol station, hotel, wherever.
* it is not in my personality to like everyone all of the time. I guess I just always need someone to grumble about but I should always grumble to myself as it's my problem, not theirs.
* I need to prooofreed before ever postin anythink everytiem.
 

Peter Fransiscus

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#35
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Love your post, wish you all the best and a Buen Camino, Peter.
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#37
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(Sept 2018 planned)
#38
Actually sabbott, your son's video (gorgeous, by the way!) highlights one of the biggest things I learned about the Camino - it isn't wilderness. I really had to adjust my mindset in that regard. It also shows why we so often ask if there is camping along the Camino! Because, as they say in the film, "there's a lot of God in the wilderness".
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#39
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Beautifully filmed. I loved that the narrative touched on our loss of wisdom. My son/daughter and I will hold lifelong memories of the High Sierras, through our many camping trips there, particularly Tuolumne Meadows, Burney Falls and June Lake (great Brown trout fishing) and drives through the Mojave desert. Easy to relate his spoken feelings to many moments on the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances; Sept.2015
#41
You are well prepared my friend.
What I would add is to make friends and write down their phone number, email, or Facebook names. When you get home, it will be nice to reach out and relive the moments with those that were there with you. I drove my family and friends crazy talking camino (now I contain myself) but those that were there with me are always ready to talk.
Buen Camino
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#42
PS to my original posting. Did I mention that I wake up in the middle of the night, and wonder why the heck I have set this whole "walk across Spain with a 15 lb backpack" thing in motion? That I lie in the dark, safe at home in my bed, worrying about how I'll make my way through a dorm room in the middle of the night to find the bathroom? Or whether my knees will give out two hundred miles before Santiago? I could make a list of "The Top Ten Things That Make Me Anxious Thinking Ahead to My Camino".

I guess I'd be an idiot if the idea of navigating by foot across Spain didn't cause some moments of nerves. So I'll add an eleven to my original list of "What I've Learned"--
11. Ignore your fears, and just start walking.
 

Seabird

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April/May (2016), starting in St. Palais, France
#43
PS to my original posting. Did I mention that I wake up in the middle of the night, and wonder why the heck I have set this whole "walk across Spain with a 15 lb backpack" thing in motion? That I lie in the dark, safe at home in my bed, worrying about how I'll make my way through a dorm room in the middle of the night to find the bathroom? Or whether my knees will give out two hundred miles before Santiago? I could make a list of "The Top Ten Things That Make Me Anxious Thinking Ahead to My Camino".

I guess I'd be an idiot if the idea of navigating by foot across Spain didn't cause some moments of nerves. So I'll add an eleven to my original list of "What I've Learned"--
11. Ignore your fears, and just start walking.
Yes, please don't start a "top 10 fears" list....... There's not enough time in the day to list them all! :D

Just know that I'm right there with you, mi amiga.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 2016 from Burgos to Finisterre
#44
PS to my original posting. Did I mention that I wake up in the middle of the night, and wonder why the heck I have set this whole "walk across Spain with a 15 lb backpack" thing in motion? That I lie in the dark, safe at home in my bed, worrying about how I'll make my way through a dorm room in the middle of the night to find the bathroom? Or whether my knees will give out two hundred miles before Santiago? I could make a list of "The Top Ten Things That Make Me Anxious Thinking Ahead to My Camino".

I guess I'd be an idiot if the idea of navigating by foot across Spain didn't cause some moments of nerves. So I'll add an eleven to my original list of "What I've Learned"--
11. Ignore your fears, and just start walking.
I really enjoyed your original post but reading this one makes me feel like I'm reading what I would write. I booked my flight two days ago to walk my first Camino and am a great mix of excitement and worry now. I very much look forwaRd to my first step of many on the journey so I can stop thinking so much.
Buen Camino
Dean
 
