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Using a waterproof backpack?

Sho

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2020)
Assuming I don't have a goal of shaving every possible ounce off my gear weight, are there arguments against using a waterproof backpack (assuming it balances well and has good hip straps)?

I keep reading that rain covers keep your pack only sort of dry, but water runs down your back and comes into the pack through wet shoulder straps; that ponchos blow around in the wind and don't keep your legs covered; that a rain jacket and pants keep you dry but not your pack; that plastic trash bags inside the pack still mean your pack itself gets sopping wet....

Thanks!
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
No reason not to do so that I can see provided it is well-made, appropriate size and fits properly. I've never seen a fully waterproof rucksack as comfortable as my regular fabric ones though. So I stow all my gear in roll-top dry bags of different colours and don't worry too much if the pack itself gets wet.
 

Camino Chris

One step forward...
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Assuming I don't have a goal of shaving every possible ounce off my gear weight, are there arguments against using a waterproof backpack (assuming it balances well and has good hip straps)?

I keep reading that rain covers keep your pack only sort of dry, but water runs down your back and comes into the pack through wet shoulder straps; that ponchos blow around in the wind and don't keep your legs covered; that a rain jacket and pants keep you dry but not your pack; that plastic trash bags inside the pack still mean your pack itself gets sopping wet....

Thanks!
Yep, I think you've got all those bases covered...now you will have to choose which combination to use. As good as they each are, all for different reasons, unfortunately not a one of them is a perfect "10"!
 

Bedolino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
português (2016)
Fenech- next - (2018)
I used a thin trash bag inside my backpack (osprey exos 48) with capacity slightly above (50 liters). It weighs almost nothing andamento protects the backpack beyond it raincover. I took another one or two indo casa of tearing while loading and unloading the backpack. Camino Português, 10 days of rain, no problem.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Assuming I don't have a goal of shaving every possible ounce off my gear weight, are there arguments against using a waterproof backpack (assuming it balances well and has good hip straps)?

I keep reading that rain covers keep your pack only sort of dry, but water runs down your back and comes into the pack through wet shoulder straps; that ponchos blow around in the wind and don't keep your legs covered; that a rain jacket and pants keep you dry but not your pack; that plastic trash bags inside the pack still mean your pack itself gets sopping wet....

Thanks!
Hi, Sho, and a belated welcome to the Forum.

Maybe I can help to add to what has been previously posted.

Cuben Fiber packs exist which are waterproof, do not absorb water, and are the lightest backpacks manufactured. They are expensive, but if you are going to do a lot of hiking and backpacking then the cost per mile is fairly small. :)

Many manufacturers will use a coated fabric for the pack bags. The fabric is waterproof. What is NOT waterproof are the seams on the bag produced when the bag is sewn together. BUT one can make the seams waterproof, which also makes the pack waterproof. One can purchase or make seam sealers which are liquids that after being applied to a seam, dry to a waterproof coating. Although originally made for waterproofing tent seams, Many have used these to great effect on our backpack bags. The amount, method, and instructions are the same whether for a tent or a bag.

Manufactured seam sealer. When I owned a Tarp Tent backpacking tent, I used their instructions for a home made seam sealer

Modern synthetics used for most backpack bags and belt/harness construction will only absorb a small amount of water overall, and will dry out quickly. The shoulder strap pads and hip belt padding are made of non water absorbent material, like closed cell foams.

So the strategy of using a waterproof bag liner, like a kitchen compactor bag or a heavy duty utility plastic bag is a sound strategy. I do agree that pack covers can allow water to access a pack, depending on how heavy the rain is and how long the deluge lasts :)

Ponchos can be very effective if they are of a length suitable for going over a backpack. They are also multi-taskers in that they have a lot of uses besides rain wear. I've used the same poncho for thousands of miles thru hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, the Colorado Trail, and on my Caminos. If the weather looks or sounds like it might rain or drizzle, I keep the poncho in my side pocket where it is quickly reachable. Even without stopping, it is a simple matter to give it a couple of 'fluff-out' shakes and then slip it on over me and my pack.

The poncho, as you already know, keeps the bag and the straps and waist belt dry from water.

Wind and ponchos? There are techniques one uses to make that a non-issue. In fact, I look forward to breezes and winds if I'm wearing a poncho as that adds to the ability of air to move in order to keep perspiration and condensation at an even lower level.

