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Vegan worries

catfishonrye

New Member
Hey All,
So far all the posts I have seen say that vegetarians should have no problem on the camino but us vegans might be s.o.l. People have mentioned the availability of supermarkets quite a bit, mostly in the context of buying bread, cheese, fruit, and tuna. What about beans, esp lentils, chickpeas and black beans? I realize asking for tofu and soymilk would be a bit greedy, but I'm wondering if there is an alternative source of protein for us vegans, and if so, would I be more likely to find it in can or dried form? Dried beans, naturally, would present a new host of difficulties... Oh, and as for breakfast (the hardest meal to eat "out," as any vegan will tell you)- anything like oatmeal available? Or Cliff bars? Luckily, I have no objection to eating the same thing day after day. Also, normally people mention cooking as a group activity. Anyone had success cooking for themselves, day after day? Obviously, I would welcome others, but strangely not everyone thinks my dairy, egg, meat-free diet is as delicious as I do... :)

Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I found plenty of fruit, nuts, dried fruit, fresh vegetables, canned beans, etc. to eat ...
I don't think you'll have a problem in most places.
Other places may present issues.
Most "breakfast" I found along the way had either bread (bocadillo) or eggs (torta).

You can stock up in the cities, but then you have the weight to deal with.

I'm not sure WHY you're a vegan (some for health, some for politics, some for animal treatment) but I can tell you that the meat, cheese, eggs in Spain are much cleaner and the animals are treated much better, if that makes a difference.

Also, the wheat, which I cannot eat here in the USA is cleaner there and does not cause the flareups I have here.

Good luck!
I'm sure you'll be fine.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Alas Vegans don't eat eggs and therefore don't eat bread made with eggs or any other animal derived product. Basically if its not grown its not on. So, Catfishonrye might be a good forum name but a vegan wouldn't eat it :)

Catfishonrye, Anniesantiago is absolutely correct - in Spain you will find abundant salads and vegetables - in shops even in the smaller villages you will find a ready supply of beans and lentils - these are staple parts of the Spanish diet.

You need to ensure however that when you order a salad it has no tuna which in Spain is often automatically added to salads. You will also need to be careful because many dishes contain meat - the famous lentejas for example is a dish of lentils - always flavoured with ham.

I'd advise you to make a list of the words in Spain you'll need and learn a few relevant sentences - if you don't speak Spanish maybe one of the linguists in the Forum will help?

Like Annie I'm also sure you will be fine but I also think you'll eat a lot of salad and french fries along the way :)

Buen Camino

John
 

viajero

Active Member
Last year on the Camino we met a Spanish vegan. He had decided that while on the Camino he would eat dairy and eggs. He thought it would be too difficult to find vegan food otherwise. He planned to return to his vegan diet after he finished the camino. I think he made this choice based on the fact that we wasn't going to be cooking and was trying to eat at bars/restaurants as well as picking up items at grocery stores. I think you can stick to your vegan diet but you might have to prepare for eating a lot of the same things day after day. Even my dairy and egg eating vegetarian friends grew very tired of eating the same things day after day. As to the cooking...
Often the ktichens at the albergues are quite small--sometimes with just one or two cooking rings on the stove. So, there isn't a lot of time for individuals to take turns each preparing their own meal hence the communal meals. We had a couple of vegetarians among the people we shared meals with and whoever was cooking did their best to accomodate them. I'm sure others would do the same for you. You can cook individual meals but it might not be likely that you'd get to do so everyday. Shops do carry granola bar type items but those that have more protein (like cliff bars) I don't recall seeing in the regular shops--maybe some larger supermarkets in the bigger cities.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Most bread has no eggs, unless it's a really rich bread like Portuguese Sweet Bread. It may, however, have milk.

French bread, however, has no eggs or milk. It is made with water only.

I'd just ask at the panaderia for a bread without eggs or milk.
I bet you can find something and once you do, you'll know what to ask for.

