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Things you do NOT need to bring on the Camino

Camino Badges
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
Hairdryers
Perfume or Aftershave lotion
Electric razors
Makeup
Water purifiers
Heavy bottles of shampoo, rinse, whatever
More than 2 Tampons or sanitary napkins
Tent
Umbrellas
Heavy Can Openers (most cans I found on Camino were pop-top)
Mess kits
stoves and gas
utensils
plates
cups
food from home
more than one full change of clothes
????? what else?????
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
Anniesantiago said:
More than 2 Tampons or sanitary napkins
You're clearly NOT at a 'certain age'. :oops: :roll:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
:::laughing::::

Well, my point was that you can buy them on the Camino... Spain is NOT a 3d World Country... they have young women there too :lol:

I'm depressed today and that made me laugh.. thanks lol
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Walking sticks
floor mats-everyone seems to take them (once) but never uses them
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2005, 2007; Madrid/Frances 2011; 1/2 VdP 2012; Portugese Litoral2019; Finisterre/Muxia2019
nope Omar, you just can't win that 'no walking sticks' theme. Essential gear for many pilgrims, I, for one, never leave home without them!
 

Trudy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2006) Roncesvalles to Leon (2007) Leon to Compostela
Have to disagree about the umbrella.

I always take a small lightweight travel umbrella which I've used many times on the Camino. It's useful for sightseeing on those rainy days when a rainjacket is just too much. And it proved invaluable as a sunshade on extremely hot, still, days on the Meseta.

Trudy
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Utensils, plate and cup - and walking sticks.
I always take a camping knife, fork and spoon set. Very useful for those picnic lunches and when there are only two forks and no knives left in the albergue kitchen! I also take a small spiral, immersion heater. Great for making early morning coffee before starting off or heating soups or making 2 minute noodles.
Ditto the plate. I use a lid from a 2L ice cream tub. Nice and flexible and has a lip around the edge so if you cut tomatoes on it, the juice doesn't spill over the edge.
Can't do without a large but lightweight camp mug. Great for the 2min noodles or cup-of-soup in places where there is no cafe-bar or restaurant.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
A fascinating question is "what did you leave out from your first Camino when you went back for the second, third, fourth"...

I've met lots of repeat pilgrims and some serial pilgrims :) and although we can all go on about weight, weight, weight, I think some of us learned the lesson the hard way. In my case I set off on the Via de la Plata from Sevilla on the 1st of January and I took:

A rucksack that was too heavy - but I was sooo proud of myself that I'd bought a sleeping map and courageously had decided to leave it behind. In fact I never met another pilgrims for 21 days so you could say bed availability was not an issue :)

1 too many of EVERYTHING :) - including 2 torches in case one broke down and of course extra batteries.

A thermos and powder soup ( for those bitterly cold days in Extremadura which were 2 weeks ahead of me!) That got left behind on the second day :)

A tin cup - for the soup of course!

A little short wave radio to listen to the BBC on those long winter evenings when it gets dark early rather than spend all evening in the bar - whilst this was a good idea it soon became apparent that the rythm of each day didn't work like that and I could work out my walking day so that I arrived at 6pm just before dusk.

Just far too much in my first aid kit - in case I needed field surgery! :)

and of course that little bag of "spares" - matches, clothes pegs, sewing kit etc That actually took me another couple of Caminos to dump.

The ubiquitous but in fact redundant and expensive swiss army knife

A pencil AND a pen

But what I did do meticulously was rip out the pages of the guide book and dispose of them at each etapa :oops:

But the BEST things I took in winter were:

A down jacket which weighs less that .5 kgs and folds into one of its own pockets

A "top bag" for sleeping in - a down sleeping back which has 200g of quality down on top and around the feet but just a single layer of fabric on the base - ideal for sleeping on beds in albergues.

A merino wool base layer.

Expensive but I am still using these items.

