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travel plan from australia

Year of past OR future Camino
Hoping to go in April (2014)
I am hoping to do the walk from france to santiago in 2014. Ifound some details earlier but lost them. So i think it was fly into france them train to st john pied de port(?) if someone could clarify this and give more detail that would be great.
Also my sister is a very fit person who has walked the bib track, coast to coast, and others. I am not so fit but aim to just take my time and bring a small tent in case i d ont make the refuge in time. When i told her yesterday of my plan she actually sneered at me and said: "i hate to tell you this dear but there is no way you could carry a backpack.'" Now of course i shall do it if i have to crawl. So tell me are any other folk doing this without having a super level of fitness.
Thanks for reading this
 
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MeganG22

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-->SdC
(Oct3-Nov3 2012)
Pamplona-->SdC
(Oct1-Oct29 2014)
Upcoming!
Pamplona-->SdC
May 1-? 2017
Hello there-

The "main" starting point is indeed St Jean Pied de Port in France. You can take a train there from many other places in France and shouldn't have a problem searching on the main train sites online.

I do not think you need a tent. There are many MANY towns along the way and plenty of albergues to stay in. Eventually you will hit some 17kilometer stretches where there is nothing but you should be in shape enough by that point to make it without a problem. (Oh, um, the first day is a 20 kilometer stretch up and over the Pyrenees, I almost forgot about that :roll: But you also have the option of taking "the lower route" instead and will end up at the same destination that day.)

Since you are not starting until 2014, I say just start walking. Just take walks in the next year, maybe do some hiking.... just to get your feet in shape and so you're not shocking your system when you start the Way. There are people from all over the world, in all sorts of shape, who do this walk each year. It may be hard for the first week or two, but your body will adjust and you will be fine.

YOU WILL BE FINE :D
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Hoping to go in April (2014)
Thanks for your reply. Two reasons for the tent idea were one: worried that i might not make it to the refuge and two: i would rather sleep outside the refuge (when i get to one) as i have problems sleeping and snoring would have awake all night! But it seems the extra weight could be a problem. I see on the site that some use a tarp using theire poles but i have no idea how one would do that. Any thoughts.
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
Earplugs are much lighter than a backpack :). Most hostels won't accommodate tent pilgrims :(
 

MeganG22

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-->SdC
(Oct3-Nov3 2012)
Pamplona-->SdC
(Oct1-Oct29 2014)
Upcoming!
Pamplona-->SdC
May 1-? 2017
travelingtrish said:
Thanks for your reply. Two reasons for the tent idea were one: worried that i might not make it to the refuge and two: i would rather sleep outside the refuge (when i get to one) as i have problems sleeping and snoring would have awake all night! But it seems the extra weight could be a problem. I see on the site that some use a tarp using theire poles but i have no idea how one would do that. Any thoughts.


Does this mean YOU snore or others snoring will bother you? If you yourself snore, I wouldn't worry about it. Many people snore in albergues and it's just part of the overall experience. However, that being said, if you have problems sleeping with other noise, then yes, the albergues may be difficult for you. I always considered myself a light sleeper and easily awakened, but earplugs worked amazingly for me on my walk.
I don't know anything about your budget or personal preferences (perhaps you WANT to tent along the way?) but there are also always private rooms available in either albergues or hostales/pensiones along the way.
 
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max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
travelingtrish said:
I am hoping to do the walk from france to santiago in 2014. Ifound some details earlier but lost them. So i think it was fly into france them train to st john pied de port(?) if someone could clarify this and give more detail that would be great.
Also my sister is a very fit person who has walked the bib track, coast to coast, and others. I am not so fit but aim to just take my time and bring a small tent in case i d ont make the refuge in time. When i told her yesterday of my plan she actually sneered at me and said: "i hate to tell you this dear but there is no way you could carry a backpack.'" Now of course i shall do it if i have to crawl. So tell me are any other folk doing this without having a super level of fitness.
Thanks for reading this

