A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement


Buy any book, get free camino shell

traveling with a donkey in France

Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#1
I have walked both the Frances and the Le Puy routes, and now would like to walk at least part of the Le Puy route again, or variants of it, with a donkey. I can get by well enough in French. Here are some questions:

1. First of all, is it fair to a donkey that a complete stranger take it away for a chunk of time like this?
2. How does one find a donkey rental outfit in that part of France?
3. How can one know if that outfit has the donkey`s interest and needs at heart?
4. How much time is needed to get to know the donkey, its needs and so on, before setting out on the walk?
4. Related to #4, can one stay on the farm, help out, etc, so it is possible to get to know the donkey?
5. What is the approximate rental cost?
6. Do such rental outfits have basic camping gear (at least tent and mat) for rent if desired?

There are many other questions, but those will do for now. If anyone reading this has had a walking-with-donkey experience, I`d appreciate any comments at all. Thanks so much. BTW, I started having fantasies of doing such a walking trip (specifically in the massif central) many years ago, well before I even knew of the Camino de Santiago, and if I actually get to do it, oh how wonderful that would be! While walking the Le Puy route a few years ago, I met several donkeys, and they seemed well-treated, and uncomplaining, but I am concerned about their welfare most of all. Thanks again. Clara Birnbaum
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#2
I've met three people on the Camino with donkeys and they all regretted it. Hard to carry food for. Hard to find lodging. And when the donkey decides the day is finished, it IS finished, no matter if you are only half way to the Gite. That's all I know.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#4
I guess the key question might be......why do you want to walk with a donkey?

Is it for your benefit or the donkey's ? ;)

Those I have seen walking with a donkey seemed to be laden with gear..... easier to just wear a back pack surely ?
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#7
What ever happened to the French gentleman who rented two donkeys and was going to let us know how it went? And the woman with the shoping cart/donkey contraption she was going to take on the Camino and feared dogs would lift their leg on?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#8

edandjoan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
St. Gallen to Muxia
2012-2018
#9
We saw a few on the Le Puy to SJPP route last fall. There are companies that "rent" donkeys and the Miam Miam Dodo notes what gites take animals. The large saddle bags on the donkey carried the animals food. I actually looked into it and then decided taking care of myself and my pack was enough for me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#11
Thanks so much for these links. I`ve taken a quick look at some of the sites, and I think I will find out precisely what I need to know.
I've met three people on the Camino with donkeys and they all regretted it. Hard to carry food for. Hard to find lodging. And when the donkey decides the day is finished, it IS finished, no matter if you are only half way to the Gite. That's all I know.
I've met three people on the Camino with donkeys and they all regretted it. Hard to carry food for. Hard to find lodging. And when the donkey decides the day is finished, it IS finished, no matter if you are only half way to the Gite. That's all I know.
I suppose that is a concern if you have a reservation, which is the way in France. As for going slowly, I don`t mind going at a donkey`s pace at all. Good company and the walk. What more can one want.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#12
I guess the key question might be......why do you want to walk with a donkey?

Is it for your benefit or the donkey's ? ;)

Those I have seen walking with a donkey seemed to be laden with gear..... easier to just wear a back pack surely ?
I would not bring any more gear than I did when I walked the Camino alone. The 10 K or so would be nothing for the donkey, although it was no big deal at all to have it on my own back. I love walking, I love animals, and I love the French countryside. I would love the companionship of a donkey as I walk through this paradise. That`s my reason.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#13
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#14
I would not bring any more gear than I did when I walked the Camino alone. The 10 K or so would be nothing for the donkey, although it was no big deal at all to have it on my own back. I love walking, I love animals, and I love the French countryside. I would love the companionship of a donkey as I walk through this paradise. That`s my reason.
I wrote 10K. meaning, of course, 10 Kilograms. I guess it was obvious.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#16
@birnbaumclara, perhaps you can contact @GAUVINS. I am not sure that he is still a member of this forum. You can search for all his messages which may contain useful information for you; use the search options in the top right corner of the screen. He walked with two donkeys while he was accompanied by his wife and his two young daughters, and in France only, not in Spain. They all - humans and donkeys - seem to have had no complaints and a happy time. He writes that they did get acquainted with walking with donkeys while still at home. Perhaps you can do this where you live?

