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Vasque boots

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
It seems a lifetime ago, but prior to my first camino I was dealing with the question of footwear and a friend had a pair of high end Vasque boots that were too small for her. Before she took them back to REI she suggested I try them as an option for my coming Camino.

The size seemed correct at the time (7), but I’ve actually sized all the way down to a 6.5 from a dress shoes of 7-7.5.

I tried them for about 4-5 days and concluded that nothing had ever hurt my knees and the tops of my shins so much as these boots. It felt like I had to work at keeping the boots going in the direction I wanted to walk. It is really the strangest feeling I’ve ever had in any shoe — and I used to dance pointe, which is a thought most people would find horrifying.

I felt like the sole of the boot had an idea about how I was supposed to walk and it was at odds with how I actually walk.

My knees, just under the patella to about a third of the way down my shins just ached like I’d been in a bar brawl. And when i walked I felt off balance, off gait etc etc.

I found my Keen boots and sandals that have been my primary go-to at the very small outfitter near to my shack in the woods, and aside from days 10-11-12 of my first Camino I’ve never had any more troubles. I also wear the Altra Lone-Peak trail runners and as long as it’s not a should season those are likely to remain my distance hike go-to Even though I wear through the backs of them fairly quickly because I have such a pronounced heel ridge.

Anyway, I don’t see much mention of Vasque boots on the forum, and so it got me curious…

Does @davebugg have an option of Vasque boots?

Has anyone else been told they are the Porsche of footwear, only to find them more like the Lada?

The person who loaned the boots to me still uses the brand, but I don’t really know why. They seem too hot and heavy to me for fieldwork in jungles and rain forests, but it’s her feet.
 
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Icacos

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Can’t say anything about Vasque boots, but I’ve had a pair of Vasque shoes for about twelve years. Recently I bought another pair exactly like them - as replacements - and then realized that I could have had the old pair reheeled. Now I’ve got the old pair mended so currently I have two pair of Vasque walking/hiking shoes which I figure will last me the rest of my life. They are quite heavy but I don’t notice the weight when I’m wearing them. I couldn’t imagine being able to find a better pair of shoes. Sorry you are having so much trouble with your boots.
 
Past OR future Camino
2018
After 60+ years of hiking, trail running and long distance running, and 20 years of hiking in Vasque boots, I was unpleasantly surprised that they hurt my feet on my first Camino. After about 10 days, I shipped them home (from Burgos, for EU50.00). I then limped into an athletic store store in Burgos and bought a pair of Salomon Trail runners. Next morning, I lit out from Burgos, walking 25 miles with happy feet. I still have my Vasque boots, but only for day hiking on rocky terrain or doing handyman construction work. Great boots, but never again for a trek. My second Camino was Salomon Trail shoes the entire CP, from Lisboa to Santiago, with zero foot or leg issues.
Just one fellow's experience; my physical therapist back home opined that it might have something to do with day after day of long distances in shoes that are NOT trail/running shoes or flip flops (my daily footwear of choice).
Buen Camino and wear what works for you!
 

dagomez

New Member
I am on my 4th pair of light weight Vasque boots (currently Breeze model) and swear by them. I believe in buying equipment from companies that specialize in a product. Vasque only makes boots and they do it well. FYI I have no affiliation with the company so my comments are based solely on personal experience.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2018
I am on my 4th pair of light weight Vasque boots (currently Breeze model) and swear by them. I believe in buying equipment from companies that specialize in a product. Vasque only makes boots and they do it well. FYI I have no affiliation with the company so my comments are based solely on personal experience.
Nice pun in the last line... :>)
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
Can’t say anything about Vasque boots, but I’ve had a pair of Vasque shoes for about twelve years. Recently I bought another pair exactly like them - as replacements - and then realized that I could have had the old pair reheeled. Now I’ve got the old pair mended so currently I have two pair of Vasque walking/hiking shoes which I figure will last me the rest of my life. They are quite heavy but I don’t notice the weight when I’m wearing them. I couldn’t imagine being able to find a better pair of shoes. Sorry you are having so much trouble with your boots.
Oh, my current boots and shoes are just fine.

