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Vaseline - Is it an Essential Item to Pack?

Galaxy1

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
September to October 2017
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
 
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ksam

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
We've been using Aquaphor (fancy Vaseline!) and it helps with the feet. Hubs no longer gets blisters at all. I still do...on occasion. Just how my feetsies work I guess. But it lessens them considerably. IMHO! If you take it...take a tiny travel size. If you run out and Andy said...buy more there. You are walking from town to town...not thru the wilderness! Been Camino!
 
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ksam

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
As a male, I have an essential use for it that does not apply to yourself. I have two things that reside below my belly button and above my knees. I apply Vaseline between them and my thighs. Without it....pain. Don’t need it anywhere else.
Weeellll um no!! :D But another option...that females can totally get....thigh chafe...and for that believe it or not...solid deodorant. Apply liberally to inner thighs and ta da!! No chafe when wearing dresses in the summer with no stockings or tights....might work for guys too..don't know for sure..try it and let us know :eek:
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
There are 2 main reasons for carrying Vaseline:
  1. Chafing - wherever you suffer from it (and many people, including me, don't)
  2. Blister prevention - Also a variation on chafing. Other products may work better, with less of the mess that Vaseline creates in your socks. Depends on what kind of blisters you get. I have specific blister spots and don't find vaseline to be a solution.
I don't use it anymore., mainly because it interferes with the use of tape on the blisters or blister-prone spots. (Tape doesn't stick over vaseline.)
 
Year of past OR future Camino
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I encountered several German pilgrims using Vick's Vapo Rub for the same reason. As they pronounced it "wix wappo roob" it took me a while to figure out what they meant.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?

YES
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
I find it a necessity for long walks/hikes and when I used to run religiously. Not a fear, but a tool of sorts. A tool I use everyday on the Camino. As far as fears go, I have none that are packable, but when on the Camino I do fear that my beer will be warm. Does that count? :D
Anti-blister and anti-chafing as well as treating any chafing you may get. Also for chapped lips, noses and ears. Hands, too.
I bring a tube of it of approximately 100 grams. I consider it a consumable. It gets lighter as you go on and eventually ends up in a bin (the empty tube). Like toothpaste and sunscreen. That is why its weight not an issue to me.
 
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Charlotte Helbig

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés Sept. 2017
Camino Portugués May-June 2019
Didn’t take it didn’t need it. I used dry wicking sock liners—-they weigh practically nothing and work great!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
For anti-chafing and as a anti-blister strategy, there are longer lasting and better products which are less messy than Vaseline nowadays. The petroleum jelly products will work, and I used to use them since there was nothing else to take their place. Here are just three such alternative products.

  1. 2Toms is my favorite for anti-chafing applications.
  2. Hiker Goo is my current favorite for use in my 'wet feet while backpacking or Camino' strategies. I do not use any lubricants on my feet for blister prevention, but it is excellent and very long lasting for that application, too.
  3. BodyGlide does a good job with both anti-chafing and foot lubricant for blister prevention strategies. BodyGlide also comes in a container labeled specifically as FootGlide, but they are essentially the same product. :)
 

Galaxy1

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
September to October 2017
That’s it for me, but if you need it, buy it there. Spain is not a 3rd world country. Don’t pack your fears. Buen camino! The lighter you travel, the more buen it will be.
I'm not one to pack fears, but thanks for advice.
 
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spursfan

Veteran Member
For anti-chafing and as a anti-blister strategy, there are longer lasting and better products which are less messy than Vaseline nowadays. The petroleum jelly products will work, and I used to use them since there was nothing else to take their place. Here are just three such alternative products.

  1. 2Toms is my favorite for anti-chafing applications.
  2. Hiker Goo is my current favorite for use in my 'wet feet while backpacking or Camino' strategies. I do not use any lubricants on my feet for blister prevention, but it is excellent and very long lasting for that application, too.
  3. BodyGlide does a good job with both anti-chafing and foot lubricant for blister prevention strategies. BodyGlide also comes in a container labeled specifically as FootGlide, but they are essentially the same product. :)

Vaseline might be messy but it's well worth taking - the 20g tin is widely available and much cheaper and probably lighter than the easily-available-in-the-US and expensive-elsewhere products that you have suggested (however good they might be)
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
Vaseline will do in a pinch, but look out for lanoline based products as they are better and there are several excellent day / night foot creams available in Spain.

After suffering badly from blisters on my first Camino I now always grease my feet on long haul walks, have recently switched to an excellent cream made from bees wax, apricot and kanuka oil... It's called Paw Balm and made to help farm dogs feet. But if it's good enough for my best friend, it's got enough for me.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Vaseline might be messy but it's well worth taking - the 20g tin is widely available and much cheaper and probably lighter than the easily-available-in-the-US and expensive-elsewhere products that you have suggested (however good they might be)

You do have a point. I have made considerable use of vaseline in the past, and would use petroleum jelly in a pinch :)

I remediate the weight issue by removing the amount of product from the container that I think I might need and place it into a ziplock baggie. As to cost, while the products mentioned are more expensive per ounce than petroleum jelly, their performance is superior in longevity of an application, the considerable lessening of the mess, and even the functioning of the product.