So come on you guys: CONFESS :)
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
Johnnie, as a lapsed Catholic I still remember the privacy of Confession :shock: But I can confirm that my pack definitely got lighter and lighter the longer I walked. :D
Margaret
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Sil-have you had a conversion?! I always thought you liked walking sticks!-This post is what NOT to take.Congratualtions on seeing sense!
 

crackmrmac

Veteran Member
Now, this made me laugh out loud!

Johnnie, as a lapsed Catholic I still remember the privacy of Confession :shock: But I can confirm that my pack definitely got lighter and lighter the longer I walked. :D
Irish people often bring their own tea bags abroad. I resisted taking them.

Second time around i brought light plastic cutlery & no cup. Not sure if they would survive a full blown camino.

Brian
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
Hi All,

When I got home from my first Camino, I was unpacking my rucksack and found, in the bottom of one of the side pockets, two rather heavy bungee cords that my dear son, an avid camper and hiker, had put in for me because he felt they were an absolute necesity.... And I had also carried an extremely weighty "leatherman tool" - for those who don't know it is a kind of all around tool, not unlike a swiss army knife, but with fewer useful gadgets and significantly heavier! I was certain it would be inordinately useful... but it ended up at the bottom of the back, unused. I put it back in my car - a much better place for it!

On the matter of the mat - I have carried one, and used it. After walking about 38 km and arriving to the "completo" albergue in Ribadiso, we were offered floor space in the outdoor kitchen and gratefully accepted it. It was a stone floor and the nights were getting very cold. My companions had no mats, but some pilgrims we knew from walking went 'round and collected mats from some of the people who had beds and kindly lent them to us. We had an extra and I gave it to a pilgrim who had been breaking up cardboard boxes so as not to have to sleep on the (very) cold floor. He was incredibly grateful. I know many will disagree and that's ok. I like my mat! :wink:

Buen Camino,
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Nice lists - have to disagree about leaving the swiss knife - I carry one always and use it frequently (how do other people function without one?) and disagree with leaving the umbrella.

Mine is a Fulton Huntsman. Thicker shaft than normal, double ribbed, metal spiked and with a solid wood curved handle (as used by our Royal Family). They are brilliant. Very strong indeed, comfortable to use as a walking stick, excellent rain cover in any weather, perfect sunshade - great for a sunshade when having a snooze and an effective and hilarious dog deterrent. Doesn't look like a weapon but is a serious piece of kit if needing to defend oneself (Google 'walking stick self defence').
Heavier than a walking pole of course but well worth the extra weight. Elegant too - Englishman abroad and all that.

What did I discard? Inflatable pillow :oops:
What did I need? shower/house sandles - those ridiculously light ones.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Things I added on my second and subsequent trips on the Cami

Light umbrella
Titanium cup
Finger nail clippers
Titanium fork and spoon
Swiss army knife with scissors and cork screw
Four ounces of isopropyl alcohol
One ounce of liquid bleach - used twice to kill growth in water tube
Polypro gloves
Needle and thread (never used)
One boot lace
Altus poncho
Gaiters
Very large cotton bandana

Dare I say that you are not REQUIRED to take these items?!
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (May 2009), French Camino (May 2011), Via de la Plata (April/May 2012)
I´m still working on my list for my first Camino, so maybe I shouldn´t comment, but it occurred to me that if I am taking safety pins for attaching any items that need drying to my pack, and needle and thread for blisters, a sewing kit is not really necessary.
Sandra
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Sandra, I take a plastic pill bottle with 4 needles already threaded with different colour cottons. Saves you having to thread them while you are in the albergues.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Sansthing - good tip, if you are taking safety pins, is to take nappy pins (what's a nappy pin in American? diaper fastener?) as they lock shut.