As far as legs go, there are several issues at play. I like hiking only in shorts. If it is raining and I find the bit of rain that contacts my legs at mid calf to be uncomfortably chilled, then I will put on a thin base layer bottoms on under the shorts. Even wet, they keep my legs toasty. The other option I might use is an ultra lightweight rain kilt/skirt.

Wet legs themselves are no big deal to me. They dry off quickly and never get saturated. But, one can wear rain pants or a rain kilt/skirt if wet legs are somehow bothersome. :) This is an issue whether one chooses a rain jacket approach, a poncho, or walking nekkid.

Concerns which are really anxieties about walking and hiking in rain tend to deflate to a low level 'yuck' as experience with wet weather walking increases. Experience leads to Knowledge leads to Confidence. :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela

Camino Chris

One step forward...
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I used a thin trash bag inside my backpack (osprey exos 48) with capacity slightly above (50 liters). It weighs almost nothing andamento protects the backpack beyond it raincover. I took another one or two indo casa of tearing while loading and unloading the backpack. Camino Português, 10 days of rain, no problem.
I use a heavy white trash compactor bag inside my backpack. I have been able to use the same one for 3 full caminos with no ripping or holes. Give it a try, you do not even have to be careful. They are superior to regular trash/garbage bags and a nice midsize.
 
Last edited:

david marquez

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte ( Irun to Luarca), Camino Primitivo-Fisterra: April-May 2018
Via de la Plata 2019
I used a Hyperlight cuben fiber pack this past April May for a very wet Del Norte/Primitivo and I had no water leakage at all. I did carry a poncho that has extra space in the back to covera pack and I packed my gear in cuben fiber stuffsacks.
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17, 09/18 SJPdP - Fisterra
Portuguese ~05/19
There was a lot of heavy rain this past fall on the Frances. I used a pack liner instead of a rain cover to keep my stuff dry. None of my stuff ever got wet even though my pack did. My pack was always dry in the morning including the shoulder straps etc. I like to use a pack liner because I have the option to ship it forward with most of my stuff and keep my pack with me with the essentials if needed (think glorified day pack).

I did make some additions and changes to my rain gear when I got back home.

1) I switched out my Enlightened Equipment Rain Wrap for a Zpacks Vertice Rain Kilt @ 2.5 oz. The silnylon EE kilt was a little too thin, really whipped around in the wind, and was too transparent for wash days (sorry).

2) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Gaiters - Calf Height @ 2.1 oz. I think the combination of these with the kilt will give me adequate rain protection. I swelter in pants. There was snow on O Cebreiro this past year, and a lot of rain, wind, and cool temps during late October / early November.

3) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Mitts @ 1 oz. Last year I bought a pair of XXL dish washing gloves at the supermercado.

4) I used an Outdoor Research Helium II Jacket, but I am considering switching to the Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket @ 5.6 oz. It has pit zips!

Maybe the additions to the rain gear are overkill, but for a few more ounces I will be more prepared and comfortable. The gaiters and mitts would be a non issue in the summer.

¡Buena suerte!:D:cool:
 
Last edited:

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča 2017; Norte Mar’18; Ingles Nov’18; VDLP Mar’19
The UK store KARIMOR has cheap dry sacs. I use a 30L Millet Venon women’s pack with rain cover (rain jacket and rain kilt) and don’t worry about the straps getting wet because my stuff stays dry inside the bag. I use a smaller dry sac for my silk liner and sleeping bag (isolate it from my clothes in case I pick up a bedbug 🙄). Weight wise and ease of use “for me” I prefer rain jacket + rain kilt + backpack with rain cover and dry sacs vs the poncho
 

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča 2017; Norte Mar’18; Ingles Nov’18; VDLP Mar’19
There was a lot of heavy rain this past fall on the Frances. I used a pack liner instead of a rain cover to keep my stuff dry. None of my stuff ever got wet even though my pack did. My pack was always dry in the morning including the shoulder straps etc. I like to use a pack liner because I have the option to ship it forward with most of my stuff and keep my pack with me with the essentials if needed (think glorified day pack).

I did make some additions and changes to my rain gear when I got back home.

1) I switched out my Enlightened Equipment Rain Wrap for a Zpacks Vertice Rain Kilt @ 2.5 oz. The silnylon EE kilt was a little too thin, really whipped around in the wind, and was too transparent for wash days (sorry).

2) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Gaiters - Calf Height @ 2.1 oz. I think the combination of these with the kilt will give me adequate rain protection. I swelter in pants. There was snow on O Cebreiro this past year, and a lot of rain, wind, and cool temps during late October / early November.

3) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Mitts @ 1 oz. Last year I bought a pair of XXL dish washing gloves at the supermercado.

4) I used an Outdoor Research Helium II Jacket, but I am considering switching to the Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket @ 5.6 oz. It has pit zips!

Maybe the additions to the rain gear are overkill, but for a few more ounces I will me more prepared and comfortable. The gaiters and mitts would be a non issue in the summer.

¡Buena suerte!:D:cool:
I’m a rain kilt user also but the ULA kilt is super light and much less expensive.
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
Hi, Sho, and a belated welcome to the Forum.

Maybe I can help to add to what has been previously posted.

Cuben Fiber packs exist which are waterproof, do not absorb water, and are the lightest backpacks manufactured. They are expensive, but if you are going to do a lot of hiking and backpacking then the cost per mile is fairly small. :)

Many manufacturers will use a coated fabric for the pack bags. The fabric is waterproof. What is NOT waterproof are the seams on the bag produced when the bag is sewn together. BUT one can make the seams waterproof, which also makes the pack waterproof. One can purchase or make seam sealers which are liquids that after being applied to a seam, dry to a waterproof coating. Although originally made for waterproofing tent seams, Many have used these to great effect on our backpack bags. The amount, method, and instructions are the same whether for a tent or a bag.

Manufactured seam sealer. When I owned a Tarp Tent backpacking tent, I used their instructions for a home made seam sealer

Modern synthetics used for most backpack bags and belt/harness construction will only absorb a small amount of water overall, and will dry out quickly. The shoulder strap pads and hip belt padding are made of non water absorbent material, like closed cell foams.

So the strategy of using a waterproof bag liner, like a kitchen compactor bag or a heavy duty utility plastic bag is a sound strategy. I do agree that pack covers can allow water to access a pack, depending on how heavy the rain is and how long the deluge lasts :)

Ponchos can be very effective if they are of a length suitable for going over a backpack. They are also multi-taskers in that they have a lot of uses besides rain wear. I've used the same poncho for thousands of miles thru hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, the Colorado Trail, and on my Caminos. If the weather looks or sounds like it might rain or drizzle, I keep the poncho in my side pocket where it is quickly reachable. Even without stopping, it is a simple matter to give it a couple of 'fluff-out' shakes and then slip it on over me and my pack.

The poncho, as you already know, keeps the bag and the straps and waist belt dry from water.

Wind and ponchos? There are techniques one uses to make that a non-issue. In fact, I look forward to breezes and winds if I'm wearing a poncho as that adds to the ability of air to move in order to keep perspiration and condensation at an even lower level.

As far as legs go, there are several issues at play. I like hiking only in shorts. If it is raining and I find the bit of rain that contacts my legs at mid calf to be uncomfortably chilled, then I will put on a thin base layer bottoms on under the shorts. Even wet, they keep my legs toasty. The other option I might use is an ultra lightweight rain kilt/skirt.

Wet legs themselves are no big deal to me. They dry off quickly and never get saturated. But, one can wear rain pants or a rain kilt/skirt if wet legs are somehow bothersome. :) This is an issue whether one chooses a rain jacket approach, a poncho, or walking nekkid.

Concerns which are really anxieties about walking and hiking in rain tend to deflate to a low level 'yuck' as experience with wet weather walking increases. Experience leads to Knowledge leads to Confidence. :)
Hi Davebugg
I am interested in what brand/ model of poncho you favour. I have steered away from them but in the last CF in early November we had horrendous weather in Galacia and although I had full all weather gear it still was cold and damp without the added layer of a poncho
 

linkster

Nunca dejes de creer!
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 05/17 brazo roto Portomarín
Francés 09/17, 09/18 SJPdP - Fisterra
Portuguese ~05/19
I’m a rain kilt user also but the ULA kilt is super light and much less expensive.
Looks similar to the EE skirt, but not as transparent. Much better for wash days.:eek::):cool:
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
A great hybrid pack cover/raincoat is the Packa. I don't have one myself, but I walked with a couple who did, and it's a great option.

I made myself something similar, called a Parcho, from a kit that I bought from Quest Outfitters. My Parcho only weighs 7.2 ounces/204 grams, so it's actually lighter weight than the Packa.
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
Assuming I don't have a goal of shaving every possible ounce off my gear weight, are there arguments against using a waterproof backpack (assuming it balances well and has good hip straps)?

