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Vegetarian food?

#1
Hi,

Just wondering, what does a typical pilgrim menu in an albergue consist of? I'm a vegetarian and don't necessarily want to go to a cafe or restaurant every night just to get something that doesn't have meat in it, I'm not going to have that much money to spend. Do the albergues offer vegetarian meals?

Thanks,
Jo
 

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#2
Hola,

Just a thought but you might want to do a search for "Vegetarian food" in the search box and see what has been said on this before.

We only saw one "vegetarian" cafe before we got to Santiago and that was in Sarria.

You can, of course, go to the market and fix whatever you want in many of the albugues.

Rual northern Spain had wonderful food, but vegetarian was not high on the list.

Jerry
 

viajero

Active Member
#3
The wonderful hospitaleros in Ruitelan made a lovely meal at the albergue. There was a vegetarian option as well which was very satifsfying. They made a great veg. paella meal at the albergue in Vilar de Mazarife (I can't remember the name of the albergue but I believe it was the first one on the right just as you enter the village). I think a couple of the others may have done veg. meals as well but these are the two that come to mind. Several of the albergues have kitchens so if you pick up a few items you can prepare meals too. The restaurant Manolo in Santiago had a very fillling vegetarian plate (I don't think it is on the menu so you have to ask for it). I myself am not a vegetarian but met and walked with several on the camino and I must say it was sometimes difficult for them. They got a little bit tired of salad, french fries, bread and eggs. I think that buying a few groceries here and there will help. Good luck.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
Hi Jo,
Very few albergues offer any food at all. Some of the smaller albergues - Eunate, Tosantos, Granon, St Nicholas, Manjarin come to mind - offer an evening meal for a donation whilst others, like Ave Fenix or the Albergue Vegetariano at La Faba, charge about 10 euro.
Many albergues have kitchens (with limited utensils) where you can cook your own meals.
The Spanish are a carnivorous people and eat a lot of meat and fish. I found that the Menu del Peregrinos, which you can get for about 10 euro in any little village or cafe-bar, offer chips and chicken, salads and a fruit or yoghurt. We very rarely saw vegetables on the menu.
It is much cheaper to make your own dinner. I took a little immersion heater (a spiral one cup heaters) and often bought a bottle or tin of vegetables to add to a cup of soup eaten with fresh bread. There are large and small supermecados along the way where you can buy pastas, rice, lentils etc to cook in the albergues. Often people leave opened packets behind and you are free to use those as well.
You can buy yoghurt with fruit or muesli for breakfast, some cheese or a tomato and a fresh loaf to have al fresco for lunch. Treat yourself occasionally in a restaurant and you will find that the platos are often cheaper than the Menu del Dia.
You won't starve - but you might crave a home cooked vegetarian meal!
 
#5
Oh well thats at least 3 meals you can have....... :D

I say to my wife that vegetarians in Spain are a little like Introverts, (they do exist but are very hard to find).

But seriously I don't know how much of a vegetarian you are (some will eat fish occasionally) but I think you may struggle in parts.

Even the mixed salads nearly always have tuna. I also saw someone order a mixed "vegetable stew" that when it arrived it had chicken in it and when questioned the waiter said "well its just chicken".

So be carefull, again it depends on how serious a vegetarian you are.

Someone once told me a story of about Swami Vivekanada (devout vegetarian) who after eating a dish with meat in it by mistake and being physically ill once he rcognised the fact came back inside and asked his host for another helping, saying that he should get over his "attachment" to not eating meat.

Anyway

I wish you the best of luck .

Buen Camino

Pablo
 

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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#6
Pablo is quite right! The Spanish don't seem to understand the concept of vegetarianism.
I often ordered soup - sin carne - only to have the host spoon a big chunk of sausage out of it before passing it to me!
When I asked for ensalada - sin pescado - it often came with tuna chunks it. A Spanish pilgrim explained that tinned atún is not considered to be real fish!
 

ksam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese May "08" Camino Frances May/June "11" del Norte Sept/Oct "14"/Camino Invierno May 2016/ Camino Ingles Oct 2017
#7
Hi! There is/are breakfast cereal/yogurt combos (the come four cups together) that are "shelf" stable..and can be carried with you. We found them when doing the Camino Portuguese recently...can't think of the brand but I do remember it had Bifidus in the label in bold letters...helps with the digestive tract staying on track! They made a great breakfast or lunch addition...and helped with protein consumption.

Post when your on the road so we can see how you make out!! Being married to the butchers son...being a vegetarian ain't really possible!!!

