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Vegan! Recipes and do's and Don'ts

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Time of past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
I have a few members of our family that are vegans. I do not understand it but I really do not want to be ignorant. I have seen a chicken moved of the dinner as it has an offensive smell , yet the same person ate meat for 30 years?
In today's times it just seems so difficult to please everyone - HOWEVER , I am keen to learn and as a hospitalero I may be asked for a vegan meal? So do I just put all the veg on the table and ask the pilgrim to make their own or do I TRY to cook? I know you can get Vegan(egg free) Pasta and of course there is gnocchi.
I look forward to some suggested recipes that may only take say 20 minutes but lasagna
pasta and other elaborate dishes I will also try.
 
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jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Time of past OR future Camino
A few in the past; more in the future!
So do I just put all the veg on the table and ask the pilgrim to make their own or do I TRY to cook?
I understand that this is all new to you but you are making it sound as though cooking for vegans is like cooking for aliens who come from a planet that has none of the same ingredients that we have on earth. Most of the ingredients you already cook with are likely to be vegan. All it takes are some tweaks here and there to come up with simple, healthy, vegan meals.

I know you can get Vegan(egg free) Pasta and of course there is gnocchi.
Most dried pasta is indeed egg-free, while most fresh pasta is not. Gnocchi is typically fresh and would often contain eggs although in all cases it's obviously always best to check the list of ingredients on the packet.

I look forward to some suggested recipes that may only take say 20 minutes but lasagna
pasta and other elaborate dishes I will also try.
I'd recommend starting with Happy Pear, two brilliant Irish lads who make vegan cooking easy using simple recipes, mostly whole foods and basic ingredients.

Here are links to their recipes - either in written form on their website, or on their YouTube channel.

As Molly mentioned above, beans are very available in Spain so dishes like chilli and chickpea stews are easy to make and fit within Spanish cuisine. Equally, in the summer months, gazpacho is easy to make, already vegan and can be made in large batches.

For more exotic dishes, Asian stir-fries with either rice or noodles are easy to make vegan, possibly with tofu or tempeh in place of meat.

If you really want to try lasagna, send me a PM and I'll send you the recipe for how I do it.

Good luck!
 

HelenVanW

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2017
I recently had to be vegan for health reasons, and discovered a YouTube channel I can recommend highly to everyone, not just vegan. Spain on a Fork has many, many quick and easy recipes with Spanish inspiration. The creator is located in Spain, but grew up in the US and is fluent in both English and Spanish. I have gotten many good ideas from him.
 

Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Time of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
A friend pointed me towards a recipe for a vegan tortilla using chickpea flour as an egg replacement. I make it quite often even though I am pretty omnivorous :)
 
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Sam - AU

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - Apr/May 2018, Feb/Mar 2019 .... upcoming Nov/Dec 2019
Vegetarian (part vegan) here and I can't speak for everyone, but on all 3 of my caminos I would have simply been delighted and over the moon with just a big bowl of roast vegetables, particularly given the scarcity of any vegetables other than fries in most of the villages on the way.

I think it's important to point out the menu del dia and pretty much the staple restaurant offerings on the way, outside of the big cities, for vegetarian / vegans are unappealing salads (always originally still offered with tuna per most dishes in Spain), plain pasta in a basic sugary tomato sauce, fries and bread - now imagine a month of that. So the bar to impress is pretty low which is in your favour :)
Anything outside of the above and most people would be super appreciative to know there was simply something offered that didn't cause anxiety about whether they would/could eat it or cooking yourself or another night of zero nutritional value.
Another idea is to simply google vegan restaurants and look at their menu on the website, it will give you a starting point to get an idea as to what type of dishes might be easier to adapt than others and you can formulate something you are comfortable with from there.
I think it's amazing to want to try to have one dish up your sleeve, but if it gets overwhelming, don't overthink it and stick with the absolute basics, roast vegetables, soup or a bigger quantity of a side dish you would normally make, that's how I try to stop my friends panicking and feeling like its super complicated when I am coming over.
Also if there is something you make already that lacks meat but is not vegan, just google alternatives for the non vegan items e.g. canned coconut cream instead of dairy cream etc.
Thank you for just having the thought!
 
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Corned Beef

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
C. Norte Sept/2022
I understand that this is all new to you but you are making it sound as though cooking for vegans is like cooking for aliens who come from a planet that has none of the same ingredients that we have on earth.

I must admit feeling this way when told a new family member was vegan. After a few moments of panic, and a quick scour of the supermarket shelves, it seems there are a lot more companies who are creating lines of product to meet the growing demand.

Family meals can be a bit lopsided with double the number of dishes on the table, but it can be a bit of a foodie adventure when you try something you've never had or considered before.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Where will you be serving as hospitalero where you will be required to cook and come up with recipes yourself?

I would find/create some recipes for simple vegan dishes - veggie and bean stews, pasta dishes, etc. and serve the same menu to everyone. Add a salad and bread and you're good to go!

I've stayed at a couple of albergues that served communal vegan dinners - La Casa Mágica in Villatuerta and Albergue Verde in Hospital del Orbigo. Both meals were delicious, and no one missed the animal products.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
CF Spring 2022
I think it's important to point out the menu del dia and pretty much the staple restaurant offerings on the way, outside of the big cities, for vegetarian / vegans are unappealing salads (always originally still offered with tuna per most dishes in Spain), plain pasta in a basic sugary tomato sauce, fries and bread

Is this really what it’s like for us vegetarians? I guess it was just a matter of time before I encountered something about the Camino that I am not looking forward to 😞

So yes, any efforts to add more meat-free choices to a menu are very much appreciated. Soups made with vegetable stock are a good place to start, and are often something even non-vegetarians will happily eat - I just last night made a huge pot of lentil and spinach soup with bits and bobs of other vegetables lurking in my refrigerator (carrot, green onion, etc.) and it was a big hit for my whole family.
 
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Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Time of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Is this really what it’s like for us vegetarians?
In the 1980s I walked to Walsingham twice with the Student Cross pilgrimage. In one village kind local ladies had cooked food for us: shepherd's pie for the carnivores and chicken for the vegetarians.... A concept not fully understood in rural Norfolk at the time. Things have moved on a bit since then for vegetarians and vegans - even in Spain :)
 
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To go off piste a bit, we have friends coming to visit us for several days down in Gulf Shores and they are arriving in an hour! The wife only eats gluten-free and no dairy. I spent a couple of hours at the supermarket finding items she can eat and trying to plan some meals. It is stressful as I want to be a good hostess and have her enjoy herself. Thank goodness for some basic mainstays, but sauces, salad dressings, etc. are an issue.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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In one village kind local ladies had cooked food for us: shepherd's pie for the carnivores and chicken for the vegetarians.... A concept not fully understood in rural Norfolk at the time.

Reminds me of my beloved aunt with whom I have spent Christmas dinner with for most of my life. We're an Italian-American family and lasagna with meat sauce is always a part of the meal - and every single year she asks me "can't you just eat around the meat?" Bless her heart 🥰
 
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Aragonés ('18)
I'd also vote for simple dishes based on recipes you already know, like soups/stews, and pasta with sauce.