I have asked so many questions and read so many comment etc on here. This site is a wealth of experience and options. I am coming from western Australia. When reading these forums, the advice is different because people don't mention what time of year they walked.(As a rule) Our USA friends use seasons to indicate time where as us Australians use the Month in order to keep it universal. When you and I read "spring" we would not have a clue when spring in in the USA(For example). Another important note is, different people have different time frames and have different backgrounds. You and I, as Australians hare brought up to be self sufficient and ALWAYS carry extra water etc. This is foreign to us not carry 450ml of water on a long trek and HOPE we can find potable water later. I say this because most pilgrims are based on just having the absolute minimum to get from A to B with no emergency supplies or backup. This took me a while to realise, and to adjust my way of thinking when looking into the Camino. Another important note is the time frame you have off work. The whole trip can be done in 30 days. Even above it says you need to get to the "first" point in one day or go the low road, which still requires an uphill climb to reach the same endpoint altitude. The messages I have got from others who have done this trip a few times is... take two days to get to the first point..dont rush..enjoy and build up. I have spoken two a few people who didnt do any training at all and they made the whole trip. I am going to take 6 seeks to do my trip from end to end, and WILL NOT rush out and skip things just to get a bed. I am taking a 1kilo tent, sleeping bag and ground mat. Even a light weight stove I have taken all of these on many other treks including a much more gruelling Himalayas trek and others, for example. The Camino is long but it's not a mountain climb type trek. One thing I have learned in the military and trekking all over the world is, hope for the best and plan for the worst. People have died on the Camino and in many other treks in the world. Most deaths are due to no emergency fall backs. IE, I always take an emergency thermal blanket which weighs less than a box of matches. This has saved my life before.(If you know how to use them correctly)
Take what you feel comfortable with and you can always post things back. I bet your sister took at least 3 litres of water each day when she did the BIB track!
Like I said, different countries are brought up differently and its hard for us not to think of not having a fall-back plan. We are taught this from primary school(I grew up in the outback). Look around this site more, read the comments and then work out when the author is going, what time of year they went, the conditions and which country they originated from.
It's a long flight from Oz to Spain..why ruin the trip by doing to much to quick.
I have decided on Perth to Paris, then trains and buses and leave from Paris two months later. In between I can do what i like and see other countries on the way back to Paris. Paris then to Perth via Singapore. I did get a flexible return ticket so I can go see other places while I am so far away.
The Camino is the BIB track with a heck of a lot more towns, places to sleep and eat along the way. The BIB is just a remote area isolated track with a much longer distance to travel.
Hope this has helped a bit. From one Australian to another :)
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
max44 said:
travelingtrish said:
When i told her yesterday of my plan she actually sneered at me and said: "i hate to tell you this dear but there is no way you could carry a backpack.'"
LOL sisters hahaha
You can do this. You could also get her to carry your tent for you :)
Oh..take walking poles...ones that fold up or telescope in..don't worry about what your sister thinks of them ;)
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
Trish, you can do it if you want to. I'm in my 50s and not the fittest candle on the cake, but I did it. The key is really just to take it a day at a time, a step at a time, a hill at a time- but you'll find it easier without the weight of a tent. It's really a succession of day walks, many of them not so difficult. If you start out with short walks now, and gradually make them longer and harder, you'll be on the right track to walk the Camino.
Margaret
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
Margaret is right about the tent. I am only taking mine because this I part of how I want "my camino" to be. My camino is about exploring off track not just walking. Hence the six weeks to two months. Otherwise I wouldn't take it.
 

Buckeroo

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
October 2012 SJPdP to Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia
Good on you from another Australian. I walked the Camino last October and am a seasoned walker although 1st time for 800kms in one go. I agree with all of the above but I wouldn't worry about a tent even at only 1kg. The albergues are great and I agree with Megan, earplugs are lighter. And like she said, there is usually an option of a private or smaller room too. I even had a hotel room in a couple of the larger towns.

I flew to Paris from Melbourne. There is a fast train south that leaves from the airport if you are not interested in seeing the sights. Otherwise you can get a train from the centre of Paris. I got in a bit late so spent the night at Bordeaux as I had to change trains there anyway. There is another train from there in the morning to Bayonne where you change again (couple of hours wait) to St Jean Pied de Porte; beautiful short trip. You'll be there for lunch.

Anyway, just go at your own rate and if you're up to it when you get to Santiago, I can recommend the extra few days and kms to Finisterre and then on to Muxia; great walking.

PS. I intend walking the Bib track in a couple of months. This long distance stuff gets to you. I'm hooked.

Cheers
Grant.
 