Buen Camino, Karin
 
#8
Hi,

In 2003 I walked for more than a week with a nice canadian vegetarian girl. It was surprising for me to see how easy was for her to take only vegetarian meals.

Salads and omelettes, Caldo Gallego, lentejas, fruits, and so on.

Usually it's possible to order two "first" in a menu, so you can ask Caldo and a salad.

She used to buy fruit for breakfast.

Buen Camino,

Javier Martin
Madrid, Spain.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Donating Member
#9
Alas Caldo Gallego is made from meat stock - at least pork and beef and in some places also chicken. I've also never known lentejas to be made with anything other than ham.

But there are plenty of vegetable/salad options plus tortilla and of course ubiquitous chips.

If you eat fish then there are many other options.
 

elzi

Active Member
#10
Hello, Just made it thorugh the whole camino alive and I´m vegetarian.

Most vegetarians I met along the way tried to stay in the albergues that had kitchens and made their own food (lots of chick peas, lentils and salads etc). It was usuallly fairly easy to find albergues with kitchens but I struggled a bit across the meseta and also in very small villages sometimes if there is just one bar offering a pilgrim menu the albergue might well not offer a kitchen (presumably so the bar gets the money?). In big towns there was almost always a kitchen.

If you want to eat out be very caareful about ordering. If you eat fish you will probably find you will be eating fish almost constantly. Almost all salads in spain seem to come with tuna on for some reason so if you don´t eat fish be sure to ask for "sin carne" AND "sin pescado". Or just ask for a salad without tuna.

Also be very careful with soups. Even vegetable soups come with meat in. Most soups are made with meat stocks so even if you ask for a vegetable soup without meat you will almost certainly be given vegetable soup made with meat. I haven´t eaten meat for about 18 years and it makes me very sick, I got very ill a few times on the french route last year and once this year eating "vegetable" soup so now I avoid soup entirely. I guess it depends how fussy you are about how "vegetarian" you like your soup.

Sometimes people can be very understanding, the last pilgrim meal I had I left the soup and the chef came out to ask me what was wrong with his food. When I explained about the meat stock he gave me a lovely vegetarian salad and made me a really nice egg pasta diah as well. Mostly though don´t expect the spainsh to truly understand the concept of vegetarianism.

Please remember though that you won´t starve as virtually EVERY single bar in spain has Tortilla a vegetarian staple. Whatever restaurant/bar/albergue you are in you´ll pretty much always be able to order tortilla as an alternative..... Wow, I´ve had a lot of Tortilla!

Good Luck! :)
 

viajero

Active Member
#11
Years ago when I lived in Spain, an American friend met a Spanish family who said that they were vegetarians. She was surprised as she had met so few Spanish vegetarians. When she asked them what they ate, the father replied, "vegetables, chicken, and Jamon de york "(regular deli style boiled ham as opposed to jamon serrano). We found it pretty amusing that chicken and ham were considered vegetarian fare. If you ever order the "sandwich vegetal" beware! In the village where I lived the sandwich vegetal always came with ham.
 
#12
...If you are a vegetarian like me... (well... ok I do eat fish)... you can still survive the camino, though spanish restaurants tend to put meat in everything. I always remove the meat from the soups... (I dont mind if the stock is made on meat... - as long as I do not have to eat read meat)

Ham is not considered as meat in Spain... sometimes when I ask... "¿lleva carne?" (does it have meat?) They usually answer me "No! lleva jamon york" (no it has york ham). When I reply to them "Ham is meat..." - they respond... "Yes but it only has a little bit".

Some restaurants can cook up a VERY nice vegetable plate... with NO meat.

Also it is posible to get lentel soup with no meat... (however as already mentioned the stock might be from meat.... )

I haven't eaten red meat for 20 years... and if I have it I will get a bad stomace ache... however it seems I can deal with the stock...

I have done the Camino now 3 times... without suffering or having to eat the same thing over and over again... - and now living in Spain... I still survive.

Just use your imagination. Most restaurants can serve you tomatosoup, lentelsoup... a nice plate of beans... there are salads... tortilla frances or tortilla de patata... it is even posible to get integral bread... so you do not have to eat white bread.

Nothing is impossible... many restaurants will cook something up if you ask nicely... and with out expecting to get it as a part of the peregrino menu...

