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Time for Some Trail Runners

Sandra Riordan

Hobart Australia
Camino(s) past & future
Francis 2015, Portuguese 2016, El Norte 2017 & VDLP 2019.
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:

After 4 Caminos I firmly believe trail runners are the best option. I love them and have never had a blister or foot trouble.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
Merrell Moab Ventilators were my trusty loafers for last 2000 Kms and for my October Camino I will be investing in ankle paddling where its worn away but I was close to purchasing these bad boys 🤠
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
I walk in Merrell Trail Gloves - they're got Vibram soles, are very light and dry quickly - most importantly, they're really soft on the heels - for me the Hokas I tried were much too hard at the back of the shoe above the heel and gave me instant blisters
 

Geoff Shepherd

I’m the big fella on the left.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep-Oct 2018, Aug-Sep 2019. Planning May-June 2020.
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:

Try Altra Lone Peak - I used the LP 3.5, but the 4.0 model is out now. A bit hard to get in Oz currently though - new US supplier being sorted soon I hear. The zero drop is great as is the wide toe box. The Altra Timps are good also with more padding underfoot than the LPs. No blisters, lightweight and dry v’quickly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Camino Frances SJPP / 2014 Camino Portugues / 2015 Camino Ingles / 2015 Hospitalero Training
2016 (fall) Camino Sanabre / Hospitalero?
To each their own. Yes I have Hokas and blister free 6 Caminos while my wife feet are never happy. My advice is to be "One with your shoes" before you leave. Style or not wear your chosen footwear everyday for the month before you go. Take care of your feet, stop when you feel them, Vaseline, Compeed, Gold Bond, stick deodorant, if it works great please don't go unprepared. This is a new adventure for most of us.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
As @williamlittig said to each his own. I have worn Brooks Cascadia's for my 4 Caminos and will wear them again in November. As I have stated more than once here, my completely unscientific study of blisters and foot issues have proven, beyond a shadow of a doubt, at least for me :) trail runners are the way to go. Great support, great comfort, light weight, quick to dry, and it seems people have less severe and fewer issues than those wearing boots. But of course if you can get Davebugg to chime in you will be sitting at the feet of the "Master of Feet"
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:


Rob, do you need an extra wide shoe width, or are you comfortable walking in shoes that are the typical 'regular' width? That will help narrow down which Hoka One One model might be worth trying.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Try Altra Lone Peak - I used the LP 3.5, but the 4.0 model is out now. A bit hard to get in Oz currently though - new US supplier being sorted soon I hear. The zero drop is great as is the wide toe box. The Altra Timps are good also with more padding underfoot than the LPs. No blisters, lightweight and dry v’quickly.

:) Altras are very good shoes, but they do require an additional set of evaluation criteria for the user's consideration if they have never worn an Altra shoe before.

For some folks, Altras are just not suitable. The 'zero drop concept' of the shoe's profile can take weeks for some folks to adapt to. Some folks never get used to them or dislike the 'feel'. For many people, they adapt immediately or very quickly and never look back.

I advise everyone that considers Altra, or other manufacturers of zero drop shoes, to allow a good amount of time for a proper evaluation of fit and feel. Even if they feel good out of the box, issues can develop days after one starts using them. This does not apply to those who have already been using zero drop shoes.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
The Stinson ATR may suit you with the cushioning aspect, and it has a more aggressive tread pattern than the Bondi 6. You can compare those two, especially if you want to see how a 'wider' version feels which is only with the Bondi 6.

If you feel like you want a shoe with a bit beefier stability, I tend to like Gaviota 2. . . which is also available in a wider width if needed. It is a bit less 'plush' with cushioning but it has more motion control/stability than the Stinson or Bondi.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
The Stinson ATR may suit you with the cushioning aspect, and it has a more aggressive tread pattern than the Bondi 6. You can compare those two, especially if you want to see how a 'wider' version feels which is only with the Bondi 6.

If you feel like you want a shoe with a bit beefier stability, I tend to like Gaviota 2. . . which is also available in a wider width if needed. It is a bit less 'plush' with cushioning but it has more motion control/stability than the Stinson or Bondi.

Many thanks Dave. I'll go try some.
The extra cushioning sounds good.

I discovered from my Podiatrist, who by the way is based at Sydney Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre (so should know what he's doing I hope, that as we age we lose the natural cushioning on our heels!
 

Ed Aster

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May 2017
Columbia Ventralia out dry mid trail runners, 3 camino’s and superb comfort, great toe box and fantastic cushioning. Waterproof and rugged when you need that extra toughness. Excellent for going downhill and solid for going up.

Buon Camino
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Many thanks Dave. I'll go try some.
The extra cushioning sounds good.