When I went last time, I began on a raw-food diet (vegetables and fruits) because of my MCS, but found after a week that I was able to eat foods in Spain I was unable to eat here. But I found plenty of non-animal foods.

I'm sure you'll be fine. Go and enjoy and have a great Camino!
 

Dave

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 2002; most recent: Norte/Primitivo 2019
You'll be fine. My two pieces of advice are: 1) Stay in as many albergues with kitchens as you can and 2) Stock up in the big towns. It is possible to find tofu - El Corte Ingles has a pretty big range and there is jarred tofu available in some places (I've found it multiple times in supermarkets in Ponferrada and Negreira, and I'm sure it's at more).

I wrote up my overview for how I ate well as a vegetarian here (and it's equally applicable to vegans) - http://roadscholarswa.com/veggie.html

I haven't walked the Frances in a few years, so there's probably some info out of date.

Dave
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Dave, that's a great link. Maybe you should put it in its own little post. A lot of people ask about this.
 

carriedavey

Member
Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2013
I am not a vegan/vegetarian and can eat (in the main) whatever is put in front of me :D My wife however is vegetarian and all the information contained in this thread has been of great assistance to us for our Camino planned for April-May this year.
For health reasons I eat very little red meat, chicken, fish or pork, so vegetarian suits me fine, on the other hand if I have to eat a meal that has a "meat connection" this is fine too.
Thanks so much for easing some of our concerns! Buen Camino!!
Dave
 

nreyn12

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2005) (2007) (2008) (2009) (2010) (2011) (2012) (2013) (2014) (2015); Guide 2013-2016
A quick search on this forum for 'vegetarian' will yield a number of good results, including this one:

food-on-the-camino-de-santiago/topic4163.html

My personal favorite is mentioned in there - Restaurante Sarasate in Pamplona. Best meal on the Camino, in my opinion.

Buen provecho!
 

River Woman

New Member
Vegan couple here from the U.S. wondering the same. Figure there is fresh fruit, salads and such. have been to Espana before for a long stay and had no problem in most restaurants, we found most bread/baguettes do not have egg. Can anybody comment on the available of 'live' food along the way?
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Hi River Woman,
As people have posted in the past there will be no problem finding fresh or dried fruit and nuts, vegetables and canned beans (all types). In large cities/supermarkets (Eroski for example) you can find soy milk but I have yet to encounter it elsewhere.

The Spanish do not consider ham 'meat' so you may be surprised to find something in your lentil soup you weren't expecting.

I am not a vegan so I do not find being on the Camino a problem - I can always get by in a restaurant having an omelette or a salade (their 'ensalada mixta' has eggs so beware). Eating in a restaurant will be difficult for a vegan. I hope that another vegan answers your post.
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
Generally you can get jars of cooked beans in shops. I met a guy with a tiny budget who had lived on beans and bread for his camino. Bread and jam is a common breakfast too in Spain. I took a small plastic-topped container in which I sprouted seeds along the way (just put holes in the lid - easy) they sprout v quick in warm weather and are very nutritious. You can get peanut or other spreads too - with banana and bread they make a meal to march on! I think the dinner is the meal you will have most problems with - if eating out - as others have said the Spanish do not consider ham or tuna to be meat! Chips and asking for salad without tuna/egg would be the norm I reckon. Be prepared to fish out any meat that has been added - I know that will gross out most vegi/vegans but it is amazing how hunger overcomes the feeling... I picked out a hundred bits of ham off a pizza once and handed to the waiter on a serviette - saying 'Actually this IS meat' - I think that grossed him out! Otherwise get beans and loads of veg and cook up when you can in albergues - do rice/veg/beans and cook enough to have cold the next day if there are no cooking facilities.
Oatmeal/porridge oats are sometimes hard to find in Spain - its ok in big stores but otherwise you need a health shop and they'll cost a fortune. We usually breakfast on oats with dried fruit and seeds soaked in water (tastes better than it sounds!) but sometimes found it hard to source the oats.
I expect you'll be fine - after a day walking you will wolf down anything - even if its bread and jam for the tenth day running...!
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Diet is a personal choice, but perhaps it is wise to be polite about it. Vegans in Spain are not mainstream, and it is pointless to be snippy across the language barrier about something the Spanish that do not universally understand. The culture is not going to change even if one's diet choice is superior or more efficient ecologically. We all want to be special, but it rarely works out well to keep pointing out how special each of us really is, especially if it is contrary to long established tradition, a pig based tradition.:)
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
I wasn't being impolite or snippy - just stating the facts. Spanish vegans I have met cannot get meals without meat added despite being fluent. It's not just a Spanish thing either, my Grandma was just the same, 'But it's only a little bit of ham dear' !! If someone is allergic it could be dangerous. But the question was asked about Spain and eating a vegan diet in Spain, since I have had direct experience of that I answered the question. Now I eat all foodstuffs - although prefer them to be organic/fair trade/ethical/un-messed-around-with. Presently in France, I now have problems getting the meat cooked not raw!! (This is said tongue in cheek Falcon - although true!)
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I wasn't being impolite or snippy
I apologize. I did not take your post to be impolite or snippy. However, the scenario that popped into my mind from
I picked out a hundred bits of ham off a pizza once and handed to the waiter on a serviette - saying 'Actually this IS meat'
made me think that of the two options -- simply pick off the meat, or bring it to the waiter's attention -- you picked the one that might try to change the world, and the waiter probably did not comprehend the big picture.;)
 