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CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#45
I really enjoyed your original post but reading this one makes me feel like I'm reading what I would write. I booked my flight two days ago to walk my first Camino and am a great mix of excitement and worry now. I very much look firwRd to my first step of many on the journey so I can stop thinking so much.
Buen Camino
Dean
When you actually arrive in St. Jean Pied de Port--or wherever you plan to start from---for your first ever Camino, I guarantee you will look around and think, "I'm here...oh, my...I'm actually here..." and then, you will feel a great sense of accomplishment for getting the hardest part of the journey taken care of, all that planning, and worry, and excitement, and wondering. You will start the adventure of a lifetime, and just possibly, an adventure that you will revisit.
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
#46
Great lists and additions by all.
I would like to add one more thing...

*Don't make it too complicated and don't worry in advance.*

Although the planning is part of the fun, all the little details are mostly personal preference and whatever you decide will likely work out fine. I met people who decided to go only a few days before they set foot on the Camino, tossed a few things out of their closet into a backpack and had a wonderful time. (Keeping it light of course.)

It is a long walk. A verrrrrrry long walk. But in the simplest terms, it really is just that.

It is completely different than the beautiful film about the OP's son's Pacific Crest Trail trip. (I loved his video! Well done.)

You will be sleeping indoors at night, there are many places along the way for food and drink, and you are never very far from water. There are ample stores to buy whatever you might need.

Everyone is so helpful to pilgrims from the locals to other pilgrims.
Whatever minor mishaps or mistakes happen, and there will be some, there are so many helpful people and random acts of kindness that they will all be handled.

So relax. Slow down. Don't worry. And enjoy.
Buen Camino!
 

Angie94

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016 www.angie-carter.com/camino
https://youtu.be/PtE_hvREZc4
#47
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
I thoroughly enjoyed watching this video! Wow. Thank you so much for sharing the link so that we could enjoy this wonderful visual trip of the PCT. When I am on the camino and I begin to think that it is tough going...I will think back to this video and know there are walk abouts that are tougher!! haha....What an incredible journey they must have had...I cannot begin to imagine doing a trek like that. I loved how he put the whole video together...great photography and music. Well done. (credits at the end said Susan Sabbott artwork, hmmm.....:rolleyes:)
 
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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#48
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Thank you sabbot for sharing this beautiful video, I found it both interesting and informative. One of the things that struck me was that the guys wore trail runners for the duration of the walk, I thought that this trail would be definately a "boot" trail.
I also agree with the guy who said "there is God in the mountains".
Buen Camino.
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
#49
I just watched the PCT video. MAN I'M JEALOUS. WHAT A HIKE.

Been thinking about this one for a while now. Would love to do this., eventhough 3 things get in the way...

1 miss my girlfriend and our daughter (well, she's 15, in puberty and thus annoying, so maybe not her hahaha ;) ) oooohhh :)
2 hinking this alone. Thats a choice i have to make.
3 the damn visa! If i hike this, i want it to be a thru hike, not a section hike, but US immigration is not the easiest when it comes to long term multiple entry visas....but, you never know.


@sabbott Thanks for sharing this vid. Really really enjoyed it!
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#50
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
My husband and I really enjoyed this film, especially as we have both hiked sections of it. We live in Oregon, and have both travelled a lot through California and Washington, so these place names were really familiar:

1. The Cali - Mexico border, with helicopters and stark heat.
2. Joshua Tree National Monument, which I have hiked.
3. Tuolomne Meadows in the Yosemite Park, which I have hiked
4. Crater Lake, which we have visited, and where I was a "trail angel" for a hungry and thirsty PCT hiker
5. Mount Thielson, near Diamond Lake
6. The Three Sisters Wilderness area, with the Three Sisters mountains, which Jay and I have both hiked
7. Mount Hood, which I've climbed, and we live about an hour and a half from
8. Bridge of the Gods, Stevenson, Washington--where our daughter was married at Skamania Lodge
9. Goat Rocks, where we did a very vigorous hike in 2005, assisting a friend who collapsed in the hot, exposed shale of a difficult assent.

sabbot, we LOVED watching your son's film, and thank you for sharing it.
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#51
Great lists and additions by all.
I would like to add one more thing...