No need to learn fancy new recipes. Just keep the meat out. If needed, it can be cooked in a seperate pot/pan and added to the plates of those who want it. Beans and lentils are really the way to go to add protein to vegetable soups/sauces. Red lentils are the most easy to use, because they don't need to be cooked very long.

If you want to learn to make something new that is still easy to make, maybe hummus?

Canned chick peas can be used to make it. They are easily available in every supermarket and also cheap. Hummus could be a real treat for vegan/vegetarian guests without much work or expenses for the host :)
 
Time of past OR future Camino
CF Spring 2022
@Camino Chrissy, would that be Gulf Shores, AL? New Orleanian who has spent family vacations on your lovely stretch of coast here 👋 If there's a Rouse's nearby (which Google Maps tells me there is), they have a great selection of vegetarian, vegan, and even non-gluten food and condiments. And even a lot of things in the "regular" aisles at the supermarket would be suitable for your guests, though it may involve some extra label-reading on your part. Thank you for being such a kind and considerate host!
 

jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Time of past OR future Camino
A few in the past; more in the future!
Is this really what it’s like for us vegetarians? I guess it was just a matter of time before I encountered something about the Camino that I am not looking forward to 😞
It's not that bad in my experience. While what the person you replied to said regarding the daily or pilgrim menus is generally true, there are also more options if you seek them out. We have always found that even if there's nothing suitable on the menu, restaurant staff in Spain are usually willing to accommodate requests. Speaking Spanish helps but even without it, making suggestions for dishes that already contain ingredients they know/have is a good idea. For example, if you're in a small village with one restaurant and you ask for a tofu red curry or a buddha bowl, that's not realistic. But if you ask for parrillada de verduras (grilled vegetables, always more delicious than it sounds!), paella de verduras, garbanzos guisados (stewed chickpeas) etc, you should have more luck. ¡Buen camino y buen provecho!
 
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@Camino Chrissy, would that be Gulf Shores, AL? New Orleanian who has spent family vacations on your lovely stretch of coast here 👋 If there's a Rouse's nearby (which Google Maps tells me there is), they have a great selection of vegetarian, vegan, and even non-gluten food and condiments. And even a lot of things in the "regular" aisles at the supermarket would be suitable for your guests, though it may involve some extra label-reading on your part. Thank you for being such a kind and considerate host!
Thank you, yes, it is! I saw a Rouses, but had never been in one so I opted for my go to Walmart when down here across the street. Very limited supply, but I did buy a loaf of gluten-free grain bread...only $6.😅, among other items.

EDIT- I assume needing gluten-free offerings on the Caminos could pose a few problems for some, in addition to the vegetarians issues.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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I saw a Rouses, but had never been in one so I opted for my go to Walmart when down here across the street. Very limited supply, but I did buy a loaf of gluten-free grain bread...only $6.😅, among other items.

EDIT- I assume needing gluten-free offerings on the Caminos could pose a few problems for some, in addition to the vegetarians issues.

Even Walmart has a decent selection of vegetarian/vegan/GF foods these days, or at least my go-to here in NOLA does! As a great prophet once said: the times, they are a-changin' ...

And yes, I'd imagine that having to adhere to a gluten-free diet would be an order of magnitude (or several) more difficult that avoiding meat and/or other animal products on the Camino, as it is in many places. A quick Google search turned up resources like this and this, and the topic also seems to have been discussed here before. Still, I'm very thankful that's one thing I don't have to worry about and that I can stuff myself with as much freshly-baked bread and cheese-filled bocadillos as I want. Mmm, bread 🤤
 

Anhalter

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2019 CF
I am not vegan or vegetarian. As a fact, i like fish and meat very much.
However, i like to cook and make my guests happy, so i make arrangements for their preferences.

This Silvester we had a vegan friend over, and a vegetarian was 50/50 on joining us aswell. So i came up with the question on what to cook.

We went with Tacos and it was awesome. Guacamole, vegan. Salsa Roja, vegan. Refried beans, vegan. Herbs and spices, vegan. All without buying anything out of the ordinary. Cheese was a bit of a thing, but i found a vegan cream cheese. For "meat" we made Tofu-crumbles and they are amazing (Recipe)
And for the non-vegans there was some shredded regular cheese and a single bbq-marinated grilled chicken breast. Awesome meal and mostly ingredients that every supermarket carries.

Since silvester my wife asked me to cook more vegan, so for tonight it's Zuchini+Carrot pancakes with some vegan herb cream cheese, for tomorrow Spaghetti Alio&Olio. Anything Chickpea is also always a staple. Hummus, Falafel... can't go wrong with that. Bulgur and Quinoa (Quillnoa?) are also stuff that works surprisingly well in a lot of dishes.

So i am likely not going to keep cooking this much vegan food, but to be honest, i am quite surprised how easy it is. Of course i can always cheat at work and have a Bratwurst for lunch.

edit: Even a Caldo Verde can be easily made vegan. Just offer the meat/chorizo as a side dish so everyone can adjust to their likings.

edit2: Same goes for Sopa de Ajo, another camino classic.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
When cooking vegan or vegetarian it's best to focus on the ingredients that you can use, rather than those that you can't.

For vegans and vegetarians there are a number of websites that have suggestions on what to eat on the Camino, like this one
 

Darby67

Enólogo caminando
Time of past OR future Camino
2018 CF Jan-Feb
2019 CF Jan-Mar
In 1998 some very good friends visited me in Spain when I was living there. They were vegans. While Visiting the Priorat in the hills of Tarragona in a small village restaurant famous for its lamb we went through the usual discussion. “Oh we have plenty of non meat options…fish!“. When it was further explained that no animal products were used, the reply, “Your friends are going to starve to death in this country!” Fortunately the friends were very adaptable and flexible. A lot of insalada mixta was consumed.

Things have really changed. My wife and I ate at vegan restaurant in Pamplona and there were options in many places that 20 years ago wouldn’t have existed,

Garbanzos and lentils are a super simple crowd pleaser. Some overnight soaked pardina lentils, pimentón, carrots, onion, garlic, olive oil and some laurel leaves. Having some chorizo on the side for the meat eaters is awesome but following one of the super simple local recipes is excellent with some crusty bread. And soak the legumes, don’t buy canned. Simple, nutritious, yummy!
 
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jsalt

Jill
Time of past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Hmmm, interesting responses, but I sympathize.

I am vegetarian (since I was a kid – just hated eating meat, didn’t like the taste and everything about it, and my nephew did the same before he could even talk), and yet I have no idea how to cook vegetarian, as I cannot cook to save my life. Don’t tell me it’s practice – you can either play the piano, speak another language, ride a bike, or you can’t.

Anyway, what I am saying is: Keep it Simple. One of my favourite meals is mixed veges (roasted, steamed, boiled, microwaved, stirfried or whatever) with a handful of chopped nuts spinkled on top, and maybe soya sauce at hand for seasoning. Can’t get any simpler than that, and beats a soggy salad.

