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Three ladies walking need your help

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hi you all
I am sure that these questions are the usual ones but I need everything in one lot.
We are three ladies walking with small health problems, for instance I cannot carry heavy weight on my back, so I would like to know...
Question A:How easy is it to get this network of putting your rucksack in a taxi to take it to the next sleeping point?
Can the rucksack be taken to the albergues and leave them there or is it too risky?

Question B: Could you explain the difference of these routes
1) Sarria, Portomarin, Palas de Rei, Melide, Arzua, Pedrouzo and santiago
Second choice
2) Sarria, Portomarin, lestedo, Coto,Castaneda, Rua and Santiago...I haven't be able to find some of these villages.
Questions 3:
where are the nicest albergues? I am planning to sleep in Albergues and hotels....alternative days to make sure I can sleep.....any recommendations of cheap places, private rooms for three ladies?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Hello there and welcome to the forum!

A. It's easy and costs between €4 and €6 per stage. You can leave your bag at the albergue once you've checked in, but I would not leave anything I can't replace, such as electronics or cash or papers.

B. I'm not sure I understand your question. Those are villages along the route from Sarria to Santiago. The more villages you stop in, the fewer kilometers you walk per day.

C. You are talking about that busiest section of the Camino. There are lots of nice places to book. However, if you're going soon, I'd suggest you get on www.booking.com NOW and make bookings, as places are filling up fast for the Holy Year.

Good luck and Buen Camino!
Annie
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hello there and welcome to the forum!

A. It's easy and costs between €4 and €6 per stage. You can leave your bag at the albergue once you've checked in, but I would not leave anything I can't replace, such as electronics or cash or papers.

B. I'm not sure I understand your question. Those are villages along the route from Sarria to Santiago. The more villages you stop in, the fewer kilometers you walk per day.

C. You are talking about that busiest section of the Camino. There are lots of nice places to book. However, if you're going soon, I'd suggest you get on www.booking.com NOW and make bookings, as places are filling up fast for the Holy Year.

Good luck and Buen Camino!
Annie
Thank you Annie

The rucksuck transport ..is it individually or you get set in a group of bags?

the question 2 is the villages we have been given by tour operators...but we don't know wich one to follow. We want to walk 22 kilometres per day and stay two full days in Santiago
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Hi you three!
Have you seen this site? http://www.gronze.com/camino-de-santiago/caminos/guia-del-camino-frances If you click on the different sections you can see for yourselves where those different villages/towns are. Another way to check them out and perhaps help you decide is this camino distance planner: http://www.godesalco.com/plan/frances

Now I'm guessing *someone* is going to say this, so it might as well be me;-) Are you aware that you don't *need* a tour operator. Of course, if you want one, that is entirely your decision, but it is possible you may not realise that the way is well marked and you'll have no trouble simply turning up in Spain and walking. You can always book accommodation a night or two ahead if that gives you peace of mind, but you may well find that you enjoy being able to choose each day how far to walk. You might end up wanting to go on further than you thought you'd manage. Having that flexibility can be beneficial to many pilgrims.

All the best.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
This depends on the time of year and if you are willing to sleep in albergues or if you want private lodgings. Affordable Private lodgings for the summer are beginning to fill up all the way through September. Because it is a Holy Year, I wouldn't be comfortable just walking into a village and expecting to find a bed if I were slower than a 50 year old. It will be a race for beds on the Sarria to Santiago stretch. You can always find taxis to the next village but for Catholics wanting the Compostela it's going to be a roll of the dice during the summer months in my opinion, because you are required to walk each step.

Most people are fine walking 22-28 kilometers per day. And this section from Sarria to Santiago is fairly flat and easy. I like the first option but I don't know of some of the villages in the second.
 

CykaUJ

Kenyan Heart, Russian Soul, Global Citizen
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago to Muxia Feb 2016
I have booked my first camino through a company called Follow the Camino. They booked all the hotels/guest houses, organised daily pickup/transfer of my luggage. I spent the extra money on this for a couple reasons (yes veterans, feel free to flame me). One being that although I live in the Kenyan bush and am used to long walks without markings and such, I have never done this before and even though the forums and talking with others who have done it is really good, at the end of it, it's how comfortable I feel. Second is that never having been very good at planning things myself, as mentioned above, beds can be difficult to find and I found myself getting frustrated trying to figure it out online from Kenya (where my internet connection isn't great and it took ages for pages to load). Another reason is that because I haven't done it before, combined with no idea what the weather was going to be like and that I tend to be an overpacker anyway, I feel more secure having a decently packed suitcase being transported with probably more than I need, but it means I can keep my backpack a lot lighter and know that I can adjust my layering/jackets/shoes every day. Plus, they also provide a 24 hour number for emergencies or to come get you if you can't go on.