*Don't make it too complicated and don't worry in advance.*
So true, @Ahhhs, thank you for the reminder!


My husband and I really enjoyed this film, especially as we have both hiked sections of it. We live in Oregon, and have both travelled a lot through California and Washington, so these place names were really familiar:
Great, @CaminoDebrita, I'm glad that the film brought back good memories. I'll pass that on to Colin!

I just watched the PCT video. MAN I'M JEALOUS. WHAT A HIKE.

Been thinking about this one for a while now. Would love to do this., eventhough 3 things get in the way...
@Dutch, Colin met many folks from other countries on his PCT hike, though I'm not sure if they were thru hikers. It takes about 4 1/2 months to get from Mexico to Canada, and can't take much more because of the probability of running into snow in the north. Anyway, I hope you can do it one of these days!

Thank you sabbot for sharing this beautiful video, I found it both interesting and informative. One of the things that struck me was that the guys wore trail runners for the duration of the walk, I thought that this trail would be definately a "boot" trail.
Thanks for watching, @wayfarer. Yes, almost all the ultralight long distance hikers wear trail runners. Colin went through four pairs of Salomens, luckily he received free replacements. The trail runners dried quickly, and other than a few initial blisters, he didn't have problems with his feet.

I thoroughly enjoyed watching this video! Wow. Thank you so much for sharing the link so that we could enjoy this wonderful visual trip of the PCT. When I am on the camino and I begin to think that it is tough going...I will think back to this video and know there are walk abouts that are tougher!! haha....What an incredible journey they must have had...I cannot begin to imagine doing a trek like that. I loved how he put the whole video together...great photography and music. Well done. (credits at the end said Susan Sabbott artwork, hmmm..
Thank for watching, Angie! I'll pass these comments on to Colin. I did do the artwork, fun to collaborate with your kids. Hoping he and I can do a hike together someday, but it's more likely to be a Camino rather than a wilderness hike, given my hiking level....
 

Jenyat53

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: September 2013 & April/ May 2014
CF: April/May 2016
#52
Such a beautifully filmed piece! What an inspiration your son is! I have passed link on to several Aussie friends. Thanks so much for sharing sabbot!
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#54
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:

Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
An excellent film!! I especially liked the comments about the end, when they reached the monument: "We fall silent. The journey is done and we don't know what to say, what to think or what to do. There's no great realization, no epiphany, no feeling of bliss. Those moments resided in the life of the journey, not in its ending."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Want to walk 2wks in May 2016
#56
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
What a great film - it left me smiling. Such obvious enjoyment in the outdoors. I have only 2 weeks on the Camino Portuguese and I am getting really excited. Two weeks off the treadmill of working life enjoying nature and walking. Thankyou for the video.
 

marylynn

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-12-14-15-16-17+(18) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 Hærvejen DK
#57
When you actually arrive in St. Jean Pied de Port--or wherever you plan to start from---for your first ever Camino, I guarantee you will look around and think, "I'm here...oh, my...I'm actually here..." and then, you will feel a great sense of accomplishment for getting the hardest part of the journey taken care of, all that planning, and worry, and excitement, and wondering. You will start the adventure of a lifetime, and just possibly, an adventure that you will revisit.
I remember when "I'm here...oh, my...I'm actually here!" finally replaced "What in the world am I doing?? Who do I think I am??? Why did I think this was a good idea???" It took a few trips, but now I take those first few steps on the trail and think "Wow! I'm actually here--again!!"
 

marylynn

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011-12-14-15-16-17+(18) CF
2013 Arles/Aragones
2015 & 2017 Hærvejen DK
#58
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Fantastic film! Thank you for sharing it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I have visited the Cathedral in 2011, but not in a pilgrimage. I plan to go within the next 3 or 4 years by my 50th birthday.
#59
PS to my original posting. Did I mention that I wake up in the middle of the night, and wonder why the heck I have set this whole "walk across Spain with a 15 lb backpack" thing in motion? That I lie in the dark, safe at home in my bed, worrying about how I'll make my way through a dorm room in the middle of the night to find the bathroom? Or whether my knees will give out two hundred miles before Santiago? I could make a list of "The Top Ten Things That Make Me Anxious Thinking Ahead to My Camino".