I discovered from my Podiatrist, who by the way is based at Sydney Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre (so should know what he's doing I hope, that as we age we lose the natural cushioning on our heels!

My recommendation for walkers/hikers/backpackers are podiatrists who specialize in sports and with athletes. I'm glad you have access to one :)

The more cushioned Hoka models also seem to be a favorite for Podiatrists to recommend for those with a history of Plantar's Fasciitis.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I have worn Hoka One Ones, Sauconys, Keens, and Asics, and have had good luck and no blisters, but the Hokas are my favorites! You just cannot beat the cushy, springy, marshmellow feel of them underfoot...I love them!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Merrell Moab Ventilators were my trusty loafers for last 2000 Kms and for my October Camino I will be investing in ankle paddling where its worn away but I was close to purchasing these bad boys 🤠
Morrell Moab 2, ankle boot, just tried these on in a Merrell shop and pulled the laces, one of the fasteners pulled straight out and on closer inspection, they are attached to a layer of plastic. Hopeless construction....
 

owms2323

Credential question
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances (2014) Camino Frances (2016) Camino Finisterre/Muxia (2017)
My recommendation for walkers/hikers/backpackers are podiatrists who specialize in sports and with athletes. I'm glad you have access to one :)

The more cushioned Hoka models also seem to be a favorite for Podiatrists to recommend for those with a history of Plantar's Fasciitis.
Any advice for plantar fascitis sufferers?
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
My recommendation for walkers/hikers/backpackers are podiatrists who specialize in sports and with athletes. I'm glad you have access to one :)

The more cushioned Hoka models also seem to be a favorite for Podiatrists to recommend for those with a history of Plantar's Fasciitis.
Haha, I got insoles from a podiatrist, they were too high and I ended up with a stress fracture and lisfrancs joint injury, agonising walking like this. Be very careful, who you choose....I kept on saying, they were too high and the guy said I needed to persist. I was livid. Took me over a year to come kind of right, but only 90% recovered...
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have worn Hoka One Ones, Sauconys, Keens, and Asics, and have had good luck and no blisters, but the Hokas are my favorites! You just cannot beat the cushy, springy, marshmellow feel of them underfoot...I love them!
I agree, they feel wonderful at first, but after an hour of walking, I can't stand the springiness, takes heaps of energy to get back up from the lowest point and my feet hurt. We are all so different...
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I had plantar fasciitis and did the rolling over golfball exercise and then wore stiff soled boots for a while. It lasted for about 3 months, then disappeared...
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I agree, they feel wonderful at first, but after an hour of walking, I can't stand the springiness, takes heaps of energy to get back up from the lowest point and my feet hurt. We are all so different...
Sorry to hear that, Gitti. Yes, our feet are like our bodies...no two people's feet are exactly alike.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Any advice for plantar fascitis sufferers?

This is from an earlier post of mine. It can help, but is focused more on helping prevent PF. Never the less, the exercises are often recommended during the recovery process. :)
---------------------------------------------------

Top Exercises to Help Avoid Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis is a common type of chronic heel pain. It seems to affect young male athletes and middle-aged obese women more than any other group, but that does not mean other groups are immune to it. The inflamed tissue around the heel seems to cause a stabbing-like sensation, which is worse in the morning. This condition may be prevented, and the following exercises will help you do that.

Arch Stretching
Stretching your arch muscles is not too difficult, but the exercise is a little peculiar. The first thing you need to do is take off your shoes and get barefoot, and then place a towel on the floor. Now, simply place your foot on the towel, and curl your toes to clench the towel. Pull the towel toward you, and that is it. Place the towel in front of you again, and repeat. Be sure to do the same for your other foot.

This exercise is typically suggested by professionals for those who actually have plantar fasciitis already, but it can definitely be helpful to everyone. You should try and do this several times a week, but make sure to not overstretch your feet while you’re doing it.

Calf Strengthening
The calf and the tendons surrounding your heel need to be strengthened. A simple exercise that may help you do this is calf raises. What you want to do is stand straight on level ground. You should be barefooted for best traction, but it is not absolutely necessary. Now, all you have to do is lift your heels off the ground so that you are standing on your toes. Stay in this position as long as you can before returning your heels to the ground, and just repeat this at least nine more times.

Another way to do this exercise that works great is to stand at the edge of a stair or curb. You want your toes to be what keeps you on the stair or curb. Then, raise your heels up so that you are on your “tippy toes” and then back down again, but allow your heels to go lower than your toes past the edge of the stair or curb. This exercise allows for a fuller stretch.