I don't think that anyone should abandon vaseline if that is what is available and is preferred. It works, and its downsides can be dealt with --- for example, reapplying it to ones feet during each break.
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
Blister prevention is my number one use for Vaseline. I rub it all over my feet and between my toes before socking up. I reapply every few hours and then put on dry socks.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
For anti-chafing and as a anti-blister strategy, there are longer lasting and better products which are less messy than Vaseline nowadays. The petroleum jelly products will work, and I used to use them since there was nothing else to take their place. Here are just three such alternative products.

  1. 2Toms is my favorite for anti-chafing applications.
  2. Hiker Goo is my current favorite for use in my 'wet feet while backpacking or Camino' strategies. I do not use any lubricants on my feet for blister prevention, but it is excellent and very long lasting for that application, too.
  3. BodyGlide does a good job with both anti-chafing and foot lubricant for blister prevention strategies. BodyGlide also comes in a container labeled specifically as FootGlide, but they are essentially the same product. :)

Adding to your list @davebugg : Compeed makes a fabulous anti blister/antichafing stick. I've not found it in stores in the US and order it on Amazon. But I did find it in farmacias in Spain. Non-greasy, washes out of sox/clothing easily. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000MV919I/?tag=
...and as an aside, my friend used it on blistered pantie-line areas and it worked perfectly!
 
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D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Adding to your list @davebugg : Compeed makes a fabulous anti blister/antichafing stick. I've not found it in stores in the US and order it on Amazon. But I did find it in farmacias in Spain. Non-greasy, washes out of sox/clothing easily. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000MV919I/?tag=
...and as an aside, my friend used it on blistered pantie-line areas and it worked perfectly!

Yes :) It is very similar to BodyGlide. Since Johnson and Johnson 'owns' the Compeed brand, you will find that same Compeed anti chafing product packaged in the States as 'Band-Aid Friction Block Stick'.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I don't Vaseline, but for those of you who do - and who like multiple use products to save weight - it does work as a moisturiser. And a hair conditioner/treatment. It is basically mineral oil and waxes. Made from petroleum byproducts.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
Yes :) It is very similar to BodyGlide. Since Johnson and Johnson 'owns' the Compeed brand, you will find that same Compeed anti chafing product packaged in the States as 'Band-Aid Friction Block Stick'.

Odd...I tried Band-Aid Friction Block Stick as well as Compeed and found them quite different. Would be interesting to see the ingredients...But , it's another option for others to investigate :)
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
I don't Vaseline, but for those of you who do - and who like multiple use products to save weight - it does work as a moisturiser. And a hair conditioner/treatment. It is basically mineral oil and waxes. Made from petroleum byproducts.
@Kanga ...you make a point worth mentioning. My children's pediatrician was not fond of any use of Vasoline, but stated that if one were to use it, be sure it is the Vasoline brand or another reputable brand. You don't want to be buying this at a dollar store as budget brands may not be tested for purity and can have harmful petroleum by products/impurities.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Odd...I tried Band-Aid Friction Block Stick as well as Compeed and found them quite different. Would be interesting to see the ingredients...But , it's another option for others to investigate :)

It could very well be that the ingredients were changed. It's been awhile since I compared the two. :)
 
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Syncro

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francais
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?

Vaseline has many uses: chafed lips, removing makeup, and anti-chafing.
 

Red Rose

redrose
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis September/October 2015
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago March/April 2019
This is a good thread for people who tend to get blisters. I was told by a friend who completed the Camino Francis to use vaseline on my feet and use a nylon sock liner to keep the socks from sliding around. On top of that use reqular socks then shoes. About a week into my camino I decided it was a waste of time and didn't do it. Lo and behold I had blisters. I learned a hard lesson very quickly. I went back to the Vaseline routine and five hundred miles later I passed many pilgrims sitting and nursing their blisters. I bought the mini size Vaseline at Walmart for $1.00 and in Spain it was $4.00. Dollar Tree has sock liners for $1.00 which worked well. I used cheap socks, so it doesn't matter if you pay a lot for socks.
 

Syncro

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francais
This is a good thread for people who tend to get blisters. I was told by a friend who completed the Camino Francis to use vaseline on my feet and use a nylon sock liner to keep the socks from sliding around. On top of that use reqular socks then shoes. About a week into my camino I decided it was a waste of time and didn't do it. Lo and behold I had blisters. I learned a hard lesson very quickly. I went back to the Vaseline routine and five hundred miles later I passed many pilgrims sitting and nursing their blisters. I bought the mini size Vaseline at Walmart for $1.00 and in Spain it was $4.00. Dollar Tree has sock liners for $1.00 which worked well. I used cheap socks, so it doesn't matter if you pay a lot for socks.
I couldn't agree with you more! I brought BodyGlide because it was recommended on this forum. I neglected to use it on day 1 and 2 and I paid dearly for it with blisters. I also did not heed warnings to stop when you feel "the burn" on day 1 as I was walking with someone and stupidly chose to not stop when I should have. The Camino will very quickly teach you lessons. And, of course, I did not have liner socks either! I picked those up soon thereafter, too!
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accomodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducingly tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the sock to move a bit in the shoe. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, the have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
 
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Red Rose

redrose
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis September/October 2015
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago March/April 2019
I couldn't agree with you more! I brought BodyGlide because it was recommended on this forum. I neglected to use it on day 1 and 2 and I paid dearly for it with blisters. I also did not heed warnings to stop when you feel "the burn" on day 1 as I was walking with someone and stupidly chose to not stop when I should have. The Camino will very quickly teach you lessons. And, of course, I did not have liner socks either! I picked those up soon thereafter, too!
I didn,t mention in my post that I was 57 years old when I did the Camino Francis. Planning on doing the Portugese route in the next year or two. Vaseline will be in my pack before I start.
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
Don't use it, didn't bring it, didn't miss it. Glop in my socks...yuck! ;)
One pair of good fitting, quality hiking socks works for me. Rarely do I ever blister.