As for sewing kits - anyone who was in the forces or merchant marine would have been issued with a Hussif (means 'housewife') which is a roll and tie to close complete sewing kit. Thing is, they are about independence, self-reliance .. what the New Age folk now name 'at causality'.
I always travel with one though my original one is long gone, I now carry a German army one. It isn't just that buttons fall off it is that you can repair as you go along. I was attacked by a mad cow once and eventually thrown onto a barbed wire fence .. not very nice ... 1st aid kit for me and my hussif for my clothes ... it happens. I've also added leather needles to my kit as the buckle once came off one of my sandals and an ordinary needle wasn't strong enough.

The other thing is, the small things we carry - it isn't all about oneself is it. To be able to help someone else is a fine thing, don't you think? :wink:
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
John - you are wicked!!
I have a black shirt, dark blue shirt, red fleece shirt, and South African Flag shorts. I needed four different colour thread. And, I cannot thread a needle without my specs (can hardly thread them with the specs) so I thread them at home!
I don't wear anything with buttons - too much hassle - and then I'd have to carry spare buttons too? No, no ..... they would push my sub 5kg over the top.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Re: Things you might want to bring on the Camino

A 12" cable tie. Snatch thieves, much more common in places other than the Camino, can be thwarted by using a re-usable cable tie to attach your day bag to your chair, table leg, or bed post.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
sillydoll said:
John - you are wicked!!
I have a black shirt, dark blue shirt, red fleece shirt, and South African Flag shorts. I needed four different colour thread. And, I cannot thread a needle without my specs (can hardly thread them with the specs) so I thread them at home!
I don't wear anything with buttons - too much hassle - and then I'd have to carry spare buttons too? No, no ..... they would push my sub 5kg over the top.

sub 5kg - that's the way to go! does that include the pack Sil? - there are some really light ones available now ...

but think ... if we wore just one colour clothing ........
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Yep Br David - a good, English backpack it is too. The OMM (Original Mountain Marathon) 32Lt Ultralight that weighs about 600gr.
Wear all the same colour? A girl has to colour co-ordinate you know! Black and Blue shirts to match the backpack!

Nope - Spursfan - that includes 2 X 500mls bottles of water
 

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A

Anonymous

Guest
I am so pleased that you have an OMM 32 as that is the choice I've made for my new pack (I use a softpak at the moment, nice pack but 1kg). Definitely think that size is best - my son went off for a year + India and NZ and all with a 32l.

Thing is - if you go to a place that gets cold there tend to be places that sell sweaters and if you go to a place that gets hot they tend to sell shorts ... (etc etc blah blah)

so that water is a kilo .. pack is 600 stripped .. so you take 3.4 - nicely done!

and if you added red socks and a green hat you'd have your flag ... :roll:
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Re: Things I found handy to bring on the Camino

Flowers and some small coins to give to destitute children.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Red shoelaces!
 

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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Gees Falcon - remind me not to step on your toes if we meet on the camino! An airhorn would send me right over the edge!
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (May 2009), French Camino (May 2011), Via de la Plata (April/May 2012)
Thanks Br. David, I meant nappy pins (I´m English!) when I wrote safety pins. My problem is that in these days of disposable nappies I have been unable to find any of those large nappy pins which lock, the shops here in Brazil don´t seem to stock them anymore. I know they sell them at Boots, in England, and I have asked my daughter-in-law to post me some. I wonder what they´ll make of it at the post office if my little parcel gets X-rayed :!:
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
Sansthing said:
My problem is that in these days of disposable nappies I have been unable to find any of those large nappy pins which lock,
What is amazing is that they have come up with some non-pins fasteners for the few parents (my daughter used to go to a 'Nappicino' group where they got together to swap second hand nappies and tips on which of the modern designs are the best) who prefer not to fill holes in the ground with 'disposable' but non-degradeable nappies and continue to use real nappies - these are made of stretchy plastic like a three legged spider. At each end they have a spikey bit, a bit like claws, which hook into the loops of the towelling/terry nappy. The force of the pull back to the middle keeps the claws in the loops and the nappy on. So you might be lucky to find any proper nappy pins even in Boots.