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FrancesK

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (April/May 2012); Le puy (Sept 2013)
I flew Perth to London, London to Biarritz and then took a taxi to Saint Jean. This worked very well (and it meant I could leave bags at my Auntie's place in Cambridge).

You have plenty of time to get yourself into walking condition. I went 3mths after shoulder surgery and was completly unfit (though fit before surgery) and had no problems fitness-wise (blisters and a sprained ankle were a different matter haha).

I really wouldnt recommend the tent, you need to try and keep your backpack to 10% of your body weight and others have mentioned there are tonnes of places to stay along the way.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Trish,
The camino is quite different from most multi-day walks in Australia. One way of looking at it is that it is a series of day-walks, just that it progresses across Spain, rather than returning home each day.
I started each day with 3li of water, some bread, cheese, snacks etc. Generally enough to last me the whole day at least. But I don't recall any stretch where it wasn't possible to get coffee or a meal around lunchtime. (I must admit to having several days supply of artisnal chocolate at some point, as well as other goodies!)

Water was more of a problem, with many of the fonts marked in Brierley's guide dry when I walked in early spring. I was always able to refill my bladder where I got coffee or lunch, but I didn't trust being able to refill in between. I don't think I would walk again without carrying at least 2li, but that is a personal preference.

You have plenty of time to address fitness issues, provided you don't leave it too late. You were a bit coy about your level of fitness, and it would be difficult to give specific advice! However, the more you are able to put into some basic fitness and training, the greater your prospects of being injury free (including being blister free - it is possible).

Regards,
 

Cejanus

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJDP - Santiago April "2013"; European Peace Walk"2015"; VIa de la Plata "2016"
I am from WA and travelling this year. I have looked at many options from Perth to Paris. There are many airlines from Australia that will take you into Paris (CDG) and from the airport you can take the train through to Bayonne and then a regional train to St Jean Pied de Port. Depending on time of arrive in Paris you can get a direct train TVG from the airport OR (And this is what I am doing) taking the RER from CDG across Paris to Gare Montparnesse and then the TVG from there to Bayonne. AND if you are a Senior you can get a senior's ticket for around $55 if you book early.

I am flying via Hong Kong with Cathay Pacific. It breaks the trip into almost two equal halves time wise. Arrive at paris (CDG) about 07:00 which gives me options for trains.

I am flying back out of CDG to Perth. I intend to train it from Santiago de Compostela back to Paris so that I can see the countryside and I love train travel. At this point in time I am having some difficulty with organising this part of the trip back to Paris.

Get in some training, pack lightly, repack and discard and go with the bare basics. If you need something there are plenty of places along the Camino where you can purchase it.

I have been inspired by the forum members and particularly the seniors who provide such good advice.

Happy planning
Cejanus
 

fortview

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino frances Sept/oct 2012 , Salvador, Primitivo 2013
Cotswold Way July 2014
European Peace Walk August 2014 (John)
Hi Trish,
I am one of the worlds worst sleepers. Years of raging insomnia, and sleeping pills.
And yet, with all the exercise , fresh air, and earplugs , I managed to get enough sleep in the albergues ! And I came off the pills ! ! :) one of the best things about the camino for me.

You will be fine ! :D
 

catsmom

New Member
Hi. I walked from Sarria to Santiago this year after doing a few weekend walks of about 8 kms and also getting off the bus halfway to work. I had never walked 20km in one day but had no problem and averaged about 25km a day so got there earlier than I thought. I also bought my backpack and boots four months before I left and did walk with the pack on weekends and the boots as much as I could. I followed great advice on the forum as to the the right brands and bought a recommended guidebook online. I found it really quite easy going although I obviously can only speak for the last section. I'm sure you'll find that even if you aren't that fit it is certainly do-able. BTW I was on the wrong side of 50 and had no blisters or injuries at all. Don't worry, you should be absolutely fine and even if you're alone you will walk alongside encouraging fellow pilgrims every day.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
Hoping to go in April (2014)
Again, thank you all. I will be going solo when i go and i will be 70. Still working in aged care (what a hoot) and very fit in many ways and now will be working on getting even fitter. I love all the advice but still feel i would feel better with a tent. I have a fear of not getting to refuge in time and i suppose if i dont use it i can post it home.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
Once you get your hands on a lodging guide (either Brierly or MMD or one of the French-language or German-language counterparts) and you see how closely spaced the refuges are, you will see that a tent is not necessary. Also, as you start your training walks along with a weighted pack, and you start weighing your pack, you will realize that the difference in a 1 kg tent weight is huge. One can discern the difference in 250g added to a pack; adding 1000g will feel like you have added a brick.