But as always everyone is different and whatever works for you, works.
There are so many variables and opinions for each item in your pack you just have to decide what YOU like.
If we collected all the recommendations we read about, we wouldn't be able to lift our packs.

Buen camino.
 
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Harington

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
Without anointing my feet liberally in Vaseline each morning I could not have completed all my Camino journeys, nor could I have got to Rome on foot!
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
Hello
Appreciate all the comments and like many have found out what works for me. Chafing in the groin is also an issue. I have used various creams and ran out on a recent camino so purchased Vaseline in Spain works far better than I expected. Did not have goey socks.
One caution I was advised to avoid putting any creams between the toes as it can lead to fungus infections. All over the feet are fine. If between the toes are an issue then 5 toe socks work or taping the toes either side of where the problem is likely to occur.
I have 5 toe socks I alternately wear with normal. When I use 5 toe I wear a liner over the top so effectively 2 pairs.
Good luck
Happymark
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
its called vaselina in Spain. widely available.
Knowing this saves on embarrassing mime.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Planning to walk June "2017"
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?

Vaseline can be used to cover cuts, scrapes, burns, lubricate walking poles, soften dry skin, retain moisture in hands etc but we took Vicks Vapo Rub for our feet.....
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?
For anti-chafing and as a anti-blister strategy, there are longer lasting and better products which are less messy than Vaseline nowadays. The petroleum jelly products will work, and I used to use them since there was nothing else to take their place. Here are just three such alternative products.

  1. 2Toms is my favorite for anti-chafing applications.
  2. Hiker Goo is my current favorite for use in my 'wet feet while backpacking or Camino' strategies. I do not use any lubricants on my feet for blister prevention, but it is excellent and very long lasting for that application, too.
  3. BodyGlide does a good job with both anti-chafing and foot lubricant for blister prevention strategies. BodyGlide also comes in a container labeled specifically as FootGlide, but they are essentially the same product. :)
EXPENSIVE
 
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Patricia Bell

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Planning a trip between 14May to 14 June 2017. Starting out from Santander, for the first time.
I have read with interests who has been written about vasaline which I have used in the past.

I bring two creams with me. Aqueous Cream BP, which contains liquid paraffin, white soft paraffin, emulsified with purified water and other stuff, which I apply on my feet and other place where needed. The other is Arnica cream for bruises. Both of these creams are decanted into small pots.

For blisters I was recommended sheeps wool (which I collected from the fields) to place next to blisters that are undamaged but painful (recommended by a New Zealander), plus micropore tape with scrap pieces of cotton or tissue for minor cuts.

I am a hardy soul so perhaps my methods are not for all!

I have 16 days left to prepare before I start out on my second Camino Frances.
 

Jmay1

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Santiago (June 2019)
Adding to your list @davebugg : Compeed makes a fabulous anti blister/antichafing stick. I've not found it in stores in the US and order it on Amazon. But I did find it in farmacias in Spain. Non-greasy, washes out of sox/clothing easily. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000MV919I/?tag=
...and as an aside, my friend used it on blistered pantie-line areas and it worked perfectly!
Thanks, my one issue with Vaseline-type products is how to get the socks clean at the end of the day.
 
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cindyjo

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2012
Camino del Norte /Primitivo (2014)
Chemin la Puy (2016)
Camino Portuguese (2017)
I second davebugg’s use of 2Toms. I’ve used 2Toms with great success on all my caminos. I’ve also used hikers wool to wrap my little toe on my right foot so it won’t hug the toe next to it. I think trying things out before heading out to walk a Camino is important so you can find out what works for your feet.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Called Vaselina in Spain, it is called Vasenol in Portugal. I always bring a tiny plastic bottle / jar, usually available at a checkout counter here in the US.

If I need more, I can get it in any supermercado over there. The thread above contains all the information about uses you need.

Vaseline is like 'duck tape' on the Camino. You always find new and creative uses for it. I am always surprised when someone raises an issue and the answer is either vaseline or duck tape...

Hope this helps.
 
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Walking Lover

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
Absolutely! I have done 3 Caminos and never have had a blister. I put vaseline on my feet every morning.
 

Carol Larson

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April (2017)
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?


I used Foot Glide. Others used Body Glide. I don't like the greasiness of Vaseline. I had no blisters.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
EXPENSIVE

:) In comparison to vaseline, sure. But, c'mon, we're not talking about the cost difference between a Ford and a Ferrari. :)

While there is more expense, it won't hardly create a budget crisis. And the extra bit of expense buys better overall performance, and you use less of those products than you would vaseline because they last much longer per application.

While plain baking soda is less expensive toothpaste, and course sand is less expensive than body soap, and wash tubs and wash boards are less expensive than a washing machine, and candles are less expensive than electrical wiring and light bulbs, folks do make choices which don't always focus on costs, but on palatability, performance, and convenience.

If vaseline is one's preferred product, so be it. That's cool. But using 'cost' as a reason to stick with vaseline -- when one wants to use a different product -- is not an effective argument against doing so.
 
