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Trekking sandles that take orthotics

2020 Camino Guides

Karen2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 2017
Hi,
can anyone recommend sandles that can fit orthotics. I will wear them in my boots but want the option of sandles also. All advice greatly appreciate.
:)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Karen:

I wear the men's variant of this hiking sandal: http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/shoes/women/arroyo-ii

I use the identical, full-length prescription orthotics in both my Keen Targhee II mid-height boots, and the Keen Arroyo sandals. However, I use the sandals for level terrain hiking and general use, like playing traveler / tourist. I am too large a fellow to use them for hiking a Camino as I need the extra ankle support.

In the men's sizing, the Arroyo sandal runs one-half size LARGER than stated, and the Targhee mid-height boot runs one-half size SMALLER that stated. The result is that they both accept the orthotics perfectly, and interchangeably. You need to check the manufacturer's specification for any brand or model you are considering. Also, when considering sizing, make sure to try them on a walk around the shop with the socks you plan to wear on Camino, AND allow at least one extra half-size for swelling feet. There are many threads and posts on correct shoe & boot sizing here in the Forum.

One point I should make is that, if you are going to use a full-orthotic with a hiking sandal, make certain the sandal has a full heel counter. That is the part of the sandal that supports the heel completely. This prevents the orthotic from shifting as you walk.

Also, the Arroyo also has a good "toe box" to protect your "little tootsies..." on a downhill segment, where too many people wear too small footwear, get serious blisters, and lose toenails as a result of their feet slamming into the front of the toe box repeatedly.

I hope this helps.
 

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
When I was searching for a sandal the Keen Arroyo was the only one I found that had a removable foot bed. Alas I was unaware of them running large and I probably should have returned them as I have to wear my thicker socks with them. I prefer to wear sandals with only liners.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Four years ago, while I was getting geared up for my first Camino, It was an REI shoe salesman who advised me to always check the manufacturer's web site to see how the "last" in that model runs, per size, small or large. Fortunately, Keen does publish this advice. I cannot state what other labels do.

As a result, and wearing a size 11 (US) 45 (EU) "street show," my Targhee II boots are a size 13 (47). My Arroyo sandals are a 12 (46). However, because of the +/- size fluctuation, both are actually a size 12.5 (46.5). As a result, my prescription orthotics are interchangeable and easily replace the insole that came with the boots/sandals.

I follow the street-shoe-size, plus 1,5 sizes "school of thought." It works for me, but might not for others. I start with my (US) street shoe size (11), then add .5 size for the two pair of socks, another .5 size for daily swelling, and finally another ,5 size for "splaying" of my feet after carrying a rucksack for several weeks. My feet will temporarily increase in girth / size as much as .5 size after a two or three week walk with a loaded rucksack. They retain this increased size for a couple of weeks after I return. Must be my peasant genes...

The mathematical result is a size US 12.5. The above discussion, relative to the Keen boots and sandals, illustrates how this "rule" applies. Remember, your experience, and feet may be different. Search the Forum for boot or shoe sizing. There are lots of discussion threads on this subject. Everyone's feet are different, and respond to weather and load conditions differently.

However, in my experience helping other pilgrims I come across with poorly fitting footwear, I have never come across someone with boots at least one full size larger than their usual street size with more than a minor blister. These were usually caused by poor lacing, or wearing a single pair of cotton socks...yikes!

In all the cases of major toe and foot problems, the first questions I ask are what is your normal shoe size "back home," followed by "what size shoes/boots are you "wearing right now?" Nine out of ten times the answer and size are the same. THAT is a recipe for a ruined Camino.

In any event, you must add at least one-half size for the toe box, as walking down hill is not something many of us do in our daily regimen. Also, cramming two pair of socks into a too small shoe or boot does not help either.

If you cannot enlarge the boot or shoe, the best thing you can likely do, is to replace whatever sock you are wearing with a single merino wool sock of appropriate weight to fit your footwear, while cushioning your foot. Others may disagree with this, but natural wool, with a small amount of nylon or spandex blended in for stretch and durability is probably the best type of sock for doing a Camino for most folks. Also, applying Compeed or Moleskin to your toes to prevent rubbing and bumping abrasion may also help.

Finally, checking how the brand, and style runs, per size, is also critically important. If you do not know whether the style you are considering runs larger or smaller than advertised sizing, how can you make an informed decision?

I hope this helps.
 

Karen2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 2017
Karen:

I wear the men's variant of this hiking sandal: http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/shoes/women/arroyo-ii

I use the identical, full-length prescription orthotics in both my Keen Targhee II mid-height boots, and the Keen Arroyo sandals. However, I use the sandals for level terrain hiking and general use, like playing traveler / tourist. I am too large a fellow to use them for hiking a Camino as I need the extra ankle support.