The Camino Frances is not the Australian Outback nor the Himalayas nor the Rocky Mountains. One walks from town to town, through farmlands and a few well-travelled forests. Water, food, lodging, medical assistance, and emergency services are all readily available. The single controllable factor that seems to most impact successful pilgrim experiences is light pack weight.

So, you have plenty of time for training, planning, and perusing the enormous information in these forums. Buen Camino!
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
Hi again Trish,
As you havnt mentioned "when" you are thinking of doing "your Camino" equipment will vary greatly. For example, a lot of the places to stay are closed in the off season.

This link equipment-questions/ has lots of information on equipment including sections for those wishing to take tents. Just remember this is how you wish to do your Camino. Others do their own Camino.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I haven't read all the posts, so maybe someone mentioned this, but you can pay for baggage transport to transport your tent and any other heavy items. It costs between 3 and 6 euros per day, depending on where you are on the Camino.

I took a lightweight screen tent and happily used it several times.
It was set up using my walking poles and I had titanium stakes.
I loved having it.
 

Buckeroo

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
October 2012 SJPdP to Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia
Hi Trish again, as for fitness, like I said, you go at your own rate. I met a rather large silver haired man who was quite happy walking just 10kms a day. We shared an albergue and he got away early in the morning. I later caught up to him in a cafe for breakfast (for me, morning tea for him). He said that was it for him for the day. He new his limitations and walked accordingly. Lovely bloke.
 
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colinPeter

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPP-SDC (2009) Somport-Jaca, Burgos-SDC, Cee-Muxia (2012) Le Puy - Aumont-Aubrac (2014) SJPP-SDC (Oct 2015)
Cejanus said:
...if you are a Senior you can get a senior's ticket ....I intend to train it from Santiago de Compostela back to Paris so that I can see the countryside and I love train travel. At this point in time I am having some difficulty with organising this part of the trip back to Paris.
The Spanish leg of the train is easy enough once you're at SDC (Renfe or travel Agent) and seniors should be able to get a "tarjeta dorada" rail card for 5 euros for good discounts. Not sure of the French train leg as I usually fly out of Barcelona.
http://www.renfe.com/EN/viajeros/me...os/avant/descuentos_avant_tarjeta_dorada.html
Buen Camino
Col
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Hoping to go in April (2014)
This is all such a great help. Of course i cant remember all names but thanks for the tent comment and legting me know it worked for you and the send on bag idea.

Yes i did forget that i am planning to begin in mid April and will take as long as it takes.
Also love the anecdote re the chap who just did the 10ks but where did he sleep if the refuges are 20/25 ks apart?
Thanks again.
Trish
 

Buckeroo

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
October 2012 SJPdP to Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia
There wouldn't be many stretches where you would go 20/25kms without some form of accommodation. I can't think of any without referring to my book. I used to head off about 08:00 to 08:30 and just see where I ended up between 14:00 and15:00 depending how I felt. There was always something nearby. There are a lot of different types of accommodation apart from albergues; depends on your budget. No matter where you stay and at what level, it is all relatively cheap especially now that the A$ is so high.
 
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ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
My recollection is that for the CF the longest stretch without a Albergue was 17km
 

camino-david

RIP 2020
Year of past OR future Camino
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
Hi. I have walked the Camino a couple of times and I am sure that the longest stretch (17 km)without an albergue is from Orisson to Roncevalles, on day 2 (assuming you do stay at Orisson), and after that there is an 17 kmstretch between Carrion de los Condes and Caldadilla de la Cueza about halfway to Santiago, but by then you will be fit and strong and well able to walk this almost flat stretch.
In April and May you should have no problems getting a bed in an albergue providing you arrive by about the middle of the afternoon, and if there is one full, another will be close by. Even if by chance they are full, there is usually someone in the village who accomodates occassional pilgrims, especially ladies. I am positive you will have no problems on this score.
In additional to getting reasonably fit by walking before you go, get boots or walking shoes that fit like a glove and walk in them for at least a couple of months before you go to break them in. Wear two pairs of socks if you like if the boots are slightly too big.
Whether you use a tent or not is up to you, but it is important to keep the weight of your pack as low as possible. By that I mean below 8 kgs excluding water. There are lots of equipment guides on this forum to help. I hope this helps. David.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Valcarlos is about 13 km from St. Jean Pied de Port, so the 17 km stretch from Orisson to Roncesvalles is optional. The longest listed stretch is into Burgos, but that is overstated because you can stop at hotels by the Burgos airport. It is 17 km into Calzadilla de la Cueza and cannot be shortened. Cacabelos is listed as 15.1 km from Ponferrada, but you can shorten that by at least 2 km by choosing a hostal near the bus station.