I guess I'd be an idiot if the idea of navigating by foot across Spain didn't cause some moments of nerves. So I'll add an eleven to my original list of "What I've Learned"--
11. Ignore your fears, and just start walking.
I'm starting to feel the same. I lie in my comfy, cozy covers with my two extra pillows for my knees and hips and my cushion top on my bed. I worry about being so physically tired without the extra padding needed to rest and having to climb down in the night from a top bunk! Among other worries! Lol
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF , SJPP to Santiago Sept/Oct 2016
#60
I am so grateful for this forum. As a first timer (to the Camino and this forum) I appreciate the honesty, encouragement and simplicity shared by this community of pilgrim. I have the privilege of having a wonderful sister who has done several Camino. For years she try to fire me up with a desire to go and it just would fall "flat" on me... This puzzled me? Then in 2014 I realized a life long dream and spent 5 weeks in Peru with 3 weeks solo! It was while hiking in the Andes, on my last week that the Camino landed in my heart.... Upon returning home, instead of annoying everyone with my Peru trip, I found myself O.C.D on anything Camino... I called my sister: "What the heck is this all about?" "Why now?" She answered: "The Camino called." The minute I heard these words, I knew, I understood what she meant and I knew that I would not rest until I committed. A month ago, I booked my flight for London September 2016 and called my sister... After the initial"I got my ticket ..." I burst into tears! (This is not my usual style but the Camino was already at work). One of the hardest thing was to have the courage to be true to myself and to go solo for my first Camino... My sister grieves a little but she understand (true pilgrim!)
So it is with great anticipation that I will set out for what "called me", my mind thinks it knows why I am going on this crazy adventure but my heart smiles and says... Think again!
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#62
"The Top Ten Things That Make Me Anxious Thinking Ahea
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#63
Sabbott, part of your post above (I messed it up). Please put this list out of your mind. You are going to have an amazing experience. Wish you well and Buen Camino
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#64
Sabbott, part of your post above (I messed it up). Please put this list out of your mind. You are going to have an amazing experience. Wish you well and Buen Camino
Thank you, @movinmaggie , and thanks to everyone else who has responded to this thread. One of the big reasons I want to walk the Camino is to not plan so much, not have control over every detail, and to just see what happens hour by hour, day by day. I've done a lot of traveling alone--right now I'm sitting in an airport by myself. I think that what's going to make this time in Spain so different is the traveling "without baggage", in so many meanings of the word. But I'd better stop here, before I start anticipating!
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#66
I did not like the pulpo!!:eek:
I'm with you. I find it awful. And yet I love making it at home. But apparently the pulpo sold in Noeth America and Spain are differnt types, and that dull flavour of the pimenton in thick oil. Urgh. I boil mine in salted water with a bit of vinegar. When cooked it gets sliced up and mixed in with olive oil, lemon juice, capers, red nion, garlice, dried organo and basil, and finally a bit of pepper. Delicious!
 

LisaAnn

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycling Lisbon to Santiago - Oct/Nov 2015
2017 - TBD, I have 2-3 weeks and don't really like crowds
#68
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Thank you so much for sharing! I spend a lot of time on both the AT and LT (good training ground for a Camino) as they are my back yard. I've always thought about doing sections of the PCT, this makes it even more enticing. We can do anything we put our minds to. Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances [2015]
Camino Frances [2016]
#69
Hi Sabbott,

You have created an excellent list of the Camino "principles" and the others made valuable additions. Here are a few of mine:

29. The most important words in Spanish you must know are "Buen Camino".
30. Another important word is "tranquilo".
31. The attitude is everything. Come to the Camino expecting a wonderful experience, and the Camino will deliver.