He also wrote that he was "a bit puzzled by the [negative] chorus" on this forum concerning walking with donkeys in France. It certainly seems to be popular in some areas, for example in the Massif Central which you mentioned and of course on the RL Stevenson trail.

I have no experience whatsoever and no answers to your questions #1 and #3. There may be more concern on the side of the owners that their customers have "the donkey's interest and needs at heart" than the other way round. I presume that these donkeys are not working animals in the traditional sense, i.e. not raised for farm work and commercial transport.

I see that @MinaKamina has posted excellent links. Hiring a donkey is not cheap!
When I walked the Le Puy route, I too met a few walkers with donkeys, and all seemed well, especially a father, his daughter, and donkey named, Rudy. I met them about 3 times, and fell in love with Rudy, especially (also the father and daughter) and really thought I`d love to travel this way the next time. Thanks so much for your response.
 

beiramar

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho Português, Camino del Norte, Fisterra,
#18
I couldn`t imagine anything more pleasing.
Personally, I just don't see myself with a donkey having dinner at a nice downtown restaurant, standing in line at the supermarket or checking in a small guesthouse ;)
I'd rather consider bringing my cat.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
#19
I would not bring any more gear than I did when I walked the Camino alone. The 10 K or so would be nothing for the donkey, although it was no big deal at all to have it on my own back. I love walking, I love animals, and I love the French countryside. I would love the companionship of a donkey as I walk through this paradise. That`s my reason.
Found a sweet video of a young French family who hiked the French part of the Chemin de St Jacques with 2 donkeys, 2 young children and a baby in a sling ;)


And some stories:
http://www.ouest-france.fr/pays-de-...jacques-de-compostelle-au-pas-de-lane-2753295
http://marcheurs.blog.pelerin.info/...-vers-saint-jacques-de-compostelle/#more-2718
It may take a while to get to know one another (Après deux jours de route, l'ânesse fait sa tête de mule et fausse compagnie à son ânière pour reprendre seule la direction de Grez-Neuville), and these French pilgrims appear totally willing to accept this as part of their journey.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#20
I love walking, I love animals, and I love the French countryside. I would love the companionship of a donkey as I walk through this paradise. That`s my reason.
And to me that's a good enough reason...
Buen camino and best of luck on finding your donkey. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
#21
Have you thought of doing the Stevenson Way with a donkey instead? The GR and Miam Miam Dodo guides give details of where donkeys can be hired (and collected at the end) also of accommodation where there is grazing for the beast. Years ago I met a couple doing this who said that the donkey's natural pace is slightly slower than a human's; as a result they had more time to look around and had seen so much more. By the way thr Stevenson is a delightful walk.
Good Luck.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#22
The Stevenson Trail really set up for donkeys, and there are many people who know and love donkeys to help. You said you already did the lePuy route.

Go back to LePuy, but this time head south on the Stevenson. You and the donkey will be glad.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#23
Personally, I just don't see myself with a donkey having dinner at a nice downtown restaurant, standing in line at the supermarket or checking in a small guesthouse ;)
I'd rather consider bringing my cat.
Found a sweet video of a young French family who hiked the French part of the Chemin de St Jacques with 2 donkeys, 2 young children and a baby in a sling ;)