¡Que aproveche!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#13
I don't eat any animal, eggs or milk. But, I will eat a muffin or cake baked with egg and milk - or even a patata tortilla. I always take my little spiral immersion heater and a large mug with me on my travels. Even the smallest shops in Spain sell bottles or tins of mixed vegetables and these, added to a mug of packet soup, make a really substantial meal accompanied with bread and cheese. I carried a couple of those little tins of veges with the pull off tops and often ordered a plain salad - sin atun - and just added my own vegetables to it.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#14
If you stop in at our place on the meseta we´ll make you up a lovely veg. meal. We´re just now starting into a semi-vegetarian lifestyle (we only eat meat when we have company who eat meat); Patrick is becoming a fine vegetarian cook, and we operate on a co-op/donativo basis.

Reb.
 
#15
La Trucha in El Acebo is a vegetarian B&B; the host is very welcoming and the homecooked food a world away from the chicken'n'chips pilgrim menus. I'm not a veggie but enjoyed it very much. Ensuite room, dinner and breakfast for 2 was 60 euros total so treat yourself if not on tight budget.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Donating Member
#16
Completed the Camino Frances from SJPdP to Finisterre July 2010 without (as far as I know) eating meat.

It was actually quite easy - always had a supply of dried fruits (apricots/figs) and nuts with me which I usually munched on for breakfast/lunch. There are lots of grocery stores or small markets along the way where I picked up food. My pack was light so I also carried a tin of beans (garbanzos), pack of olives, apples, etc.

I never had a pelegrino meal but treated myself to ensalada mixta or racion de queso every once in a while and at Perroquial albergues we made vegetarian pasta meals, salad and fruit.

Besides surviving well, I also spent very little money - only about E15,- per day including auberges.

Cheers,
LT
 

peregrino_tom

Active Member
Donating Member
#17
I did frances in the winter of 2008. Found there was often some leeway with the peregrino menu to change the main dish to an omelette. But was heartily sick of any egg dishes by the time I got to finisterre. In fact couldn't look at an egg (or for that matter cheese and white bread) for about a month afterwards. Fenix did a nice lentil dish which I reckon really was veggie and the one restaurant doing a (very meaty) peregrino menu in Portomarin also did pizza.
What kept me sane was that so many village shops stocked chick-peas and other beans in jars as well as a good range of vegetables. This meant we could prepare big bean soups where there were kitchen facilities. Little shops have a limited range of spices and dried herbs though, so it's worth taking some of your favourites with you as they're so light to carry.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#18
Vegetarians always make me feel a little guilty. So does my Hindu neighbor's respect for insects (bedbugs?). Maybe I have just been carrying on a long tradition:

Early hominins were using stone tools to butcher meat as long ago as 3.4 million years, about 800,000 years earlier than previous evidence dates to, scientists report in this week's issue of Nature.

The whole article if you care:

http://www.nature.com/news/2010/100811/ ... 0.399.html
 

ksam

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese May "08" Camino Frances May/June "11" del Norte Sept/Oct "14"/Camino Invierno May 2016/ Camino Ingles Oct 2017
#19
falcon269 said:
Vegetarians always make me feel a little guilty. So does my Hindu neighbor's respect for insects (bedbugs?). Maybe I have just been carrying on a long tradition:

Early hominins were using stone tools to butcher meat as long ago as 3.4 million years, about 800,000 years earlier than previous evidence dates to, scientists report in this week's issue of Nature.
Oh...don't worry 'bout the guilt! Eat and be happy....according to a similar article I stumbled to recently, the carnivorous aspect is what allowed us to grow larger brains and evolve into what we are now! Oh...wait...maybe we should go back to veg only!! The article pointed out that when we were strictly gatherers...we barely made our caloric needs...nothing much left to spare, but when be began to eat meat, there was finally enough to allow for more and more growth, esp the brain. Although perhaps the amounts some of us eat, might explain our attitudes and aggressiveness.

Still, my sympathies to those who choose not to eat meat. It's not easy, but you have my admiration and respect. Be creative and hit every Super Mercado...one way to make sure YOU are in control.

Buen Camino, Karin
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 Seville - Finestere, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#20
This is a bone of contention for us as Scott is a committed carnivore while Hel is a vego (actually a funny meat allergy) and so can end up throwing up and breaking out in weird rashes from misplaced chicken stock or worse, salad where someone has picked the ham out - same thing right?