Victoria
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Portuguese 2017
Camino Fisterra 1017
#70
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Wow!! I am about to begin my first Camino, arriving in Bilbao on March 30. 2016. These exact thoughts and the appreciation of others who shared such a wealth of knowledge that'll help so many of us along the way is priceless. You hit the nail right on the head as they say. Well written. Brief and to the point. And very very thoughtful. You combined so many sound lessons I've been reading about for the last 9 months and expressed in understandable way and with so much feeling I felt I must thank you. I think you probably speak for many folks who feel equally grateful for this forum and are about to join the counless others who walked before us. Thank you for your beautiful story. I am so happy you will be among those lucky few disappearing into a security line filled with the forum lessons to brighten (and lighten) the way. Buen Camino
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
#71
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#72
I just applied for my visa :) and the pct permit.

If the visa comes thru, i'll be walking the whole pct this year. Very very excited.

I will be sure to read Colins blog.... Thnx for the tip :)
Wow, I'm impressed. Would never ever cross my mind to attempt that. I like my Camino glamping.
 

Dutch

Straightforward
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC sept '13
Porto-SdC May '14
SdC-Finis/Muxia May '14
SJPP-Finisterre sept '14
Pamplona-Burgos march '15
Porto - Sdc may '15
Camino salkantay june '15
SJPP - SdC aug/sept '15

Pacific Crest Trail april thru sept 2016
#73
Maybe be a bit impressed when, no, IF i finish, but please not upfront hahaha

Been wanting this for a while. Its a yes-no thing, but now...if the u.s. embassy lets me :) it will be a yes
 
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sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#74
Wow!! I am about to begin my first Camino, arriving in Bilbao on March 30. 2016. These exact thoughts and the appreciation of others who shared such a wealth of knowledge that'll help so many of us along the way is priceless. You hit the nail right on the head as they say. Well written. Brief and to the point. And very very thoughtful. You combined so many sound lessons I've been reading about for the last 9 months and expressed in understandable way and with so much feeling I felt I must thank you. I think you probably speak for many folks who feel equally grateful for this forum and are about to join the counless others who walked before us. Thank you for your beautiful story. I am so happy you will be among those lucky few disappearing into a security line filled with the forum lessons to brighten (and lighten) the way. Buen Camino
Thanks for these thoughts, @Forestgirl ! I hope you have a wonderful time on your northern Camino.
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#75
I just applied for my visa :) and the pct permit.

If the visa comes thru, i'll be walking the whole pct this year. Very very excited.

I will be sure to read Colins blog.... Thnx for the tip :)
That's great, @Dutch! Keep us posted about the visa, and your PCT planning!
 

AndyK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2016
#76
sabbot, thanks for sharing your son's video. Beautifully filmed and from his narrative I think he grew wise beyond his years on this trip. What an adventure! What an achievement! And I thought walking the Camino will be hard... ;) Well, it still can be and will be I'm sure, but compared to this...

Wish I'll have the courage and opportunity to take on at least a part of the PCT one day. Colin's video somehow got me hooked.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
#77
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
#78
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Sabbott, this post is so awesome, I have shared it with my children! You have summed up how I feel about my planned trip starting in just 5 weeks time!
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#81
Octopus. Plain simple Octopus. Boiled up with a few aromatics & astringents. Griddled sometimes once cooked for added savouriness. Tastes absolutely unlike any chicken I would want to eat. Is delicious.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016 & 2018), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
#82
OK, I'll bite. What is Pulpo??
Many people hate the thought of eating octopus, but in my opinion it tastes delicious. The famous place on the Camino Frances for pulpo is Melide. My favourite Pulperia, A Garnacha, is on the left as you walk into Melide town centre.