Maybe a fresh tomato (or seasonal veg or bean) soup before, and followed by a yummy homemade dessert, NOT flan :eek: 🤣 .
 
F

Former member 91017

Guest
A friend pointed me towards a recipe for a vegan tortilla using chickpea flour as an egg replacement. I make it quite often even though I am pretty omnivorous :)
Just be careful about chick-pea *amounts consumed*. Wonderful source of protein, also a neurotoxin…. This feature is very well-known in regions where chickpeas are used as the primary replacement for a variety of things from eggs to flour ( so the vegan GF crown can really fall into this issue). I learned about the hazards of overzealous reliance on chickpeas in grad school: anthropology of medicine…. Was very surprised.

See: https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/pharmacology-toxicology-and-pharmaceutical-science/lathyrism
 

Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Time of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Just be careful about chick-pea *amounts consumed*. Wonderful source of protein, also a neurotoxin….
A confusion over naming here I think. The chickpeas in the recipe I posted are Cicer arietinum - the very common legume known in Spanish as 'garbanzos'. The article you linked to concerns a plant of an entirely different genus which happens to share a similar common name - Lathyrus sativum.
 
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Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Time of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Thank goodness no one (as far as I know) tries to keep Kosher while on the Camino.
Passing through London on my return from a Camino several years ago I got into conversation with a young American woman who was in the UK for a few weeks summer school. She asked about the Camino and said that she might like to walk one day. Then she went on to tell me that she belonged to an evangelical church very strongly opposed to alcohol and that she personally would never eat in a place where alcohol was sold. Not a problem in her "dry" home county in the southern US. She was finding it quite tricky to find eating places in London which were alcohol-free other than fast-food joints. I suggested she try halal restaurants which are fairly common in many parts of London. I'm not sure she really understood or believed me when I told her that virtually all cafes and restaurants in Spain sell alcohol and that she would struggle to eat along the way if she kept to her strict rule. It would certainly be a challenge.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Yearly and Various 2014-2019
Via Monastica 2022
A confusion over naming here I think. The chickpeas in the recipe I posted are Cicer arietinum - the very common legume known in Spanish as 'garbanzos'. The article you linked to concerns a plant of an entirely different genus which happens to share a similar common name - Lathyrus sativum.
Latin binomials change all the time, so it gets confusing. L. arietinum, L.sativum, and C.arietinum are the same beast.
 

Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Time of past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
Latin binomials change all the time, so it gets confusing. L. arietinum, L.sativum, and C.arietinum are the same beast.
I think that is incorrect. If you search for images of the plants and seeds you will find that Cicer arietinum and Lathyrus sativum are very different species. The Wikipedia articles for both species list the binomials used for each species in the past and these terms do not overlap.
Chickpea-(Cicer-arietinum)-organic.jpg
Lathyrus_sativus_sl27.jpg

The Wikipedia article on Lathyrus sativum states "Due to its toxicity, its human consumption was forbidden in Spain from 1967 to 2018. However, it was widely distributed as animal feed and displayed away from other flours valid for human consumption (BOE-2484/1967. September 21st. Paragraphs 3.18.09 a and b and 5.36.16 b)" If these two species are in fact 'the same beast' then every Spanish village tienda, supermarket, bar and restaurant which sold garbanzos for more than 50 years was breaking the law. Is that likely?
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
Camino future
This is one of my favorite vegan (actually whole food plant based) recipes.
(vegan - oreos - processed food leaves you with WFPB)

Greek Lentil and spinach Soup with lemon (though it is thick so maybe a Stew or add more water). It takes about an hour to make and it makes a lot, holds well in the fridge or freezer.

Ingredients​

  • 1 pound brown or large green lentils, rinsed and picked over
  • 10 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 medium Yukon gold, russet or red potatoes (1 1/4 pounds), scrubbed and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 10 ounces baby spinach, chopped
  • 1 small butternut squash (1 pound), peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 3 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 ribs celery, with leaves, sliced
  • 3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or more to taste
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 lemons
You can change the greens or the squash, use more or less or different types. It can be served with orange slices instead of lemon. Green or brown lentils. A jalapeno pepper or whatever kind you have on hand.

I've made it myself many times and I never get tired of it. We had it last week and I already want to make it again.

You could serve it with ham or chicken cubes on the side, or bacon. Cooking for omnivores doesn't have to be so hard.
 
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RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Time of past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
Hmmm, interesting responses, but I sympathize.

I am vegetarian (since I was a kid – just hated eating meat, didn’t like the taste and everything about it, and my nephew did the same before he could even talk), and yet I have no idea how to cook vegetarian, as I cannot cook to save my life. Don’t tell me it’s practice – you can either play the piano, speak another language, ride a bike, or you can’t.

Anyway, what I am saying is: Keep it Simple. One of my favourite meals is mixed veges (roasted, steamed, boiled, microwaved, stirfried or whatever) with a handful of chopped nuts spinkled on top, and maybe soya sauce at hand for seasoning. Can’t get any simpler than that, and beats a soggy salad.

Maybe a fresh tomato (or seasonal veg or bean) soup before, and followed by a yummy homemade dessert, NOT flan :eek: 🤣 .
Most interesting , I have noticed that most people I know have a signature dish that they are good at preparing. Even though you cannot play the piano and I understand that FULLY! , you still have a coping mechanism , I like that. Your little recipe is perhaps the most simple and best so far.
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Time of past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
This is one of my favorite vegan (actually whole food plant based) recipes.
(vegan - oreos - processed food leaves you with WFPB)

Greek Lentil and spinach Soup with lemon (though it is thick so maybe a Stew or add more water). It takes about an hour to make and it makes a lot, holds well in the fridge or freezer.

Ingredients​

  • 1 pound brown or large green lentils, rinsed and picked over
  • 10 cups vegetable broth or water
  • 1 jalapeño pepper, stemmed, seeded and chopped
  • 2 teaspoons whole coriander seeds
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 medium Yukon gold, russet or red potatoes (1 1/4 pounds), scrubbed and cut into 1/2-inch dice
  • 10 ounces baby spinach, chopped
  • 1 small butternut squash (1 pound), peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 3 cups)
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 ribs celery, with leaves, sliced
  • 3 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt, or more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper, or more to taste
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 lemons
You can change the greens or the squash, use more or less or different types. It can be served with orange slices instead of lemon. Green or brown lentils. A jalapeno pepper or whatever kind you have on hand.

I've made it myself many times and I never get tired of it. We had it last week and I already want to make it again.

You could serve it with ham or chicken cubes on the side, or bacon. Cooking for omnivores doesn't have to be so hard.
Wow! I make my own sweet corn bread , a few slices with your dish would go down well , forget the bacon.
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Yearly and Various 2014-2019
Via Monastica 2022
Is that likely?
No, far more likely that I'm wrong. 😂
Sorry @Bradypus, you're right. I Posted in haste and messed up.

Cicer arientinum L and Cicer sativum Schkuhr both refer to the same plant - garbanzo, gram, or chickpea in common parlance. What we all use for hummus.

