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Unsettling death on Camino del Norte

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Nev Sheather

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking now (2017)
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
 

freeflyer123

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
He went in the way he would have like to go. At least he was doing something he obviously loved and it would have been a lovely calm crossing for him too as he would have been at peace with himself.

Some years ago I was on holiday with a few friends. We were spending the week cycling in France and one of the men had a heart attack and died. Just a while before he had been happily telling us that he had just retired and the cycling holiday was his gift to himself. While he died happy I was very upset that he never got to spend at least a few years enjoying retirement.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
RIP... your words are very kind indeed, given a choice, I would choose to bow the final curtain like this if I ever had a choice. Still, it is upsetting to see death first hand. Buen camino!
 

Bala

Veteran member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
So sorry to read this, and I can imagine how unsettling it must have been for you. May he rest in peace and his family find comfort knowing he was doing something he loved. All the best to you as your journey continues.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013) San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
I hope that you have managed to bring the poor (?) pilgrim in your onward/inward camino. I am really sorry for you having been presented with that situation, and I do hope that you can walk on in peace.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Death is a fact of life on the Camino. Pilgrims have been expiring enroute for 1,200 years, since the inception of the Camino de Santiago around 850 AD. This does not diminish the tragedy or emotional impact when it occurs, especially to someone you know.

I personally experienced this sort of loss on my first Camino in 2013. A fellow i had spent my first week with passed overnight in his sleep at an albergue. The hole in my daily routine was profound. But, it taught me a valid lesson... the Camino is all about the journey, NOT about the destination, per se.

It (death) happens. May this pilgrim rest in peace, and in the knowledge that he passed unto the eternal Camino which pursuing a destination greater than the individual.

When in Santiago, i invite you to walk to the bottom of the ramp adjacent to the Parador, off Plaza Obradoiro. To the left is the Church of San Fructoso. Immediately to the left of this old church is the ancient pilgrim cemetery.

Many centuries ago, all pilgrims arrived in Santiago without personally identifying documents. In fact, identity documents only came into general use over the past 150 years or so. These pilgrims were nameless, except to their immediate companions. Many died from the privations of their pilgrimage. It was much more difficult than it is now. Decathlon did not exist in the 10th century...

On arrival, these ill pilgrims went into the "hospital," now the present site of the Monastery of San Martin Pinario. Many died there. The root word for hospital is hospice. Back in the day, you either got well, or died. The current Parador Hotel was formerly a hospital built in later years, like the 16th or 17th century IIRC.

Each morning, those who passed the previous night were collected by wheeled cart. A funeral Mass was conducted at a nearby church, not in the Cathedral. Afterwards, the cart with the shrouded bodies, was wheeled down the ramp to the site of the cemetery.

The present day hedge greenery lies atop the mortal remain of thousands on thousands of pilgrims who died on arrival at Santiago. Consider that sobering thought. I do, every time I walk past this site.
 
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Pruden

Pilgrim of life
Camino(s) past & future
October 2012 Camino Francés Sarria /Santiago.
November 2013 Camino Francés
León to Sarria
June 2014 Camino Francés San Juan Pie de Port to Logroño.
November 2016 Camino Frances ,Logroño to León.
It’s pity when someone pass away, but we have to understand that the Camino is just like any where else, life and death is just part of it, I can no imagine a better way to pass away that doing and enjoy what you like most.( I wouldn’t like to died in a hospital after a long and painful illness, not for me and not for my relatives and friends).
But sorrows are for the ones that remain here after a death of known person.
DEP !
God bless pilgrims!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
I am over 70 and see my doctor once a year for a checkup. She thinks it great that I do long pilgrim walks and stay in excellent health. If you are a senior who does not get regular checkups, you might want to get checked out. And without one you will probably not qualify for medical insurance. But I cannot imagine my GP agreeing to refer me to a cardiologist just in case.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
Death is a fact of life on the Camino. Pilgrims have been expiring enroute for 1,200 years, since the inception of the Camino de Santiago in the mid-800 AD. This does not diminish the tragedy or emotional impact when it occurs, especially to someone you know.