Bozzie

Continuing to walk my camino daily. Blessings!
Camino(s) past & future
2012/2016
Hey All,
So far all the posts I have seen say that vegetarians should have no problem on the camino but us vegans might be s.o.l. People have mentioned the availability of supermarkets quite a bit, mostly in the context of buying bread, cheese, fruit, and tuna. What about beans, esp lentils, chickpeas and black beans? I realize asking for tofu and soymilk would be a bit greedy, but I'm wondering if there is an alternative source of protein for us vegans, and if so, would I be more likely to find it in can or dried form? Dried beans, naturally, would present a new host of difficulties... Oh, and as for breakfast (the hardest meal to eat "out," as any vegan will tell you)- anything like oatmeal available? Or Cliff bars?
Hola, Pilgrim...
I was vegan before I walked the Camino, but went back to vegetarian for the 35 days. I didn't cook for myself and stayed in pensions after a few days. I did eat the pilgrim meals and it was slim pickin' s for even for a vegetarian. I ate lots of pasta and eggs. Salads are basically iceberg lettuce, a few slices of tomato and some grated carrots. I know you said you won't get bored with repetition, but after a week, you'll be surprised how you want different nutrients for your body! I dreamed of kale every night! Lol. (Not kidding) they do have kale but you never see it on menus or in markets. They feed it to the chickens!!! That's why the eggs are so good, I guess :).
It's important to plan where you'll stay, if you are staying in albergues. Find the ones that have kitchens (not all do) so you can cook vegetables, grain and legumes for your self. You may end up carry more food than you want to because not every village will have a market.
You can walk the Camino as a vegan, you just have to plan it. You don't want to be burning all the calories each day without eating something that makes you feel satisfied. It will just take a little more planning...and that's ok! The forum has so much info that it won't be difficult to sort of map out a strategy.
Best of the Camino to you! It's SO totally worth it!!!
Dee Anne
(Aka Bozzie)
 

Parisian

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010, 2015 2016, 2020 postponed 2021 planning
My take on walking the Camino with plant-based fuel. My eating plan for health reasons is "nothing with a face or a mother." I am a V-N-O, vegan, no oil. (Or nuts) After two strokes. I found his plant based program and have had my 4th anniversary as a vegan. I worried that I would have problems on the Camino.

I did not.