You're right. Lathyrus sativus L. and Cicercula sativa (L.) Medik. are synonyms for a different beast - commonly called the grasspea, chickling pea, or cicerchia.
This is the toxic one when eaten in quantity:

I am relieved to know I can eat hummus with abandon. The main issue with chickpeas is as an allergen:

Interestingly, wikipedia speaks of a traditional stew in La Mancha made from grasspeas.
Flour made from grass peas (Spanish: almorta) is the main ingredient for the gachas manchegas or gachas de almorta.[8] Accompaniments for the dish vary throughout La Mancha. This is an ancient Manchego cuisine staple, generally consumed during the cold winter months. The dish is generally eaten directly out of the pan in which it was cooked, using either a spoon or a simple slice of bread
Lana, Sureste, and Levante pilgrims - moderation is your friend. It sounds like you need to eat a lot over an extended period to cause Lathyrism, as in times of war or famine:
During the Spanish War of Independence against Napoleon, grasspea served as a famine food. This was the subject of one of Francisco de Goya's famous aquatint prints titled Gracias a la Almorta ("Thanks to the Grasspea"), depicting poor people surviving on a porridge made from grasspea flour, one of them lying on the floor, already crippled by it

Hummus, bread, soup (gazpacho, yum) or stew, and salad (maybe with some walnuts or almonds) would be a heavenly meal.
Here's a hummus recipe. So easy and always a hit:

Edited to add: no need to fuss over the gazpacho. You can get boxed versions in any tienda that are actually quite nice.
 
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Time of past OR future Camino
CF Spring 2022
I think that is incorrect. If you search for images of the plants and seeds you will find that Cicer arietinum and Lathyrus sativum are very different species.

They are indeed very different! Thanks for correcting what was a rather startling case of mistaken identity about the humble, versatile, and delicious chickpea, a staple of not only Spanish and my grandparents' Italian cuisine but of the entire Mediterranean basin, North Africa, the Middle East, and Indian subcontinent.

(And thanks to falling into a Google hole for "chickpeas" over the course of reading this thread, I now know more interesting facts about chickpeas than I did when I woke up this morning!)

 

LTfit

Veteran Member
My go-to simple vegan meal is a hearty pureed vegetable soup or crema de verduras. I usually make enough for a few days.
Step one: saute a red onion and garlic in olive oil.
Step two: throw in some spices. I love dried cumin, tumeric and coriander although the Spanish are in general more familiar with pimentón.
Step three: pick a vegetable such an zucchini, cauliflower, pumpkin etc and dice. Lots.

Throw together with boiling water, a vegetable bouillon cube and several handfuls of red lentils. The colour is nice and it thickens the soup and you now have a nutritious soup with protein.

Combinations of vegetables works too, I usually look to see what I already have. Cauliflower and pumpkin are always a good base then add red peppers for example. Broccoli is also nice with cauliflower but you need more of it to make the soup thick. Of course you can also throw in some canned chick peas to make it an even heartier meal.

Buen provecho!
 
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Sue127

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Time of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Coastal May 23
In the 1980s I walked to Walsingham twice with the Student Cross pilgrimage. In one village kind local ladies had cooked food for us: shepherd's pie for the carnivores and chicken for the vegetarians.... A concept not fully understood in rural Norfolk at the time. Things have moved on a bit since then for vegetarians and vegans - even in Spain :)
That I understand. As a vegetarian living in France I have asked for vegetarian omelette and had it cooked with lardons (small cubes of bacon) or bacon removed from around French beans when commented on. 😏Things are starting to improve, but in rural France it's slow going (which is why I love being here)!
 
F

Former member 91017

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Well, I shall have to write to the bio-anthro professor in the medical anthro programme and tell her that she’s full of misinformation.
For 20-some years I have thought (qua @VNwalking) that the chickling and the chickpea were in the same group and have avoided gorging on chickpeas lest I end up like the Romanians, the Gulag prisoners, or the famine victims.
I’m not convinced that a bio-anthropologist who specialized in vegetarian food cultures and problems with food substitutions when agriculture in a region is disrupted can be completely wrong on this point (which was kind of central in her work), so I’m definitely going to have to find out if there’s some subtlety in *amounts* for the chick pea as most of us know it. Meanwhile, I still won’t use it as the main protein source.
 

C clearly

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Most years since 2012
I shall have to write to the bio-anthro professor in the medical anthro programme and tell her that she’s full of misinformation.
Well, it may not be appropriate to tell her that she's full of misinformation:oops: . But if she was the person who connected the research cited below, with the chickpea/garbanzo, she may have made a mistake. Even respected professors/scientists can make mistakes, and the example of lathyrism is still an interesting medical anthro case to study.
As far as I can see (which isn't very far), the connected article does not equate the "drought-resistant chickling pea (Lathyrus sativus)" with our chickpea/garbanzo.
 
F

Former member 91017

Guest
Well, it may not be appropriate to tell her that she's full of misinformation:oops: . But if she was the person who connected the research cited below, with the chickpea/garbanzo, she may have made a mistake. Even respected professors/scientists can make mistakes, and the example of lathyrism is still an interesting medical anthro case to study.

As far as I can see (which isn't very far), the connected article does not equate the "drought-resistant chickling pea (Lathyrus sativus)" with our chickpea/garbanzo.
Not the same person as in this article. And yes, even profs make mistakes, but not usually in their main areas of research.
She was very clear with us in the caution about amounts. She said that it would take about 300G per day, but that if one used the flour as a substitute for many kinds of proteins one could hit that — and that the GF/vegans had to be especially careful.
For a time I worked at a community kitchen as a volunteer, ad we would pulverize soaked seeds (small, flat, dark brown — the name won’t come to me now) to make a jelly-Ike protein that we used as an egg-white substitute to bind chickpea “meatballs”…. I increasingly wondered about the amount of *processing* and issues of bioavailability in totally vegan diets… and of monocropping (soy, corn, etc.) But the chickpea thing stuck with me all these years.
Anyway, it’s not specific to camino eating, but I’m probably going to stick to my egg tortilla.
 
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jungleboy

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I increasingly wondered about the amount of *processing* and issues of bioavailability in totally vegan diets… and of monocropping (soy, corn, etc.)
The biggest use of soy and corn is to feed animals in the meat, dairy and egg industries, not to feed vegans.

Re: soy, from WWF:
In fact, almost 80% of the world’s soybean crop is fed to livestock, especially for beef, chicken, egg and dairy production (milk, cheeses, butter, yogurt, etc).

Re: corn from data posted in this article at Visual Capitalist: the highest use of corn in the U.S. is for animal feed (38.7 percent), then ethanol (fuel) at 26.6 percent.
 
F

Former member 91017

Guest
The biggest use of soy and corn is to feed animals in the meat, dairy and egg industries, not to feed vegans.

Re: soy, from WWF:


Re: corn from data posted in this article at Visual Capitalist: the highest use of corn in the U.S. is for animal feed (38.7 percent), then ethanol (fuel) at 26.6 percent.
Yes, and I don’t eat industrial meat for that reason. I am very privileged to be able to afford to eat only from small, local farms with a “closed circle” approach to chicken, lamb, beef and pork, and to small plot vegetables (farms of roughy 30 acres in which they rotate the vegetable crops and the animals).

