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Luggage Transfer Correos

two pairs of shoes vs one pair

Camino Badges
Camino(s) past & future
Walking entire Camino summer of 2019 starting end of June.
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
 

Lurch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
looking at 2018-2019
Mine dried out a bit, but were still damp the next day...socks dried out first. Good reason to bring an extra pair of socks. I brought a pair of closed toe sandals just because I wear large shoes which I would be unable to find in Spain.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
Check the average (of course don't count on it 100%) climate stats at the location(s) and you'll get some answers. Just some!

I doubdt that will staisfy you though ;)

So try it at home. Soak your trail runners or whatever of your gear and you'll know. Easy peasy ;)
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
You might find a light(er)-weight trekking sandal useful when you’ve finished walking for the day (particularly for those occasions when your Salmons are drying 😉) They would also be useful as airy-er (is that a word?), alternative footwear for warmer days ... and, as you’re walking the Norte, you could use them on the beach 🙂

Buen Camino!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
This is a repost of a guide I wrote. Perhaps it might help.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water will enter hiking footwear through any opening during a rainstorm, when walking through wet grass and brush, or drench into them if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:
  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
 

malingerer

Active Member
This is a repost of a guide I wrote. Perhaps it might help.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water will enter hiking footwear through any opening during a rainstorm, when walking through wet grass and brush, or drench into them if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:
  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
I like this post! I too am ex forces and did two years in a mountain rescue unit. There is a lot of good common sense in your post and dispels quite a few myths. I have been involved with camino since 2003 but have never thought of making a post like yours as most people seem content with their own mythology and advice from "gurus" especially the Gore-Tex disciples :) Still, if ya mistakes don't kill ya they become your teachers and I'm still upright!. :)

Yours aye,

The Malingerer.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
This is a repost of a guide I wrote. Perhaps it might help.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water will enter hiking footwear through any opening during a rainstorm, when walking through wet grass and brush, or drench into them if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:
  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
I have seen you post this before. It is so valuable for walkers that I want to Thank you again for creating it and for reposting it! Very thoughtful!
 

Dochim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 July - April 2018 Francés
June - July 2018 Primitivo
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
[/QUOTE
My solution is very simple. Take a second pair of walking shoes. The benefits are that (a) the nice spongy insole of the carried shoe has at least 24 hours to return to sponginess and (b) the carried shoe has time to dry out. I use merino wool blend socks which stay warm when wet, I lather my feet in ‘goop’ which I usually apply once before and once around lunch time. I use standard Adidas supernova trainers, one gore-tex and one non gore-tex. The extra weight (700g) is well worth it. The gore-tex trainers work well for short wet sections and are non-sweaty. The non gore-tex trainers get wet immediately but the combination of goop and merino socks mitigate the problem to a large extent. With this regime I get no blisters and effortless walking. Heaven 😊
 

William Krueger

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Porto (2018)
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
I took a pair of Tevas on the Portuguese and was glad I did. I wore Hoka Speedgoat 2's which were great. However, the last two days I got a pain in my foot arch. No pain with Tevas. Also really felt good on the pavement. Would not have been so great on the cobble stones earlier.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
When it looks like rain or just for to be prepared stick a newspaper that is sitting around one of the bars in your backpack. If it rains and your shoes are soaked as soon as you get to the albergue crumple the newspaper and stuff the newspaper into your shoes. If my shoes are really wet I will change the newspaper a few times. I always put dry newspaper in right before I go to sleep. My trail runners are always dry in the morning. Many albergues will have newspapers on hand. For a second pair of shoes I wear Toms at night. Super light and if I need to I can walk 7 or 8 kilometers in them.
 

Robert Long

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2016
Camino Portuguse Oct 2018
Definitely bring two pair of shoes. At the end of the day I change into light weight shoes to walk around town. In the mean time my boots are drying out. REI has a great pair of light weight shoes, less than 14 oz. and only $70.