I was merely curious because I see very little about Vasque on the forum, and I was wondering why… when there are so many recommendations for this or that shoe/boot etc.

And I’ve never loathed the feel of a brand of footwear as I loathed those Vasques. It’s counter intuitive to me simply because with footwear there tends to be a correlation between cost and quality; the Vasques are about $70-120 CAD more than I pay for my Keens or Altras, coming in as the Vasques do in the high 200’s in CAD.

But literally: you could not pay me to wear them.

So I was wondering if they just aren’t right for anything *except* alpine hiking… or if people don’t talk about them much here because they are so costly…

I go through 3 pairs of boots per year, generally, with about 3500km per year on average on my feet. I would not want to go through nearly $1000 (taxes added in) on my boots unless they were magic.

As it turns out, Keens are my magic at a significantly lower price.

So, it’s really just a matter of curiosity for me…
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
It seems a lifetime ago, but prior to my first camino I was dealing with the question of footwear and a friend had a pair of high end Vasque boots that were too small for her. Before she took them back to REI she suggested I try them as an option for my coming Camino.

The size seemed correct at the time (7), but I’ve actually sized all the way down to a 6.5 from a dress shoes of 7-7.5.

I tried them for about 4-5 days and concluded that nothing had ever hurt my knees and the tops of my shins so much as these boots. It felt like I had to work at keeping the boots going in the direction I wanted to walk. It is really the strangest feeling I’ve ever had in any shoe — and I used to dance pointe, which is a thought most people would find horrifying.

I felt like the sole of the boot had an idea about how I was supposed to walk and it was at odds with how I actually walk.

My knees, just under the patella to about a third of the way down my shins just ached like I’d been in a bar brawl. And when i walked I felt off balance, off gait etc etc.

I found my Keen boots and sandals that have been my primary go-to at the very small outfitter near to my shack in the woods, and aside from days 10-11-12 of my first Camino I’ve never had any more troubles. I also wear the Altra Lone-Peak trail runners and as long as it’s not a should season those are likely to remain my distance hike go-to Even though I wear through the backs of them fairly quickly because I have such a pronounced heel ridge.

Anyway, I don’t see much mention of Vasque boots on the forum, and so it got me curious…

Does @davebugg have an option of Vasque boots?

Has anyone else been told they are the Porsche of footwear, only to find them more like the Lada?

The person who loaned the boots to me still uses the brand, but I don’t really know why. They seem too hot and heavy to me for fieldwork in jungles and rain forests, but it’s her feet.
My guess is that the soles were quite stiff. If you're not used to that it can affect your gait considerably. Stiff soles are good for real mountain walking especially if it's rocky, partly because they give a lot of sideways stability, but on smoother ground it's not necessary especially if you have reasonably healthy feet and ankles. And yes, if you're not accustomed to that sort of boot they can put a lot of stress on your knees and lower legs.

One of the reasons I had my walking boots made to measure was that I could specify a much more flexible sole that most off the peg boots provide. These days I walk in the lightest trail runners I can find that are wide enough for my hobbit feet, without any correction for pronation or stability.
 

tominrm

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I wore Vasque Sundowner boots during my first two caminos, and had no problems. They were comfortable albeit a little heavy. It was recommended by my doctor who enjoys hiking. When I was looking for the replacement I noticed many people complain about "Vaque not being what used to be", but I purchased the same boots. They were exactly the same boots and same size, but somehow they were not as comfortable. Since then I have bought two pairs of other brands.
 
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Owensr23

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I love my Vasque boots and have done many backpacking trips in the Great Smokie mountains and along the AT. I carry about 35-40 pounds depending on how may days of food I need. The most food I have had to carry was 8 days and my pack may have hit 45 for the first few days.

That being said hikers have a saying for this: "a pound on your feet equals five pounds on your back." And likewise, removing a pound of weight that's covering your feet feels like removing five pounds from your backpack.

On the Camino I carry 12 pounds before food and water, and don't need the extra support on the ankles that comes from the boots. I walked blister free wearing Merrell Moab 2 Ventilators. With the amount of pavement walking I believe keeping your feet cool is the most important. I think it is important to treat blisters like burns.