And some stories:
http://www.ouest-france.fr/pays-de-...jacques-de-compostelle-au-pas-de-lane-2753295
http://marcheurs.blog.pelerin.info/...-vers-saint-jacques-de-compostelle/#more-2718
It may take a while to get to know one another (Après deux jours de route, l'ânesse fait sa tête de mule et fausse compagnie à son ânière pour reprendre seule la direction de Grez-Neuville), and these French pilgrims appear totally willing to accept this as part of their journey.
Thanks so much, for these offerings. I watched the video and read the two articles, all so so lovely and tantalizing. Walking with a donkey in a similar way is still for me at the fantasy stage, but I am storing up information of all kinds and pondering the logistical challenges, which are significant. I live in Japan, I`ll have about one and a half months maximum, which feels too short, considering I need to get to know the donkey and its needs . . . can`t just set out with it as though it were a bicycle, but it does seem possible nonetheless. I don`t even have a cellphone which was a nuisance when I walked the Le Puy route about 3 years ago. I was pestering people all the time to borrow theirs to make reservations at sites, and I think this time I would just have to get one. I am also leaning toward the idea of having camping gear this time, given the donkey could carry it. That I want to embark on this adventure, is clear, and this thread is indispensable. Your words and links are nourishment. Thanks so much.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#25
Have you thought of doing the Stevenson Way with a donkey instead? The GR and Miam Miam Dodo guides give details of where donkeys can be hired (and collected at the end) also of accommodation where there is grazing for the beast. Years ago I met a couple doing this who said that the donkey's natural pace is slightly slower than a human's; as a result they had more time to look around and had seen so much more. By the way thr Stevenson is a delightful walk.
Good Luck.
It is a thought. I do have a practical concern, and that is that on the Chemin de St. Jacques, I am entitled to a "credentiel" as pilgrim, and that allows me to stay at the cheap gites only open to pilgrims. This is less an issue in France, if I remember correctly, but still often an issue. Since the rental and other expenses involved in traveling with a donkey are pretty high, I have to keep other expenses down where possible. However, thanks for the tip. I will look into the details of going on the Stevenson Way instead. I know nothing of it except for what I read in the Stevenson account itself (I`m reading it now), which is a little out-of-date of course.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#26
The Stevenson Trail really set up for donkeys, and there are many people who know and love donkeys to help. You said you already did the lePuy route.

Go back to LePuy, but this time head south on the Stevenson. You and the donkey will be glad.
Please read my reply to SixWheeler below as it applies here in terms of overall expense (I hadn`t seen your comment at that time). I have to research my claim that it may be cheaper on the GR 65 because of the "credential", because if that`s not true, I am not fixed on the idea of returning to the Le Puy route. Since the Stevenson Trail is in the Massif Central, I am very interested. My original fantasy many years ago was of walking with a donkey in the Massif Central, and I don`t even know what sparked that image since I didn`t even know where the Massif Central was at the time (or the Camino de Santiago for that matter). It`s magical for me that I only found out once I decided to walk the Le Puy route a few years ago. This thread, and comments like yours are delicious. Thanks so much!
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#27
Please read my reply to SixWheeler below as it applies here in terms of overall expense (I hadn`t seen your comment at that time). I have to research my claim that it may be cheaper on the GR 65 because of the "credential", because if that`s not true, I am not fixed on the idea of returning to the Le Puy route. Since the Stevenson Trail is in the Massif Central, I am very interested. My original fantasy many years ago was of walking with a donkey in the Massif Central, and I don`t even know what sparked that image since I didn`t even know where the Massif Central was at the time (or the Camino de Santiago for that matter). It`s magical for me that I only found out once I decided to walk the Le Puy route a few years ago. This thread, and comments like yours are delicious. Thanks so much!
I`m back, this time with a technical question. Each time I want to reply to someone on this thread, I press the "reply" button. It seems to move the text I`m responding to down to the bottom, or somewhere else anyway. Then, once I`m done, I press "Post Reply" and my words whizz off into cyberspace as I hope they will, but then I see a space below where I`ve just written, where I`m invited to write a reply. But but but . . . I just did!?! Time is reversed! Am I doing things right? I`m a cyber moron at the best of times. I`m about now to press the "Post Reply" button. Whooooooooooooooshhhhhhhh . . . .
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#28
Your replies look like they have been done right. Here is something it took me a while to figure out, although I'm not sure that it answers your question. Or that you really want the details. However, here goes...

When you first click on Reply, the entire post is copied into a window below, with some "Quote" code around it. (That's what puts it in the pink box when it is posted.) Then you type your message below. If, by mistake, you type your words in between the QUOTE bookends, it will be hidden in the pink box. Or if you type before the first QUOTE end, it will appear before the quoted message.

If you highlight only some words in the post you want to reply to, and use the +Quote button that appears, then only those words you highlighted will be saved. When you click "Insert Quote," those words are put in a pink box. For example I'm going to do that below...
Each time I want to reply to someone on this thread, I press the "reply" button.
Another tip is that you can use Reply and then delete whatever part of the first message you don't want to include in the pink box.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#29
Your replies look like they have been done right. Here is something it took me a while to figure out, although I'm not sure that it answers your question. Or that you really want the details. However, here goes...