Again, I did this just for a bit of 'insurance', something I probably will forgo the next time once I've done it the first time and have learned how well it's marked, how the albergues work, etc.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Buy a guide, visit a few web sites, and all your questions will be answered. Secret is that this process is the best part of the Camino.
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
I have booked my first camino through a company called Follow the Camino. They booked all the hotels/guest houses, organised daily pickup/transfer of my luggage. I spent the extra money on this for a couple reasons (yes veterans, feel free to flame me). One being that although I live in the Kenyan bush and am used to long walks without markings and such, I have never done this before and even though the forums and talking with others who have done it is really good, at the end of it, it's how comfortable I feel. Second is that never having been very good at planning things myself, as mentioned above, beds can be difficult to find and I found myself getting frustrated trying to figure it out online from Kenya (where my internet connection isn't great and it took ages for pages to load). Another reason is that because I haven't done it before, combined with no idea what the weather was going to be like and that I tend to be an overpacker anyway, I feel more secure having a decently packed suitcase being transported with probably more than I need, but it means I can keep my backpack a lot lighter and know that I can adjust my layering/jackets/shoes every day. Plus, they also provide a 24 hour number for emergencies or to come get you if you can't go on.

Again, I did this just for a bit of 'insurance', something I probably will forgo the next time once I've done it the first time and have learned how well it's marked, how the albergues work, etc.
Buen Camino @CykaUJ! Lots of people do the Camino in this way, so no one will criticise you for using an agency. It sounds like you're all set - as @mspath said, just relax and enjoy what will hopefully be a great experience.

One practical suggestion - Follow the Camino usually includes evening meals in its package, but it's possible to opt out of that aspect. As well as reducing the cost, this might give you more flexibility - especially if you meet others along the way and you would like to dine with them.

Good luck and enjoy every step!
 

CykaUJ

Kenyan Heart, Russian Soul, Global Citizen
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago to Muxia Feb 2016
Buen Camino @CykaUJ! Lots of people do the Camino in this way, so no one will criticise you for using an agency. It sounds like you're all set - as @mspath said, just relax and enjoy what will hopefully be a great experience.

One practical suggestion - Follow the Camino usually includes evening meals in its package, but it's possible to opt out of that aspect. As well as reducing the cost, this might give you more flexibility - especially if you meet others along the way and you would like to dine with them.

Good luck and enjoy every step!
Thank you!

Ahhh I wish I had known that about FtC, I would have for sure opted out. (edit-I just checked my vouchers and it seems that I did opt out...they only say breakfast included) I'm a little cross with them right now because my pack did not arrive to the hotel where I am now, so I have no notes or anything yet.
To be honest though, I am a real introvert, seeing the posts about meeting so many people along the way kind of puts a little fear into me. It's not that I'm completely unfriendly, I don't have resting bitch face, and my friends seem to like me (haha), but I am hesitant to just strike up conversations with people and then feel obligated to spend time with them. This is my one and only fear about the camino. I don't want to be rude to people, but I dread turning someone down for conversation or dining and then seeing them every day on the camino! (hmmm, i'm not really endearing myself here, am I? :( )
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF x 3
I don't believe anyone will say anything negative, @CykaUJ about your choice.

Firstly, it's your Camino experience and your choice! Secondly, everyone who does something the first time will feel nervous to lesser or greater degrees depending on your experiences. Perhaps if you love the experience and decide to go again, you may decide to do things a little differently the 2nd time around. Or maybe not! Hakuna Matata!!

To your second thought, I too am an introvert and can share one of my greatest experiences about the Camino. That is, when you want to walk alone or be alone, people genuinely understood and respected that. Of course, there may always be an exception but from my experience, I was able to walk alone and contemplate anytime I wanted. In the end I made some wonderful, lasting friendships that I still value very much. Everyone has their own unique reason to walk the Camino and so most understand and accept if someone else has a different agenda. I hope you get out of it what you're looking for :D

Buen Camino,
Jordon
 

CykaUJ

Kenyan Heart, Russian Soul, Global Citizen
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago to Muxia Feb 2016
[/QUOTE]
I don't believe anyone will say anything negative, @CykaUJ about your choice.