Buen Camino Bob
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
I'm wedded to good, strong, waterproof walking boots. The path from Irun to Donostia, the middling path not the 'Alpinista', is, as I recall, brimming with brutal stones that will massacre feet not protected by a strong sole. But what about the shower later? Something you can wear in the communal shower, like flip-flops or Crocs. I think a pair of walking boots, some flip-flops, AND some walking sandals for around town and just in case your boots (or flips) fail you.
I did the Norte in Brooks trail runner. I’m finishing the Portugués tomorrow in Brooks trail runners without a problem.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
The newspaper trick is the best for wet shoes. I’m on the Portugués now and the one day it rained I could pour water out of my shoes. Take out the insoles and put in piece of paper and stomp on them. Unwrap and they will be dry in the morning. Stuff newspaper in your wet shoes. Change several times and in the morning they will be dry.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I have seen you post this before. It is so valuable for walkers that I want to Thank you again for creating it and for reposting it! Very thoughtful!
Thank you. I hate reinventing the wheel, and with a constant influx of folks seeking answers to questions, it seems pertinent to periodically repost previously written information to help the newbies out :) . I am just glad that veteran members are patient with the repostings. :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
Even when doing thru hikes of the Pacific Crest Trail and others, and even on shorter, multi-day or multi-week backpacking trips, I would not take the extra weight of a second pair of shoes. As I wrote above, there are adequate strategies to avoid needing to do that. When one is burdened by a heavy backpack and looking at ways to cut-down that total weight, this makes a difference. :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
The path from Irun to Donostia, the middling path not the 'Alpinista', is, as I recall, brimming with brutal stones that will massacre feet not protected by a strong sole.
You are hitting on an aspect of foot protection that should not be overlooked :)

Your choice of boots can certainly help with this type of severe terrain underfoot. Likewise, most trail runners are also designed to handle these same issues with rough and rocky trail surfaces. Many will incorporate a 'rock plate' which is a lightweight and flexible thermoplastic or carbon fiber sheet. It is typically placed in one of the sections of the sole - like between the outer and middle sole - or it can be underneath the insole inside the shoe. Rock plates are very effective at keep rough trail surfaces from imprinting against the foot.

Some models of running and trail shoes, like the Hoka One One models, will use a strategy of incorporating layers of cushioning to do the same job. The amount and firmness of the cushioning absorbs the, sometimes severe, irregularities of the tail surface.

I post this information so that folks know that boots are just one, among several, effective options. Those who are concerned with the weight of their footwear do have choices to best suit their needs. :)
 

Ozrob

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Nord
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
I did the Norte started 22nd April this year. I wore lightweight Hoka trail runners. They dried pretty well overnight because they are lightweight and breathable - especially when there was heating (not always). Because I have two pairs of the same shoe I only took one pair but I took the inner soles and laces from the second pair. When they got soaked (only twice) i completely pulled them apart to dry (remove laces and inner soles) and they were fine. I also noticed that by about halfway through the walk the inner soles had compressed to about half their thickness so I changed them and kept the spare pair in. It was almost like having a new shoe on. I only encountered 2 days of rain on norte to villaviciosa and Primitivo. It poured in Santiago 😂
 

DBride

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Burgos April 2019
Take a pair of hiking sandals. You can wear them when you rest. Or just to use them when the other are wet. It's more comfortable when you can change your shoes.
Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2019)
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
Put the second pair of shoes... Be ready for any risk.
 

Rover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis, Fall 2016
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
You only need one pair of broken in walking shoes and slip flops for after hours comfort. The type of shoe you take is a personal choice -- some wear mid top boots, others low top, some waterproof and others not and sometime a running shoe - it's whatever you are most comfortable with. I wore waterproof mid top Solomon's which I wear backpacking and they worked fine. Whatever you do, minimize your load and keep your pack weight down.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked
Bad idea IMO -- it's just some extra weight.

Either wear the sorts of shoes/boots where it really doesn't matter in the slightest if they get soaked, or get some very good quality leather ones that will simply keep all of the water outside.

Having said that, there *is* a good case for carrying an extremely light pair of espadrilles or other such easy footwear for your evenings -- don't do so personally, though I might if I could get hold of a pair without rubber/plastic soles (which I hate), but there's nothing intrinsically wrong with the notion of non-cumbersome ultra-light footwear for post-hike relaxation purposes
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
I only take one pair...they are comfortable when walking so i also wear them at the end of the day. 2nd pair would be cumbersome and bulky...remember when in doubt leave it out
 

david1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Paris to Santiago de Compostela
Deffo a second pair of either hiking sandals or runners. No matter how great the boot/shoe your foot appreciates the break!
I'd often change over to my walking sandals just to give my feet a break.
Sandals are also good for wearing at the end of the day's walk...and to and from the shower.
 