In generally the food is great and if you have your own personal taster (or can eat seafood) you'll still enjoy a wide range of great food. But it is a shame that a lot of the great beany /lentil food you want to eat is always cooked in spec or ham base so its out of bounds - yes they do think pork is a vegetable. And why do they use chicken in seafood paella? Actually Hel had a great meal in 2004 in Najera when the local albergue found out that the she wouldn’t be able to eat the festivals paella they were making, they began another from scratch for her which was fantastic – even more so when they were being cooked in 3m wide paella pans and served down the river bank toped off with melon and copious local wine – bliss!

Tortilla is a great saviour, the bread is usually petty good and you can pick up lots of fresh produce to make your own along the way. I wouldn't resort to packet /tin soup as not only being dreadfully dull and boring it doesn't have enough to keep you going - and for goodness sake if you're only going to eat bland safe food you have at home, why bother going all the way to Spain.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 Seville - Finestere, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#21
Pacharan said:
La Trucha in El Acebo is a vegetarian B&B; the host is very welcoming and the homecooked food a world away from the chicken'n'chips pilgrim menus.
Good to see this one mentioned too, it's a great little find, and a memorial meal finished of by fresh picked blackberries and grappa - just go light on the grappa!
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#22
Jaime's hospitality and company and his wonderful fresh food at La Trucha made it the best stay in all of our camino last year. I will not forget him or his fantastic and imaginative menu.

lynne
 
#23
We made the camino last summer of 2010. It was great.
My girlfriend is vegetarian and it was also a big concern before our departure.

Let me say that almost everytime we had absolutly no problem finding something to eat. I say almost because some hospitaleros forbit us to use the kitchens to prepare something to eat even in this special case and even knowing that we wouldn't find any place open at the time. Really silly from them, but.. you have to catch some stupid moron once on a while.. But all the rest of people we found was quite sympathetic and helpful.

We brought some liofilized food but was almost unnecessary. Almost all restaurants have compatible dishes. We ate lots of tortilhas also! And it's common on the cafes to have some kind of frozen pizzas and pastas with vegetarian options.
We made also plenty meals with stuff bought on supermarkets.

Bottom line: it's not vegetarian heaven but it not impossible to do it either.

Tip: train your spanish expressions, it really helps!
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
#24
Just a word to say that because a hospitalero/a stops you cooking isn't because he/she is a "stupid moron". It's because they are told not to let pilgs do cooking. This in turn is because legislation makes problems for the organisations who provide you with accommodation. Your target is not the hospitalero, but the EU legislature, and you could first contact your MEP if you want to help. Let us know how you get on.

I fully understand your irritation, but "stupid moron" isn't really justified. Hospitaleros work for free, and honestly, they don't want to spoil your camino, they want to enable it.
 

AlanB

Active Member
#25
I walked a short time with a german girl who was vegan. Met up in SDC, she said that it had been fine. Fair play to her
 

nreyn12

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2005) (2007) (2008) (2009) (2010) (2011) (2012) (2013) (2014) (2015); Guide leading groups 2013-present
#26
This is an older original post, but I'll go ahead and add a reply anyway, as I think the more info about vegetarian options out there, the better.

It is now quite easy to get vegetarian food along the Camino, but you do have to be specific about how YOU define vegetarian. Otherwise you might find a trout on your plate, complete with head and tail. In many cases the nutritional value of the meal may be lacking, but you certainly won't go away hungry. And if you are watching your cholesterol, watch out for all those egg-based veg solutions!

The following albergues are specifically vegetarian: Pieros (2 km after Cacabelos), Las Herrerias (1 km after Ruitelan), and La Faba (not the German-run one). Ruitelan will provide a veg option on request, as will all other albergues that serve a meal on-site. Many albergues have a kitchen, so the options are as broad or limited as what's on offer at the local shop.

Updated 2013: Two additional vegetarian albergues not to be missed: Albergue Verde in Hospital de Orbigo, and Albergue Ecologico El Beso in A Balsa, 1.5 km after Triacastela.

There is a fantastic vegetarian restaurant in Pamplona, called Restaurante Sarasate, on c/San Nicholas, only 50 meters off the Plaza Castillo. They now offer a pilgrim price on the regular Mon-Sat lunch menu, at 9.50 euros (not sure they are offering the pilgrim price as of Fall 2013, but do ask).

There is a vegetarian restaurant in Burgos, called Gaia. It is located just opposite the cathedral, near Hotel El Cid.

In nearly any Spanish city, you will find an Italian restaurant, which will have veg options. My favorite (proper) pizzeria on the Camino is la Competencia, with locations in Burgos, Leon, and Ponferrada. Burgos has a number of places that serve falafel sandwiches/salads, and a new place has opened in Melide. And of course Santiago has plenty of choices, with my favorite being Cedro's Restaurant for falafels and Thai food.