Alleviate Pronation
Pronation is a natural part of your foot’s movement. This refers to how the foot rolls and applies pressure when the heel finally hits the ground. Pronation may be normal, but that does not mean the constant shock it receives when you walk or run does not have an effect on it. One way you can alleviate the pressure is to try doming. To do this, just place your foot flat on the ground, and then press your toes on the ground while keeping your heels firmly on the floor. This should create a dome between your heel and toes. Maintain this position for 10 seconds, straighten your foot, and then just start again.

Work the Interossei
The Interossei muscles help support your arch muscles thus preventing this issue. All you have to do is place a large rubber band around your toes for resistance. Then, stretch your toes and hold for 10 seconds. Squeeze your toes for another 10 seconds, and repeat these steps about five to 10 times.

What to Do When Your Feet Are Hurting?
Whether or not you’re at risk of getting Plantar Fasciitis, you’re going to come across a time where you’re feet are going to hurt. Maybe you were standing all day at work, ran a marathon, or whatever. If your feet are hurting, take a break and rest, stretch, and recover. Get off your feet for a little bit and either ice or heat your feet. If you notice any swelling or severe pain, then ice it. If it’s just sore, then apply heat with a hot bath. Then, make sure to rub out the tension and to do some basic exercises. You can try the ones above or do some other types. One popular one is to roll a tennis ball underneath the feet. This helps to preserve the arch and massage it at the same time
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Haha, I got insoles from a podiatrist, they were too high and I ended up with a stress fracture and lisfrancs joint injury, agonising walking like this. Be very careful, who you choose....I kept on saying, they were too high and the guy said I needed to persist. I was livid. Took me over a year to come kind of right, but only 90% recovered...

A Podiatrist friend told me that orthotics are a routine source of income. He believes too many of his colleagues are far too quick to prescribe their use.

Sports Podiatrists are far more attuned to the needs of athletes and hikers, and usually have more training and experience due to their specialty.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
A Podiatrist friend told me that orthotics are a routine source of income. He believes too many of his colleagues are far too quick to prescribe their use.

Sports Podiatrists are far more attuned to the needs of athletes and hikers, and usually have more training and experience due to their specialty.
I did see a sports podiatrist...
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I have had a low arch from youth and a hurting transverse front arch as well.
After three brands of orthodic inlay soles, I have found the right guy to make them,
I use Bauerfeind soles and after 2014 to current date I now have the most perfect wet footprint that I have ever had. almost normal...
I admire it every day..!
The foot is a wondrous construction !!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Does anybody else think that @davebugg 's shoe cupboard must rival Imelda Marcos'? 🥾🥾🥾

You are not far off from the truth, Jeff :)

At one point, I had over 40 pairs of various make and models of everything from trail runners to mountaineering boots stashed in a few storage tubs. When a company has me test a shoe, they usually have me keep them. If something is really negative about a shoe in my reports, the company sometimes will want them back to do a close inspection as part of their QA process, comparing my reported observations with what they actually see on the shoe.

At any rate, I usually end up donating them to one of the homeless Mission shelters in town, IF they clean up well and are not exhibiting too much wear and tear. I've even given a couple away to Forum members :)

You should see the amount of shoes and insoles I have around the house from Amazon and REI when I need to replace my own shoes. Thank goodness for the easy return process. :)
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
Morrell Moab 2, ankle boot, just tried these on in a Merrell shop and pulled the laces, one of the fasteners pulled straight out and on closer inspection, they are attached to a layer of plastic. Hopeless construction....
Haha, sounds like somebody's had their weetabix. Can't comment on the ankle boot version. Mine is a walking shoe and having walked 2,000 Kms over varied terrain, laces still intact, eyelid's still as good as new, no plastic coming off shoe, and only wear is the fabric at the heel which can be expected after putting feet in and out several hundred time's, a shoe horn should really be used. My trusty loafers were £55 and in my opinion present excellent value for money. Some alternatives costs 3 time's this and would they perform any better 🤔What's your footwear of choice?
 
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willydp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Inglés June 2019
To do: C Primitivo June 202x :(
I use the BONDI 6 and had no problems from the start. No problems on the Inglés neither.
I recently bought the Altra LP 4 and they need adjustment time.
Walked around 2,5 weeks and I now have pain in my right knee and tibia pain in both legs.
Took the Bondi 6 today and will see if it gets better or not.
Will try again later to see if problem comes back or not.
So train well before you start 😉
And yes, we all have different feet 🙃
Buen Camino
 

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
How much cushioning is too much? Here is an interesting study to consider.
  • New research published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine investigated whether runners’ biomechanics change after they train in maximalist shoes for six weeks.
  • The study found that even after becoming acclimated to the mega-cushioned shoes, the runners’ biomechanics stayed the same, and their bodies continued to absorb more impact while running in maximalist shoes compared to regular trainers.
The study found that the Hokas caused greater impact forces and loading rates than the New Balances both before and after the six-week period. Why do these forces matter? Well, common sense tells us that the more the impact our legs and feet absorb, the higher our injury risk.