In the men's sizing, the Arroyo sandal runs one-half size LARGER than stated, and the Targhee mid-height boot runs one-half size SMALLER that stated. The result is that they both accept the orthotics perfectly, and interchangeably. You need to check the manufacturer's specification for any brand or model you are considering. Also, when considering sizing, make sure to try them on a walk around the shop with the socks you plan to wear on Camino, AND allow at least one extra half-size for swelling feet. There are many threads and posts on correct shoe & boot sizing here in the Forum.

One point I should make is that, if you are going to use a full-orthotic with a hiking sandal, make certain the sandal has a full heel counter. That is the part of the sandal that supports the heel completely. This prevents the orthotic from shifting as you walk.

Also, the Arroyo also has a good "toe box" to protect your "little tootsies..." on a downhill segment, where too many people wear too small footwear, get serious blisters, and lose toenails as a result of their feet slamming into the front of the toe box repeatedly.

I hope this helps.
Four years ago, while I was getting geared up for my first Camino, It was an REI shoe salesman who advised me to always check the manufacturer's web site to see how the "last" in that model runs, per size, small or large. Fortunately, Keen does publish this advice. I cannot state what other labels do.

As a result, and wearing a size 11 (US) 45 (EU) "street show," my Targhee II boots are a size 13 (47). My Arroyo sandals are a 12 (46). However, because of the +/- size fluctuation, both are actually a size 12.5 (46.5). As a result, my prescription orthotics are interchangeable and easily replace the insole that came with the boots/sandals.

I follow the street-shoe-size, plus 1,5 sizes "school of thought." It works for me, but might not for others. I start with my (US) street shoe size (11), then add .5 size for the two pair of socks, another .5 size for daily swelling, and finally another ,5 size for "splaying" of my feet after carrying a rucksack for several weeks. My feet will temporarily increase in girth / size as much as .5 size after a two or three week walk with a loaded rucksack. They retain this increased size for a couple of weeks after I return. Must be my peasant genes...

The mathematical result is a size US 12.5. The above discussion, relative to the Keen boots and sandals, illustrates how this "rule" applies. Remember, your experience, and feet may be different. Search the Forum for boot or shoe sizing. There are lots of discussion threads on this subject. Everyone's feet are different, and respond to weather and load conditions differently.

However, in my experience helping other pilgrims I come across with poorly fitting footwear, I have never come across someone with boots at least one full size larger than their usual street size with more than a minor blister. These were usually caused by poor lacing, or wearing a single pair of cotton socks...yikes!

In all the cases of major toe and foot problems, the first questions I ask are what is your normal shoe size "back home," followed by "what size shoes/boots are you "wearing right now?" Nine out of ten times the answer and size are the same. THAT is a recipe for a ruined Camino.

In any event, you must add at least one-half size for the toe box, as walking down hill is not something many of us do in our daily regimen. Also, cramming two pair of socks into a too small shoe or boot does not help either.

If you cannot enlarge the boot or shoe, the best thing you can likely do, is to replace whatever sock you are wearing with a single merino wool sock of appropriate weight to fit your footwear, while cushioning your foot. Others may disagree with this, but natural wool, with a small amount of nylon or spandex blended in for stretch and durability is probably the best type of sock for doing a Camino for most folks. Also, applying Compeed or Moleskin to your toes to prevent rubbing and bumping abrasion may also help.

Finally, checking how the brand, and style runs, per size, is also critically important. If you do not know whether the style you are considering runs larger or smaller than advertised sizing, how can you make an informed decision?

I hope this helps.
Hi, thank you for this great information
Karen:

I wear the men's variant of this hiking sandal: http://www.keenfootwear.com/product/shoes/women/arroyo-ii

I use the identical, full-length prescription orthotics in both my Keen Targhee II mid-height boots, and the Keen Arroyo sandals. However, I use the sandals for level terrain hiking and general use, like playing traveler / tourist. I am too large a fellow to use them for hiking a Camino as I need the extra ankle support.

In the men's sizing, the Arroyo sandal runs one-half size LARGER than stated, and the Targhee mid-height boot runs one-half size SMALLER that stated. The result is that they both accept the orthotics perfectly, and interchangeably. You need to check the manufacturer's specification for any brand or model you are considering. Also, when considering sizing, make sure to try them on a walk around the shop with the socks you plan to wear on Camino, AND allow at least one extra half-size for swelling feet. There are many threads and posts on correct shoe & boot sizing here in the Forum.

One point I should make is that, if you are going to use a full-orthotic with a hiking sandal, make certain the sandal has a full heel counter. That is the part of the sandal that supports the heel completely. This prevents the orthotic from shifting as you walk.

Also, the Arroyo also has a good "toe box" to protect your "little tootsies..." on a downhill segment, where too many people wear too small footwear, get serious blisters, and lose toenails as a result of their feet slamming into the front of the toe box repeatedly.