No fear, vegetarians! Plenty to choose from :)
 
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ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
#27
nreyn12 said:
The following albergues are specifically vegetarian: Pieros (2 km after Cacabelos), Las Herrerias (1 km after Ruitelan), and La Faba (not the German-run one). :)
When I was at Lafaba in June it was closed, the woman there told it had closed down ( not just for the winter) is it running again ?

I love vegetarian food it goes great with a nice steak ;)
 

nreyn12

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2005) (2007) (2008) (2009) (2010) (2011) (2012) (2013) (2014) (2015); Guide leading groups 2013-present
#28
ffp13 said:
When I was at Lafaba in June it was closed, the woman there told it had closed down ( not just for the winter) is it running again ?

I love vegetarian food it goes great with a nice steak ;)
LOL It does go well with steak! (Although my last steak was in 1989.)

When I ate at the La Faba veg albergue in Fall 2011 the owner was quite burned out, and I wouldn't be surprised if he did take a sabbatical. However, when I passed through in October (2012), I was invited in for a coffee. I didn't accept and just kept walking, but I took that to mean it's open.
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
#29
Hopefully it is open agin and will be when I return next year
 
Camino(s) past & future
May - June 2015 (portion of Via de la Plata, then Astorga to Santiago)
#30
La Trucha in El Acebo is worth every penny you pay ... gourmet vegetarian dinner and breakfast. I paid 35 euro for a single room. In Santiago, Malak is a lovely little restaurant run by a delightful man from Palestine. While not fully vegetarian, his menu offers a wide variety of veg options and I ate there several times to try the different options. He and his restaurant were a special place to recover from the weaker vegetarian options along the way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2010, 2015
#31
My take on walking the Camino with plant-based fuel. My eating plan for health reasons is "nothing with a face or a mother." I am a V-N-O, vegan, no oil. (Or nuts) After two strokes. I found this plant based program and have had my 4th anniversary as a vegan. I worried that I would have problems on the Camino.

I did not.

Some reasons why the Camino was so successful:
1) I made laminated cards stating in Spanish, what I could not eat and what I could eat. The word "stroke" doesn't translate well so I put "Heart Attack Survivor"
Dear Chef, Thank you for helping me stay healthy.
( what I can eat and not eat... I put the NO OIL in caps. That's the most challenging issue. )

What I can eat.
At the end I mentioned, "I do drink wine." Now everyone is happy for me, yeah!

I have my emergency energy kit. like seeds, nutritional yeast, spices and mustard. And when I can find them, herbs. A restaurant house salad comes alive with a dressing of spices, nutritional yeast, mustard and wine... Just a little from my glass. I ask for fresh veggies and beans. Some of the plates are photo shoots. Think success and satisfying.

Big find. Health food stores generically called Herbolario or Herbolaro . This is the mother load. Tofu, soy milk, rice and almond milk, tempeh, dried fruits, seeds, and spices. Other items all are at least vegetarian. I found Herbolario s even in small towns.

My Supermarkets list: Garbanzo beans, roasted red peppers in water, white asperagus, lemon, veggies, greens. Lentils (make sure it is not prepared with meat broth) ( bottle of wine) Balsamic vinigar. Freezer bag.
Great salad mixings.

Hummus recipe. garbanzo beans, spices, cut up roasted red peppers, lemon. Balsamic viniger. Put in heavy freezer zip-lock bag. Use wine bottle as a rolling pin until all ingredients are the consistency of paste. Serve with crackers or bread and balsamic vinigar .. Lots of favors... And wine.

Another addition to the salad dressing is a little orange juice.

If I get to cook:
Stayed two days at an albergo in Pamplona, the other guests named me, Spice Girl, and gave me an apron with the city's symbol of the bull. Made me feel young.

Dry roasted mushrooms. Clean and cut mushrooms. That's all. Cook over a medium heat add salt. Salt helps the mushrooms release their liquor.

Melangé of ingredients for a one-pot meal. Lentils, beans, frozen tiny peas, veggies, can of tomatoes, spices. Can be served over greens, rice, or pasta.

Dessert: pumpkin seeds or pepitos, sugar and a touch of Cayenne. Skillet. parchment paper. Yea, I carry that with me along with a light plastic cutting board and my knife.

Warm sugar until it melts, add pumpkin seeds and stir till they are coated. Finish with a touch of cayenne. Pour out onto the parchment paper. Let cool. Break apart into peanut-brittle sized pieces.