I personally experienced this sort of loss on my first Camino in 2013. A fellow i had spent my first week with passed overnight in his sleep at an albergue. The hole in my daily routine was profound. But, it taught me a valid lesson... the Camino is all about the journey, NOT about the destination, per se.

It (death) happens. May this pilgrim rest in peace, and in the knowledge that he passed unto the eternal Camino which pursuing a destination greater than the individual.

When in Santiago, i invite you to walk to the bottom of the ramp adjacent to the Parador, off Plaza Obradoiro. To the left is the Church of San Fructoso. Immediately to the left of this old church is the ancient pilgrim cemetery.

Many centuries ago, all pilgrims arrived in Santiago without personally identifying documents. IN fact, identity documents only came into general use over the past 150 years or so. These pilgrims were nameless, except to their immediate companions. Many died from the privations of their pilgrimage. It was much more difficult than it is now. Decathlon did not exist in the 10th century...

On arrival, these ill pilgrims went into the "hospital," now the present site of the Monastery of San Martin Pinario. Many died there. The root word for hospital is hospice. Back in the day, you either got well, or died. The current Parador Hotel was formerly a hospital built in later years, like the 16th or 17th century IIRC.

Each morning, those who passed the previous night were collected by wheeled cart. A funeral Mass was conducted at a nearby church, not in the Cathedral. Afterwards, the cart with the shrouded bodies, was wheeled down the ramp to the site of the cemetery.

The present day hedge greenery lies atop the mortal remain of thousands on thousands of pilgrims who died on arrival at Santiago. Consider that sobering thought. I do, every time I walk past this site.
Are there any headstones or other indications that its a cemetery? Im kind of a graveyard aficionado.
 

Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
I am over 70 and see my doctor once a year for a checkup. She thinks it great that I do long pilgrim walks and stay in excellent health. If you are a senior who does not get regular checkups, you might want to get checked out. And without one you will probably not qualify for medical insurance. But I cannot imagine my GP agreeing to refer me to a cardiologist just in case.
If you are over 70 and only visiting the doctor annually for a check up you probably don't need to visit the doctor.
 

Evvie

Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
If you are over 70 and only visiting the doctor annually for a check up you probably don't need to visit the doctor.
In my mind, if I'm going to walk 500 miles I want to be sure my doctor is cool with me doing it and that there's no physical reason I shouldn't. This means an EKG and blood work. If you're a senior I'd also want to be sure that my ticker can handle it. We all know about heart disease and that it can be a silent killer. I can speak to that, as I had a heart attack when I was 59 and fortunately was able to get immediate medical care. If I'd been out on the Camino I wouldn't have survived. I'm 63 and will definitely get checked out thoroughly before I go!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Part of (2018)
Primitivo (2019)
Finistere (2019)
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
Let the experience form you and add to your life. It is in trauma of one kind or another that we see how God makes a
Death is a fact of life on the Camino. Pilgrims have been expiring enroute for 1,200 years, since the inception of the Camino de Santiago in the mid-800 AD. This does not diminish the tragedy or emotional impact when it occurs, especially to someone you know.

I personally experienced this sort of loss on my first Camino in 2013. A fellow i had spent my first week with passed overnight in his sleep at an albergue. The hole in my daily routine was profound. But, it taught me a valid lesson... the Camino is all about the journey, NOT about the destination, per se.

It (death) happens. May this pilgrim rest in peace, and in the knowledge that he passed unto the eternal Camino which pursuing a destination greater than the individual.

When in Santiago, i invite you to walk to the bottom of the ramp adjacent to the Parador, off Plaza Obradoiro. To the left is the Church of San Fructoso. Immediately to the left of this old church is the ancient pilgrim cemetery.