I also use only Wright Socks. I have 2 decades of blister free hiking on running with these. Both of my sons ran cross country and track for many years blister free. I feel like I should get paid for the endorsement. :)

On last endorsement for gaiters. I wear them every day on the Camino. A brand that is made for trail running is Dirty Girl Gaiters. Interesting name -- I know.
 

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Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
Fay and Rex, my wife had nearly an identical experience with her Vasque high top hiking boots. Before our first Camino Frances, we went to REI and my wife tried on several different types of boots, being expertly guided by their knowledgeable staff. She selected Vasque then spent most of the summer breaking them in. During our first camino we hiked the Napoleon route and she immedately developed several blisters. We decided to ignore for a few days, hoping they would heal on their own. They did not. We drained several blisters and kept hiking. The painful blisters caused her to change her gait. Within days, she started developing knee pain, then severe knee pain. Even though I am not a fast hiker, she struggled to keep up with me. Finally when we arrived in Carrion de los Condes, a pilgrim angel told us about Jacotrans. From that day forward, we shipped her backpack ahead and we were successful in making it to Santiago. Along the way, an experienced hiker and runner told us about Salomon Trail Runners. I bought Cindi a new pair for Xmas and she's worn those during our second and third caminos and they worked blister free.

By the way, when we returned to the US after our first camino, Cindi was still experiencing knee pain. She went to the doctor who took xrays and she had developed two stress fractures, thanks to the Vasque boots. Bob
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Just goes to show how personal gear is and of course shoes take it to another level. Went on their website and said no way. Also no way would I ever wear a boot on a camino. I bought a pair of Hoka Speedgoat and love them. They are comfortable and light and have lots of fusion. Will I wear them on my next camino even though I think they feel amazing????? NO WAY. I have been only wearing Brooks Cascadias in all their incarnations for 10 years. Probably walked 7-8,000k minimum in them. Had less than a handful of blisters and no foot or leg problems. So my advice is. If Vasque works more power to you. If what you have tried doesn't work I hope you find something that does very soon.
 
Past OR future Camino
Portugues '15, '16, & '19
Via Francigena '17
Frances '18
Muxia & Finisterre '18
Tahoe Rim Trail '19
I think Vasque boots are great however what works for me doesn't necessarily mean it will work for you. I use boots for backpacking short trips where it is rocky whereas I use Altra trailrunners and Chaco Sandals for a Camino. I size up for both applications.

All of this takes time to get dialed in then the model of shoe or boot changes and the new model may not fit the same. I have found that Altra shoes tend to get smaller and less ventilated as the models advance.

I have friends who can hike an entire Camino with heavy boots and never have a blister or problem. I am fine with boots for short trips but for a long hike in warm weather I am much better off with my shoe and sandal sandal combination. My booted friends would probably not like to hike in sandals
 
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Past OR future Camino
Sep-Oct-2013 Camino Frances (Bordeaux to Santiago)
I bought my first pair of Vasque boots (Breeze model) in 2012. I wore them on my only Camino in Sep 2013 (Bordeaux to Santiago). They are light weight, cool when worn with Merino socks and liner socks and mainly water proof due to Gortex uppers. I finally replaced them in 2020 with an identical replacement and feel no reason to explore an alternative boot.
 

motero99

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2019
Camino Norte (2020)
I have wide feet and the Vasque Breeze fit me well. Since the mid and low height models share the same last, I have a pair of each. I love them and had no problems on the Camino. Decided to use the mids for the Camino since they pick up fewer pebble when walking. Might switch to the lows for the next Camino. My only complaints are that the Vibram soles don't seem to last as long as I would expect, the low models sometimes come with show laces better suited for the mid model, and they did not seem to go on sale this year.
 
Past OR future Camino
None
Oh, my current boots and shoes are just fine.

I was merely curious because I see very little about Vasque on the forum, and I was wondering why… when there are so many recommendations for this or that shoe/boot etc.