Some reasons why I was so successful:
1) I made laminated cards stating in Spanish, what I could not eat and what I could eat. The word "stroke" doesn't translate well so I put "Heart Attack Survivor"
Dear Chef, Thank you for helping me stay healthy.
( what I can eat and not eat... I put the NO OIL in caps. That's the most challenging issue. )

What I can eat.
At the end I mentioned, "I do drink wine." Now everyone is happy for me, yeah!

I have my emergency kit. like seeds, nutritional yeast, spices and mustard. And when I can find them, herbs. A restaurant house salad comes alive with a dressing of spices, nutritional yeast, mustard and wine... Just a little from my glass. I ask for fresh veggies and beans. Some of the plates are photo shoots. Think success and satisfying.

Big find. Health food stores generically called Herbolario or Herbolaro . This is the mother load. Tofu, soy milk, rice and almond milk, tempeh, dried fruits, seeds, and spices. Other items all are at least vegetarian. I found Herbolario s even in small towns.

My Supermarkets list: Garbanzo beans, roasted red peppers in water, white asperagus, lemon, veggies, greens. Lentils ( bottle of wine) Balsamic vinigar. Freezer bag
Great salad mixings.

Hummus recipe. garbanzo beans, spices, cut up roasted red peppers, lemon. Balsamic viniger. Put in heavy freezer zip-lock bag. Use wine bottle as a rolling pin until all ingredients are the consistency of paste. Serve with crackers or bread and balsamic vinigar .. Lots of favors... And wine.

Another addition to the salad dressing is a little orange juice.

If I get to cook:
Stayed two days at an albergo in Pamplona, the other guests named me, Spice Girl, and gave me an apron with the city's symbol of the bull. Made me feel young.

Dry roasted mushrooms. Cleaned mushrooms and salt. That's all. Cook over a medium heat. Salt helps the mushrooms release their liquor.

Melangé of ingredients for a one-pot meal. Lentils, beans, frozen tiny peas, veggies, can of tomatoes, spices. Can be served over greens, rice, or pasta.

Dessert: pumpkin seeds or pepitos, sugar. Skillet. parchment paper. Yea, I carry that with me along with a light weight cutting board and my knife.

Warm sugar until it melts, add pumpkin seeds and stir till they are coated. Pour out onto the parchment paper. Let cool. Break apart into peanut-brittle sized pieces.

If I have an oven... Rare
I grill veggies in a roasting bag
Another desert is baked apples, cinnamon and sugar. (You can do this in a skillet on the stove, too. ) mix 1- part cinnamon and 2 parts sugar in a flat pan. Cut and core an apple place cut side on mixture. 350F for 45 minutes depending on the apple.

WARNING: People will want what your food.

So bottom line to my fello Vegans pilgrims..... You Can Do It!
Not to fear with a touch of planning, you will be plant-strong and on track.

Sources.
How to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, by Dr. Esselstyne who is my doctor as well as President Clinton's and a whole lot of others.
Engine 2 Book by Rip Esselstyne, tri-athlete
No Meat Athlete. Blog by Matt.
Forks Over Knives. Movie

Buen Camino.... See you in April 2016 Elin
 

Nanumea

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2016
Buen Camino.... See you in April 2016 Elin

Did I understand it right? Are you a vegan pilgrim walking the Camino in April 2016? So am I!

On my first Camino I was a gluten-free vegetarian and had no problems with finding food to eat. But I have to admit, I ate lots of dairy back then.. This time, on my future Camino in April 2016 I'm determined to make vegan choises. I have a feeling that a vegan camino won't be as easy as a vegetarian one, but I also don't think it's impossible. As long as the small tiendas have canned beans that don't need a can opener, I'll be fine. Most of the supermarkets in Spain even have soy products nowadays. I will carry some corn cakes in my backpack at all times (they are lightweight and a good alternative for bread for someone with a gluten allergy). Avocados are my favourite snacks when walking.

I'm planning to cook most of my food myself. If I find a vegan/vegetarian restaurant in some of the bigger cities, I will try them because I want to support the logal veggie restaurants. Since I cook most of my own food, I will save some money that I can then spend in a good restaurant.