And I’m not going to rely on that monocropping/water use etc to provide the 20% for straight up food, which I guess is the only way the industry has found it economically “viable” to create the food supply.
Protein replacement foods are still riding the coattails of industrial food. The vegan soy and corn relies on the same mono crops and the same *system* for its economic viability (In our current industrial food system, that I do not defend).

Solution? I dunno. But I avoid participating in it, personally. I don’t go as far as my old professor who maintained a strict body-weight as a political principle (she did not want to do field work in places like Tanzania, arriving as a person with a body size larger than her average research participants). I do try not to take more than I need.

I am not sure what to do about the fuel issues… We have to stay warm… even with the mini-split heatpumps, there has to be some kind of power generation. My step father designed boilers for nuclear power stations (he did the installation near Moissac as just one of many around the globe); I tend to agree with him that there were/are the safest/cleanest option we have until solar gets a lot better, and more affordable. But the public still needs cheap fuel, and nuclear remains really unpopular.

On the Francés I learned that most of the sunflower fields were for cooking oil and for biodiesel.

It’s all a very big mess that I don’t have the answers for, only what I personally try to avoid using.
 
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C clearly

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She was very clear with us in the caution about amounts. She said that it would take about 300G per day
Would that 300g per day be for a normal population or for the malnourished populations that were researched. This may be an example of how a valid conclusion from good research can develop a life of its own, and mutate into misinformation.
 
F

Former member 91017

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Would that 300g per day be for a normal population or for the malnourished populations that were researched. This may be an example of how a valid conclusion from good research can develop a life of its own, and mutate into misinformation.
She said we could reach that very quickly if we started using it as a substitute both for protein and for flour as a vegan/GF diet might. Cheap, easy, tasty, and with good textural results… it could enter into the 300g zone very easily. That was her caution. The 300g came from the prison/concentration camp data, and it would not apply to anyone who just likes hummus (my kid eats 2-3 tubs of it per week), but if you start making crackers, hummus, “omelettes”, stew… and used the *chickpeas* (I can’t stress how much she was not worrying that we’d go get a different looking, flatter pea) for all those things, we would easily hit it. Chickpea omlette, hummus and crackers, chickpea stew, a 5-bean salad with chickpeas… in different tasty/savoury deliveries would not feel like a diet of chickpeas… that was her point.
 
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For a time I worked at a community kitchen as a volunteer, ad we would pulverize soaked seeds (small, flat, dark brown — the name won’t come to me now)

Those would be chia seeds, the same ones that those of us who grew up in the 1980s remember from TV commercials for animal-shaped ceramic planters. In addition to their use as a thickening agent they make a pretty tasty (and very easy to prepare) "pudding"-like dessert with the addition of things like fruit, nut or grain milk, and sweeteners. And like many vegetarian/vegan ingredients, they are an integral and minimally processed food.


She said we could reach that very quickly if we started using it as a substitute both for protein and for flour as a vegan/GF diet might.

One of the wonderful things about a vegetarian/vegan diet for me is the wide range of options there are, and I can't imagine anyone using chick peas/garbanzos as an exclusive protein or flour source anyway. But I guess your professor is to be commended for an excess of caution, even if she did get "chickling peas" and chick peas confused?
 
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F

Former member 91017

Guest
Yes. Chia seeds. Sadly, having tried the pudding many times, I have given up. I hate them, especially the sour pudding… To each their own.

I *do like* chocolate mousse with avocado as a diary substitute. I think some people might find it tastes a little too “green” or “grassy” but I don’t dislike it at all.

And I never said chickpeas weren’t tasty… just was immediately reminded of this rather serious caution about not using them across the ”substitutions” list (from a prof who had been vegan and remained a very disciplined vegetarian).
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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And I never said chickpeas weren’t tasty… just was immediately reminded of this rather serious caution about not using them across the ”substitutions” list (from a prof who had been vegan and remained a very disciplined vegetarian).

And with all respect to your professor, she was misinformed about chickpeas (or garbanzos, or whichever of the several other names they go by around the world). While they can cause gastrointestinal distress when consumed raw, there is absolutely no corroborating evidence linking them to lathyrism. The "link" has repeatedly been found to be the result of a decades-old confusion in botanical and common nomenclature, as is the case here.


I'm only belaboring the point because there are enough misconceptions about vegetarian and vegan food out there already - we certainly don't need another mucking up the waters :)

(And now I'm off to Google chocolate mousse recipes with avocado, which I suddenly have a craving for!)
 
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Mycroft

Veteran Member
I am not vegan or vegetarian. As a fact, i like fish and meat very much.
However, i like to cook and make my guests happy, so i make arrangements for their preferences.

This Silvester we had a vegan friend over, and a vegetarian was 50/50 on joining us aswell. So i came up with the question on what to cook.

We went with Tacos and it was awesome. Guacamole, vegan. Salsa Roja, vegan. Refried beans, vegan. Herbs and spices, vegan. All without buying anything out of the ordinary. Cheese was a bit of a thing, but i found a vegan cream cheese. For "meat" we made Tofu-crumbles and they are amazing (Recipe)
And for the non-vegans there was some shredded regular cheese and a single bbq-marinated grilled chicken breast. Awesome meal and mostly ingredients that every supermarket carries.

Since silvester my wife asked me to cook more vegan, so for tonight it's Zuchini+Carrot pancakes with some vegan herb cream cheese, for tomorrow Spaghetti Alio&Olio. Anything Chickpea is also always a staple. Hummus, Falafel... can't go wrong with that. Bulgur and Quinoa (Quillnoa?) are also stuff that works surprisingly well in a lot of dishes.

So i am likely not going to keep cooking this much vegan food, but to be honest, i am quite surprised how easy it is. Of course i can always cheat at work and have a Bratwurst for lunch.

edit: Even a Caldo Verde can be easily made vegan. Just offer the meat/chorizo as a side dish so everyone can adjust to their likings.

edit2: Same goes for Sopa de Ajo, another camino classic.
Hey let me know the next time you are having a vegan feast! Yum!
 

april_pdx

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Hoping for spring 2023
I know lots of people have already posted replies, but!
There are many many websites and books with vegan recipes. Even if you don't follow them, looking at what other people made is good for getting ideas.

My own advice as a mostly-vegan of nearly twenty years:
Roasted/grilled veggies are something everyone likes and is easy to make.
"Pasta with beans and veggies" is the basis of many, many tasty dishes from stews to salads--that's practically the mainstay of my diet, honestly.
Having plant milk for people to put in their coffee/tea (soymilk, oatmilk, whatever's available locally and not too expensive) is a really unexpected and nice thing to see when not at home.
Don't be afraid to season things heavily! So many people make vegetarian and vegan dishes very bland, and there's no reason for it.
Fake meats/cheese/etc are a nice treat but tend to be expensive--I don't use them often at home.
Don't be afraid to have a heavy hand with things like olive oil. Most vegan foods have very little fat on their own compared to meat/dairy/eggs; and fat makes things taste better and also makes meals more satisfying.
Check the labels on things. Non-vegan ingredients hide in surprising places--and conversely, some foods are vegan that you wouldn't expect!
 

dick bird

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Time of past OR future Camino
Plata, Ingles, Madrid, Norte, Primitivo, Invierno, Aragones, Olvidado, Chemin D'Arles
Remember that as a hospitalero, you never have to cook for the same person twice. In other words, you can cook the same dinner every night. I would experiment with a few vegan recipes at home before you leave. Choose the best one, and then serve it every night in the albergue (and have a crafty bacon sandwich in the kitchen when everyone has gone to bed when you can't stand it any more).
 
