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Trekking poles

Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Its beginning to look like the best solution for transporting trekking poles is to not do it. I am thinking just purchase a set in SJPDP and leave them in Santiago.
I’ve checked mine on 3 trips to my different Camino’s. Twice with my pack that’s too big to carry on and once separately with a few other items. After 45 years of serious travel I know there’s always a chance it could go astray but, you can always buy locally as a last resort. As always, do what you think is best for you. Good luck.
 
Its beginning to look like the best solution for transporting trekking poles is to not do it.
Why? If you are concerned about carrying them into the cabin, send them as checked luggage in a small bag or box. That is, separate from your more precious backpack and other items, which you will carry on board. Unless you have to rush out of the airport at the end of your trip, you will spend less time waiting for them up at the luggage belt than you would spend buying new ones somewhere. Furthermore, it is less wasteful than buying and discarding poles.

This is a good summary post about traveling with poles.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Yes, buy poles in SJPP. The last time we checked our poles in their own container, they did not arrive on our flight with us into SdC. The problem that caused, is that we were busing up to Ferrol that evening. We would have been without poles except for a very nice lady in luggage at the airport who told us to follow her and she escorted us to a storage room full of poles which saved the day. Our good fortune. The Camino provided.

I never check my pack going to a Camino. However, I often check it coming home since it usually contains a lovely bottle or two of Spanish vermouth. If you were to buy collapsible poles in SJPP, these could be put into your pack and checked for your return flight. I don’t worry about the checked pack on the return. My pack has never been lost, only delayed to a later flight. No issue picking it up a couple days later at my nearby airport if necessary.
 
Unless you book a "basic economy" ticket, flights to/from the US generally include a checked bag. That "bag" could be a box with your poles.
I returned in June from Madrid through Atlanta. I put my folded poles inside my backpack and carried it on with no problem. I understand that isn't always the case, but I'll try it again next time!
 
I bought a pair of collapsible poles from G3 (the "Pivot Treks"), and they fit inside my bag quite easily. They're also on sale as of today (July 5th, 2024 at my locale). I'm rather pleased with them after doing some testing.

I'm only doing one Camino (the CF during Sept-Oct), and I'm still on the fence as to whether or not I'll check my pack. I'm thinking of carrying my pack on and boxing up the few things that security always seems to object to and check those, which I guess will include the poles. Otherwise, everything goes in the pack and then I check that, and just carry on a very small over-shoulder travel bag with the essentials (like underwear!).
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Bought poles in Porto since I didn’t want to check a bag. Decathlon was far but we found some in a mall while walking around. Sailed through security in my carryon on the way home to the US through Lisbon and Kennedy. They’ll be going to a local pilgrim from my group who wants to try out poles for the first time.
 
This may have been answered in one of the zillions of previous threads about poles, but… Is there a place in Santiago where poles can be dropped off and eventually transported back to SJPDP or other major starting points on the Caminos?
 
This may have been answered in one of the zillions of previous threads about poles, but… Is there a place in Santiago where poles can be dropped off and eventually transported back to SJPDP or other major starting points on the Caminos?
I *believe* Ivar (the owner/operator of this very forum) has a service similar to that (you can drop your poles off at his place of business in SdC as a donation), but I don't know if they get trans-shipped to any origin points.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I’ve checked mine on 3 trips to my different Camino’s. Twice with my pack that’s too big to carry on and once separately with a few other items. After 45 years of serious travel I know there’s always a chance it could go astray but, you can always buy locally as a last resort. As always, do what you think is best for you. Good luck.
For those of us who fly on the cheap from the U.S., checking your poles for $75 each way makes buying them in SJPdP and leaving them in Santiago a more than reasonable alternative.
 
For those of us who fly on the cheap from the U.S., checking your poles for $75 each way makes buying them in SJPdP and leaving them in Santiago a more than reasonable alternative.
Yes the airlines miss no opportunity to gouge their customers. Under those circumstances, I agree.
 
This may have been answered in one of the zillions of previous threads about poles, but… Is there a place in Santiago where poles can be dropped off and eventually transported back to SJPDP or other major starting points on the Caminos?
Yes, there are several places where poles can be dropped off - for example, Casa Ivar and Pilgrim House. The poles are then available for others to pick up, but there is no organized service to transport them back to major starting points on the Caminos. Unfortunately, the complexities and cost considerations conspire to make this difficult, without a favourable business case.

For those of us who fly on the cheap from the U.S.
Yes the airlines miss no opportunity to gouge their customers.
I'm just wondering what the base price might be for such tickets.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Yes, there are several places where poles can be dropped off - for example, Casa Ivar and Pilgrim House. The poles are then available for others to pick up, but there is no organized service to transport them back to major starting points on the Caminos. Unfortunately, the complexities and cost considerations conspire to make this difficult, without a favourable business case.



I'm just wondering what the base price might be for such tickets.
DFW-MAD $862++++
 

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Its beginning to look like the best solution for transporting trekking poles is to not do it. I am thinking just purchase a set in SJPDP and leave them in Santiago.
Last week I saw a thread stating that Santiago Airport was letting trekking poles aboard while inside carry-on luggage. You may wish to do a search here on this to verify. Better still, contact the Airport TSSA i Santiago or their website to verify.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
If your GP Doctor is agreeable to it, ask them to write a medical certificate stating it's a necessary item to carry. I've surrendered multiple hiking poles (Kmart in Australia sells a great low cost one) but I plucked up the courage and asked, and that piece of paper is gold. Keep it handy going through check in and security as you will need to present it, but it is never challenged. We only do carry on and each country's airport security is different in what they'll permit. I've dismantled poles and tubed them and made it to Spain, but I've never got the pole out. My husband walks with a full size umbrella and yet he manages to get that through when we leave. Never could understand that.
 

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