Search 57,387 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

Traditions on the Ingles?

nackyann

New Member
Past OR future Camino
CF (2003)
I am assuming that the CF being the oldest/most traveled route is the only one with traditions and symbolic gestures. Are there any traditions specific to the Ingles or other route, for that matter?
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
The most famous festival on the Inglés is Os Caneiros (you can google to see photos), days 18 and 25 August A big balloon is released and boats sail river Mandeo to the festival field with a lot of wine involved.
In Betanzos is famous the tortilla de patata with more eggs than usual and orujo is also good.
 
Past OR future Camino
2012
The Camino Frances is by no means the oldest route, see Primitivo, but is certainly the most travelled in modern times. The Ingles gets its name from the English pilgrims who were unable to walk through France during the three hundred years that England was at war with France, France was at war with the English or even the French were at war with the French. Part of this period was known as the Enlightenment but that's one for historians rather than this Forum. English pilgrims would make their way by boat to ports on the North coast of Spain, including to Ferrol and A Coruna but as far east as Bilboa and make their foot pilgrimage from there. Of course that could not occur during the near 100 years that the English were at war with the Spanish ( and contrariwise) but English pilgrims who had managed to walk through France at that time had generally acquired enough French to pass themselves off when necessary.

My favourite tradition of the modern Camino is this one: walk, eat, sleep, repeat. And give thanks to all the gods that you can.

And @Pelegrin is right, Orujo is also good.
 

TerryB

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Norte/Primitivo (April/May) 2009: Norte/Primitivo (parts) (April/May) 2010: Inglés (May) 2011: Primitivo (April/May) 2012: Norte / Camino de La Reina (April/May) 2013: Camino del Mar / Inglés (May/June) 2015
I am assuming that the CF being the oldest/most traveled route is the only one with traditions and symbolic gestures. Are there any traditions specific to the Ingles or other route, for that matter?

There is an old tradition of pausing at daybreak, mid-day and sunset to say the Angelus. On the Camino del Norte especially there are a number of "Capillas de Animas" dedicated to this. These pics are of various "Capillas" between Santander and Oviedo. The middle one is very small, not much more than a meter in height. They seem to be a feature of the Camino routes through Asturias, most common on the Norte, Primitivo and the Salvador. They are often in the middle of nowhere and would seem to mark the course of the ancient Pilgrims' Way.

318.JPG 324.JPG DSCF0182.JPG

Blessings
Tio Tel
 

nackyann

New Member
Past OR future Camino
CF (2003)
Thank you, for your replies (and so quickly!) Yes, Tincatinker, I realize you are right about the Primativo. It's the Frances that gets all the hubbub and the one we hear the most about with all the "mystique" which is why I was wondering if the Ingles (and other routes) had their own specific traditions, because I hadn't heard of any. Thanks Pelerin for the festival info too. Tio Tel thanks for the photos and info on the capillas, I didn't know about them! In India I saw tiny little places like these (I'm sure they have a name) at street intersections and other places where (I'm assuming Hindus or others) could pop in to pray or meditate. I loved that--it reminded me to think of the Divine whenever I saw one.
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 101 ratings
Downloads
15,194
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,873
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,673
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top