I keep reading that rain covers keep your pack only sort of dry, but water runs down your back and comes into the pack through wet shoulder straps; that ponchos blow around in the wind and don't keep your legs covered; that a rain jacket and pants keep you dry but not your pack; that plastic trash bags inside the pack still mean your pack itself gets sopping wet....

Thanks!
Hi Sho
I have one pack rated as waterproof and the manufacturer claims you can swim with it on your back without the contents getting wet.
It is made in NZ by Aarn and I have the Featherlight Freedom one I used on the VDLP in 2018.
It has two front chest pockets and one large one on the back. Inside each is a dry bag with a roll down and securing capability. Saves a rain jacket or poncho.
I have walked in some rain and it works fine, but not tried swimming!!
Their main claim is they designed the packs so the front "balance chest pockets" hold small heavy items to have all the weight straight over the waist with no weight pulling you backwards.
There are YouTube videos about fitting them etc.
Happymark
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hi Davebugg
I am interested in what brand/ model of poncho you favour. I have steered away from them but in the last CF in early November we had horrendous weather in Galacia and although I had full all weather gear it still was cold and damp without the added layer of a poncho
I have used the ZPacks poncho for a few years now.
 

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča 2017; Norte Mar’18; Ingles Nov’18; VDLP Mar’19
Hi Davebugg
I am interested in what brand/ model of poncho you favour. I have steered away from them but in the last CF in early November we had horrendous weather in Galacia and although I had full all weather gear it still was cold and damp without the added layer of a poncho
IKEA PONCHO works fine costs approx €7
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
There was a lot of heavy rain this past fall on the Frances. I used a pack liner instead of a rain cover to keep my stuff dry. None of my stuff ever got wet even though my pack did. My pack was always dry in the morning including the shoulder straps etc. I like to use a pack liner because I have the option to ship it forward with most of my stuff and keep my pack with me with the essentials if needed (think glorified day pack).

I did make some additions and changes to my rain gear when I got back home.

1) I switched out my Enlightened Equipment Rain Wrap for a Zpacks Vertice Rain Kilt @ 2.5 oz. The silnylon EE kilt was a little too thin, really whipped around in the wind, and was too transparent for wash days (sorry).

2) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Gaiters - Calf Height @ 2.1 oz. I think the combination of these with the kilt will give me adequate rain protection. I swelter in pants. There was snow on O Cebreiro this past year, and a lot of rain, wind, and cool temps during late October / early November.

3) I added a pair of Zpacks Vertice Rain Mitts @ 1 oz. Last year I bought a pair of XXL dish washing gloves at the supermercado.

4) I used an Outdoor Research Helium II Jacket, but I am considering switching to the Zpacks Vertice Rain Jacket @ 5.6 oz. It has pit zips!

Maybe the additions to the rain gear are overkill, but for a few more ounces I will me more prepared and comfortable. The gaiters and mitts would be a non issue in the summer.

¡Buena suerte!:D:cool:
The ZPacks Vertice material has a much higher vapor transfer rate than the OR Helium II.. in fact it is the highest period. I have used the jacket, and if I ever decided to give up my poncho the Vertice is what i would use. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Pamploma (April/May 2014)
VDLP March 2019
Hi Sho
I have one pack rated as waterproof and the manufacturer claims you can swim with it on your back without the contents getting wet.
It is made in NZ by Aarn and I have the Featherlight Freedom one I used on the VDLP in 2018.
It has two front chest pockets and one large one on the back. Inside each is a dry bag with a roll down and securing capability. Saves a rain jacket or poncho.
I have walked in some rain and it works fine, but not tried swimming!!
Their main claim is they designed the packs so the front "balance chest pockets" hold small heavy items to have all the weight straight over the waist with no weight pulling you backwards.
There are YouTube videos about fitting them etc.
Happymark
I have an Aarn pack also. Very light, waterproof and super comfy. Highly recommend
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
IKEA PONCHO works fine costs approx €7
My wife also tried the IKEA one and found it unmanageable in rain with high winds. In snow and sleet also no warmth retention. Looking for something better.
Happymark
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
It's not the pack that you need be concerned about being dry, it's the contents within. Just about all modern backpacks have some water repellent qualities, and they are all made of quick dry material. So in the event they do get wet, they dry pretty quick, especially during the warmer, drier months in Spain.
Just make sure you have good waterproof bags for your gear and on the days it looks like it's going to rain, play it safe and secure your stuff in them before you begin the walk in the morning.
I always just put all my stuff in a heavy duty trash bin bag and secure the closure with a stout rubber band. The trash bin bag is slightly larger than my pack compartment and fits nicely as a liner and when not in use rolls up tight, and weighs nothing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
I keep reading that rain covers keep your pack only sort of dry
I think your reading is spot on.