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino future
Having plant milk for people to put in their coffee/tea (soymilk, oatmilk, whatever's available locally and not too expensive) is a really unexpected and nice thing to see when not at home.
Don't be afraid to season things heavily! So many people make vegetarian and vegan dishes very bland, and there's no reason for it.
Fake meats/cheese/etc are a nice treat but tend to be expensive--I don't use them often at home.
Don't be afraid to have a heavy hand with things like olive oil. Most vegan foods have very little fat on their own compared to meat/dairy/eggs; and fat makes things taste better and also makes meals more satisfying.
Check the labels on things. Non-vegan ingredients hide in surprising places--and conversely, some foods are vegan that you wouldn't expect!

I think it would be very nice to have sugar/honey/maple syrup, oil, salt, pepper, vinegars, lemon juice, soy sauce, condiments-?, and plant milk available, near or at the table. (that is what one of my kitchen counters has on it!) The reason many vegetarian/vegan/whole food plant based diets are made bland, are so people can add what they need and want.
I for instance, restrict sweeteners, all refined oil, salt, and all animal products. If everything is heavily seasoned and oiled, I could not eat it. Heavily peppered anything my husband couldn't eat. We are eating for health, and health issues, and to us that matters. I hope you understand I am just giving another view point and yours is equally valid.

It's kind of like going to a big coffee shop, and there is a table to go to add sweeteners, cocoa, flavored sugars, stir sticks, syrups, and lids. People can add what they need or want to enjoy it.
----
This is our favorite sauce. I make 2 quarts at at time, for stir fries, or cauliflower wings, anything with vegetables that needs a kick of flavor. I do make substitutions, no tahini for us, and I change the chili sauce. This recipe is for a small amount just double double double it until you get 2 pints at a time, stays nice in the fridge. The balance of flavor is sweet and savory. Make it to your taste.

Mix all of this, then bring to a boil to slightly thicken it.
Stir Fry Sauce
  • 3 Tablespoons low sodium tamari * (or watered down soy sauce)
  • 3 Tablespoons organic maple syrup (or honey or sugar)
  • 1 Tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 1 Tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons molasses
  • 1 Tablespoon tahini (or not)
  • 1 to 3 teaspoons chili garlic sauce (+/-) * (or low salt ketchup)
  • ½ teaspoon ground mustard powder
  • 1 teaspoon fresh minced ginger
  • 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • ¼ teaspoon dried red pepper flake (+/-)
  • ½ teaspoon cornstarch (or arrowroot powder)
This is the original link: https://monkeyandmekitchenadventures.com/szechuan-veggie-stir-fry/ (every time we run out my family asks for more..more!) Many of the recipes on this site are very good.
Good luck with making the vegan food. It would be great to hear how it went for you cooking for so many people with different needs and wants.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Remember that as a hospitalero, you never have to cook for the same person twice. In other words, you can cook the same dinner every night. I would experiment with a few vegan recipes at home before you leave. Choose the best one, and then serve it every night in the albergue (and have a crafty bacon sandwich in the kitchen when everyone has gone to bed when you can't stand it any more).
Definitely.

My easy to make but tasty dish was pasta with vegan spinach pesto (using cashews) with a ratatouille of vegetables from the garden. A group of Italians even liked it!

I definitely don't agree that vegan food is bland but then again I love herbs and spices so add then generously to my dishes. That said, I have found that the Spanish are generally not used to Indian spices but other nationalities were happy to have a meal with those flavors.
 
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David Tallan

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I think it would be very nice to have sugar/honey/maple syrup, oil, salt, pepper, vinegars, lemon juice, soy sauce, condiments-?, and plant milk available, near or at the table. (that is what one of my kitchen counters has on it!)
Pardon me for the complete tangent, but is maple syrup readily available in Spain now? I didn't think to look for it when last on Camino, but I have definite memories about trying to explain it to English students in Spain 30 years ago when they had never heard of it.
 
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Pardon me for the complete tangent, but is maple syrup readily available in Spain now? I didn't think to look for it when last on Camino, but I have definite memories about trying to explain it to English students in Spain 30 years ago when they had never heard of it.
It's not a tangent! I have no idea.
edit: I also wrote 'condiments?' as I don't know traditional condiments in Spain.
 

jungleboy

Spirit of the Camino (Nick)
Time of past OR future Camino
A few in the past; more in the future!
Pardon me for the complete tangent, but is maple syrup readily available in Spain now? I didn't think to look for it when last on Camino, but I have definite memories about trying to explain it to English students in Spain 30 years ago when they had never heard of it.
Not sure about Spain but I have to go to specialty stores to get it in Portugal as the standard supermarkets don’t have it.
 

J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2022
As a hospitalera I have several recipes which are versatile for vegans, vegetarians, and people with gluten restrictions and peanut-other allergies, etc. I always ask ahead of time and we just work it out. I usually have a large container of homemade hummus that can be set out in bowls with various house made toppings of choice (red pepper sauce, olive tamponade, etc.) and eaten with bread or raw vegies. Usually all the non-vegans are eating as much as the vegans. I make it with an immersion stick blender and find that pilgrims often want to help and learn to make it and toppings themselves.

I also make lentil stew with and without meat if desired. I have a Tomato-Potato-Basil Soup vegan recipe that almost eveyone loves. I have made mac and cheese with gluten-free noodles that the gluten free and gluten tolerant both eat. I have a Peanut Kale pasta dish that can have pork added or just other vegetables depending on who is at the table. Usually we have a nice salad of vegetables. Marinated lentils also make a great cold starter as well. Roasted vegies can be more difficult since we often do not have an oven in the albergue, but vegies steamed in the microwave with a little Asian dressing and some almonds or peanuts added before serving works well (or let people add their own). Or toss vegies in some thyme and olive oil and microwave in a covered dish..

Basically if you ask people to help you prepare the meal, you will find that they love the food. You'll have very few complaints when they have helped you make something even if it is just cutting up something and putting it in a bowl. The one's that don't cook can play the guitar or help wash up or set the table. Include your guests in the meal making and your work as a hospitalero will be much more enjoyable. I have had people make their own noodles, whip up some peanut butter with the immersion blender, cut up chickens, and/or watch the pot while I am at mass with some of the other pilgrims.