And I’ve never loathed the feel of a brand of footwear as I loathed those Vasques. It’s counter intuitive to me simply because with footwear there tends to be a correlation between cost and quality; the Vasques are about $70-120 CAD more than I pay for my Keens or Altras, coming in as the Vasques do in the high 200’s in CAD.

But literally: you could not pay me to wear them.

So I was wondering if they just aren’t right for anything *except* alpine hiking… or if people don’t talk about them much here because they are so costly…

I go through 3 pairs of boots per year, generally, with about 3500km per year on average on my feet. I would not want to go through nearly $1000 (taxes added in) on my boots unless they were magic.

As it turns out, Keens are my magic at a significantly lower price.

So, it’s really just a matter of curiosity for me…
Oh, my current boots and shoes are just fine.

I was merely curious because I see very little about Vasque on the forum, and I was wondering why… when there are so many recommendations for this or that shoe/boot etc.

And I’ve never loathed the feel of a brand of footwear as I loathed those Vasques. It’s counter intuitive to me simply because with footwear there tends to be a correlation between cost and quality; the Vasques are about $70-120 CAD more than I pay for my Keens or Altras, coming in as the Vasques do in the high 200’s in CAD.

But literally: you could not pay me to wear them.

So I was wondering if they just aren’t right for anything *except* alpine hiking… or if people don’t talk about them much here because they are so costly…

I go through 3 pairs of boots per year, generally, with about 3500km per year on average on my feet. I would not want to go through nearly $1000 (taxes added in) on my boots unless they were magic.

As it turns out, Keens are my magic at a significantly lower price.

So, it’s really just a matter of curiosity for me
It seems a lifetime ago, but prior to my first camino I was dealing with the question of footwear and a friend had a pair of high end Vasque boots that were too small for her. Before she took them back to REI she suggested I try them as an option for my coming Camino.

The size seemed correct at the time (7), but I’ve actually sized all the way down to a 6.5 from a dress shoes of 7-7.5.

I tried them for about 4-5 days and concluded that nothing had ever hurt my knees and the tops of my shins so much as these boots. It felt like I had to work at keeping the boots going in the direction I wanted to walk. It is really the strangest feeling I’ve ever had in any shoe — and I used to dance pointe, which is a thought most people would find horrifying.

I felt like the sole of the boot had an idea about how I was supposed to walk and it was at odds with how I actually walk.

My knees, just under the patella to about a third of the way down my shins just ached like I’d been in a bar brawl. And when i walked I felt off balance, off gait etc etc.

I found my Keen boots and sandals that have been my primary go-to at the very small outfitter near to my shack in the woods, and aside from days 10-11-12 of my first Camino I’ve never had any more troubles. I also wear the Altra Lone-Peak trail runners and as long as it’s not a should season those are likely to remain my distance hike go-to Even though I wear through the backs of them fairly quickly because I have such a pronounced heel ridge.

Anyway, I don’t see much mention of Vasque boots on the forum, and so it got me curious…

Does @davebugg have an option of Vasque boots?

Has anyone else been told they are the Porsche of footwear, only to find them more like the Lada?

The person who loaned the boots to me still uses the brand, but I don’t really know why. They seem too hot and heavy to me for fieldwork in jungles and rain forests, but it’s her feet.
Hi Faye...enjoyed your curiosity. When a pair of boots seem to have a mind of their own, it’s quite possibly the wrong pair of boot for your feet. As you already know, your feet will always tell you if it is a good fit and since it is the only part of our body to touch the ground, I listen to them closely. No one brand fits everyone, but my Ecco boots are very kind to MY feet...no blisters ever on any trail.
 