When you first click on Reply, the entire post is copied into a window below, with some "Quote" code around it. (That's what puts it in the pink box when it is posted.) Then you type your message below. If, by mistake, you type your words in between the QUOTE bookends, it will be hidden in the pink box. Or if you type before the first QUOTE end, it will appear before the quoted message.

If you highlight only some words in the post you want to reply to, and use the +Quote button that appears, then only those words you highlighted will be saved. When you click "Insert Quote," those words are put in a pink box. For example I'm going to do that below...


Another tip is that you can use Reply and then delete whatever part of the first message you don't want to include in the pink box.
C Clearly also clearly instructs. Thank you.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#30
I loved the Stevenson trail and met many nice donkeys along the way. I'm on a kayak trip at the moment but can provde a lot of info when I get back

On the Stevenson, your donkey will have donkey friends to pasture with. They like that.
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#31
I loved the Stevenson trail and met many nice donkeys along the way. I'm on a kayak trip at the moment but can provde a lot of info when I get back

On the Stevenson, your donkey will have donkey friends to pasture with. They like that.
That all sounds wonderful (about the donkeys, and that you will share your experiences with me), and I really look forward to hearing from you when you get back! BTW, I used to kayak in Tofino, Canada where I used to live. My old kayak is still there . . . somewhere. Enjoy your trip.
 

NavyBlue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy and Camino Frances. Via Francigena. Tro-Breiz in progress.
#32
Hello Birnbaumclara,

Some feedback about walking with a donkey, from an experience some 20 years ago. We rented donkeys from an agency which doesn't exist any longer and walked in the Mezenc/Gerbier de Joncs area in the Massif Central, with our kids (14, 12, 9 and 3) and two donkeys, from gite to gite along a closed loop for a week. The animals carried our stuff and the youngest kid.

We were given limited information by the agency, the most important one was : "Don't let them do what they want. If one stops for grazing, just kick (gently!) its head." So we went.

The first day is all about testing. At the end of the day, there will be only one boss, you or the donkey. Let it be you. They would stamp on your feet, on purpose (although they have four legs, they know perfectly where they are), blow down your sunglasses with an ear, try to stop... Show authority! Far from stubborn, they act as a three year old kid...

The daily care is rather limited : take off the pack saddle, check the hoofs for possible blocked stones, tend to the bruises due to horseflies, thank them for their help... Leave the animals graze in an assigned piece of land.

The donkeys were quite friendly and cooperative. The main problem is their fear of water : you have to insist, or even bribe them, to cross streams or puddles.

Altogether, great memories for the whole family!

Some contacts (no personal experience) : http://www.ane-et-rando.com/chemin-stevenson
 
Last edited:

GAUVINS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Amiens-Santiago de Compostela
#33
(was notified of this thread. In a rush - I apologize for a quick post from my phone)

We walked 1500+ kms last summer with 2 donkeys (Salomé and Lolita), and our family of 4, including our 4 year old. Fantastic experience.

1. We rented from professional breeders. They select animals based on their breed and temperament and train them as pack animals. Not at all trivial. Donkeys prepped for chemin du Puy are Pyrénées donkeys, roughly the size of a mule. They are fitted with horseshoes on their front legs. Donkeys rented on the Stevenson are much smaller are walk barefoot.

2. Pyrénées donkeys can walk as fast or faster than their human companions. We averaged close to 30kms per day at 4.5 km/h.

3. Providing for donkeys is simple. They need grass and water. Brushing every morning / evening. Cleaning hoves every morning. Diet can be supplemented with carrots, apples, old bread. Occasionally oats.

4. The quality of your relationship with the donkey is critical. We were advised to avoid a brute force approach (and witness how ineffective it is) and warned that donkeys will try your will (and they do). My understanding is that a pack donkey is a working animal and that you must shape the donkey's expectations in a caring yet firm manner.

5. It is said that the best donkeys are castrated males, followed by pregnant females. Females in heat sometimes become somewhat temperamental. An uncastrated male is outright dangerous.