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J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
I have never had to use Vaseline or glide. I wear a silk sock liner under my smart wool socks. I have hiked several thousand miles without any blisters. Now planters fasciitis that is another story all together.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
This thread brings memories to mind of my running and jogging days of the past. I carried a small tube of vaseline in a tiny pocket on the back of my running shorts. And I still have that little tube, which must be over 35 years old :eek:

When the vaseline ran out in the tube, I would warm up a little pot of vaseline from a large jar and suck up the semi-liquid contents into a syringe without a needle. I would then insert the tip of the syringe into the tube's opening and squirt the contents in. I like the footprint of that tube cause it fit just right into my pocket, and I just never found another one after that initial purchase.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
We know how good Vaseline is. I at one time a freight car repairman on the rail road. We used Vaseline to lubricate the train wheels and axels. It lasted longer than axel grease. It was stored in 50 gallon drums That we rolled on carts. (Jus'sayin)
 

SusanSmyth

Happy Member 😋
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
This is a good thread for people who tend to get blisters. I was told by a friend who completed the Camino Francis to use vaseline on my feet and use a nylon sock liner to keep the socks from sliding around. On top of that use reqular socks then shoes. About a week into my camino I decided it was a waste of time and didn't do it. Lo and behold I had blisters. I learned a hard lesson very quickly. I went back to the Vaseline routine and five hundred miles later I passed many pilgrims sitting and nursing their blisters. I bought the mini size Vaseline at Walmart for $1.00 and in Spain it was $4.00. Dollar Tree has sock liners for $1.00 which worked well. I used cheap socks, so it doesn't matter if you pay a lot for socks.

I had the same experience you did! Vaseline, nylon sock and wool sock. Worked like a charm.... until the day I took someone’s advice and switched out my Vaseline for Linitul (?). First blister of the Camino! Needless to say I switched back right away.
 

Red Rose

redrose
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis September/October 2015
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago March/April 2019
I have never had to use Vaseline or glide. I wear a silk sock liner under my smart wool socks. I have hiked several thousand miles without any blisters. Now planters fasciitis that is another story all together.
Check a recent blog on plantars fascitis. We discussed Voltaren/Diclofenac for pf.
 
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Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
Wow, so many replies. Whatever one uses and are happy with it, that's fine.
I will put in my tuppence worth anyway. I was told some time ago not to use vaseline as it heats up.
Blisters were never really have been an issue with me, but just to make sure, I now use Lanolin. It's brilliant. Rub genenerously between your toes and heels. It is messy , but worth it. it even impregnates into your socks. Leaving them very smooth even after washing. On the downside, its quite hard to find a stockist. I eventually found one stockist in Yorkshire.
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
So that would be pronounced Basselina?
Where do you find it? Pharmacies?
I've had trouble finding it in the past.
I found it in a tube at a farmacia. I bring a tube from the States and then replace it as I run out.
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
My friend did a chafed anus impression with sound effects in a chemists shop on the French. And he pointed at me. It was very difficult not to laugh, he had no idea why the staff were looking stone-faced. Basselina sounds about right. It's a few years since I was there but the memory will be with me for life.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Vaseline, whatever it is called, can be bought in supermarkets and some smaller tiendas across Spain and Portugal. In Europe, it is one of the few 'first aid' type items that can be bought over the counter, not requiring dispensing by a pharmacist.

First, check where toiletries and cosmetics are kept. Then, check the tiny first aid section. Finally, check where the baby supplies, diapers, nappies, etc. are sold. it will be in one of those three places.
 
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colossalsquids

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino del Norte (to Primitivo and Finisterre) 2017
Jakobsweg (Baden-Wurtemburg) 2018
Absolutely a must for me. Luckily you can buy tiny containers of it in the US, I sometimes would apply more than once a day. I just did a short part of the Jakobsweg in Germany last week and it was one of the first things I packed!
 

Jodean

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
I don't use vaseline or any other cream. Wearing knee high nylons under my wool socks works for me. No blisters yet. Occasionally use a bit of body glide on the heels or toes.
 

backpack45

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Vezelay (2017, in progress); Primitivo & Norte; Geneva/LePuy; Arles; Portuguese; Francés + more
I don't ever carry Vaseline; I have other ways of dealing with footcare and I don't experience chafing. However, there has been a time or two when I needed a tiny bit of that sort of thing and I used my Chapstick :)
.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
No vasaline. Its oil based use something natural
If you are concerned about the petroleum aspect of it, I once asked my dear departed step-dad about that. (He had a chemistry degree and worked all his life in an oil refinery.) I don’t recall the precise details, but my understanding is that whatever was in the oil that might cause concern has been removed from the Vaseline that we buy. In any event, what he told me allayed my concerns.

Incidentally, I happened to catch an interesting interview on the radio some months back, about how Vaseline came to be. Apparently an enterprising young man (in Texas I think) noticed that a lot of gunk accumulated on and about the drilling apparatus of oil rigs and, from time to time, it had to be scraped off. He asked what was done with the scraped off gunk and was told it was just discarded. But it was also mentioned to him that the oilfield workers sometimes used it as a sort of balm for various skin ailments and that it worked great. The enterprising young fellow took some of the gunk home, tested it himself and got good results. He then spent some time working with it to produce a product that he thought would be marketable. When he achieved what he thought would work he tried selling it through the drug stores. The drug stores were not interested in it, so he started showing it himself at fairs, etc and giving out samples. Word spread and folks got interested and they started going to drug stores to purchase more. He had created his own market!! The rest is history. I thought that was a neat story.