I hope this helps.
Four years ago, while I was getting geared up for my first Camino, It was an REI shoe salesman who advised me to always check the manufacturer's web site to see how the "last" in that model runs, per size, small or large. Fortunately, Keen does publish this advice. I cannot state what other labels do.

As a result, and wearing a size 11 (US) 45 (EU) "street show," my Targhee II boots are a size 13 (47). My Arroyo sandals are a 12 (46). However, because of the +/- size fluctuation, both are actually a size 12.5 (46.5). As a result, my prescription orthotics are interchangeable and easily replace the insole that came with the boots/sandals.

I follow the street-shoe-size, plus 1,5 sizes "school of thought." It works for me, but might not for others. I start with my (US) street shoe size (11), then add .5 size for the two pair of socks, another .5 size for daily swelling, and finally another ,5 size for "splaying" of my feet after carrying a rucksack for several weeks. My feet will temporarily increase in girth / size as much as .5 size after a two or three week walk with a loaded rucksack. They retain this increased size for a couple of weeks after I return. Must be my peasant genes...

The mathematical result is a size US 12.5. The above discussion, relative to the Keen boots and sandals, illustrates how this "rule" applies. Remember, your experience, and feet may be different. Search the Forum for boot or shoe sizing. There are lots of discussion threads on this subject. Everyone's feet are different, and respond to weather and load conditions differently.

However, in my experience helping other pilgrims I come across with poorly fitting footwear, I have never come across someone with boots at least one full size larger than their usual street size with more than a minor blister. These were usually caused by poor lacing, or wearing a single pair of cotton socks...yikes!

In all the cases of major toe and foot problems, the first questions I ask are what is your normal shoe size "back home," followed by "what size shoes/boots are you "wearing right now?" Nine out of ten times the answer and size are the same. THAT is a recipe for a ruined Camino.

In any event, you must add at least one-half size for the toe box, as walking down hill is not something many of us do in our daily regimen. Also, cramming two pair of socks into a too small shoe or boot does not help either.

If you cannot enlarge the boot or shoe, the best thing you can likely do, is to replace whatever sock you are wearing with a single merino wool sock of appropriate weight to fit your footwear, while cushioning your foot. Others may disagree with this, but natural wool, with a small amount of nylon or spandex blended in for stretch and durability is probably the best type of sock for doing a Camino for most folks. Also, applying Compeed or Moleskin to your toes to prevent rubbing and bumping abrasion may also help.

Finally, checking how the brand, and style runs, per size, is also critically important. If you do not know whether the style you are considering runs larger or smaller than advertised sizing, how can you make an informed decision?

I hope this helps.
Hi. Thanks for all this great information. I current wear 1/2 orthotics I think I will go have a chat to my podiatrist. I am worried about the orthotic slipping and causing issue.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Karen:

If your orthotic is for the arch and heel, the "fix" is a full-length version with a "non-functional" insole "tongue" that goes under the ball of your foot and toes. I have those for my dress shoes at home. But, you are correct. You should consult your foor doctor and explain what you are going to do, and what you need.

The other piece of advice I can offer regarding orthotics is that they are available in a "sports" version. Many orthotics are made or leather, foam and flannel felt, that is intended for dry use only.

The "sports" versions are intended for heavy duty athletics and are made of materials that can get wet. My walking orthotics look like a heavier duty version of what came with the shoes and boots originally. But, clearly, the inner-layers are specially crafted to support my particular foot issue.

I can even remove them nightly, rinse them in a sink, and they are dry the next morning.

I hope this helps.
 

Karen2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 2017
Karen:

If your orthotic is for the arch and heel, the "fix" is a full-length version with a "non-functional" insole "tongue" that goes under the ball of your foot and toes. I have those for my dress shoes at home. But, you are correct. You should consult your foor doctor and explain what you are going to do, and what you need.

The other piece of advice I can offer regarding orthotics is that they are available in a "sports" version. Many orthotics are made or leather, foam and flannel felt, that is intended for dry use only.

The "sports" versions are intended for heavy duty athletics and are made of materials that can get wet. My walking orthotics look like a heavier duty version of what came with the shoes and boots originally. But, clearly, the inner-layers are specially crafted to support my particular foot issue.

I can even remove them nightly, rinse them in a sink, and they are dry the next morning.

I hope this helps.
Definitely helps thank you, off to make an appointment
 

Karen2017

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 2017
I don't know where you live, but if you are in the US you should check out The Walking Company. They have their own brand, Abeo, and many of their styles come with a choice of footbeds. Here is one example: http://www.thewalkingcompany.com/abeo-b.i.o.-huntington-neutral-brown/18696
Thanks, we are in Geraldton Western Australia. 500km from a major city so we will be buying on-line which is scary for boots. Will.have a look and see if they can ship international.
 

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