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The Unlikely Rise of the Pastel de Nata, and Why It’s Suddenly Everywhere

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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I was going to say... Being Brazilian born and living in Australia (where the Portuguese have a vibrant community in Sydey), the pasteis de Nata have always been around my entire life.

Glad they are becoming mainstream in more places though, it is a delicacy that deserves to be eaten more often! :D
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
Don’t forget that they’ve been available in Chinese Dim Sum houses and restaurants for hundreds of years as part of the Portuguese influence on Asia through its trade routes! 👍
 

pipello

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés, Camino del Norte, and the Camino Portuguese (May, 2018)

simply B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
somewhere between "not enough" and "way too many"
Ok then, we all agree on its deliciousness. Anyone have a great recipe?
How about this?

https://leitesculinaria.com/7759/recipes-pasteis-de-nata.html

This one looks like it is close to authentic but I have not yet had time to try. You really do need an oven than can hold consistent heat of at least 450 deg F, 500 is better.

Any native Portuguese who wishes to share a home recipe - - let's see it! (As long as such a sharing will not get you into trouble with Mom!;))

B
 

Carolethecatlover

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2018
I was going to say... Being Brazilian born and living in Australia (where the Portuguese have a vibrant community in Sydey), the pasteis de Nata have always been around my entire life.

Glad they are becoming mainstream in more places though, it is a delicacy that deserves to be eaten more often! :D
I am Australian too, and have to agree, they have been around the last 32 years in Sydney....Petersham is the barrio Portuguese. Brazil is on our time, ... Inevitable far from inexplicable rise....
 

gschmidl

sator arepo tenet opera rotas
Camino(s) past & future
Kumano Kodo (11/2018), Camino Sanabres (4/2019)
Potentially heretical, but I prefer the ones with the thicker, more "stable" non-fillo crust. I cannot for the life of me remember what they're called, though.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Ok then, we all agree on its deliciousness. Anyone have a great recipe?
I am cooking my way through Rick Stein's Long Weekends cookbook and Pastel de Nata is one of the Recipes.
The instructions take up 2 pages and the process looks long and complicated and fiddly....I haven't got round to having a go. Serving that for a rainy day with no disruptions.
 

Drew1578

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles May 2019
After leaving SdeC by car to head to Avila and beyond, I'm decided to drop down to Braga and stop for a few hours (which only adds an additional 2 hours to my trip and coming from S. California that's just a drop in the bucket). I've been researching food (if you knew me you'd expect that....) and came across the pastel de nata. Yeah! Good thing I've dropped 15 pounds before I leave because I'm going to gain it all back.... My
Camino has gone from being a solely religious pilgrimage to a religious/epicurean pilgrimage.
 

Swift3

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP, Porto to SdC, May/June 2016
I am cooking my way through Rick Stein's Long Weekends cookbook and Pastel de Nata is one of the Recipes.
The instructions take up 2 pages and the process looks long and complicated and fiddly....I haven't got round to having a go. Serving that for a rainy day with no disruptions.
Good luck with it. Hope it meets your expectations and beyond.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
The sheer number of pastry shops in Portugal was staggering. Referred to as “pastelarias,” these eateries are founded on the secular trinity of the highly caffeinated coffee, the sugary sweet pastries, and the community offered by the place where everyone goes to talk. Café culture is part of the Portuguese daily routine, and dropping into one of these pastelarias half a dozen times each day is not uncommon. Most pastelarias offer a simple luncheon “prato do dia,” or daily special. At Imperio Pastelaria, I had the bean soup of the day for my first course and a fried pork medallion with potato fries for my main course.
It was fortunate for me that my server had studied English at school for several years, as do most high school students here. I wanted to order some pastries for desert, and I asked the waitress to translate some of the offerings posted on a large sign hanging behind the long glass case.
“So, tell me what a ‘bolo rei’ and a ‘bolo rainha’ are?” I asked the young server.
“That is the king cake, and it is a Christmas cake much like the fruit cake they have in England,” she explained expertly. “It is named after Louis XIV of France, where it originated, and it is brioche-like bread dough baked with nuts and raisins and dried crystallized fruit. The queen cake, or ‘bolo rainha,’ is the same thing but with less dried fruit and more nuts.”

“Yeah. I think I’ll pass on that. How about the tartes diversas?” I asked.
“You know about our famous pastel de nata, a many-layered flaky pastry filled with custard. Then there are the other types, ‘diversas,’ of tarts we serve, in which the fillings might be coconut or almond or white bean puree. The pastel de coco or the pastel de amendoa or the pastel de feijao are the other tarts we make here.”
“Those sound delicious, and of course, like most visitors to your country, I have had the pastel de nata and also the almond tarts. But what is the serradura?” I inquired.
“In English this is—how do you say— ‘sawdust pudding,’ which is crumbled cookies layered in a whipped cream pudding. Serradura was introduced to Portugal from Macau in China when it was a Portuguese colony. I actually just helped to make some of it today. It is very simple to make, with just four ingredients, but it’s very delicious. Can I get you one of those?”
“That sounds perfect for desert—one serradura. Also, I want two pastries to go please, perhaps one pastel de coco and one pastel de amendoa,” I said.