00536br.jpg
 

Joodle

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May 10th through June 21st 2016 Yahooo!!
#83
Ha Ha, I had to ask, and you had the perfect picture. I will try it. I had a very food adventurous Dad. He fed us shark, snake, pigs ears, tripe, pickled pigs feet.......He would make stinging nettle cough syrup and chasing us around the house trying to dose us for a cough. :eek: I think I will try and probably like the Pulpo. Thanks
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walked 2014
#84
Thank you so much for sharing! I spend a lot of time on both the AT and LT (good training ground for a Camino) as they are my back yard. I've always thought about doing sections of the PCT, this makes it even more enticing. We can do anything we put our minds to. Buen Camino.
This is so awesome!
 

gidivet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés - SJPP to Santiago de Compostela - 24 April to 1 June 2014.
Camino Francés - Short section Sept 2014
Camino Francés - Short section May 2015
Camino Francés and Camino Le Puy short sections - April/May 2016
#85
Awesome post - very encouraging. Thanks!
 

Angie94

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016 www.angie-carter.com/camino
https://youtu.be/PtE_hvREZc4
#86
Many people hate the thought of eating octopus, but in my opinion it tastes delicious.
Oh my! Mike, that is the most graphic and close pic of 'pulpo' that I have seen thus far! :eek:
hmmmmm....I just don't know about that, guess we'll have to wait and see. I don't consider myself a picky eater by far, but I just don't know about this!!o_O
 

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#87
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Loved your son's video, just beautiful. Perhaps you and I will run into each other on the Camino.
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#88
Loved your son's video, just beautiful. Perhaps you and I will run into each other on the Camino.
I hope so! I think you're leaving close to when I am, but from a different starting point.
 
Last edited:

Lmsundaze

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2016), CP (2017)
#89
Sabbot, I am leaving April 17 from Pamplona. Given my level of health and fitness, I think I will be better able to complete the camino if I do not begin with crossing the Pyrenees. I will be going slowly, so if you start behind me perhaps you will pass me. Linda
 

JKH

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) and Camino Fisterra (2015)
#90
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Good luck, Sabbott. I certainly enjoyed your post. Walk with an open heart and enjoy the moment.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
#91
Ahhhhh, just back from Camino. I flew back in eight days ago, on April 5th. I'm still struggling with jet lag, but have thrown myself back into work, and am also trying to get this lawn and gardens taken are of.

I learned a few things on this last Camino.

--I can't be away from home more than two weeks. It's too hard on my husband to take care of the farm without me. I can arrange a house sitter, and farm workers, and if I need to be gone for awhile, I have to have husband with me. Otherwise it's too hard. This is my personal situation.

--Don't try posting on the forum in the first few days back. I'm too tired. It is exhausting to walk a few hundred miles and then try to function well physically, let alone mentally. I'm lying here typing anyway, but I've been struggling with exhaustion. It's okay to not be perfect, but I'm just not fully "back" yet.

--Our forum members are truly kind people. Online friends are generally wysiwyg--what you see is what you get. I was glad to meet forum members while in Spain, whom I thoroughly enjoying spending time with.

--Spain airport workers are so kind. When I arrived to the Madrid airport incredibly weak from a rough night (got very ill and just lost strength), they helped me tremendously, pushing me in a wheelchair to the gate. Pretty embarrassing, but it was necessary.

--El Prado museum in Madrid is spectacular, and not to be missed. Seeing the art work by the Masters was a wonderful experience.

Glad to be back.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - 2014
Portuguese - 2016
Chemin St Jacques - TBD
Via Francigena - TBD
#92
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Simply outstanding! Congratulations to your son and you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
#93
If anyone would like to take a look at the film my son Colin made about his Pacific Crest Trail thru-hike, you can watch it here:
Although it's journey through wilderness rather than the settled areas we encounter on the Camino, there are some similarities in what happens to your head on a long walk.
Thank you for sharing!
 

denis52

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (June 2016)
#94
Two years ago I kissed my son Colin goodbye at the airport and watched him and his 15 lb backpack disappear into a security line. He was on his way to the Mexican border to begin walking the Pacific Crest Trail. 2,700 miles and four months later, he made it all the way to Canada.