Thank you Parisian for the tips, I will sure try them! :)
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
You might also want to do a search here on the forum for vegetarian albergues, there are quite a few of them around now and as vegetarians they 'should' understand vegan needs also. Buen Camino, SY
 

Parisian

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010, 2015 2016, 2020 postponed 2021 planning
Did I understand it right? Are you a vegan pilgrim walking the Camino in April 2016? So am I!

On my first Camino I was a gluten-free vegetarian and had no problems with finding food to eat. But I have to admit, I ate lots of dairy back then.. This time, on my future Camino in April 2016 I'm determined to make vegan choises. I have a feeling that a vegan camino won't be as easy as a vegetarian one, but I also don't think it's impossible. As long as the small tiendas have canned beans that don't need a can opener, I'll be fine. Most of the supermarkets in Spain even have soy products nowadays. I will carry some corn cakes in my backpack at all times (they are lightweight and a good alternative for bread for someone with a gluten allergy). Avocados are my favourite snacks when walking.

I'm planning to cook most of my food myself. If I find a vegan/vegetarian restaurant in some of the bigger cities, I will try them because I want to support the logal veggie restaurants. Since I cook most of my own food, I will save some money that I can then spend in a good restaurant.

Thank you Parisian for the tips, I will sure try them! :)


Hi Nanumea, How wonderful that we found each other. I found most of my white beans in glass jars and found them most places.

As for eating in vegetarian restaurants, my experience as a vegan has not been good. It seems the vegetarian cooks feel that they have "the solution."
Did I understand it right? Are you a vegan pilgrim walking the Camino in April 2016? So am I!

On my first Camino I was a gluten-free vegetarian and had no problems with finding food to eat. But I have to admit, I ate lots of dairy back then.. This time, on my future Camino in April 2016 I'm determined to make vegan choises. I have a feeling that a vegan camino won't be as easy as a vegetarian one, but I also don't think it's impossible. As long as the small tiendas have canned beans that don't need a can opener, I'll be fine. Most of the supermarkets in Spain even have soy products nowadays. I will carry some corn cakes in my backpack at all times (they are lightweight and a good alternative for bread for someone with a gluten allergy). Avocados are my favourite snacks when walking.

I'm planning to cook most of my food myself. If I find a vegan/vegetarian restaurant in some of the bigger cities, I will try them because I want to support the logal veggie restaurants. Since I cook most of my own food, I will save some money that I can then spend in a good restaurant.

Thank you Parisian for the tips, I will sure try them! :)


Hi Nanumea, Great hearing from you. I am walking with a friend for her birthday and will start on the 14th of April at Sarria, 100K+ from Santiago.

As for vegetarian restaurants: I have had more issues with chefs and staff in these places over giving my "Eat and Don't Eat" card to people in a general restaurant. I don't eat eggs, oil, or nuts. My pasta came with a lot of great steamed veggies on top of egg pasta with oil used in the tomato sauce and pine nuts. I think that in these situations, and there have been many at home and abroad, ones path in the vegetarian-vegan world is akin to religion with a "mine is right" attitude.

Please write about any questions and I would love to know how it works for you. I will say that my telling the chef I need to do this for the health reason, is helpful. They seem not to want me to die at their table.

Buen Camino, Elin.
 

Nanumea

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2016
Hi Elin, I'm surprised to hear that you have had more issues in vegetarian restaurants than the "usual" ones! I thought maybe they would be more understanding, but I guess not. Luckily I've been studying Spanish two years after my first Camino and it should be easier to explain things in restaurants when I go to Spain next time. Thanks for the tip about telling you're doing it for health reasons. That is actually one of the reasons I live a vegan lifestyle, but it's not the main reason.