Well, that is my bit of trivia for the day.
 
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sternenstrasse

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (11-12/2009)
Search the Internet for "deer tallow cream" or Hirschtalg (adeps cervidae). It's very popular among German speaking pilgrims and mountaineers. Known brands: Scholl, Rohde, Xenofit. Not for the vegan pilgrims, though. But extremely effective against chafing and blisters! I never got blisters on my camino with deer tallow cream.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Thanks, my one issue with Vaseline-type products is how to get the socks clean at the end of the day.
I have used Vaseline (when I lost my tube of Nok cream) and somehow my socks were none the worst for it.... Mind you it is always difficult to get them really clean, best is to use a wahing machine from time to time ;)
 

tfw

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP (2013), CP (2018)
I like Neosporin rather than Vaseline. Get the greasy type rather than creme type. Comes in a couple of tube sizes, a medium size being plenty for a Camino. Use on all the aforementioned applications, including foot lube. Seems to aid in healing up blisters, too.
 

Teresafun

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Del Norte Sept 2018
How about using Organic extra virgin cold pressed coconut oil. Use on feet, lips, thighs, hair and when hungry you can eat it. I’m going to take some in a baggy unless I hear anything against this in place of Vaseline
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
From my favorite source: Fixingyourfeet.com (most of his readers are ultra-marathoners)

Q: Lubricants in Hot Temperatures - Brazil135 was fantastic. I concluded the race without any foot problem by applying lanolin and Vaseline several times a day. I wonder if you could comment on the use of the above lubricants in high temps such as Badwater in July.
A: I would avoid Vaseline. It is too sticky and over time, cakes up on the socks. It also then tends to catch all the grit and sand that ends up inside your shoes. In high heat, it is also very liquid. Better to use Hydropel, SportsSlick, or BodyGlide. They also last longer.
Q: Lubricants and Powders - I stopped by your site and wanted to know if you could comment on the use of Vaseline or petroleum covered with powders.
A: Vaseline is the old standard for a lubricant. The problem is that it is sticky and attracts grit, gust, sand, and whatever the athlete comes in contact with. It tends to also cake up over time and can almost harden over time on socks, shorts, or other materials. Newer lubricants are less sticky and are much slicker and better at lessening the effects of friction. Putting powder on a lubricant can be done but usually athletes use one of the other. I have only seen a few use both. Powder may cause the lubricant, especially Vaseline, to cake up.
 
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Deleted member 67185

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From my favorite source: Fixingyourfeet.com (most of his readers are ultra-marathoners)

Q: Lubricants in Hot Temperatures - Brazil135 was fantastic. I concluded the race without any foot problem by applying lanolin and Vaseline several times a day. I wonder if you could comment on the use of the above lubricants in high temps such as Badwater in July.
A: I would avoid Vaseline. It is too sticky and over time, cakes up on the socks. It also then tends to catch all the grit and sand that ends up inside your shoes. In high heat, it is also very liquid. Better to use Hydropel, SportsSlick, or BodyGlide. They also last longer.
Q: Lubricants and Powders - I stopped by your site and wanted to know if you could comment on the use of Vaseline or petroleum covered with powders.
A: Vaseline is the old standard for a lubricant. The problem is that it is sticky and attracts grit, gust, sand, and whatever the athlete comes in contact with. It tends to also cake up over time and can almost harden over time on socks, shorts, or other materials. Newer lubricants are less sticky and are much slicker and better at lessening the effects of friction. Putting powder on a lubricant can be done but usually athletes use one of the other. I have only seen a few use both. Powder may cause the lubricant, especially Vaseline, to cake up.

This is exactly what I've tried to get across. Thanks, Jill :) I do not think Hydropel -- which was a favorite -- is still available, though. :( 2Toms seems to be a good alternative, though.
 
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Deleted member 67185

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How about using Organic extra virgin cold pressed coconut oil. Use on feet, lips, thighs, hair and when hungry you can eat it. I’m going to take some in a baggy unless I hear anything against this in place of Vaseline

Hi, Teresa and welcome to the forum :)
The thing which makes any good coconut oil edible and good for skin conditioning, its low melting point and ease of absorption, would make it very ineffective for a lubricant against blistering and chafing.
 

leichecerca

Can’t stay away
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Finisterre: May 2018
Camino Frances: April-May 2018
Camino Frances: April-May 2017
Vaseline totally rocks! It is the second-most important item to bring (the first being well-fitting, well-broken-in footwear). Did not use Vaseline my first Camino: got blisters. Second Camino: Vaseline all over my feet & between my toes every day — no blisters at all. Did not experience any sock gunk problem either. I used the same kind of wool socks and sock liners both years — the only difference was the Vaseline. Also, my feet felt smoother and less calloused at the end of that second Camino than they were at the beginning. I swear by Vaseline. It was easy to find at a farmacia in Spain when my initial small jar ran out. Good luck & Buen Camino!
 

alhartman

2005-2017 Delightful 346 days in Spain and France.
Year of past OR future Camino
2017
If you have something that works for you, stick with it. I am a fan of BagBalm; if it is good enough for cows udders it is good enough for my feet. And it has all the other side uses of Vaseline: chapstick, cold sores, chaffing, minor cuts and scrapes, mustache wax, etc. It is more viscous than Vaseline so lasts longer on my sweaty feet. I do use a silk inner sock which collect the excess. I put on morning and night and sleep in my silk liner socks to keep it off my sleep sack. It is lanolin and petroleum jelly with a bit of antiseptic. My tout aside, most of my runner or cycling friends swear by body-glide (no petroleum or animal lanolin). Admiral Byrd supposedly took BagBalm to Antarctica.
Chacun son goût
But do read DaveBugg excellent treatise: it should be a permanent resource. Blisters are caused by moisture, heat, and/or friction. Make them go away however you can. My sole blister in over 350 days of caminos was when I walked thru wet grass and neglected to dry out my feet and put on fresh socks.
 