From "Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment"
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
The sheer number of pastry shops in Portugal was staggering. Referred to as “pastelarias,” these eateries are founded on the secular trinity of the highly caffeinated coffee, the sugary sweet pastries, and the community offered by the place where everyone goes to talk. Café culture is part of the Portuguese daily routine, and dropping into one of these pastelarias half a dozen times each day is not uncommon. Most pastelarias offer a simple luncheon “prato do dia,” or daily special. At Imperio Pastelaria, I had the bean soup of the day for my first course and a fried pork medallion with potato fries for my main course.
It was fortunate for me that my server had studied English at school for several years, as do most high school students here. I wanted to order some pastries for desert, and I asked the waitress to translate some of the offerings posted on a large sign hanging behind the long glass case.
“So, tell me what a ‘bolo rei’ and a ‘bolo rainha’ are?” I asked the young server.
“That is the king cake, and it is a Christmas cake much like the fruit cake they have in England,” she explained expertly. “It is named after Louis XIV of France, where it originated, and it is brioche-like bread dough baked with nuts and raisins and dried crystallized fruit. The queen cake, or ‘bolo rainha,’ is the same thing but with less dried fruit and more nuts.”

“Yeah. I think I’ll pass on that. How about the tartes diversas?” I asked.
“You know about our famous pastel de nata, a many-layered flaky pastry filled with custard. Then there are the other types, ‘diversas,’ of tarts we serve, in which the fillings might be coconut or almond or white bean puree. The pastel de coco or the pastel de amendoa or the pastel de feijao are the other tarts we make here.”
“Those sound delicious, and of course, like most visitors to your country, I have had the pastel de nata and also the almond tarts. But what is the serradura?” I inquired.
“In English this is—how do you say— ‘sawdust pudding,’ which is crumbled cookies layered in a whipped cream pudding. Serradura was introduced to Portugal from Macau in China when it was a Portuguese colony. I actually just helped to make some of it today. It is very simple to make, with just four ingredients, but it’s very delicious. Can I get you one of those?”
“That sounds perfect for desert—one serradura. Also, I want two pastries to go please, perhaps one pastel de coco and one pastel de amendoa,” I said.

From "Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment"
Now I am very hungry!
 

EricBerg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May 2019
There was probably a similar headline when bagels were first 'discovered' at the corner deli by the food snobbies. Forget the fact that regular folks had been enjoying them for generations. :)
Don't you mean beigels?
 

EricBerg

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May 2019
There was probably a similar headline when bagels were first 'discovered' at the corner deli by the food snobbies. Forget the fact that regular folks had been enjoying them for generations. :)
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
I was going to say... Being Brazilian born and living in Australia (where the Portuguese have a vibrant community in Sydey), the pasteis de Nata have always been around my entire life.

Glad they are becoming mainstream in more places though, it is a delicacy that deserves to be eaten more often! :D
And I live inPerth, not far from Fremantle, where there is also a vibrant Portuguese community and those little Custard and pastry tarts have been around for as long as I've been here in Perth which is 50years this year.
 

mark connolly

Member
Camino(s) past & future
sept 2016 CF
sept 2017 Lourdes to SJPDP via Piemonte
SJPDP to SDC via CF
2019 CF (God willing)
Ok then, we all agree on its deliciousness. Anyone have a great recipe?
Here is one from youtube. The chef states:

Learn how to make Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)! If there were a Hall of Fame for tarts, these would have an entire wing. They truly are a unique, and mind-blowingly delicious sweet treat. Plus, they were invented by hermit monks, which make them even cooler. Visit https://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2018/... for the ingredients, more information, and many, many more video recipes. I really hope you enjoy this Portuguese Custard Tart recipe!





Mark
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Here is one from youtube. The chef states:

Learn how to make Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata)! If there were a Hall of Fame for tarts, these would have an entire wing. They truly are a unique, and mind-blowingly delicious sweet treat. Plus, they were invented by hermit monks, which make them even cooler. Visit https://foodwishes.blogspot.com/2018/... for the ingredients, more information, and many, many more video recipes. I really hope you enjoy this Portuguese Custard Tart recipe!

Mark
That was most interesting, watching how those delicious tidbits are made, but I think I’ll scout around to find a bakery that makes good ones. Seems like just a bit too much work for me. :)
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Don’t forget that they’ve been available in Chinese Dim Sum houses and restaurants for hundreds of years as part of the Portuguese influence on Asia through its trade routes! 👍
We have plenty of both available here in Toronto, with substantial Portuguese and Chinese communities, and you can definitely tell the difference between the two. Pasteis de nata are clearly sweeter and Chinese egg tarts are noticeably eggier. You can see that they are related, but don't try and substitute one for the other.
 

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