FRM

How do you walk the Camino? One step at a time.
Past OR future Camino
O'Cebreiro to Santiago (2014)
Pamplona to Sahagun (March 2019)
Sahagun to O’Cebreiro (March 2020)
I’ve used the Vasque Breeze on my three walks in Spain. They have served me well, though in October I’m bringing a pair of Altra Lone Peaks (mid rise, water resistant). I’ve found them very pleasant to walk in due to the wide toe box and zero drop heel. They are noticeably lighter and my legs appreciate it.

frm
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
I have worn vasque shoes/boots for at least 30 years. First started with the Sundowner boots. Still have a pair! Then Iwent through numerous pairs of the low breeze hiking shoes. However, I found them a bit heavy for The CF. In 2015 I switched to their new Synthetic Shoe, not leather, - Velocity Shoes. These were heavenl....but are no longer made 😧 Then I went through 5 pairs of Inhaler II s ..Which were also synthetic. But the drop, support and hard, thicker vibram bottoms were perfect for my feet. These were also discontinued and unfortunately replaced by trail running shoes....not hiking shoes!

Right now I am breaking in, actually settling, Ithink, for a pair of Vasque Talus Hiking shoes. They are about 2oz.heavier per shoe than my Inhalers-and less flexible because they are leather. Nevertheless, they provide much better support for my feet thananyshoe I have tried including various Salomons, Hokas, Keens, Merrells, etc. I can walk 10 miles on a road, in them, if necessary, and my feet will not hurt. Yet the verdict is still out...time will tell.
Each shoe weighs 16.12 oz. about an extra 4 oz. (total) on my feet which translates into a little over an extra pound on my back.. worth it to me for the support.

The traditional Breeze hiking shoes fit perfectly, but they are almost another 4ozs per shoe and would be too clunky along such a long distance.
I have been a loyal Vasque customer...hope they continue making quality hiking shoes.
 
Last edited:
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henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
‘Porsche’ quality boots work very well if you have Porsche feet.

I wear Zamberlan ultra lite GTX boots. I currently have two pairs well broken in (two different sizes depending on whether I’m planning cold-weather thick socks, or not. A third pair has just been unboxed and is in use for short dog walks. Three more pairs are in my store. I’ve been wearing the same design for over 30 years.

More rigid boots like vasque ( I actually use Scarpa Freney) simply cannot be broken in - they either fit well or they don’t - mine are only used in serious winter conditions.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
‘Porsche’ quality boots work very well if you have Porsche feet.

I wear Zamberlan ultra lite GTX boots. I currently have two pairs well broken in (two different sizes depending on whether I’m planning cold-weather thick socks, or not. A third pair has just been unboxed and is in use for short dog walks. Three more pairs are in my store. I’ve been wearing the same design for over 30 years.

More rigid boots like vasque ( I actually use Scarpa Freney) simply cannot be broken in - they either fit well or they don’t - mine are only used in serious winter conditions.

I find the low shoes seem to have a little more give overtime.
 

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
More rigid boots like vasque ( I actually use Scarpa Freney) simply cannot be broken in - they either fit well or they don’t - mine are only used in serious winter conditions.

I wonder if that was the thing... they just didn't have the correct last or vamp for the shape of my foot and they were not going to change.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I had a similar experience with heavy duty Scarpa boots. Supposed to be the Rolls Royce but, as @henrythedog says, rigid heavy boots either work for you or they don’t. They gave me weird internal pains in my feet and reviewing the experience with my podiatrist, she was not at all surprised. She recommended flexible shoes for me and after that I wore very lightweight ASICS. Now wear sandals.
 
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Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
My guess is that the soles were quite stiff. If you're not used to that it can affect your gait considerably. Stiff soles are good for real mountain walking especially if it's rocky, partly because they give a lot of sideways stability, but on smoother ground it's not necessary especially if you have reasonably healthy feet and ankles. And yes, if you're not accustomed to that sort of boot they can put a lot of stress on your knees and lower legs.

One of the reasons I had my walking boots made to measure was that I could specify a much more flexible sole that most off the peg boots provide. These days I walk in the lightest trail runners I can find that are wide enough for my hobbit feet, without any correction for pronation or stability.

Neat! I learned something from you about stiff soles!