But here’s the tricky part: While the load may be greater overall in maximalist shoes, it’s absorbed by different body parts than more minimal shoes.

“We’re probably not lowering injury rates with different shoe types, we’re just choosing different injuries,” Richard Willy, Ph.D., a physical therapy and rehabilitation science professor at University of Montana who was not involved in the study, told Runner’s World.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
How much cushioning is too much? Here is an interesting study to consider.
  • New research published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine investigated whether runners’ biomechanics change after they train in maximalist shoes for six weeks.
  • The study found that even after becoming acclimated to the mega-cushioned shoes, the runners’ biomechanics stayed the same, and their bodies continued to absorb more impact while running in maximalist shoes compared to regular trainers.
The study found that the Hokas caused greater impact forces and loading rates than the New Balances both before and after the six-week period. Why do these forces matter? Well, common sense tells us that the more the impact our legs and feet absorb, the higher our injury risk.

But here’s the tricky part: While the load may be greater overall in maximalist shoes, it’s absorbed by different body parts than more minimal shoes.

“We’re probably not lowering injury rates with different shoe types, we’re just choosing different injuries,” Richard Willy, Ph.D., a physical therapy and rehabilitation science professor at University of Montana who was not involved in the study, told Runner’s World.
Had to Google "maximalist" to convince myself it's a real word. Any idea of the effect on the body of walking in thick soled shoes as opposed to running in them?
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
Have walked two Caminos in HOKAs and had totally fine results. No blisters. No problems. Would also join in recommending Stinson or Bondi. My first ones were Cliftons and I actually needed a wider foot bed, especially on the Camino. I bought insoles for them and found that they worked better for me without them. Simply used the HOKA insole they came with.
 

Carlos Capacete

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked from Villafranca del Bierzo to Santiago on Sep 2017. Want to do SJPP to Burgos spring 2018
the Hokas are my favorites! You just cannot beat the cushy, springy, marshmellow feel of them underfoot...I love them!

The Hokas work great in the Camino. My only concern (based on my experience) is that you can wear out the treads. If you’re doing a shorter Camino, by all means do the Holas, not in my opinion they’re not suitable for a 35 Day Camino.
 

bikerkvw

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Inglish, Camino de la Plata. Future Camino Francis
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:

I being my 5th camino in 10 days. I use to use Keen Tarhee III hiking boots. I now use Hoka Stinson ATR something. I love them. I am bring two pair with me. I will be switching out each week. I am walking a longer Camino combining the Frances with the Sanabrea. My total distance will be about 1100 kms. I love these Trail Runners. It took me two weeks to get use to the feel. I have great support in them. In my training I have only walked 6 miles in them. However, my feet do not hurt nor do I have hot spots. I wear Darn Tough ankle high socks. Buen Camino
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Not all Hoka One Ones fit the same way, not all have the same level of cushioning, and tread patterns differ.

I have Hoka's Clifton 5, a Bondi 6 Wide and I test drove the Challenger. Each fit slightly differently and each had some advantages over the other between cushioning and tread. Any would be fine on camino, imho, as long as the fit is great. The Clifton's arch support is positioned perfectly for me but I would get the wide version for camino use. The Bondi is more neutral but more cushioned and -for me- will likely get used with an alternate insole. The Challenger went back to the store as it wasn't perfect, but I had liked that it was wider and had some cushioning.

I have Altras Lone Peak 4s which I'm slowly acclimating to ... these might be my favourites.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
:) Altras are very good shoes, but they do require an additional set of evaluation criteria for the user's consideration if they have never worn an Altra shoe before.

For some folks, Altras are just not suitable. The 'zero drop concept' of the shoe's profile can take weeks for some folks to adapt to. Some folks never get used to them or dislike the 'feel'. For many people, they adapt immediately or very quickly and never look back.

I advise everyone that considers Altra, or other manufacturers of zero drop shoes, to allow a good amount of time for a proper evaluation of fit and feel. Even if they feel good out of the box, issues can develop days after one starts using them. This does not apply to those who have already been using zero drop shoes.
Dave, as you know I am in love with my Altras and owe it all to you. But I have a curiosity question. I used my silicone orthotics instead of the insole the shoes come with and had absolutely no ill effects. Is there typically a problem with upsetting the zero drop feature by adding orthotics?
 