For a long time, through years of working, raising children, and making a home, I dreamed of the freedom and adventure of that kind of very long walk. Once this urge to strap on a pack and wander up a trail gets in your head, it's hard to shake. Colin's example inspired me to finally quit dreaming and start walking, and on April 15th I'll be disappearing into an airport security line wearing my own 15 lb backpack.

If I do manage to hike from the French border to Finisterre, it will be because of what I've learned from all of you. You've set me up for success, and if I don't make it all the way, it won't be for lack of knowledge. You've provided an education in how to walk a pilgrimage. After months of reading and note-taking, here's a summary of what I've learned. I'm sure many of you have read it all before, but it's been a help to me to gather all my slips of paper, and assemble some of what you've taught me in one place. Here are the top ten lessons I've taken away from the forum:

1. Go light. Very light. Don't pack your fears and what-ifs. You can find anything you didn't bring, and wish you had, along the way.

2. Foot problems are not inevitable. Sock liners, wool socks, a foot lubricant, airing out your feet during the day, and changing socks frequently all help prevent blisters. Whether sandals, trailrunners or boots, make sure your shoes are comfortable, well-tested, and larger than you ordinarily wear.

3. Dress in wool or synthetic layers: short sleeve base, long sleeve base, fleece and/or wind block, waterproof jacket or poncho. Add three pairs of socks, a pair of pants or a skirt, maybe leggings, buff and sun hat, two pairs of underwear, and you've got what you need.

4. When you are a guest in someone else's country, learn at least enough of their language to be polite, order a meal, and ask directions. Try not to judge your host's customs, habits, or how they run their country. Don't litter.

5. Walk your own walk. If you want to take two months and allow time to paint, meander, and linger in bars (like me!), that's fine. If you want to speedwalk your way to Santiago in three weeks, or go in a tour group, or take a taxi up the hills, that's fine, too.

6. Walk your own pace. Trying to keep up with new friends can get you hurt. (See #2)

7. Tourists expect, pilgrims are thankful. Be patient with bed-racers, snorers, early risers, window closers, window openers, hiking pole clackers, plastic bag rustlers, and bikers who don't ring their bells.

8. The Camino is not a Disneyland adventure park. There's no guarantee that you won't encounter an injury, illness, or a bad person. Take responsibility for yourself, and look out for others.

9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.

10. You're never too old to learn new skills, challenge your body, take a risk, or set off on a 600 mile walk.

I know I'm forgetting something. I'd love to hear what you first-timers would add as the most important things you've learned from this forum!
Amazing post
 
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy -> Conques June 2015
Conques -> Rocamadour -> Moissac? June 2016
Ultreia
#95
9. Plan and prepare--but when you begin your walk, leave your expectations behind. Accept that anything can happen, and will happen. The unexpected is the definition of adventure--no matter how lost, lonely or uncomfortable it may feel at the time.
As General Eisenhower said "Plans are worthless, but planning is essential." That combines nicely with Von Clausewitz's rule "No plan of battle survives first contact with the enemy."

Last year, I spent hours creating a spreadsheet with all of the places we could stay with a donkey between Le Puy en Velay and Conques, with the distances between each, and planned where we would stay each night. But I knew before we left that we wouldn't end up staying in all those places; plans always change. So when we called ahead to the only place in Aumont-Aubrac that allows donkeys and found out they only take donkeys after July 1st (when the hay in their field gets harvested), I was prepared to change plans. We did two short days to stop at the last place that takes donkeys before Aumont-Aubrac, then a few slightly long days afterwards to make it up.

So plan your trip carefully, but walk out the door knowing that your plans will change, and also knowing that because of your planning, you'll adapt easily.

It's an adventure.