Firstly, it's your Camino experience and your choice! Secondly, everyone who does something the first time will feel nervous to lesser or greater degrees depending on your experiences. Perhaps if you love the experience and decide to go again, you may decide to do things a little differently the 2nd time around. Or maybe not! Hakuna Matata!!

To your second thought, I too am an introvert and can share one of my greatest experiences about the Camino. That is, when you want to walk alone or be alone, people genuinely understood and respected that. Of course, there may always be an exception but from my experience, I was able to walk alone and contemplate anytime I wanted. In the end I made some wonderful, lasting friendships that I still value very much. Everyone has their own unique reason to walk the Camino and so most understand and accept if someone else has a different agenda. I hope you get out of it what you're looking for :D

Buen Camino,
Jordon
Thank you! I'm somewhat of an expert at appearing to look 'occupied', I have my earbuds in at all times, even if there is no music on. That generally makes people leave me alone. :D

I appreciate very much your insight, and hope that I DO meet a few people along the way that I would like to spend time with when I am feeling social. Very glad to hear that it's a very 'live and let live' vibe out there.

Cyka
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
I have booked my first camino through a company called Follow the Camino. They booked all the hotels/guest houses, organised daily pickup/transfer of my luggage. I spent the extra money on this for a couple reasons (yes veterans, feel free to flame me). One being that although I live in the Kenyan bush and am used to long walks without markings and such, I have never done this before and even though the forums and talking with others who have done it is really good, at the end of it, it's how comfortable I feel. Second is that never having been very good at planning things myself, as mentioned above, beds can be difficult to find and I found myself getting frustrated trying to figure it out online from Kenya (where my internet connection isn't great and it took ages for pages to load). Another reason is that because I haven't done it before, combined with no idea what the weather was going to be like and that I tend to be an overpacker anyway, I feel more secure having a decently packed suitcase being transported with probably more than I need, but it means I can keep my backpack a lot lighter and know that I can adjust my layering/jackets/shoes every day. Plus, they also provide a 24 hour number for emergencies or to come get you if you can't go on.

Again, I did this just for a bit of 'insurance', something I probably will forgo the next time once I've done it the first time and have learned how well it's marked, how the albergues work, etc.
Put the fire extinguisher away! No flames. After you go the first time, you'll feel more confident. Have a wonderful time and let us know how it goes! Perhaps we'll meet you on the "Way".

Buen Camino---

Deb
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Always remember, it is YOUR CAMINO! You will do what is necessary to support your effort as best you can. It is all good.

One of the basic "rules of the Camino" is that no pilgrim is in a position to judge how another pilgrim accomplishes their Camino. There are always unknown factors at play. Needs must...

I wish you a safe, pleasant and wonderful Camino.
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF x 3
Always remember, it is YOUR CAMINO! You will do what is necessary to support your effort as best you can. It is all good.

One of the basic "rules of the Camino" is that no pilgrim is in a position to judge how another pilgrim accomplishes their Camino. There are always unknown factors at play. Needs must...

I wish you a safe, pleasant and wonderful Camino.
I agree - 100%! I would love to see "no juzgues" as the unofficial credo :)
 
Hello there and welcome to the forum!

A. It's easy and costs between €4 and €6 per stage. You can leave your bag at the albergue once you've checked in, but I would not leave anything I can't replace, such as electronics or cash or papers.

B. I'm not sure I understand your question. Those are villages along the route from Sarria to Santiago. The more villages you stop in, the fewer kilometers you walk per day.

C. You are talking about that busiest section of the Camino. There are lots of nice places to book. However, if you're going soon, I'd suggest you get on www.booking.com NOW and make bookings, as places are filling up fast for the Holy Year.

Good luck and Buen Camino!
Annie
Is this a Holy Year? When is the next one?
 

CykaUJ

Kenyan Heart, Russian Soul, Global Citizen
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago to Muxia Feb 2016
CykalJJ,

The only thing for you to do now is to relax and enjoy your camino! Please let us know how it all evolves.

Bon voyage and Buen camino!

MM
Thank you!!
I absolutely will. I will be blogging it daily, link is in my bio. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
The Pope proclaimed 2016 as a Jubilee Year. This is different that a "Holy Year." Formal Holy Years occur when Sanitago's feast day (25 July) falls on a Sunday. The last one was in 2010. The next one falls in 2021.