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Had to Google "maximalist" to convince myself it's a real word. Any idea of the effect on the body of walking in thick soled shoes as opposed to running in them?
Most studies are done on runners, but the results can apply to walkers to a lesser extent.
I personally prefer a shoe with enough cushioning that still allows for a minimal feel of the surface.
The feel of the surface is important in sending neural signals to the brain, in return for the brain to control balance, movement, and coordination (how your muscles work together), minimizing injuries.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
:) Altras are very good shoes, but they do require an additional set of evaluation criteria for the user's consideration if they have never worn an Altra shoe before.

For some folks, Altras are just not suitable. The 'zero drop concept' of the shoe's profile can take weeks for some folks to adapt to. Some folks never get used to them or dislike the 'feel'. For many people, they adapt immediately or very quickly and never look back.

I advise everyone that considers Altra, or other manufacturers of zero drop shoes, to allow a good amount of time for a proper evaluation of fit and feel. Even if they feel good out of the box, issues can develop days after one starts using them. This does not apply to those who have already been using zero drop shoes.

Okay... this may or may not be a dumb question but I need to know (since I am still looking for a shoe/boot to work for my next Camino. What is "zero drop" vs. and other "drop". What's "drop"?
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Okay... this may or may not be a dumb question but I need to know (since I am still looking for a shoe/boot to work for my next Camino. What is "zero drop" vs. and other "drop". What's "drop"?

Traditional shoes have a profile where the toes will sit a tiny bit lower than the heel. The amount varies based on the profile of the footwear. A most extreme example would be the high heels of a woman's shoe.

Zero Drop means that the heel and toe sit at the same plain. Neither the toes or the heel sit higher than the other.

Hope this helps lessen the confusion of the terminology :)
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Dave, as you know I am in love with my Altras and owe it all to you. But I have a curiosity question. I used my silicone orthotics instead of the insole the shoes come with and had absolutely no ill effects. Is there typically a problem with upsetting the zero drop feature by adding orthotics?

Not really. Sometimes going away from the zero drop aspect of the shoe can feel a bit strange, but stresses to the foot and ankle structures should not be an issue. It COULD affect the profile of the shoe, though. Adding an insole or orthotic might change the zero drop aspect and make it more like a traditional shoe.

It just depends on the product.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
After 4 Caminos I firmly believe trail runners are the best option. I love them and have never had a blister or foot trouble.

Best I've used so far is Asics Gel-Sonoma GTX. I pair them with sandals though. So every time my feet gets hot I switch to sandals. But shoes are really individual and you just have to try. And what works at home might not work on the Camino.

The Asics Gel-Sonoma GTX is the most comfortable trail runners I've used so far. And they last about 3 times longer than other trail runners I've tried so far. And they become more comfortable the more you use them as well.
 

G3n0

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
no
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:

I had a great Camino, April 2019, in Hoka Speedgoats. Not only was the walk blister free but I never even felt a hot spot. I wore Darn tough merino socks with them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I used Asics GEL-SONOMA 4 (4E WIDEST) trail runners on the Frances and had no blisters. I loved them. I am a typical Kiwi from the 50's and so I never wore shoes at all until I was 6 years old and then only if I was going somewhere special or the ice on the ground was too thick. As a result my feet tend to over pronate. Usually I have used walking shoes that correct my over pronation but walking my Camino I didn't find that I had a problem. The extra wide probably helped my pronation and also allowed for heat expansion of my feet while retaining a firm fit around my ankles to stop my feet sliding down my shoes when I walk downhill.
 

camino.ninja

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 5 6,16,17,18,19,20
Primiti+Salvador 19
Portug. 17,18,20
Catalan 17
Norte 17
Plata 18
I used Asics GEL-SONOMA 4 (4E WIDEST) trail runners on the Frances and had no blisters. I loved them. I am a typical Kiwi from the 50's and so I never wore shoes at all until I was 6 years old and then only if I was going somewhere special or the ice on the ground was too thick. As a result my feet tend to over pronate. Usually I have used walking shoes that correct my over pronation but walking my Camino I didn't find that I had a problem. The extra wide probably helped my pronation and also allowed for heat expansion of my feet while retaining a firm fit around my ankles to stop my feet sliding down my shoes when I walk downhill.

I have a regular foot and they where wide enough in the forefoot to expand ...just the regular with ones. And I usually have to get the wide ones. Also they expand ...they are not fixed in the forefoot like most trail runners.
 

VAtoNC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
305 miles of the Frances, 2019. Planning another Frances 4/20 and will go the distance this time!
I have worn Hoka One Ones, Sauconys, Keens, and Asics, and have had good luck and no blisters, but the Hokas are my favorites! You just cannot beat the cushy, springy, marshmellow feel of them underfoot...I love them!
I've been going back and forth between my trusty Lowa Renegades and Hoka One One's, and I've decided to stick with my Lowa's. I find that the trail runners are too "squishy" for my feet, meaning I don't feel the stability I do in my boots. As everyone says it's an individual decision.
 