I will start my Camino 4th April in St. Jean so we won't see each other then. But maybe I will benefit from you spreading vegan awareness, as I walk some weeks behind you, haha! :D

Nanumea
 

Parisian

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2010, 2015 2016, 2020 postponed 2021 planning
Hi Elin, I'm surprised to hear that you have had more issues in vegetarian restaurants than the "usual" ones! I thought maybe they would be more understanding, but I guess not. Luckily I've been studying Spanish two years after my first Camino and it should be easier to explain things in restaurants when I go to Spain next time. Thanks for the tip about telling you're doing it for health reasons. That is actually one of the reasons I live a vegan lifestyle, but it's not the main reason.

I will start my Camino 4th April in St. Jean so we won't see each other then. But maybe I will benefit from you spreading vegan awareness, as I walk some weeks behind you, haha! :D

Nanumea
Hi Nanumea, My comment about vegetarian restaurants was a bit broad. I was reflecting on a small sampling using my own experiences. My interior meaning was more of a comment on being aware that one still has to be a advocate even in vegetarian restaurants. Something like that.
Definitely we can keep in touch along the Way.

My naive thinking.......
I had a dream before my first Camino with the message, "you will be tempered on the path." I took that to mean that I did not have to prepare at all before I started my Camino. My wise Camino advisor straightened me right up. Her comment was, " when you said 'yes' to walking the Camino, you began your Camino. So go out there and break in your new boots. You only have 6 months left. " Sage advise.

Blessings, Elin
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
I felt so blessed with the Spanish cuisine and whatever can be had during the day, raw, cooked or boiled,
- but breakfast;
Like the Scandinavian old horse that I am, I will never be going without breakfast cereal ever again.

Walking as I did the first time around on just the haphazard offers that could be had from 7 am and the next hour I was experiencing the immediate food culture, I felt, and could then be traveling light. Hah, I say. Humbug... !

Oh no, both me and my stomach was not amused...
It was either waiting in line for a full continetal breakfast galore with everything till you are bursting at the seams with eggs ´n bacon or like most days, just a quick Cortado and a mini muffin from the glass cupboard on the counter.
- No Siree, no more...
Since then, I am always bringing a weeks supply of mixed cereal muesli that can be eaten with soy milk that does not refrigeration or boiled to a porridge. I´ll take the extra load any day ..And be on speaking terms with my stomach.
And I always find a proper substitute product further down the track...

This old horse can go 2½ hours on 100 grams of porridge, I tell you..! - Easy ..
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
- this time around, however I only will bring 3 days worth of provisions..alas ! no room !
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
I am not vegan, but like to live healthy... Oats and dried fruit just in water (even soya milk curdles after being route-marched... ) is a sovereign breakfast! It is sometimes hard to find oats or dried fruit but a health shop will always have them. a plastic mug with muslin over makes a great 'seed sprouter' ... for extra vit c boost!
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
I am not vegetarian or vegan but I know many who are and have been thinking about how I would do it on the camino. I am Norwegian, so to me cake and coffee is not breakfast - I need at least a tostada with tomato and oil, but you often have to ask for it. Those who eat eggs can wait until second breakfast, when more places offer tortilla and bocadillos with tomato or for instance tortilla francesa (plain omelette), perhaps with onions, mushrooms, tomatoes etc. The ensalada mixta sin atun/huevo is offered most places and quite often you can find small cartons of gazpacho in the shops, even in the chiller! Pour into a cup or bowl and dip the rock hard bocadillo leftover in it, lovely and nutritious! But the best trick of all is to bring some ziplock bags and a tupperware tub so you can buy beans, lentils etc in glass jars and ditch the heavy jar straight away. The tub also becomes your own little salad or soup bowl. I am definitely taking some oats from now on to add to a morning yogurt!
 

mousehog

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
I eat lots of bacon and eggs on my normal ketogenic diet; I have just decided to enjoy the local cuisine and not be ultra strict. I was a vegan for 4 years but got very ill. It was not the diet for me. In Spain bread is everywhere. I do have to remember to say “No Pan”. Before it is put on the plate.
I do eat Tortillas even though potato is not on my normal diet.
I must say that hard boiled eggs, cured ham, nuts and dark chocolate travel well.
Buen Camino!
 

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