A Jubilee Year, according to the Papal proclamation, is intended to increase works of mercy and penitential practice across the Catholic faithful, worldwide. It is intended to encourage Catholics to engage in works of mercy, and penitential activities such as pilgrimage. We Catholics hope that our example will induce others to follow our example regarding acts of mercy, and general good behavior.

Thus, and according to the Papal proclamation, a Catholic who completes a pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela during the proclaimed Jubilee Year, is able to gain additional spiritual benefits than might normally be the case in "off years." For example, for those entering the Cathedral through the special Holy Door, then performing the several spiritual exercises specified for Catholics, obtain a plenary indulgence. This is a really BIG deal for observant Catholics.

Simply put, if you accomplish what the Church requirements, your soul is released from all time in Purgatory waiting to be admitted to Heaven. The indulgence dates from your baptism (at which time, we are considered pure and without any stain of sin) through when you completed the necessary requirements for the indulgence during the Jubilee Year (or a Holy Year). That is why this will appeal to many Catholics.

This applies to the Catholic faithful, and is purely a spiritual exercise. I am not in a position to opine on the spiritual effect on non-Catholics. But, I rather suspect that the effect is all good.:)

In any event, this inducement offered by the Pope will cause larger than usual number of pilgrims to walk pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela. In turn, this will increase traffic and demand for all services all along the Camino.

Finally, I do not know which specific Cathedral door has been identified as "THE" Holy Door, but I am certain it will be made known when you arrive at Santiago de Compostela.

I hope this helps...
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hi you three!
Have you seen this site? http://www.gronze.com/camino-de-santiago/caminos/guia-del-camino-frances If you click on the different sections you can see for yourselves where those different villages/towns are. Another way to check them out and perhaps help you decide is this camino distance planner: http://www.godesalco.com/plan/frances

Now I'm guessing *someone* is going to say this, so it might as well be me;-) Are you aware that you don't *need* a tour operator. Of course, if you want one, that is entirely your decision, but it is possible you may not realise that the way is well marked and you'll have no trouble simply turning up in Spain and walking. You can always book accommodation a night or two ahead if that gives you peace of mind, but you may well find that you enjoy being able to choose each day how far to walk. You might end up wanting to go on further than you thought you'd manage. Having that flexibility can be beneficial to many pilgrims.

All the best.
Thank you for the great info it made my life easier to tell my friends.
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Thank you for the great info it made my life easier to tell my friends.
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
I am not sure if I am saying tank you to all of you who has given me great information.
Now is time to buy the flight and organise the hotelfor my friends....I want to sleep in the albergues and the hotels alternative days...I want to look after my friends but at the same time to live the experience of Camino de Santiago
Thank you all
 

aliwalks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
Hi you all
I am sure that these questions are the usual ones but I need everything in one lot.
We are three ladies walking with small health problems, for instance I cannot carry heavy weight on my back, so I would like to know...
Question A:How easy is it to get this network of putting your rucksack in a taxi to take it to the next sleeping point?
Can the rucksack be taken to the albergues and leave them there or is it too risky?

Question B: Could you explain the difference of these routes
1) Sarria, Portomarin, Palas de Rei, Melide, Arzua, Pedrouzo and santiago
Second choice
2) Sarria, Portomarin, lestedo, Coto,Castaneda, Rua and Santiago...I haven't be able to find some of these villages.
Questions 3:
where are the nicest albergues? I am planning to sleep in Albergues and hotels....alternative days to make sure I can sleep.....any recommendations of cheap places, private rooms for three ladies?
Hi I used Jacotrans absolutely no worries. I have only done the first one, and I staye , hostals the entire Camino loved them!
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Finally, I do not know which specific Cathedral door has been identified as "THE" Holy Door, but I am certain it will be made known when you arrive at Santiago de Compostela.
It opens onto Praza Quintana. You can go in, but you cannot go out!! A guard is posted to prevent using it as an exit.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
It opens onto Praza Quintana. You can go in, but you cannot go out!! A guard is posted to prevent using it as an exit.
Isn't it the small metallic looking, beautiflly carved greenish-greyish door near the steps to go up and visit Santiago's statue?
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hi Everybody
I have mycertificate books, my friend is buying the flights and I am responsable for the acomodation for Valos - Brea
we walk 22 kilometres every day. The next one Portela
Do you recomend somewhere to stay around those places? anything particular to see?
Thank you
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hi you three!
Have you seen this site? http://www.gronze.com/camino-de-santiago/caminos/guia-del-camino-frances If you click on the different sections you can see for yourselves where those different villages/towns are. Another way to check them out and perhaps help you decide is this camino distance planner: http://www.godesalco.com/plan/frances