6. We've encountered maybe a dozen donkeys, most on the Stevenson. We've encountered 2 young children (long distance) and BOTH were riding with donkeys.

7. We've walked from Puy en Velay to Auch to St guilhem le désert to Puy en Velay. Maybe our expectations had been raised too high, but Stevenson has been a disappointment. This is the only portion of our summer where we've had to compose with fully booked accommodations (and no campsites), and where walking with a donkey felt more like a Disney ride. On the other hand, the Chemin d'Arles felt authentic and much more impregnated by the spirit of Compostelle.

8. Walking with a donkey makes it easy to carry camping equipment. This should help wrt budget.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
#35
Read "Travels with my Donkey" by Tim Moore. He writes a very entertaining story about it.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0312320833/?tag=camiforu-20

If he makes you want to do it even more, try to quash the urge!! ;)
I just finished Travels with My Donkey by T. Moore and let me say I would only consider taking a donkey on the Camino IF:
1) There are no bridges or cattle crossings on the Camino to cross (good luck!)
2) There are no streams on the Camino to wade through because my donk refused to cross the last bridge or cattle crossing
3) I am not be embarrassed by my donk loudly passing gas, or demonstrating how well endowed he is, or relieving himself whenever we stop at a busy plaza, a gathering of pilgrims outside a restaurant, or for photo opps with nuns outside the Cathedral
4) I don't mind picking up steaming piles of donk excrement in public places
5) My fellow pilgrims and I don't mind being woken up at 4:30 a.m. every morning by my donk's obnoxious braying that only gets louder as I try to pretend I'm asleep
6) I find it more difficult to make friends with fellow pilgrims because my donk deprives them of another 2-3 hours of sleep each morning
7)I could care less that the smell of a nearby mare in heat is more important to my donk than my need for food in the next town, which is located another 25 km down the road
8) I don't mind coating my donk in thick, gooey, odiferous donkey ointment needed to keep the flies away from its eyes
9) I don't mind walking another 15 km to the next albergue after dark, although cold, wet and hungry, when the only albergue in town has refused me a room because of my donkey
10) I cannot keep up with my donk when it wildly careens down steep mountainsides
 
Last edited:

Mailo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy- France- SdC (1998)
San Sebastián- SdC (2014)
Leon- Oviedo (2015)
#36
Hi Clara, sounds like we have a simular dream:). Love this thread! Just find a donkey companion and live your dream- hope you will go- keep us posted:)!
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#37
(was notified of this thread. In a rush - I apologize for a quick post from my phone)

We walked 1500+ kms last summer with 2 donkeys (Salomé and Lolita), and our family of 4, including our 4 year old. Fantastic experience.

1. We rented from professional breeders. They select animals based on their breed and temperament and train them as pack animals. Not at all trivial. Donkeys prepped for chemin du Puy are Pyrénées donkeys, roughly the size of a mule. They are fitted with horseshoes on their front legs. Donkeys rented on the Stevenson are much smaller are walk barefoot.

2. Pyrénées donkeys can walk as fast or faster than their human companions. We averaged close to 30kms per day at 4.5 km/h.

3. Providing for donkeys is simple. They need grass and water. Brushing every morning / evening. Cleaning hoves every morning. Diet can be supplemented with carrots, apples, old bread. Occasionally oats.

4. The quality of your relationship with the donkey is critical. We were advised to avoid a brute force approach (and witness how ineffective it is) and warned that donkeys will try your will (and they do). My understanding is that a pack donkey is a working animal and that you must shape the donkey's expectations in a caring yet firm manner.

5. It is said that the best donkeys are castrated males, followed by pregnant females. Females in heat sometimes become somewhat temperamental. An uncastrated male is outright dangerous.

6. We've encountered maybe a dozen donkeys, most on the Stevenson. We've encountered 2 young children (long distance) and BOTH were riding with donkeys.

7. We've walked from Puy en Velay to Auch to St guilhem le désert to Puy en Velay. Maybe our expectations had been raised too high, but Stevenson has been a disappointment. This is the only portion of our summer where we've had to compose with fully booked accommodations (and no campsites), and where walking with a donkey felt more like a Disney ride. On the other hand, the Chemin d'Arles felt authentic and much more impregnated by the spirit of Compostelle.