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Deleted member 67185

Guest
If you have something that works for you, stick with it. I am a fan of BagBalm; if it is good enough for cows udders it is good enough for my feet. And it has all the other side uses of Vaseline: chapstick, cold sores, chaffing, minor cuts and scrapes, mustache wax, etc. It is more viscous than Vaseline so lasts longer on my sweaty feet. I do use a silk inner sock which collect the excess. I put on morning and night and sleep in my silk liner socks to keep it off my sleep sack. It is lanolin and petroleum jelly with a bit of antiseptic. My tout aside, most of my runner or cycling friends swear by body-glide (no petroleum or animal lanolin). Admiral Byrd supposedly took BagBalm to Antarctica.
Chacun son goût
But do read DaveBugg excellent treatise: it should be a permanent resource. Blisters are caused by moisture, heat, and/or friction. Make them go away however you can. My sole blister in over 350 days of caminos was when I walked thru wet grass and neglected to dry out my feet and put on fresh socks.

And Bag Balm is great for 'monkey butt'. :)
 
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Rudie

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Norte (Irun - Oviedo), Primitivo, Fisterra, Muxia (2017);
Via Podiensis, Via Gebennensis (2019)
Hi, Teresa and welcome to the forum :)
The thing which makes any good coconut oil edible and good for skin conditioning, its low melting point and ease of absorption, would make it very ineffective for a lubricant against blistering and chafing.

That's actually not true. I had coconut oil with me as I use it for my skin, as a hair conditioner, and together with baking powder as a deodorant and as a tooth paste. I got chafing between my cheeks after the third day and had nothing else for treatment, so I used the oil. It worked like a charm. The next morning the chafing was gone. From then on I applied it every morning and evening and didn't have problems with chafing ever since. Let's not forget, coconut oil has very strong antibacterial properties.

BTW, the main ingredient of the HikeGoo is petrolatum, which means it is based on vaseline.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
That's actually not true. I had coconut oil with me as I use it for my skin, as a hair conditioner, and together with baking powder as a deodorant and as a tooth paste. I got chafing between my cheeks after the third day and had nothing else for treatment, so I used the oil. It worked like a charm. The next morning the chafing was gone. From then on I applied it every morning and evening and didn't have problems with chafing ever since. Let's not forget, coconut oil has very strong antibacterial properties.

BTW, the main ingredient of the HikeGoo is petrolatum, which means it is based on vaseline.

DaveBugg is right: moisturizing is different from lubricating. Moisturizing is helpful for a lot of things. But to avoid blisters, you need lubrication; something that stays on the surface of the skin to reduce friction.

Also, it's not true that coconut oil has "strong antibacterial properties." It does contain lauric acid, which has shown in clinical trials to have some antibacterial properties, but the studies were done with purified lauric acid; not together with all the other fatty acids present in coconut oil. In fact, if you dip your hands repeatedly into a container of coconut oil, you can introduce bacteria that will grow there.

That being said, I like the idea of bringing it along as a hair conditioner. I'm going to try that.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Search the Internet for "deer tallow cream" or Hirschtalg (adeps cervidae). It's very popular among German speaking pilgrims and mountaineers. Known brands: Scholl, Rohde, Xenofit. Not for the vegan pilgrims, though. But extremely effective against chafing and blisters! I never got blisters on my camino with deer tallow cream.

Ugh. Mix the scent of deer tallow with the thick menthol fragrances people seem to love in the albergue, and I'm going to end up sleeping out in the field.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Ugh. Mix the scent of deer tallow with the thick menthol fragrances people seem to love in the albergue, and I'm going to end up sleeping out in the field.
Sleeping out in the fields a few times - under the stars - would have been nice, but many times I would have been happy if people would just open a couple of windows.
 

sternenstrasse

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (11-12/2009)
Ugh. Mix the scent of deer tallow with the thick menthol fragrances people seem to love in the albergue, and I'm going to end up sleeping out in the field.
No way, deer tallow itself is completely odorless and white. The cream is perfumed like any other cosmetic product nowadays. Sometimes (the Scholl product) it has a rosemary scent.
 
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Deleted member 67185

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That's actually not true. I had coconut oil with me as I use it for my skin, as a hair conditioner, and together with baking powder as a deodorant and as a tooth paste. I got chafing between my cheeks after the third day and had nothing else for treatment, so I used the oil. It worked like a charm. The next morning the chafing was gone. From then on I applied it every morning and evening and didn't have problems with chafing ever since. Let's not forget, coconut oil has very strong antibacterial properties.

BTW, the main ingredient of the HikeGoo is petrolatum, which means it is based on vaseline.