Many centuries ago, all pilgrims arrived in Santiago without personally identifying documents. IN fact, identity documents only came into general use over the past 150 years or so. These pilgrims were nameless, except to their immediate companions. Many died from the privations of their pilgrimage. It was much more difficult than it is now. Decathlon did not exist in the 10th century...

On arrival, these ill pilgrims went into the "hospital," now the present site of the Monastery of San Martin Pinario. Many died there. The root word for hospital is hospice. Back in the day, you either got well, or died. The current Parador Hotel was formerly a hospital built in later years, like the 16th or 17th century IIRC.

Each morning, those who passed the previous night were collected by wheeled cart. A funeral Mass was conducted at a nearby church, not in the Cathedral. Afterwards, the cart with the shrouded bodies, was wheeled down the ramp to the site of the cemetery.

The present day hedge greenery lies atop the mortal remain of thousands on thousands of pilgrims who died on arrival at Santiago. Consider that sobering thought. I do, every time I walk past this site.
for us
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
Way to go. The tent of the old peregrino had its last tear. He moved on whilst walking. It was a hill too far. We give thanks for his life's journey. He has gone before us.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Are there any headstones or other indications that its a cemetery? Im kind of a graveyard aficionado.
Nope! As these pilgrims were buried anonymously, they remain known only to God.

One of the odd things about Santiago is that there is no sign formerly identifying this ground as the former pilgrims cemetery. Perhaps it is to deter vandalism...whatever.

This ancient burial ground is part of the ancient history of Santiago and is mentioned in many guide books about the city and the pilgrim culture that so infuses it. One wonders...
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
In my mind, if I'm going to walk 500 miles I want to be sure my doctor is cool with me doing it and that there's no physical reason I shouldn't. This means an EKG and blood work. If you're a senior I'd also want to be sure that my ticker can handle it. We all know about heart disease and that it can be a silent killer. I can speak to that, as I had a heart attack when I was 59 and fortunately was able to get immediate medical care. If I'd been out on the Camino I wouldn't have survived. I'm 63 and will definitely get checked out thoroughly before I go!
That is precisely why I was advised NOT to walk the Camino Primitivo earlier this month. With only three weeks notice until the plane left for Spain, I switched to Plan B and offered my services at the Pilgrim Office.

Everything worked out just fine. I returned home this past Friday, exhausted but content.

My issue was not cardiac, that I have an, ironically, clean bill of health on. I just finished a full cardiac specialist workup with multiple sophisticated diagnostic tests. My health issue is abruptly plummeting blood pressure that brings on fainting, for no apparent reason. Doctors say no walking in the boonies until we sort it...

But, getting fully checked over before doing anything out of the ordinary is definitely a very good idea. You would do it for you car before a very long trip, wouldn't you?
 
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samoht.w

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 SJPP to Santiago in September
2014 Camino Aragon
GR65.3.3 2015, 16, 17
Camino del Norte 2018
My physician has me on a statin so I cannot use alcohol. She is checking me out in August for my September Camino Norte because I asked her if I could discontinue the statin to be able to drink the great Spanish Vino Tinto. She will let me know in August:cool: Here's hoping!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
My physician has me on a statin so I cannot use alcohol. She is checking me out in August for my September Camino Norte because I asked her if I could discontinue the statin to be able to drink the great Spanish Vino Tinto. She will let me know in August:cool: Here's hoping!
Adapt and overcome... you will find a happy compromise...
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
My husband has been walking the Norte since Wed through the rain, mud and rocks. He is on excellent physical shape (runs 20 plus miles every Saturday at age 67) but is finding the Norte very challenging. My prayers are being sent to the family of this man.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Just for the record. I don't want to die *while* doing what I love. I want to live, doing what I love. I want to die when I'm done doing all the things I love.
You are the first person on this forum to say it out loud. When did it become a thing to say how great it is to die when you do something you love? Yes, it’s unsettling when we are confronted with death in a more immediate and direct way than usual in our society. And we tend to brush over it quickly with standard phrases. We are confronted with our own mortality or reminded of dear ones who died or may die. And more often than not there is actually a feeling that death came too early, no matter the age and especially if still in good health.
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
One of the odd things about Santiago is that there is no sign formerly identifying this ground as the former pilgrims cemetery. Perhaps it is to deter vandalism...whatever.