Of course, these fasteners would only work with the triangular nappy fold. I used to do the kite with the end folded up style which needed two pins. I dont think the claw thingy would work so well on that!

Anyway, in an obvious ploy to get back on topic - I wonder whether there is any use for a three legged and clawed spider for the environmentally aware pilgrim?

NB What's the problem with the red laces, Sil? It's only someone showing a little individuality and I don't suppose they weigh any more than black ones?

And don't 'some people' have bright red Altu ponchos?!!!! :lol:
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
Yes, Falcon,
My Son The Camper insisted that I, too, take a whistle. It probably is a good thing... especially if you were to fall down a ravine or something walking in the early morning darkness as I was wont to do!
Buen Camino,
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I started with a whistle, but there was a reason I was glad to be able to get rid of it. I had taken it, not so much for mountain safety, but because I had had one very scary experience cycling in the Loire two years previously. If such a thing happened to me out walking on the Camino, I had decided that some loud whistle blows might bring me some help from fellow walkers. But after about ten days walking from Le Puy, i felt very safe walking in the countryside, and throwing away the whistle was also a way of throwing away some fears.
But if I walk the Aragonese path, I may well take a whistle again for mountain safety!

Margaret
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
I got rid of my walking stick and added two crutches!

Got rid of the nylon cord, soap, maps, extra compeed (too late)

Added one bottle of vinotino...for each liter of water I'd initially carried, and at each supermercado I replaced a new bottle for each one I drank and found that after awhile, not only was my kit lighter...I couldn't remember what I no longer had nor missed.

Buen tinto or blanco Camino
Arn
 

30daystosantiago

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 solo and 2013 with wife and toddler
Extra batteries for a camera...I found plenty of batteries in shops on the Camino. Also saline solution for contact lenses...pharmacies sell this (however, if you have very sensitive eyes and can only use a certain brand, its better to bring a bottle or two)...else wear glasses instead.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
30daystosantiago said:
Extra batteries for a camera...I found plenty of batteries in shops on the Camino.
.....except if you are walking in France and want to use AA Lithium batteries, these were not permitted to be sold in France so you can't buy them anywhere, so bring some spares....
Margaret
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
No Perfume???
¡Que va!
If I hadn't had exactly the same bottle as the wonderful German woman I walked the whole way with (we met just outside Estella) I might have missed a very special opportunity of a "meeting of minds". While she was unpacking her backpack, out came a bottle of Gio perfume. I produced the identical bottle. "Ah," she said wisely, "we are pilgrims second, but we are Women first!"

Perhaps Gio should be a Camino sponsor for the Forum :?:

http://pilgrimagetoheresy.com
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I take perfumed Musk Oil instead of perfume. It helps keep the insects away and has a pleasant perfume.
 

Arn

Moderator
Staff member
Sil stated: Musk Oil instead of perfume
Well, just a minute here!

I was in the suk in Cairo and traipsing the spice bazaar when I cam upon a gentleman selling 'exotic' fragrances. He didn't traffic in the end product, but rather in the oils that many expensive perfumes originated. He had a bar of musk that he said came from a male deer, or stag and was not only a "hidden" essence, but a very powerful aphrodisiac.

So, I went back to the embassy to research his claims. Here's what I found (among other things):

Musk Oil: a substance secreted in a glandular sac under the skin of the abdomen of the male musk deer, having a strong odor, and used in perfumery.

The muskox (Ovibos moschatus) is an Arctic mammal of the Bovidae family, noted for its thick coat and for the strong odor emitted by males, from which its name derives. This musky odor is used to attract females.

Now, I'm sure Sil benefits from the insect avoidance capabilities of the musk oil, but what about the unintended consequences?

Buen is that a Buck snort I hear? Camino,

Arn
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Is THAT why I had those queues of young bucks following me? :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
Ummm...............
the Gio worked fine for me
..... :wink:
 

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