8. Walking with a donkey makes it easy to carry camping equipment. This should help wrt budget.
Hello Birnbaumclara,

Some feedback about walking with a donkey, from an experience some 20 years ago. We rented donkeys from an agency which doesn't exist any longer and walked in the Mezenc/Gerbier de Joncs area in the Massif Central, with our kids (14, 12, 9 and 3) and two donkeys, from gite to gite along a closed loop for a week. The animals carried our stuff and the youngest kid.

We were given limited information by the agency, the most important one was : "Don't let them do what they want. If one stops for grazing, just kick (gently!) its head." So we went.

The first day is all about testing. At the end of the day, there will be only one boss, you or the donkey. Let it be you. They would stamp on your feet, on purpose (although they have four legs, they know perfectly where they are), blow down your sunglasses with an ear, try to stop... Show authority! Far from stubborn, they act as a three year old kid...

The daily care is rather limited : take off the pack saddle, check the hoofs for possible blocked stones, tend to the bruises due to horseflies, thank them for their help... Leave the animals graze in an assigned piece of land.

The donkeys were quite friendly and cooperative. The main problem is their fear of water : you have to insist, or even bribe them, to cross streams or puddles.

Altogether, great memories for the whole family!

Some contacts (no personal experience) : http://www.ane-et-rando.com/chemin-stevenson
Dear Gauvins,

Thanks so much for your comments. I was hoping to be in touch with you given some of the references to you in this link. I haven`t visited this thread in awhile because I understood that I would be informed of any new responses, but have not gotten any word in awhile so I thought there was nothing new. I`m just reading this now, May 29. Your tips are extremely helpful, and I will take a look at the link you gave. Thanks so much. Clara
 
Camino(s) past & future
the Frances, and Finisterre and Muxia (summer, 2012). Will walk from Le Puy to SJPP (summer, 2014)
#38
Clara here. I started this thread but haven`t been on it in awhile. Notices of new responses stopped coming to my ebox, so I come on once-in-awhile to take a look. BTW, if you`re around, Newfydog, I`d love to hear from you about your donkey trip (s). Anyway, I`ve decided to start with 2 weeks of volunteering at ADADA, a donkey sanctuary, in Ambert, France (Auvergne), not far from Le Puy, and then to start my walk somewhere with a donkey. I came upon an article, by chance, on the sanctuary, and then decided that there was everything appealing about offering my time there . . . they need it, I`d learn the rudiments of donkey care, and the people there would be able to recommend a responsible donkey rental service in the general area, perhaps the Stevenson Trail, or the GR 65, the two obvious trails. I`m trying to deal with the immediate logistics (place to stay while volunteering, and plane ticket), and will then put my head to other things. I`m wondering if it`s essential to set up the rental of a donkey early. I have the feeling I can wait until I`m in France to do that, or is that ignorant? Anybody have a thought about that? Thanks, Clara
 

sibams

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future Sept 2018
#39
I've met three people on the Camino with donkeys and they all regretted it. Hard to carry food for. Hard to find lodging. And when the donkey decides the day is finished, it IS finished, no matter if you are only half way to the Gite. That's all I know.
So we take a tent!
 

konnie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF; Le Puy; El Norte; Monastery Santo Toribio; Monasteries Yuso and Suso
#41
Have you thought about what to do with the burro when you reach Santiago?
 

sibams

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future Sept 2018
#42
Have you thought about what to do with the burro when you reach Santiago?
Hi, indeed we have - luckily we can call the rental company and they come and take him home to join his 60 strong donkey family!! Will be a heart-wrencher for sure but cant really take him home to Canada!:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#43
Just noticed this was an old thread, did the original person walk with his donkey?
The trekking companies in the Atlas mountains have it all set up for you, but use mules and muleteers,
Look forward to seeing anyone with a donkey , mule or horse on the Camino, it is the way to go once we have run out of all fuel.
Bill
 

OLDER threads on this topic




A few items available from the Camino Forum Store




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 9 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 34 4.5%
  • April

    Votes: 112 14.7%
  • May

    Votes: 188 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 54 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 227 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 93 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top