In my ordinary life I have *always* worn a leather or, in some dance shoes, a suede sole. I have a deformed toe from a bad break, but because I’ve always been careful about the materials for my shoes I don’t have callouses or bunions or cracked heels, etc. My aunt taught me to pay for my shoes, as much as necessary, and to buy my clothes at the thrift store. A dress that does not fit perfectly won’t destroy my spine… but shoes… oh, they are an art. So outside of the rigid pointe shoes I left behind after a car accident ended all that when I was 14, I have almost no experience with a really rigid sole.
And you are right! I have a very rigid pair of Salomon boots with a slick vibram sole that I bought when I could not find my model of Keen’s anywhere. I rarely wear them and consider them my “desperation back up boots” for a time in the future when I can’t find a model of Keens that work for me. I can’t wear their Oakridge model, for example. But I have stockpiled Durand and Revel models.

Sort of wondering if I should just donate my barely used Salomons…
 
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese Coastal {Feb-March 2020}
Camino Frances {March 2019 & 2020}
If determined to wear boots, Vasque is a great option. After numerous pair of Keen and Merrills, which barely lasted 6 months (1000 km), I wore Vasque shoe for 5-6 years, with new insoles each year. After a multi-year, truly exhaustive search I got a pair of Vasque boots. They are great for day hikes involving bog, mud, slush, and snow, but not ice. But for the Camino light weight walking shoes and trekking poles were the best choice.

While I've not had recent experience, the trekking poles may also be useful for those bar brawls.😉
 

Marbe2

Active member
Past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
‘Porsche’ quality boots work very well if you have Porsche feet.

I wear Zamberlan ultra lite GTX boots. I currently have two pairs well broken in (two different sizes depending on whether I’m planning cold-weather thick socks, or not. A third pair has just been unboxed and is in use for short dog walks. Three more pairs are in my store. I’ve been wearing the same design for over 30 years.

More rigid boots like vasque ( I actually use Scarpa Freney) simply cannot be broken in - they either fit well or they don’t - mine are only used in serious winter conditions.
I wonder if Zamberian shoes run true to size and width?
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
They’re consistent over time and became originally popular for being made on an ‘English last’ which is wider and more foot-shaped than the other standard, the Italian last.
 
Past OR future Camino
2017 bike, solo & lost, SJPP-Santiago via Napoleon Route
It seems a lifetime ago, but prior to my first camino I was dealing with the question of footwear and a friend had a pair of high end Vasque boots that were too small for her. Before she took them back to REI she suggested I try them as an option for my coming Camino.

The size seemed correct at the time (7), but I’ve actually sized all the way down to a 6.5 from a dress shoes of 7-7.5.

I tried them for about 4-5 days and concluded that nothing had ever hurt my knees and the tops of my shins so much as these boots. It felt like I had to work at keeping the boots going in the direction I wanted to walk. It is really the strangest feeling I’ve ever had in any shoe — and I used to dance pointe, which is a thought most people would find horrifying.

I felt like the sole of the boot had an idea about how I was supposed to walk and it was at odds with how I actually walk.

My knees, just under the patella to about a third of the way down my shins just ached like I’d been in a bar brawl. And when i walked I felt off balance, off gait etc etc.

I found my Keen boots and sandals that have been my primary go-to at the very small outfitter near to my shack in the woods, and aside from days 10-11-12 of my first Camino I’ve never had any more troubles. I also wear the Altra Lone-Peak trail runners and as long as it’s not a should season those are likely to remain my distance hike go-to Even though I wear through the backs of them fairly quickly because I have such a pronounced heel ridge.

Anyway, I don’t see much mention of Vasque boots on the forum, and so it got me curious…

Does @davebugg have an option of Vasque boots?

Has anyone else been told they are the Porsche of footwear, only to find them more like the Lada?

The person who loaned the boots to me still uses the brand, but I don’t really know why. They seem too hot and heavy to me for fieldwork in jungles and rain forests, but it’s her feet.
My 1st pair of vasque were great. Made in USA. 2nd pair sole delamitated, bad glue. Moved production overseas. Rei would not honor. Over 1 year old. Mailed to vasque on my dime. They did send a replacement pair.
 
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Past OR future Camino
2017
On my first C I wore Vasques and continue to enjoy the boots. I can see why the OP found them challenging: mine took some breaking in, and I needed to dress an inside seam to prevent a blister. Overall they served me well, and each time I don my boots I receive a pleasant Camino shiver.
 

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