Pilgy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Francés April 06, C. Fisterre May 06, C. Frances Oct 17, C. Portuguese Oct 18, C. Inglese Nov 18
I have worn Hoka One Ones, Sauconys, Keens, and Asics, and have had good luck and no blisters, but the Hokas are my favorites! You just cannot beat the cushy, springy, marshmellow feel of them underfoot...I love them!
Hmmm, its the cushy feeling of the Altras that I really dislike actually! I feel as if all my momentum is lost in the sponginess. And then there is the dreaded zero drop which I find to be tiring.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Hmmm, its the cushy feeling of the Altras that I really dislike actually! I feel as if all my momentum is lost in the sponginess. And then there is the dreaded zero drop which I find to be tiring.
I never noticed any zero drop...guess I didn't pay attention. All feet are different. The Hokas served me well!
 
Camino(s) past & future
August 2015
Having walked 3 Caminos in Salomon Lightweight Boots it's time for a change. To Trail Runners.

@davebugg These are the Hokas available in Sydney. Models keep changing.
Which would you recommend? :oops:

I wore Hoka Torrent men’s trail runners for my third Camino and only had one small blister. Usually I get tons. Good luck and Buen Camino.
 

jrenner

camino Frances SEPT 18
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Sept - Oct (2018)
Brooks Cascadia 13 and merino wool socks kept all blisters at bay and the sole plates kept my foot bed unbruised. Can't recommend this combo enough. >1000km including pre-camino walks.
 

terryvinet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '13, VDLP '16, Salamanca to Santiago/Finesterra/Muxia '17, Madrid/San Salvador '19.

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member

Behold the very pinnacle of bi-pedal locomotive technology. 😉

Uh, oh. Given our very convoluted and prolonged discussion of trademarks and buffs, I wonder if the Fat Tire shoe is going to have a problem?!

 

crbonade

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo (2020)
I have had a low arch from youth and a hurting transverse front arch as well.
After three brands of orthodic inlay soles, I have found the right guy to make them,
I use Bauerfeind soles and after 2014 to current date I now have the most perfect wet footprint that I have ever had. almost normal...
I admire it every day..!
The foot is a wondrous construction !!

The Bauerfeind ViscoPed insoles? (I'm experimenting with different insoles right now, might give these a try)
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
nope, thissa one:

20190813_190709.jpg

different density zones; white is the hardest area, holds in the rim of the heel;
the dark blue area, mid density, for the pelota for front arch,
- and lighter blue for low density..
This distrubution, my feet can comprehend.
This is the one for the hardest load on the foot model .
Like you I have tried heat moulded insoles, premade run of the mill, off the shelf ones.
But these work for me. Low tech and practical...
And then there´s the orthodopist who can read my feet, of course,
Bless him!!
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
Traditional shoes have a profile where the toes will sit a tiny bit lower than the heel. The amount varies based on the profile of the footwear. A most extreme example would be the high heels of a woman's shoe.

Zero Drop means that the heel and toe sit at the same plain. Neither the toes or the heel sit higher than the other.

Hope this helps lessen the confusion of the terminology :)

It certainly does help lessen the confusion. Now I feel more "in the know" ;) Thanks much!
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
I agree, they feel wonderful at first, but after an hour of walking, I can't stand the springiness, takes heaps of energy to get back up from the lowest point and my feet hurt. We are all so different...

I wondered about all that cushiness and springiness... this helps to know the downsides. I have never hiked anywhere in anything but boots, both hi and low, and walking on what sounds like marshmallows is a new concept to me. I'll have to try them out, though, before saying no. My pastor highly recommended Hokas this past Sunday. He walked the Camino Norte in them, although he wore them out before finishing and had to buy something different to complete his walk. Yes, we are all so different.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
I've been going back and forth between my trusty Lowa Renegades and Hoka One One's, and I've decided to stick with my Lowa's. I find that the trail runners are too "squishy" for my feet, meaning I don't feel the stability I do in my boots. As everyone says it's an individual decision.

Thank you for this. I just responded to another post about the "squishy" marshmallow feel. I've always liked the stability of a boot, but I ended up with bursitis in both heels in 2017 and couldn't finish. I've been trying anything and everything since. Love REI's return policy. So far my feet haven't taken to anything. I have to come up with something to try and to break in by summer 2020. The blisters don't scare me (didn't have any), but the bursitis was more than I could deal with 😫
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Many thanks Dave. I'll go try some.

The extra cushioning sounds good.

I discovered from my Podiatrist, who by the way is based at Sydney Olympic Park Sports Medicine Centre (so should know what he's doing I hope, that as we age we lose the natural cushioning on our heels!