Hi, Rudie, and welcome to the Forum. :)

Let me share a bit of why I disagree with your post. But first, just let me say that I have no reason to sway you away from using whatever product you choose to use; what personally works for you or is your preference is not a matter for debate.

As a broad and general statement of application, it actually IS true that coconut oil is problematic when used for lubrication to prevent chafing. That it was not a problem for you is anecdotal. I have also tried coconut oil, olive oil and a variety of other similar substances, and they not only do not hold up, but they are a bit messy.

And I am not alone in looking for a vaseline substitute. In my backpacking career (and during my much younger days when doing distance running and marathons), I've known a lot of folks who had chafing problems. Not just in between thighs, but also arm pits and nipples. As part of the search for anti-chafing Nirvana, coconut oil and other oily stuff was tried by many, and then abandoned when it didn't hold up for more than a short while. Vaseline, despite its shortcomings, was the better of those choices.

As to the antibacterial properties, those found in coconut oil are limited in nature.... honey has a far better antibacterial basis if one is needing to hit the cupboard for a neosporin alternative.

Your assessment of Hiker Goo being based on "vaseline" is also not true. Yes, there is a small percentage of petrolatum as an ingredient, but it has been modified and makes up only a small part of the Goo. However, there is a primary wax based component which also contains a lanolin product. This is why Hiker Goo is 'slicker', last longer, does not create the mess that pure 'vaseline' can.

Sorry that we disagree on these points, but that happens when lots of folks discuss things :)
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
I'd go with Vicks.
  1. Lubricates just like Vaseline,
  2. Has menthol and eucalyptus oil/anti-fungal properties,
  3. Helps with a stuffy nose,
  4. Rub it in good and it won't gunk up your socks
I've been using it recently as my feet were dry, cracked and looked like the feet of a dehydrated man 3 times my age. I figured I'd give it a try with the hopes of reconditioning my feet for my camino next year. I saw an improvement in a week. One month in, and my feet look like a newborn's. Couldn't believe it myself! I was also prone to getting athlete's foot. Problem seems to be solved as well.
 
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Deleted member 67185

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I'd go with Vicks.
  1. Lubricates just like Vaseline,
  2. Has menthol and eucalyptus oil/anti-fungal properties,
  3. Helps with a stuffy nose,
  4. Rub it in good and it won't gunk up your socks
I've been using it recently as my feet were dry, cracked and looked like the feet of a dehydrated man 3 times my age. I figured I'd give it a try with the hopes of reconditioning my feet for my camino next year. I saw an improvement in a week. One month in, and my feet look like a newborn's. Couldn't believe it myself! I was also prone to getting athlete's foot. Problem seems to be solved as well.

:) I remember an unpleasant night in a bed right next to someone who used vicks slathered on their feet under some thin socks at bedtime. The smell of the stuff was overwhelming. Can't see the smell as a problem during the day, though :)
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Year of past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Anthony, I'm glad you found that Vicks works for your feet. However the strong smell of Vicks and other methol-type products used by other in the albergue made me want to cry. I felt assaulted by that scent. It doesn't clear out my nasal passages, it plugs them up with an allergic response. Please don't use them inside before bed.
 
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Jodean

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
My 2 pairs of knee-high nylons that I wear under my socks, weigh a lot less than a jar of vaseline, and my socks are easy to wash. Make sure you turn them inside out, socks and nylons, so the seams don't rub your feet.
 
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Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
I am told that vaseline heats up during use. Not sure if that is true. I use lanolin cream. Rub it between your toes and heels. Since using lanolin, I have never had any blisters.
Everyone has there own methods. Whatever works for you that's the road to go.
 

sternenstrasse

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (11-12/2009)
Whatever you rub upon your feet will surely heat up at some point. But one of the big advantages of deer tallow is the fact that it does not get absorbed by the skin but remains as a very effective lubricant between skin and socks during your walk. You must, however, accept the somewhat greasy feeling and also you need to use the same pair of socks during a reasonable amount of time (3 days min.).
 
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jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Dear all, I've been advised to pack Vaseline for my next trip in September (Santiago to Finisterre). I hear it has a multitude of uses but I am only aware of it's anti-chafing uses. What else can it do for a hiker/walker?
That in itself should be enough. I use it on my feet at the end and beginning of each day. I also use it in any rub area.
 

mvanert

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
As a male, I have an essential use for it that does not apply to yourself. I have two things that reside below my belly button and above my knees. I apply Vaseline between them and my thighs. Without it....pain. Don’t need it anywhere else.
Alas, me too, it works like a charm and makes my day a whole lot nicer!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
No. Vaseline is not necessary. Or Vicks. I don't use either. And they are on sale in Spain if you find you want some.
I have not rubbed any product into my feet, not worn sock liners and do not get blisters. I do seem to get one hot spot during my first week of walking. I catch it early using compeed, or duct tape and after a few days...voila! It disappears.
That said, all feet are unique and there is no one method of blister prevention that will be successful for everyone.
 

RemysMimi

Hooked on the Camino!!
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2018)
Frances or Portuguese (2020)
I encountered several German pilgrims using Vick's Vapo Rub for the same reason. As they pronounced it "wix wappo roob" it took me a while to figure out what they meant.
I used something similar to this that I purchased in Spain. Not one blister.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
As additional consideration, what are some reasons and thoughts to avoiding vaseline-type stuff on the skin of the feet?