Not much room in the kitchen or Covid restrictions about how many and who can be in there? No problem, go to the China Bazaar and buy some small cutting boards and several inexpensive sharp knives. Then go to the local bar and ask for all the newspapers from the day before and cover the table in the common room and set people to work chopping, peeling, and mixing. When people have food restrictions this also allows them more input about what to make and eat.
 
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In the 1980s I walked to Walsingham twice with the Student Cross pilgrimage. In one village kind local ladies had cooked food for us: shepherd's pie for the carnivores and chicken for the vegetarians.... A concept not fully understood in rural Norfolk at the time. Things have moved on a bit since then for vegetarians and vegans - even in Spain :)

I would like to make a mention of something that sandbagged me on the Primitivo last fall: a "vegetarian" meal that 1) didn't have a complete protein in it (a little rice in the thick vegetable soup, with no legumes, doesn't cut it), and 2) had "ice cream" that was apparently based on one of those fake milk products that are so super-processed. (Small servings of the food, it was beautifully presented on the plate with no family-style serving dish to get seconds from.) The whole affair was fairly low in fat, too...I ran out of steam altogether 2 hours into the next day's walk. Your pilgrims will walk the next day on what they eat for supper. Fat is good. Even if the protein of the meal is from a combination of beans/lentils/garbanzos and rice/corn. Or soybeans/tofu plus rice, for the Far Eastern version of the complete protein without meat.
 
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JabbaPapa

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Cooking for vegetarians is always easier, as things like cream, cheese, and eggs are not off the menu.

When I had to cook for large groups during party season one year, I was invited for that specific purpose which was gratifying, I found that to keep everyone happy, it was best to make two or sometimes three different versions of a vegetable-based pasta or rice sauce, with meat or without, cheese or not -- and then do everything in my power to make them taste virtually identical. Spices and garlic help towards that -- oh, and lashings of olive oil ; as does lengthy cooking of the sauces to get the flavours to blend, and the veg constituents to break down and liquefy.

Just once, I managed to get the vegan and meat option taste exactly the same, even I couldn't tell them apart by flavour !! But they did look different, and you could see just by looking that one was with meat and one without ; also texture was different.

Basic trick I think is don't try and make a "vegan meal", but make something a carnivore would like except with veg. It's vegetarian cooking really, just without the eggs and dairy. Or with pasta, keep the grated cheese separate, and let each use it or not to taste.

Protein is important, so chick peas, lentils, and so on -- which most meat-eaters enjoy too.
 
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trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Basic trick I think is don't try and make a "vegan meal", but make something a carnivore would like except with veg.
Exactly!

My husband makes a very good chili and has always made it with meat. Recently, while our daughter was visiting she asked if he could make it without the ground beef. Other than a very slight difference in texture the taste was the same as he's always made.
 

Sirage

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Le Puy to Santiago (2005), Porto to Santiago (2007), Vezelay for 200 kms (2009), From Seville, May (2015), Le Puy to Sangüesa (2016), Norte-Primitivo (Sep-Oct 2016)
Protein is important, so chick peas, lentils, and so on -- which most meat-eaters enjoy too.
Not quite: meat eaters want meat protein. Vegetable protein is not the same stuff but can be enjoyed alongside meat.
 
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Not quite: I'm a meat eater, but do not necessarily think about its protein content; it's the flavors I enjoy. I also love and make chickpea and lentil recipes.
I had read years ago that beans and rice combined in the same meal make a perfect protein, but I'm not sure if that is fact or fiction.
 
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meat eaters want meat protein. Vegetable protein is not the same stuff but can be enjoyed alongside meat.
Sure it is!
Need and want are two very different things.
Proteins are polypeptides made from chains of 20 (or 22) different amino acids - 9 of which are essential: Phenylalanine, Valine, Tryptophan, Threonine, Isoleucine, Methionine, Histidine, Leucine, Lysine.

Amino acids are amino acids. Whether they're from a plant or animal. There is no difference biochemically. And it's a myth that you can't get enough protein from plant foods. There are plenty of options for getting all 9 of these essential AAs. You need to combine foods sometimes, but protein is not lacking.
(There may be specific and personal reasons for specifically needing meat protein, and I'm not talking about that.)

I had read years ago that beans and rice combined in the same meal make a perfect protein, but I'm not sure if that is fact or fiction.
True, AFAIK.
 
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The amount of protein that is needed per day often gets overestimated, and the amount of protein found in vegetables, nuts, grain and seeds underestimated. Even oats ect. contain protein! So you eat a lot of protein 'accidentally' everyday, and probably much more than you think you do, overall.

Many plant based protein sources do not have all essential amino acids, that's true. But if you eat a healthy mix of different things, you'll get what you need.

Lentils/beans/chickpeas + grain/rice + nuts/seeds are usually a good combination.

For example:
- Hummus with tahina (sesame) and bread, plus vegetables/salad.
- Bean chili with rice, plus salad with nuts/seeds.
- thick lentil soup with bread, plus salad with nuts/seeds.

And to be honest, I make sure to get the nutrition I need, so if I'm a guest somewhere, and the meal that is offered is low in protein, it doesn't really matter. I probably had enough during the day already, and if not, one low protein day should be overall irrelevant if you usually eat a healthy, balanced diet most days...
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
The amount of protein that is needed per day often gets overestimated, and the amount of protein found in vegetables, nuts, grain and seeds underestimated. Even oats ect. contain protein! So you eat a lot of protein 'accidentally' everyday, and probably much more than you think you do, overall.

Many plant based protein sources do not have all essential amino acids, that's true. But if you eat a healthy mix of different things, you'll get what you need.

Lentils/beans/chickpeas + grain/rice + nuts/seeds are usually a good combination.

For example:
- Hummus with tahina (sesame) and bread, plus vegetables/salad.
- Bean chili with rice, plus salad with nuts/seeds.
- thick lentil soup with bread, plus salad with nuts/seeds.

And to be honest, I make sure to get the nutrition I need, so if I'm a guest somewhere, and the meal that is offered is low in protein, it doesn't really matter. I probably had enough during the day already, and if not, one low protein day should be overall irrelevant if you usually eat a healthy, balanced diet most days...
So true!
I was curious during my first Camino as a vegan (vs vegetarian) if I would notice any difference in my stamina etc. I was walking the Lana at the time. Finding vegan protein meal options was quite limited but nuts were of course in abundance as well as store bought beans. I didn't worry about my daily intake or making appropriate combos. Everyone is different but in my two weeks of walking I didn't experience any difference in my ability to walk my usual long stages. I then completed the Primitivo with the same experience.

We are all different, but I guess what I want to say is that most can do fine if you don't get enough protein during a period of time as we often consume more than we realize.
 

JabbaPapa

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Not quite: meat eaters want meat protein. Vegetable protein is not the same stuff but can be enjoyed alongside meat.
You are preaching to the converted, but what I meant was it's important when cooking for vegans.

What vegans most lack though is the animal fat.
 

JabbaPapa

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Pray tell why one would need animal fat😳?
It is THE best nutrient that exists. Including for biochemical reasons, our mitochondria love it, and the fat feeds our brains.

Having said that, there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all diet, and there most certainly exist those who can thrive on veg, and if you are one yourself, well good for you -- I have cooked for vegans, they enjoyed it, and so did I.