Opa Theo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais to Santiago
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
On our Camino last year I used two different pairs of trail runner: pair of Brooks Ghost and pair of Vasque trail runners. Reason for different shoes is that each pair stress the feet differently. I've used this strategy of alternating different brands when training for marathons. No blisters and only minor soreness. In training for the pilgrimage I auditioned Altras but found they were miserable on paved surfaces so did not use them.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I only take one pair...they are comfortable when walking so i also wear them at the end of the day. 2nd pair would be cumbersome and bulky...remember when in doubt leave it out
I agree with this, wholeheartedly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
On our Camino last year I used two different pairs of trail runner: pair of Brooks Ghost and pair of Vasque trail runners. Reason for different shoes is that each pair stress the feet differently.
To save weight and money you might be able to get away with bringing one pair of shoes but two different kinds of insoles.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Primitivo, Oct 2019
This is a repost of a guide I wrote. Perhaps it might help.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Water will enter hiking footwear through any opening during a rainstorm, when walking through wet grass and brush, or drench into them if you walk through puddles or other standing water along the Camino.

There are two potential remedies to this problem, neither of which is always effective.
  • First, you can try keeping rain pants over the tops of shoes, so the water runs down the pants past the opening. But this system can be uncomfortably hot in warm weather during rain-soaked conditions. It offers no protection for puddles or having to cross water runoffs on the pathway.
  • You can try using a footwear with a waterproof gaiter or some other waterproof cobbles -- like thick plastic bags. I have not often seen a gaiter or other waterproof trapping that would both keep the water out and keep the feet dry.
“Waterproof” shoes are a misnomer for several reasons.
  • They can fail because the materials simply don’t work over the near and long term because it is difficult to apply and cover all areas of the footwear sufficiently.
  • The waterproof coating or laminate in the shoes does not last. Some manufacturers of the lightweight trail shoes, which are usually constructed as a hybrid of fabric and leather, have treated them with a coating which can quickly wear off. It also keeps sweat in the shoe and your feet get soaked in sweat. Fairly quickly, coatings break down and will no longer be waterproof.
  • Footwear which relies on a “Gore-Tex” style of waterproof/breathable laminate will break down through both wear and tear and dirt buildup on the material which renders it ineffective.
When I’ve tested so-called waterproof / breathable fabrics in shoes for various manufacturers, their actual performance never matched what was claimed. My reports to their QA departments have always reflected these weaknesses as found during testing. Sometimes a shoe will start the test period working fairly well under a narrow range of wet conditions, but as the testing progresses the failures increase.

Waterproof/breathable membranes, like Gore-Tex, are only marginally breathable — water vapor from perspiration does not pass through the fabric as efficiently as is claimed. It can't. Unlike outerwear, the shoe material radically inhibits the ability of the membrane to allow water vapor to escape, thereby trapping it in the shoe.

So, on warm days the experience of having sweat being trapped in the shoe is common. Combined with the fact that the fabric waterproofing is quickly damaged by dirt, sweat, grime, and abrasion and it’s only a matter of time before exterior moisture begins penetrating the fabric and allowing feet to get wet from outside moisture as well.

This is why most experienced trekkers and backpackers no longer go to great lengths to keep feet dry. They accept that when the weather is wet, feet will also get wet. Even the US military uses footwear for wet conditions which is not waterproof. The strategy is how to minimize any problems when feet are wet.

In working with folks new to backpacking who ask about waterproof footwear recommendations, I have asked why they wanted waterproof shoes. Sometimes, they will look at me as if I had spaghetti sticking out of my nose. Most will answer that they think their feet will stay dry, and that having wet feet is akin to getting into horrible trouble.

This post is meant to help inform, reassure, and give a different line of thought and reasoning to this issue.

I like to have dry feet. I always try to avoid wet feet. I have tried many ways to keep my feet dry:
  • “Waterproof” shoes, which, as I’ve said, don’t work well.
  • “Waterproof” socks, which don’t work for similar reasons: shoes still get wet, and feet soak with sweat. However – In cold weather these soaks can be the basis for using vapor barrier warmth conservation of the feet.
  • Wearing multiple pairs of socks, frequently changing from wet to dry, which eventually all get wet.
  • Carrying multiple pairs of shoes, which eventually all get wet, too.
I have never had total success at keeping my feet dry in very wet conditions, which led me to research what has been done to develop effective strategies. If I can’t keep my feet dry, then I need to try and eliminate or minimize the risk of any of the bad things that could occur to my wet feet when walking.

Some of these lessons I learned while in Vietnam…. Like the fact that our boots had fabric tops and numerous holes in the thin leather bottom portions so that water drained out quickly and never sat in the boots.