BTW, I loved Colin's film. It's really well done. I'm curious, I don't see a bear canister in his packing list, what did he do to protect his food in bear country?
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
#96
Ahhhhh, just back from Camino. I flew back in eight days ago, on April 5th. I'm still struggling with jet lag, but have thrown myself back into work, and am also trying to get this lawn and gardens taken are of.

I learned a few things on this last Camino.

--I can't be away from home more than two weeks. It's too hard on my husband to take care of the farm without me. I can arrange a house sitter, and farm workers, and if I need to be gone for awhile, I have to have husband with me. Otherwise it's too hard. This is my personal situation.

--Don't try posting on the forum in the first few days back. I'm too tired. It is exhausting to walk a few hundred miles and then try to function well physically, let alone mentally. I'm lying here typing anyway, but I've been struggling with exhaustion. It's okay to not be perfect, but I'm just not fully "back" yet.

--Our forum members are truly kind people. Online friends are generally wysiwyg--what you see is what you get. I was glad to meet forum members while in Spain, whom I thoroughly enjoying spending time with.

--Spain airport workers are so kind. When I arrived to the Madrid airport incredibly weak from a rough night (got very ill and just lost strength), they helped me tremendously, pushing me in a wheelchair to the gate. Pretty embarrassing, but it was necessary.

--El Prado museum in Madrid is spectacular, and not to be missed. Seeing the art work by the Masters was a wonderful experience.

Glad to be back.
Nice to see you back Deb.
 

sabbott

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP to Ponferrada) 2016
Camino Invierno 2016
#97
As General Eisenhower said "Plans are worthless, but planning is essential." That combines nicely with Von Clausewitz's rule "No plan of battle survives first contact with the enemy."

Last year, I spent hours creating a spreadsheet with all of the places we could stay with a donkey between Le Puy en Velay and Conques, with the distances between each, and planned where we would stay each night. But I knew before we left that we wouldn't end up staying in all those places; plans always change. So when we called ahead to the only place in Aumont-Aubrac that allows donkeys and found out they only take donkeys after July 1st (when the hay in their field gets harvested), I was prepared to change plans. We did two short days to stop at the last place that takes donkeys before Aumont-Aubrac, then a few slightly long days afterwards to make it up.

So plan your trip carefully, but walk out the door knowing that your plans will change, and also knowing that because of your planning, you'll adapt easily.

It's an adventure.

BTW, I loved Colin's film. It's really well done. I'm curious, I don't see a bear canister in his packing list, what did he do to protect his food in bear country?
Glad you liked the film! You know, I'm not sure about the bears, I'll ask him.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016 & 2018), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
#98
Finally got round to listing the Top Ten things I have learned from these forums:

1. Finding smart places to stay.

2. Finding foodie places to eat.

3. Obsessing with wifi.

4. Obsessing with phones.

5. Booking ahead.

6. Transporting backpacks ahead.

7. Booking taxis.

8. Obsessing with bedbugs.

9. Packing everything except the kitchen sink.

10. Forget items 1 to 9.

:confused::D:rolleyes:
 

Ton

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la plata
#99
Great list, sabbott. I am also learning so much from the forum, and appreciate everyone sharing their experiences as I recover from illness and plan my Camino in 2018.

Point of clarity (I'm guessing someone out there knows!). These types of lists often seem to be specific to the Frances... eg RobertS26's indicates that ATMs are available at least once a day, and you're rarely more than one hour away from... It is my understanding that while this may be true for the Frances, it is not necessarily for other trails. Anyone? On the other hand, his "cash is king" and "donativo does not mean free" are really good reminders!
On the Via de la Plata this was not the case, sometimes there was no Atm in three days
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Camino(s) past & future
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
Not sure why this thread was resurrected, but I was happy to read the OP (very funny and wise), watch the video (ah, childhood memories of the PCT...and my family wonders why I joined the military o_O), and especially to see the watercolors...I hope @Sabbot you were able to create many beautiful ones from your walk.
hmmm...maybe in addition to photos there should be an 'art gallery' section for our talented member to post picture of their camino art....
 

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