I would not recommend my own dietary requirements on anyone.

Except that a 2-month or 4-month carnivore diet, IF you need an elimination diet, can work for some people ; but then I hear that for some others, a similar veggie diet can do similar.

No food dogma anyway, if that helps ?
 
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Basic trick I think is don't try and make a "vegan meal", but make something a carnivore would like except with veg. It's vegetarian cooking really, just without the eggs and dairy. Or with pasta, keep the grated cheese separate, and let each use it or not to taste.

To help get this thread back on topic regarding what @RENSHAW was looking for, I'll chime in again to say that @JabbaPapa's advice to make things that taste good first and are only "incidentally" vegetarian or vegan is an excellent way to approach the problem of cooking for a group that may include omnivores as well as vegetarians and vegans.

We're in deep gumbo season here in New Orleans, and this week I plan to make the vegan gumbo which I've gradually developed over the years since I stopped eating meat - it substitutes as many varieties of mushrooms (fresh and dried, wild and cultivated) as I can find for the chicken and andouille sausage in the original recipe, and not only has a single person I've served it to over the years ever remarked on the absence of meat but many vegans I've served it to can't believe there are no animal products in it either! Truly a crowd-pleaser, if I do say so myself :)

But if fiddling with a "real" Cajun gumbo is outside your wheelhouse, I agree with several folks here that chili recipes are the ideal vehicle to play with and adapt to using plant-based ingredients. The one linked below is a great place to start!

 
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I have no idea at all what a 'gumbo' is, but if it has all the mushrooms it can only be perfect!

It's a dish somewhere between a soup and a stew with a long and fascinating history and many different varieties, all delicious!


I suppose it's not terribly dissimilar to a caldo gallego, to put it in more Camino Forum-familiar terms - though Louisiana gumbo does not customarily include potatoes or beans or legumes of any kind. But both are the kind of hearty and abundant communal dishes, often served during the colder months, that many different places and cultures have in common
 
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J Willhaus

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Another thing to consider as a hospitalero/a is providing hearty fare on a slim budget and with limitations on ingredients. Some things I could not find in the smaller communities so substitutions had to be made. Often we do not have a car when serving pilgrims so shopping very locally may limit further what you can buy either from the local tienda or the delivery trucks. My advice is to remain flexible; stock up on the basics and staples when you can. At one location we had on hand several cases of donated "black cherry" jam which no one much liked, but it was dutifully put out each day with breakfast. You may get garden donations from the community in other months. We got fresh mint in the winter which I incorporated as a part of a marinated lentil salad.

I always looked for and kept a package of gluten-free pasta, plenty of vegetable bouillon cubes, cans and bags of beans, bags of rice and lentils, and as many fresh vegetables as I could buy reasonably on hand. One vegetarian pilgrim told me that no one had even asked him before about dietary restrictions or preferences so kudos @RENSHAW for bringing up the topic.
 
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You are preaching to the converted, but what I meant was it's important when cooking for vegans.

What vegans most lack though is the animal fat.
Well, I would slightly disagree with this: what "vegan" meals often miss is sufficient fat, period. Avocado oil, olive oil, coconut oil...it's harder to successfully eat low carb sometimes. (Beans are starch, peanuts are starch--because they're beans, all the grains are starch, potatoes are starch, sweet potatoes have less but are still starch...)
 
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We got fresh mint in the winter which I incorporated as a part of a marinated lentil salad.
I might have to try that out some time.
Garbanzo salads can be good, and you can make them from canned garbanzos, too.
I always looked for and kept a package of gluten-free pasta, plenty of vegetable bouillon cubes, cans and bags of beans, bags of rice and lentils, and as many fresh vegetables as I could buy reasonably on hand.
Veggie bouillon for the win, it tastes good, it builds a nice broth with not too many more additions, and it has needed salt in the bargain. :)
 
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J Willhaus

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Marinated lentil salad adapted from a BonAppetit: recipe:

Cook half pound of lentils in water with an onion cut halfway through and bay leaves.
Drain and remove onion and bay leaves (I freeze or refrigerate the liquid and onion a for future soup.)

In a pan add a quarter cup of olive oil, 1 teaspoon each of whole cumin and coriander seeds. (I have used ground cumin in a pinch) and heat the pan until the spices begin sizzle to smell nicely. Set aside the pan and let this cool. DO NOT add the vinegar until the oil is cool or the whole spices will pop all over your kitchen! (Voice of experience.)

When cool add 3 tablespoons vinegar to the oil (sherry, red wine, cider, balsamic or even white vinegar will do). Marinate your cooked lentils in the oil, vinegar, and spice mixture for at least 30 minutes. Serve spread on a bed of greens (chopped lettuce or chopped cabbage). Add other crunchy vegies if you have them (radishes, cucumbers, etc.) I top with fresh mint or parsley if available. You can refrigerate the marinated lentils for a nice do ahead salad. I serve with home-made hummus, cut raw vegetables, Spanish bread, and bowl a of olives. You can increase or decrease the recipe amount or add some other dishes depending on your number and mix of guests. Maybe add some kind of soup or other hot dishes if the weather is cold.
 

Jopoke

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances September 2015
Lisbon to Santigo May 2016
Porto coastal route to Santiago Oct 2016
I have a few members of our family that are vegans. I do not understand it but I really do not want to be ignorant. I have seen a chicken moved of the dinner as it has an offensive smell , yet the same person ate meat for 30 years?
In today's times it just seems so difficult to please everyone - HOWEVER , I am keen to learn and as a hospitalero I may be asked for a vegan meal? So do I just put all the veg on the table and ask the pilgrim to make their own or do I TRY to cook? I know you can get Vegan(egg free) Pasta and of course there is gnocchi.
I look forward to some suggested recipes that may only take say 20 minutes but lasagna
pasta and other elaborate dishes I will also try.
Thank you for your consideration. Beans, veg, salad, chips, patatas braves, soups, dried pasta, rice and Gnocchi are all good. You could consider veg stir fry, bean chilli, lentil soups, burritos, tostados con tomate (my favourite breakfast) avacado salad. Mushroom Rissotto without cream and cheese unless vegan. My absolute favourite whilst in Spain has to be vegtable Paella.
 
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Since this is a topical thread at the moment, some of you might be interested to know that I am giving a talk tomorrow (Saturday 29 January) about walking the Camino as a vegan. It's part of an online summit on vegan travel.

If you wish, you can register for free at this link.

I'm sorry I missed your talk, @Wendy Werneth! Is it available to view online anywhere?
 
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NozieDeeler

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If you have a vegetarian in your family and want to learn how to cook a vegetarian dish for them, start with a simple tofu recipe. You will need a ready-made mass that you can buy in any supermarket and a tofu mould to compress this mass. You can serve tofu with ginger or vegetable broth. Also, tofu is great with wasabi and soy sauce. However, not everyone may like this combination, so do not add these ingredients to tofu, but put them next to it. I hope you will pleasantly surprise your loved ones with what you cook. Good luck!
 
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