Hostal Conde de Lemos
Avenida Galicia, 85, 24400 Ponferrada, León, Spain
+34 987 41 17 09 ‎ · hostalcondedelemos.es

There may be rooms at some of the bars in the villages before Cacabelos. Camponara comes to mind. Most long stretches are created by walking albergue to albergue. Hoteles and hostales are available many times to shorten the stage.
 

dorkings

New Member
suggest you get in touch with John Davis in Kangaroo Valley who has walked the Camino Frances staying in albergues, carrying his own backpack.

Moderator note: Mr. Davis's address & personal contact was deleted due to personal security concerns. Please use the Private Message function of the forum to exchange this type of information
Grayland
 

Stacy08

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked it in 2012
I saw people of all ages and fitness levels on the Camino. Obviously the better shape you are in the easier it will be. But an option many people took advantage of was the luggage transfer service where they pick up your backpack in the morning and drop it off at your destination. Makes a big difference. But by all means give it a try!
 
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Cejanus

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJDP - Santiago April "2013"; European Peace Walk"2015"; VIa de la Plata "2016"
[/quote]The Spanish leg of the train is easy enough once you're at SDC (Renfe or travel Agent) and seniors should be able to get a "tarjeta dorada" rail card for 5 euros for good discounts. Not sure of the French train leg as I usually fly out of Barcelona.
http://www.renfe.com/EN/viajeros/me...os/avant/descuentos_avant_tarjeta_dorada.html
Buen Camino
Col[/quote]

Thanks Col, You have saved me quite a lot of time. Greatly appreciated.
I am almost ready to go just a few weeks left leaving Australia about April 1st. My family will have something to say about that date. Hope to start at SJDP 4 April. My pack weight has come in at seven kilos.
Cejanus.

Ps Anyone else starting around that time? I will,need advice on walking in cold conditions.
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
The Spanish leg of the train is easy enough once you're at SDC (Renfe or travel Agent) and seniors should be able to get a "tarjeta dorada" rail card for 5 euros for good discounts. Not sure of the French train leg as I usually fly out of Barcelona.
http://www.renfe.com/EN/viajeros/me...os/avant/descuentos_avant_tarjeta_dorada.html
Buen Camino
Col[/quote]

Thanks Col, You have saved me quite a lot of time. Greatly appreciated.
I am almost ready to go just a few weeks left leaving Australia about April 1st. My family will have something to say about that date. Hope to start at SJDP 4 April. My pack weight has come in at seven kilos.
Cejanus.

Ps Anyone else starting around that time? I will,need advice on walking in cold conditions.[/quote]
I am looking at flights at the moment. It seems cheaper to go direct to paris from Perth. I am looking a zuji.com.au it has given me the best price in the past. I will be doing the same as you from
SDC back to Paris. The above info save me a search as well
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Anyone else starting around that time?
Check the Camino de Santiago Calendar by clicking the link at the bottom of the page. It will show other pilgrims' departure dates (and I have added your estimated date).

Buen camino.
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
If you want to take a tent - perhaps a walking trailer would be a help. Monowalker, Carrix and Dixon Rollerpack are ones i have looked at. There is one make in australia - not sure of the name.
Basically the are a one wheel trailer that you tow behind on straps. For fit people you are meant to be able to tow twice what you could carry in a rucksack. as i have a disability and cannot carry a rucksack, I wanted to see if this would be a way i could still hike. It works! I got a Dixon Rollerpack and couldn't recommend it enough! I carry a tent, sleeping bag and clothing and let my husband carry the water and food - he is stronger!
So maybe try one out - maybe you could borrow one to try out, or hiking shops might stock them in Oz. I had great difficulty sourcing one in the UK - no-one has heard of them! But it was worth persevering.
Oh - and just go do it and prove your sister wrong!! Bon Camino
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
hecate105 said:
as i have a disability and cannot carry a rucksack, I wanted to see if this would be a way i could still hike. It works! I got a Dixon Rollerpack and couldn't recommend it enough! I carry a tent, sleeping bag and clothing and let my husband carry the water and food - he is stronger!