If I have an oven... Rare
I grill veggies in a roasting bag
Another desert is baked apples, cinnamon and sugar. (You can do this in a skillet on the stove, too. ) mix 1- part cinnamon and 3 parts sugar in a flat pan. Cut and core an apple place cut side on mixture. 350F for 45 minutes depending on the apple.

WARNING: People will want what your food.

So bottom line to my fello Vegans pilgrims..... You Can Do It!
Not to fear with a touch of creativity and planning, you will be plant-strong and on track.

Sources.
How to Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease, by Dr. Esselstyne who is my doctor as well as President Clinton's and a whole lot of others.
Engine 2 Book by Rip Esselstyne, tri-athlete
No Meat Athlete. Blog by Matt. Marathon runner
Forks Over Knives. Movie

Buen Camino.... See you in April 2016 Elin
 

Amioco

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Virgos to leon (2017)
#32
Oh well thats at least 3 meals you can have....... :D

I say to my wife that vegetarians in Spain are a little like Introverts, (they do exist but are very hard to find).

But seriously I don't know how much of a vegetarian you are (some will eat fish occasionally) but I think you may struggle in parts.

Even the mixed salads nearly always have tuna. I also saw someone order a mixed "vegetable stew" that when it arrived it had chicken in it and when questioned the waiter said "well its just chicken".

So be carefull, again it depends on how serious a vegetarian you are.

Someone once told me a story of about Swami Vivekanada (devout vegetarian) who after eating a dish with meat in it by mistake and being physically ill once he rcognised the fact came back inside and asked his host for another helping, saying that he should get over his "attachment" to not eating meat.

Anyway

I wish you the best of luck .

Buen Camino

Pablo
Same thing happened to me. Ordered veg stew, it had little white meat lumps in it, tried to explain vegetarian, was told, but it's only a little bit of meat! So only had soup that night... Was quite hungry! Waiter even laughed at how little I ate, made a comment about that's why I am so small/thin!!!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#33
Same thing happened to me. Ordered veg stew, it had little white meat lumps in it, tried to explain vegetarian, was told, but it's only a little bit of meat! So only had soup that night... Was quite hungry! Waiter even laughed at how little I ate, made a comment about that's why I am so small/thin!!!

Ha Ha! Most of the soups have a meat base. If you ask for vegetarian soup they just scoop the meat out!
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#35
Viajero wrote this in 2008. I have just dried my eyes after reading it and laughing so hard!
Years ago when I lived in Spain, an American friend met a Spanish family who said that they were vegetarians. She was surprised as she had met so few Spanish vegetarians. When she asked them what they ate, the father replied, "vegetables, chicken, and Jamon de york "(regular deli style boiled ham as opposed to jamon serrano). We found it pretty amusing that chicken and ham were considered vegetarian fare. If you ever order the "sandwich vegetal" beware! In the village where I lived the sandwich vegetal always came with ham.
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#36
For a change from tortilla, bread and chips...ensalada rusa. I ate it as part of pilgrim menus and bought pre-packed containers of it in tiendas and supermarkets. Did not eat any pilgrim meals where ensalada rusa came with meat but did see some containers in shops that contained ham. It does have egg so is not suitable for vegans. Then there are delish tetra packs of gazpacho. Vegan as well as vego. I bought as many of these as I could find. I often bought packs of pre-cooked rice (white, brown, mixed with quinoa, etc.) and a couple of small cans of beans or corn and veg. Add a diced tomato, cucumber, capsicum and some olives. Makes a really easy dinner with enough to share with a fellow pilgrim or enough left over for breakfast and/or lunch the next day.
I usually chose the pureed vegetable option if available as a starter on the pilgrim menu. No idea whether it contains meat or not. For me it is not an issue because I am not a vegetarian but have just made a decision to reduce my intake of meat. But greatest respect for all the vegos on the camino.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Vegetarian way to Santiago (2018)
#37
Hello! We have an ecological and vegetarian food center in Sarria (Lugo), on the road to Santiago. We offer vegan and vegetarian meals, juices, smoothies, vegetarian breakfasts and we also have a store with fresh and packaged products. Besides, we have massages, yoga, meditation, foot reflexology and other activities. Our contact information are: Ecoespazo Vitriol Calle Diego Pazos 18, 27600, Sarria (Lugo) Phone: 982886616/604004112 ecoespazovitriol@gmail.com A hug and a good way!
 

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