Just a thought @davebugg .

With this style of trail runner, I presume your feet get wet when it rains! :eek:

Wet feet.............must lead to blisters? Never had blisters yet, and don't want them.

I just noticed this pic come up, and it reminded me that Pat and I have worn waterproof boots to date. Whilst she looks like a 'drowned rat', totally dry on the inside..........
Am I swapping boots for shoes to gain one thing and lose another I wonder? :rolleyes:

 

Evelinek77

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles to Estella in 2010, O Cebreiro to Santiago in 2011, Saint Jean to Santiago 2020
Any advice for plantar fascitis sufferers?
Look for an osteopath, my plantar fasciitis was a result of poor blood flow that started on my left hip! Blood flow restored, plantar fasciitis gone instantly!
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
I wore lightweight boots on the Camino three years ago and got a few blisters. This last time (2 months ago) I wore trail runners and they were lots better. My Camino was dry all the way to Fisterra except for the one day between Roncesvalles and Zubiri when it rained steadily all day and I was walking in water all of the way. I got one very small blister on the end of my big toe which I think was the result of the very wet shoes. From now on it is trail runners for me every time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
Just a thought @davebugg .

With this style of trail runner, I presume your feet get wet when it rains! :eek:

Wet feet.............must lead to blisters? Never had blisters yet, and don't want them.

I just noticed this pic come up, and it reminded me that Pat and I have worn waterproof boots to date. Whilst she looks like a 'drowned rat', totally dry on the inside..........
Am I swapping boots for shoes to gain one thing and lose another I wonder? :rolleyes:

I wore trail runners and got very wet for two days between Roncesvalles and Pamplona and somewhat wet on two other days on my Camino that started 14 May 2019. I didn't get any blisters from wet feet.

Certainly, when your feet are wet (and your skin is soft) then you are more likely to get blisters, if you have shoes of any sort that rub. However, wet trail runners does not equal blisters, which you seem to be saying.

I purposely buy non-waterproof shoes for hiking. I do this because all shoes, even waterproof ones will get wet inside when walking in constant rain. The water gets in from the top of the shoe as it inevitably drains down your legs and pants. With waterproof shoes that water then has no way of getting out and so you end up walking in a bucket of water until you can dry your shoes and socks.

With non-waterproof shoes, I find that my walking squishes the water out and if it stops raining then the heat from my feet dries my shoes and socks enough to be comfortable.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
How much cushioning is too much? Here is an interesting study to consider.
  • New research published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine investigated whether runners’ biomechanics change after they train in maximalist shoes for six weeks.
  • The study found that even after becoming acclimated to the mega-cushioned shoes, the runners’ biomechanics stayed the same, and their bodies continued to absorb more impact while running in maximalist shoes compared to regular trainers.
The study found that the Hokas caused greater impact forces and loading rates than the New Balances both before and after the six-week period. Why do these forces matter? Well, common sense tells us that the more the impact our legs and feet absorb, the higher our injury risk.

But here’s the tricky part: While the load may be greater overall in maximalist shoes, it’s absorbed by different body parts than more minimal shoes.

“We’re probably not lowering injury rates with different shoe types, we’re just choosing different injuries,” Richard Willy, Ph.D., a physical therapy and rehabilitation science professor at University of Montana who was not involved in the study, told Runner’s World.

A couple of observations:
1. The focus of the studies are on runners, not on backpackers or other walkers. The biomechanics are significantly different between runners and walkers, including the amount of loading and impact forces experienced. The study datasets do not readily transfer for walkers. For running and runners, I do share the same concerns raised by the reports, but not for walkers.

2. The primary benefit of the ultra-cushioning is to reduce the aggravation of a variety of foot issues. For instance, Plantars Fasciitis prevention and recovery may benefit from ultra cushioned shoes like the Bondi.

For those who are doing long distance walking, this can make a difference in comfort levels of the feet, like high levels of ache in the forefeet. This report details why this is the case (" "Statistically significant decreases were seen in all plantar loading variables under the total foot and forefoot in the maximalist shoe when compared to the minimalist shoe (p < .003). )

My belief is that for those who choose an ultra cushioned shoe will find overall benefits to wearing them IF they find them agreeable and comfortable to wear. As with Zero Drop concept shoes, it can take a short adjustment period to get comfortable with them because they can really 'feel' different. So while a break in period is not needed for the shoe, there can be a bit of adjustment for the user. So give them a good try out indoors before taking them outdoors in case you need to return them.

Ultra cushioned shoes also are excellent at absorbing trail debris and pokey stuff so that it greatly lessens or eliminates the impact to foot; this eliminates the need for a rock plate or rock shield in the shoe..
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Just a thought @davebugg .