What are the most frequent and problematic 'bad' things?
  • Maceration is the medical term for pruning, where the skin’s outer layer absorbs a lot of moisture and gets “soggy” from that moisture. The skin gets sore and extremely soft which makes it more prone to blistering and developing other problems.
  • Cracking of the skin when the macerated feet dry. The natural moisture and oiliness of the skin is gone. The severity depends on how much stress the skin is exposed to after it is dried out.
So, what does work for me, and others, if I am going to be walking or backpacking in wet weather?
  • Apply a good, thick coating of a Goop (ointment or salve) to my feet and between toes before putting on socks and shoes in the morning. If rain occurs later in the day, then remove shoes and socks and do the same. This helps protect from external moisture.
Goop which has a high content of wax – either bee or paraffin – is most ideal, especially if it also has a high lanolin content.
  • Wear non-waterproof shoes which can drain and then dry out quickly. This minimizes the amount of puddling in the shoe that bathes the feet in moisture. Modern trail running shoes, and trail shoes often have nice open mesh fabric which is terrific for draining water.
Non-waterproof shoes will also eliminate moisture from sweaty feet. Remember, it doesn’t matter what the source of the moisture is that feet are exposed to: be it rain or sweat, each can cause the same problems.
  • Wear thin, light-cushioned merino wool socks, which don’t absorb as much water as thicker socks. Merino wool will also keep wet feet warm and comfortable in most seasons and temperature ranges, unless the weather is frigid winter-cold.
  • Take off shoes and socks to let feet air dry during rest stop that will be longer than 20 minutes.During this time, I will wring out any excess moisture from the socks, but I will not put on either of my dry pairs (I take three). I will also wipe off moisture on my feet and then reapply a goodly amount of Goop to my feet to help keep them from becoming macerated.
  • When stopping for the day, apply Goop to the bottoms of feet, both before and after showering.
  • Carry an extra pair of insoles. These insoles do not have to be your preferred “walking” insoles that you may have purchased separately. These can be the lightweight pair which came with your shoes. These will be the barrier between your wet footwear and your dry socks when you are done for the day and if your shoes are a bit damp come morning.
I find that at days end, I can remove the wet insoles and use absorbent paper or toweling to sop up as much moisture as is possible while I am showering and dealing with end of the day chores.

When I get ready to go to dinner or wander around town, I put on a pair of dry Merino wool socks, insert the extra pair of dry insoles into my shoes, and put the shoes back on to walk around in. This accelerates drying out the shoes. Depending on the shoe’s material, within a couple of hours the shoes are mostly dry.
  • At bedtime, I remove the insoles and stuff absorbent material into the shoes to continue the drying out process, if need be, during the night.
  • Apply more salve or ointment and wear dry and warm socks at while sleeping; this gives feet 8-9 hours of recovery.
Thanks for the extra insole tip. Is there a link to your guide?
 
Camino(s) past & future
this will be my first. Norte September 2018.
Hi, I've heard some people talk about bringing a second, lighter pair of shoes for when it rains and your primary pair get soaked (mine are breathable - not waterproof - Salomon XA-Pro Trail Runners). Do shoes like this dry out overnight or should I have a second pair along? I start the Camino Del Norte on July 22nd from Irun.
Thanks,
Dave
If you wear open toed sandals like Chacos or Tevas the water runs in then out. Use foot glide and merino toe socks. Wring out the socks whenever you stop. Dry your feet. Re - apply the foot glide. Carry extra socks. Sandals dry fast and so will your feet if they are not in damp shoes.
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); Camino Frances in 2019 or 2020
Dave:

Thanks for the write-up. Quick question though - I went to the Goop web store and couldn't find a product that seemed to fit your description. Lots of lotions but nothing jumped out with either beeswax or paraffin. Can you help narrow the search?

As an aside - my first thought when you used the term "goop" was "Shoe Goo". Do NOT use Shoe Goo between your toes! (though I suppose it would keep your toes from rubbing against each other . . . )
 

NJohn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May/June 2020
Dave:

Thanks for the write-up. Quick question though - I went to the Goop web store and couldn't find a product that seemed to fit your description. Lots of lotions but nothing jumped out with either beeswax or paraffin. Can you help narrow the search?

As an aside - my first thought when you used the term "goop" was "Shoe Goo". Do NOT use Shoe Goo between your toes! (though I suppose it would keep your toes from rubbing against each other . . . )
Hiker’s Goo
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Dave:

Thanks for the write-up. Quick question though - I went to the Goop web store and couldn't find a product that seemed to fit your description. Lots of lotions but nothing jumped out with either beeswax or paraffin. Can you help narrow the search?

As an aside - my first thought when you used the term "goop" was "Shoe Goo". Do NOT use Shoe Goo between your toes! (though I suppose it would keep your toes from rubbing against each other . . . )
Hi, Dan. This is the product:


I always put the quantity I want to carry in a smaller, lighter, plastic container. I don't carry the tube :)
 

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