This ancient burial ground is part of the ancient history of Santiago and is mentioned in many guide books about the city and the pilgrim culture that so infuses it. One wonders...
Why do you find this odd and why does it make you wonder? Medieval towns in Europe had burial grounds near their cathedrals and other churches within the city walls. Graves for common people - everyone, not just the poor or the pilgrims - were not an elaborate affair, just earth mounds without any markers or headstones. The body was wrapped in a cloth and put on a wooden plank or directly into the ground. Coffins or caskets were not common. Later these graveyards were abandoned or banned within the city walls and new graveyards were established further away. The old grave mounds just disappeared from sight and from memory and they got forgotten and were built over. It's presumably the same in any larger town and city today. There's no reason to mark them, other than mention them in guidebooks and history essays.

There are many underground archeological or historical sites that are known but not marked. They are protected from disturbance and destruction by building works for example but otherwise they are just left in peace.
 
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FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
t2andreo it was good to bump into you in Santiago last Monday at the end of our Portuguese Camino.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Are there any headstones
This made me wonder just how old these old looking headstones are that you sometimes see near old churches in England. Turns out that they are apparently not that old 😌. Rare to non-existant for medieval earth burials. It became more common from the 17th century onwards. See for example The rise of external commemoration in Britain, Ireland and New England. That would also explain the absence of any ancient memorials to pilgrims who died along the pilgrim roads. Remember that not every pilgrim was a poor pilgrim. It was just not the done thing.
 
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FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Voie de Paris / Tours Aulnay to Saintes 2017
Camino del Baztan 2018
Outside the hôpital des pèlerins in Pons Charente Maritime Fr. there are stone troughs that look like somewhere horses would drink from. Look closely and you see that there are definite body / head spaces. The Pilgrims and down and outs who stayed at the hôpital (outside the city walls) Were put outside in these troughs when death occurred.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Outside the hôpital des pèlerins in Pons Charente Maritime Fr. there are stone troughs that look like somewhere horses would drink from. Look closely and you see that there are definite body / head spaces. The Pilgrims and down and outs who stayed at the hôpital (outside the city walls) Were put outside in these troughs when death occurred.
That's interesting, thank you. I walked through its portal/gateway - don't really know how to call it - and I even sat down on the stone slabs to enjoy the shade but don't remember noticing these troughs or reading about them. Oh well, something for that long and leisurely road trip by car I might do one day ... ☺.
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Why do you find this odd and why does it make you wonder? Medieval towns in Europe had burial grounds near their cathedrals and other churches within the city walls. Graves for common people - everyone, not just the poor or the pilgrims - were not an elaborate affair, just earth mounds without any markers or headstones. The body was wrapped in a cloth and put on a wooden plank or directly into the ground. Coffins or caskets were not common. Later these graveyards were abandoned or banned within the city walls and new graveyards were established further away. The old grave mounds just disappeared from sight and from memory and they got forgotten and were built over. It's presumably the same in any larger town and city today. There's no reason to mark them, other than mention them in guidebooks and history essays.

There are many underground archeological or historical sites that are known but not marked. They are protected from disturbance and destruction by building works for example but otherwise they are just left in peace.
I was wondering about some general signage identifying the hedged area as being the site of the ancient pilgrim's graveyard. That's all. I never presumed signage that attempted to identify the many thousands of unnamed pilgrims buried there.

Then again, this does not appear to be a common thing across Spain, insofar as I have seen. Some, other places will place a sign marking the historical significance of a building or site. But, I rarely have seen it in Spain. Perhaps this is a European thing, or a Spanish thing. Whatever...