The ideal is to reduce friction to the OUTSIDE of the sock, rather than on the inside of the sock that rests on top of the skin. Using a goop on the foot attempts to deal with a symptom that causes blistering, but it leaves the cause for the problem unsolved.

Primary prevention involves stopping the shear force friction - from socks rubbing on the skin - from causing blistering. This is done by:

Use a sock material, natural or synthetic, which does not deform, becoming saggy and stretched. Socks like Smart Wool, Ice Breaker, Darn Tough, Coolmax, Wigwam, etc. use synthetic content (even in those that are Merino Wool) to prevent sock deformation to good effect.

Proper sizing. Here, you want a fit that follows the opposite of what you want in footwear for hiking/walking. You want socks which are snug on the feet, but not gangrene-inducingly tight.

Wear lightly padded socks. Heavier padding allows more movement of the sock against the skin. For considerations of cushioning, it is better to use a more 'cushy' insole, or to add additional cushioning as a layer under the insole.

Except on long and steep downhill grades, wear shoes on the loose side. This allows the sock to remain in place against the skin, but allows the shoe to slightly slide around the sock. A tight shoe can force the sock to move against the skin, creating blister causing friction forces.

An effective add-on to the shoe can be the application of the self-adhering Engo Anti-Blister patches. They can be highly effective at preventing shear force friction blistering by making it easy for the sock to move inside the shoe. Again, this keeps the shoe from forcing the sock to rub against the skin.

For those interested, I did a thorough review of the Engo Patches in an earlier Forum post.

For hotspot treatments, adhesive coverings like Leukotape P, Omnifix tape, Moleskin, sports tape (the white adhesive tape stuff) and, yes, better brands of 'duct tape' are the primary choice and are better suited and less expensive to use than Compeed. Compeed is intended for application to blisters after they have formed and have ruptured. Less expensive options can also be used for blister treatment.

An issue with using slippery substances on the skin of the feet, is that they will interfere with the application of hot spot treatments. Most treatments for the pre-blister hot-spot involves the application of barrier materials, like tapes or moleskin, etc., so it is vital for the adhesives to adhere securely to the skin. The adhesives will fail if applied to skin coated with lubricant. So care must be taken to use hand sanitizer or alcohol to clean the goop off of the skin.

Any goop residue in socks can soften and loosen adhesives, so it is a good idea to change into 'goop-free' socks after applying hot spot coverings.

If committed to using skin goops for blister prevention, use preparations that do not require more frequent application. Pure petrolatum-based goops, like Vaseline, tend to rub off fairly quickly and get absorbed into to the skin as they are warmed up from body heat.

Ironically, the softening effect to the skin by the absorption of petrolatums can make one more prone to blistering.

So a goop that is more persistent and less absorbable will perform better. I would look for a ‘waxier’ type of goop. Many times, beeswax is an ingredient for these types of foot or skin treatments for blister protection. Body Glide, HikeGoo, ChafeX, Compeed Anti-Blister Stick, etc. all use this type of formulation. These products might include some petrolatum as a part of the formula, but it is the beeswax and paraffins and other waxy components which allow for a longer duration of the product on the skin.

Anyway, perhaps this will provide some helpful information.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
No idea.I am French so I use Nok cream. A must have! But usually leave it it behind two days after starting walking and… manage fine without it! 😅
If you find you need Vaseline, no need to pack it, you can buy it in any farmacia in Spain and probably most supermarkets 🙂
 

O Peracha

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago (2014)
Annapurna Base, Nepal (2014)
GR 5 - Holland to Pompey, France (2015)
Lisbon to Finesterre (2016)
As a male, I have an essential use for it that does not apply to yourself. I have two things that reside below my belly button and above my knees. I apply Vaseline between them and my thighs. Without it....pain. Don’t need it anywhere else.

Hey, if it ain't broke and works for you . . . But vaseline sounds really, really messy and I wonder about it's effectiveness. In my opinion there are other more effective products, i.e. anything with zinc. If you're in the US, I'd recommend Boudreaux's Butt Paste but any baby rash lotion (with zinc) will work - both for prevention and treatment.
 

sternenstrasse

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-SdC (11-12/2009)
So a goop that is more persistent and less absorbable will perform better. I would look for a ‘waxier’ type of goop.

That's exactly what Hirschtalg (deer tallow) is known for, in the German speaking part of Europe. I haven's seen this product in Spain though. On my next camino, I will definately take it with me again!
 
Last edited:

malingerer

samarkand
Year of past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
Vaseline will do in a pinch, but look out for lanoline based products as they are better and there are several excellent day / night foot creams available in Spain.

After suffering badly from blisters on my first Camino I now always grease my feet on long haul walks, have recently switched to an excellent cream made from bees wax, apricot and kanuka oil... It's called Paw Balm and made to help farm dogs feet. But if it's good enough for my best friend, it's got enough for me.
I'm NOT a dog lover and this kinda tickles me! :) I use O'KEEFES HAPPY FEET CREAM before I go on Caminos and after that it's what ever I can get in a shop!

Buen Camino

Samarkand.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few times
Any future pilgrims out there wondering if vaseline is a necessity to walk the Camino? Of course not. Other than a healthy body, nothing is a necessity to walk the Camino. Carrying vaseline, and I say vaseline because it is inexpensive and available to everyone, is not something even worth giving that much thought to. Go ahead and bring it and try it. Bring a small tube/container of it. If it works for you, use it. If not, leave it on a donativo table at an albergue for someone like me that does use it.
 
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