Now I'm guessing *someone* is going to say this, so it might as well be me;-) Are you aware that you don't *need* a tour operator. Of course, if you want one, that is entirely your decision, but it is possible you may not realise that the way is well marked and you'll have no trouble simply turning up in Spain and walking. You can always book accommodation a night or two ahead if that gives you peace of mind, but you may well find that you enjoy being able to choose each day how far to walk. You might end up wanting to go on further than you thought you'd manage. Having that flexibility can be beneficial to many pilgrims.

All the best.
 

kuki

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances
Hi Everybody
I have mycertificate books, my friend is buying the flights and I am responsable for the acomodation for Valos - Brea
we walk 22 kilometres every day. The next one Portela
Do you recommend somewhere to stay around those places? anything particular to see?
Thank you
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
It opens onto Praza Quintana. You can go in, but you cannot go out!! A guard is posted to prevent using it as an exit.
Wow. Holy Doors are only one way? I mean no disrespect but does that mean it doesn't work if you go out of it then complete the rest of the formula? Or if you have qualified for the indulgence then go out of the Holy Door you came in does that negate the indulgence and you have to start again?
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Wow. Holy Doors are only one way? I mean no disrespect but does that mean it doesn't work if you go out of it then complete the rest of the formula? Or if you have qualified for the indulgence then go out of the Holy Door you came in does that negate the indulgence and you have to start again?
It is a curious rule/policy. It may have some basis in tradition, mythology, or superstition. I am curious to know the real answer (your turf, Johnny. Maybe someone in the Pilgrim Office can find the answer).
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I passed freely in and out through the Holy Door in 2004. Multiple times. It may simply be that sometimes there is a long queue of people waiting to get in, and people exiting would interfere with that so they are directed elsewhere.

We seemed to have strayed far from the original question, but as it was asked in January, I assume the OP has her answer.

It is interesting to read @CykaUJ posts in light if her recent posts.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
In January I had the entire Cathedral almost to myself, but the guard prevented me from leaving through the door to the empty Praza da Quintana. I found it very curious, and can relate only my personal experience. I watched the opening of the door on the webcam, and the very long parade of priests all went from the Praza into the Cathedral. I have watched the webcam a few times since, and have not seen anyone leaving, only entering. It may just be zealous guards enforcing a policy that is for summer crowds. Minor functionaries can be very rules-oriented! I had a superstitious roommate once who had to leave a building by the same door he entered. The Holy Door policy would make him catatonic, I think. ;)
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Hi Everybody
I have mycertificate books, my friend is buying the flights and I am responsable for the acomodation for Valos - Brea
we walk 22 kilometres every day. The next one Portela
Do you recommend somewhere to stay around those places? anything particular to see?
Thank you
If you are looking for somewhere at A Brea (Gronze etapa 32) itself there was O Meson on the main road, signed 80mts off the camino - private rooms and private albergue.
I don't recognise the other names but in Arzua the Albergue Quijote had private rooms as well as the albergue (in 2012)
 

lbpierce

Linda Breen Pierce
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
Thank you!

...To be honest though, I am a real introvert, seeing the posts about meeting so many people along the way kind of puts a little fear into me. It's not that I'm completely unfriendly, I don't have resting bitch face, and my friends seem to like me (haha), but I am hesitant to just strike up conversations with people and then feel obligated to spend time with them. This is my one and only fear about the camino. I don't want to be rude to people, but I dread turning someone down for conversation or dining and then seeing them every day on the camino! (hmmm, i'm not really endearing myself here, am I? :( )
I have walked three CF caminos and I felt exactly like you do on my first Camino. I made no friends, ate most of my meals alone, and was in introvert heaven. It was a time in my life I desperately wanted to be alone. And guess what? It was easy. People sensed that about me and I could have a short, casual conversation and not feel pressured to dine with them, etc. It worked really well. On my most recent Camino, I was more social than I am at home and loved every minute of it. But I do think people will sense how social you want to be and not intrude. And there is nothing wrong with telling them, "hey, thanks for invite to dine/get together, but I'm feeling like being alone right now." They will totally get it. Don't worry.
 

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