At the risk of repeating what others have said above:
1) use a rain proof pack - like others, mine is a zPacks (arc blast) - with a roll top
2) double up with a dry sack - zPacks make one that doubles as a pack carry bag with handle, useful for check-in at airports
3) use a cover all - @Kanga above suggests Altus - I strap mine across the top of my zPacks arc blast when not needed. Wear either shorts or a walking kilt - your legs will dry quicker that longs.
That keeps the number of wet weather items down to a minimum

Looking for something better.
I had one day when a light drizzle started. Not sufficient to deploy my poncho. Then a strong wind - too strong to deploy the poncho over everything. While the strong wind continued the drizzle turned to a torrent. On another day I found the poncho did not cover the bottom of my walking kilt - short shorts may have been OK.

Got an Altus nearly three years ago - used it for rain a few times only - more often as a wind breaker and as an extra layer on cold and early morning starts.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
Am a true fan of the ponchos similar to the Altus. Got ours on Amazon for 29€. Brand name is Bluefield and it only weighs 330gr.
We had tons of rain in Portugal. Everything stayed dry. They do not blow around, and they are easy to put on. If it looks like rain, hang it from your pack and in a couple of seconds, you can pull it over your head and the rest of you. Do the same thing after the rain stops and it drys hanging from your back pack.
Saves needing dry bags, etc.
Had a similar one on the CF 3 years ago when the winds were blowing 40km an hour, plus rain. Everything stayed dry. People walking by were jealous.
 

Colette Z

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF-Finisterra-Muxia 2017; SK Camino Kosiče-Levoča 2017; Norte Mar’18; Ingles Nov’18; VDLP Mar’19
My wife also tried the IKEA one and found it unmanageable in rain with high winds. In snow and sleet also no warmth retention. Looking for something better.
Happymark
I agree but it’s always mentioned here as a cheaper lightweight alternative. Because I’d read here about the wind flapping it I used adhesive Velcro strips at the bottom on both sides which kept it from blowing up with gusts. I used it on the very “dry” C Frances in 2017 and now in Nov 2018 on the C Ingles (the nothing what I’d consider real rain except Day 1 off/on rain which for me is the worse kind of westher day for a poncho - too much hassle when walking alone to get it off and in over pack). BUT I walked almost 35 days of rain andsome days all day deluges with wind on the Norte March 2018. I used a lightweight waterproof Zajo jacket (long pit zippers and mesh pockets and reverse zipper all good for a quick airing) + ULA rain kilt + somedays also gaiters .....it was the best combo for me. Love the kilt for those off on days. Great for chilly windy dry days for leg warmth. Personally I would advise against buying an expensive poncho for a first Camino Frances as one can buy something if needed.
 

kmrice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago - Fisterra 2008
St. Jean Pied de Port - Santiago 2013
A great hybrid pack cover/raincoat is the Packa. I don't have one myself, but I walked with a couple who did, and it's a great option.

I made myself something similar, called a Parcho, from a kit that I bought from Quest Outfitters. My Parcho only weighs 7.2 ounces/204 grams, so it's actually lighter weight than the Packa.
We’re long time Packa users and love them. Sort of the best of a poncho and a rain jacket combined and they cover your pack. Very long “pit zips” to let lots of air in. They keep the entire pack very dry.

We each also line our pack with a black contractor bag to provide extra water protection. Being black, they can also be used to kill bed bugs by putting the pack in the bag and leaving it in the sun. The only time we encountered bed bugs this worked perfectly.

Personally, I wouldn’t bother with a waterproof pack since I’d carry a poncho and a contractor bag even if my pack were waterproof.
 

firstshirt

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
I use a heavy white trash compactor bag inside my backpack. I have been able to use the same one for 3 full caminos with no ripping or holes. Give it a try, you do not even have to be careful. They are superior to regular trash/garbage bags and a nice midsize.
Plus one on the compactor bag-perfect and inexpensive, light and it works.
 

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