This is NOT a criticism of anyone or anything. I take it as part of the charm that is my second home...Santiago de Compostela. I know about this place, and I share it with other pilgrims and visitors to the city I encounter in my wanderings.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Whatever...
That was all I was trying to convey: there are so many places like this - traces of history underground - that it doesn't occur to anyone to put up a sign marking its historical significance.
 

Nev Sheather

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking now (2017)
My physician has me on a statin so I cannot use alcohol. She is checking me out in August for my September Camino Norte because I asked her if I could discontinue the statin to be able to drink the great Spanish Vino Tinto. She will let me know in August:cool: Here's hoping!
Oh? My doctor has never mentioned any bad connections with Statin and alcohol, and I hope he never does.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues (Oct 2015), Camino Primitivo (Apr 2019)
When in Santiago, i invite you to walk to the bottom of the ramp adjacent to the Parador, off Plaza Obradoiro. To the left is the Church of San Fructoso. Immediately to the left of this old church is the ancient pilgrim cemetery.
I was there in april but had no idea what it was! Thank you!
 

timr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
My physician has me on a statin so I cannot use alcohol. She is checking me out in August for my September Camino Norte because I asked her if I could discontinue the statin to be able to drink the great Spanish Vino Tinto. She will let me know in August:cool: Here's hoping!
I am a physician, and for this reason I would NEVER give medical advice to anyone on a forum or indeed anyone whom I have not examined and from whom I have not taken a detailed medical history.
Nor would I ever look for medical advice from people on a forum, however generous and well-meaning they are.
BUT, I am unaware of any statin for which moderate intake of alcohol is contraindicated. Immoderate intake of alcohol is contraindicated for everyone. Perhaps you might discuss this a bit more with your health professional?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte from Irun to Santander, Primitivo from Oviedo to Frances to Santiago September 2016
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
Having had family members and friends die a slow and painful death I would wish us all the chance to go this way. Doing something we love.
 

WayWalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2016
Davey Jones of Monkeys fame got permission from his doctor to run a marathon. When it's your time, it's your time. Rest in peace Peregrino.
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
@t2andreo - Thank you for that information. I will take a look when I am back there. Great info
 

Deacon Hutch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino Frances 2018
We came across a man who had a heart attack, the medics were working on him but apparently got there too late. This was on a hill on the Way just out of Bolivar. He was 76 and apparently had walked a number of Caminos, as he told the lady walking with. Perhaps a good way to go, sudden and doing what he enjoyed, but still unsettling
 

Deacon Hutch

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino Frances 2018
I know you are unsettled by this but I think all things considered you are correct that he was doing what he loved. Thank you for letting me know about this, may he rest in peace. I will hold him up in prayer, Amen.
 

jac52

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French route (2019)
If you are over 70 and only visiting the doctor annually for a check up you probably don't need to visit the doctor.
I was there two weeks ago. It is a large rectangular area about a city block in size that is predominately hedges, some of which are set out in a maze-like design. There are above-ground, smooth stone (perhaps granite?) rectangular slabs with no markings which are suggestive of gravestones. I did not see anything on the site that referred to it being a gravesite, but I did not weave in and out of the entire area, so might have missed it. If one didn't know it was a gravesite, one might not realize.
 

ginniek

Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances 2017
That is a good reason to visit the doctor;)
My physician has me on a statin so I cannot use alcohol. She is checking me out in August for my September Camino Norte because I asked her if I could discontinue the statin to be able to drink the great Spanish Vino Tinto. She will let me know in August:cool: Here's hoping!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I was there two weeks ago. It is a large rectangular area about a city block in size that is predominately hedges, some of which are set out in a maze-like design. There are above-ground, smooth stone (perhaps granite?) rectangular slabs with no markings which are suggestive of gravestones. I did not see anything on the site that referred to it being a gravesite, but I did not weave in and out of the entire area, so might have missed it. If one didn't know it was a gravesite, one might not realize.
You had the right place. There is no identifying sign or plaque, insofar as I know. Only the skull on the adjoining church (San Fructuoso) overlooking this area suggests the use as a cemetery.