With this style of trail runner, I presume your feet get wet when it rains! :eek:

Wet feet.............must lead to blisters? Never had blisters yet, and don't want them.

I just noticed this pic come up, and it reminded me that Pat and I have worn waterproof boots to date. Whilst she looks like a 'drowned rat', totally dry on the inside..........
Am I swapping boots for shoes to gain one thing and lose another I wonder? :rolleyes:


Sorry I missed this post, Rob. Baseline: no, wet feet do not mean that blistering is inevitable. Here is the repost of guidelines I follow for wet weather walking. Perhaps it may help as your consider your footwear options :)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Water will can enter trail runner shoes, hiking shoes, or backpacking boots through any opening during a rainstorm, or when walking through wet grass and brush, or they get drenched if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:
  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I purposely buy non-waterproof shoes for hiking. I do this because all shoes, even waterproof ones will get wet inside when walking in constant rain. The water gets in from the top of the shoe as it inevitably drains down your legs and pants. With waterproof shoes that water then has no way of getting out and so you end up walking in a bucket of water until you can dry your shoes and socks.

I'm sure that was your experience, though not mine.
My waterproof Salomon boots are.........waterproof.
The cuffs of my rain pants hang down over the boots so water doesn't really enter the boots from the top.
They get 'damp' inside, but that is more from sweat.
Hence my question about 'wet' feet.
In three Caminos and lots of rain, I've avoided getting my feet wet.....
But will try out the trail runners here at home..........
Maybe dunk my feet in a stream and see how they feel walking 'wet'.......
 

JeanFremantle

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
None but long sections long distance trails- Lycian Way and Bibbmulum Track.
“Way of St Francis”
I’m interested in mention of Goop salve. Does anyone know if you can buy in Australia? Or is there an alternative? Thanks.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm sure that was your experience, though not mine.
My waterproof Salomon boots are.........waterproof.
The cuffs of my rain pants hang down over the boots so water doesn't really enter the boots from the top.
They get 'damp' inside, but that is more from sweat.
Hence my question about 'wet' feet.
In three Caminos and lots of rain, I've avoided getting my feet wet.....
But will try out the trail runners here at home..........
Maybe dunk my feet in a stream and see how they feel walking 'wet'.......
I think that's a great idea, Robo. Douse your feet wearing trail runners in water, even with a hose at home and go for a long walk. I was surprised that I didn't mind water squishing out of the woven tops of my shoes in camino downpours!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I’m interested in mention of Goop salve. Does anyone know if you can buy in Australia? Or is there an alternative? Thanks.

The 'goop' is a generic label for several types of coatings one may use. Their singular feature is that they have a 'waxier' consistency usually because of added beeswax, lanolin or both. Here are some examples:






 

JeanFremantle

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
None but long sections long distance trails- Lycian Way and Bibbmulum Track.
“Way of St Francis”
Thanks Dave for that clarification plus your comprehension and informative answer to what to do with wet feet. I didn’t get any blisters on the Lycian Way in my favourite Salomon light weight boots ( needed on such rocky terrain). But may face some wet days on our upcoming walk on Way of St Francis- I’ve noted to take an extra pair of inner soles which weigh nothing. Many thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Rob, do you need an extra wide shoe width, or are you comfortable walking in shoes that are the typical 'regular' width? That will help narrow down which Hoka One One model might be worth trying.

OK @davebugg What's your latest view on Hoka Shoes ? :)

Whilst my next Camino is sadly still 2 years away, I need a bit of motivation to start losing weight and getting fitter.

So some new shoes should do the trick.

I'd like to try out some Hoka shoes walking to work.

Do you still recommend the Bondi 6?

I've previously used mid height Salomon boots which I really love, but I think it's wise to lose the extra weight. (Salomon Boots 950 gms Hoka looks like 300 gms. or is that per shoe?) Strangely, whilst most people don't like gortex foot wear I loved them. My feet never got wet, socks were never wet, never got blisters......... Maybe I should stick with them ! :oops:

Is it worth spraying the Hoka with a waterproofing agent? I suspect not as it might not 'breath' like Gortex.
 
Last edited:

willydp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Inglés June 2019
To do: C Primitivo June 202x :(
It is 620g for the pair 😉
They feel super light, very breathable, shock-absorbing...like walking on clouds, but keeping the shoe stable.
Not waterproof, but quick drying.
I use Merino socks so always a dry feeling.
I used them on the Camino Inglés last year in June. Very comfortable and the 2 hours rain...quick dry again.
I used Goretex boots before and would only use them again in April or May.
But offcourse, my feet are not your feet 😉
Good luck.
 

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