Love your style...I can see you wont let things get in your way :)
Do you have those metal blades that attach to Roman chariots, on your wheels in case anyone gets in your way?
I feel inspired when I hear about people with a disability overcoming the issue and making it more of an "inconvenience" rather than an excuse not to do something.
I saw a statistic on a Spanish government website that said 0.02% of pilgrims do the whole Camino in a wheel-chair. From SJPDP to Santiago, in one hit.
 
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kokoda101

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances(2001) Camino Frances(2008) Camino De La Plata(20011
We booked the plane and train from our flight centre in Queensland,arrived in Paris 6.30am and caught the train at 8.30am to St Jean de Port,just a short walk to the Citadel for accommodation and started walking next morning 8am.If you go to Roncesvalle via the road it is a heavy and boring walk,we found it easier going over the mountains but you have to leave early or otherwise get caught on the mountains in the dark.The albergues are in a lot of cases only 5 km apart,we took a tent and only used it once on the mountain when we ran out of light.Doing the walk in school holidays is a nightmare.
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
kokoda101 said:
caught the train at 8.30am to St Jean de Port,
Is there a direct train? I can only find where you have to catch two trains and a bus to get to SJPDP from Paris
 

postie rider

New Member
I am a single female and am also planning on walking from France to Santiago in 2014. I am from Central Queensland and maybe could meet up with you somewhere. My sister told me I was too old to do it - I will be 52 by then. She didn't tell me that when I walked Kokoda!! I am getting info together and finding this forum interesting and am amazed at the variety of people and questions and answers.
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
postie rider said:
My sister told me I was too old to do it - I will be 52 by then.

On the Camino you will be one of the young ones:)
 

nreyn12

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked (2005) (2007) (2008) (2009) (2010) (2011) (2012) (2013) (2014) (2015); Guide 2013-2016
You are correct that there is no direct train from Paris to SJPP. From Paris you take a train to Bayonne, then from Bayonne you take a different train to SJPP. No bus required, though, unless you fly from Paris to Biarritz.
 
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Melbrob

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Apr 2013
Hi,

I am travelling from Melbourne through Paris in April. The TGV to Bayonne is the way to go, no changes and only 5hrs.

A great web site for assistance is http://www.Seat61.com where all the issues are covered and there are even videos showing how to purchase a metro ticket!! I booked through the TGV-Europe website which was in english. No problems, seat allocation is airline style with changes allowed and I printed my own ticket which will make boarding easier.

Rob
 

max44

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
13th April 2013 leaving. SJPDP via Rome
Hi Rob,
Are these sitting up seats? What I mean is, could you sleep on this train?
Is there food on the train or do you take your own. I guess I should look up the website when my speen on the radio internet is back. Thanks for the info :)
 

Melbrob

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Apr 2013
Max,

If you look at the web site is shows you views of the train interiors for the TGV. As far as I can see they are individual airline style seats but I am not sure if they recline. For the cost I don't really care as it is much less expensive than the UK train tickets I have just purchased. On a $ per journey hour basis the TGV is great value.

Then there is always a glass of red to make the time go by.

Rob
 
Yes Trish we are doing it with a tent so we can wander and stop when and where and are not super fit we are ever weight and a bit sluggish but we plan to go and enjoy so do it!
 

Cynth

New Member
Look mate. I'm a smoker, I spend most of my day on a chair in front of the computer and I almost never ever exercise. I probably walk less than 2 kilometre each day. Not the fittest person on the camino. Everybody laughed at me when I told them I was going to do it, including my MIL, who said "You'll be taking the bus to Santiago". Well, I did it with my backpack on my back. You just keep putting one foot in front of the other, mate and you'll get there eventually. Magic happens on the camino. You'll see the fittest bloke out there shuffling along with a bungup ankle and a horizontally friendly guy just strolling pass without breaking a sweat.

As the old saying goes, the journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. You just have to take that step, ignore all the jeerings and scepticism.

Buen camino!
 
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