I assess the measurements of the hedged area as being perhaps 100 meters wide by maybe 25 meters deep. Once upon a time, the actual burial area extended beyond the current retaining wall to the flat area to the west. But, only the upper area has been retained and maintained.

This web page for the Church of San Fructoso mentions the pilgrim cemetery:


Hope this helps.
 

Nick B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - May/June 2018
Portugese - (2019)
Norte - (2020)
None of us get out of this alive.

Thoughts to his family but how great not to have passed away in a hospice, nursing home or dementia ward at 76 His last conversations were possibly uplifting and his visions amazing rather than watching the trolley come around again with the days slop for lunch.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I too believe that a sudden death doing something I enjoy is a graceful way to go. However, for those of us who live across the ocean, dying on foreign soil, can be difficult for family in terms of arrangements and possible unfinished business. So while Such an ending may be my choice the circumstances may be more complicated for others.
 

Nick B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - May/June 2018
Portugese - (2019)
Norte - (2020)
Agree complicated for the family but you would hope they see the positives of his last days on earth walking with a friend and positive experiences of Spain and the Camino.
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
I believe this possibility (of death) should be built in to my/your Camino planning prior to leaving home. I know this can sound morose or even a sad attempt at humor, but I seriously do do this assessment with my family prior to leaving the U.S. for any trip I am about to embark on, be it local or international.
(Suggestion) - I routinely go over my Living Trust, insurance policies, "Person to contact in case of emergency" paperwork, property titles etc...
I usually work with a back up plan or plan "B" in mind.
I find by doing this I can have peace of mind when I board a plane bound for fun and relaxation.

Just my thoughts...
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I believe this possibility (of death) should be built in to my/your Camino planning prior to leaving home. I know this can sound morose or even a sad attempt at humor, but I seriously do do this assessment with my family prior to leaving the U.S. for any trip I am about to embark on, be it local or international.
(Suggestion) - I routinely go over my Living Trust, insurance policies, "Person to contact in case of emergency" paperwork, property titles etc...
I usually work with a back up plan or plan "B" in mind.
I find by doing this I can have peace of mind when I board a plane bound for fun and relaxation.

Just my thoughts...

Wise man, Bob!
 

freespirit

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Lourdes v SJPDP - Santiago (June/July 2010) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (July/August 2015) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (June/July/August 2017)
That is a good reason to visit the doctor;)
Hi I my self have been taking statins (and a few other tablets) since my double heart by pass op in 2003 ,have done the Frances twice and hope to return next year and have been drinking like a fish since, am not saying we all should do it but its works ok for me, check it out with your Doc ,mind I like a good drink but don't get Rat faced or Leg less ,then again I am still only a spring chicken just turned age 74 ,on my last two Caminos the weather got really hot and after stopping there is nothing like a few glasses of cold Sam Miguel larger, or half a bottle of Red vino (and sometimes a bit extra) to make me fill better and help me sleep, Good Camino and bottoms up
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Hi I my self have been taking statins (and a few other tablets) since my double heart by pass op in 2003 ,have done the Frances twice and hope to return next year and have been drinking like a fish since, am not saying we all should do it but its works ok for me, check it out with your Doc ,mind I like a good drink but don't get Rat faced or Leg less ,then again I am still only a spring chicken just turned age 74 ,on my last two Caminos the weather got really hot and after stopping there is nothing like a few glasses of cold Sam Miguel larger, or half a bottle of Red vino (and sometimes a bit extra) to make me fill better and help me sleep, Good Camino and bottoms up

Agree this is not a prescription for most folks! Remember in addition to exercise and heat exposure, alcohol causes dehydration. The combination can leave a compromised heart under additional stress!
 

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