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Vertigo and the VF in Italy

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
Hello and Happy New Year fellow trekkers! Aiming to walk some or all of the Italian section, we have a question, please. If one lives with severe vertigo, which sections would be a problem; or, do any/all 'lofty' bits have alternative routes? Thx!
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Hello and Happy New Year fellow trekkers! Aiming to walk some or all of the Italian section, we have a question, please. If one lives with severe vertigo, which sections would be a problem; or, do any/all 'lofty' bits have alternative routes? Thx!
I walked the VF (started in London) March to June last year (😄 2019). I have a balance disorder which can be a whole theme park of 'fun'. I had a few issues on the section down from Etroubles to Aosta. They weren't insurmountable but were challenging for me when others without such a disorder wouldn't even blink. To make matters worse, it rained that day; slippery conditions & a balance disorder...oh my!
Having said that, I thought it was one of the most beautiful segments of the VF. Although that section took me longer & in parts, my heart was racing, I was swaying with dizziness & my legs felt like jelly, I wouldn't have missed it for anything.
If you live with vertigo, you know your triggers & severity. For me hill/mountain/cliff drop-offs on the left, impact me far more than on the right, the narrowness of the trail & temperature (worse with heat) all affect my condition.
You can take the bus down to Aosta but my suggestion would be to give it a go. If there are two of you (I walked solo) the vertiginous one has support plus it's not the entire day I had problems..only a few short sections. If you start & it's too much, you can always turn back & get the bus.
From memory, I don't think you'll have problems with other sections in Italy. Yes, there are hilly segments (eg Tuscany), climbs (eg up to San Miniato) & some stunning vantage points to be negotiated (eg atop of Montefiascone) but the paths are wide or don't have sudden cliff-like drop-offs or road-walking could be an alternative if necessary.
Enjoy planning!
👣 🌏
 
Last edited:

Stripey Socks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '13, Via de la Plata '14, Portuguese '16, Via Francigena - Italy '18, Madrid Combo'20
Not having vertigo, I am not sure what is extreme or not, but perhaps avoid the stage into Verres and also from Passo della Cisa is a bit 'interesting' to say the least although I understand you can take the road into Pontremoli. I didn't know that at the time.. Enjoy and happy planning
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Not having vertigo, I am not sure what is extreme or not, but perhaps avoid the stage into Verres and also from Passo della Cisa is a bit 'interesting' to say the least although I understand you can take the road into Pontremoli. I didn't know that at the time.. Enjoy and happy planning
I took the road up to & down from Passo della Cisa. It was rainy & a real 'pea-souper' so the path would have been dangerous.
20190526_115538-1305x979.jpg
I felt quite safe despite the conditions; there's always a verge/shoulder, there wasn't much traffic at all & vehicles were taking it slowly (winding road as well as foggy).
Oddly, another day I really enjoyed! 'Additional' challenges all part of the adventure!
👣 🌏
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
I took the road up to & down from Passo della Cisa. It was rainy & a real 'pea-souper' so the path would have been dangerous.
View attachment 68229
I felt quite safe despite the conditions; there's always a verge/shoulder, there wasn't much traffic at all & vehicles were taking it slowly (winding road as well as foggy).
Oddly, another day I really enjoyed! 'Additional' challenges all part of the adventure!
👣 🌏
I did too, kazrobbo, when I walked with my friend Sally from Aosta to Aulla in Lunigiana in 2017.

The part I found challenging was the section between Nus and Chatillon - in the latter part going into Chatillon the mountain-side path narrowed so much that my hiking trailer Spot was wider than the path and there was a sheer drop on the right hand side. Rocky too - horrid. Sally and I had to turn back and luckily we found the cycle route Into Chatillon.

JohnandDeborah - if you can find a cycle guide to the VF as a back up, walk the cycle sections on those days with challenging terrain. Sally and I did this in an impromptu way - we looked for the blue cycle signs rather than the red and white ones or the little yellow man signs. Some of the roads were very busy which presented another set of problems but I had a fluorescent harness that I wore. The drivers all gave us a wide berth. For us it was just a few days when we were forced to take the cycle route.

Sally and I walked as a spur of the moment thing - I was only recently back from the Camino and she had recently walked from Lausanne to Aosta. The opportunity presented itself to go to the VF so off we went without doing enough research. We had Alison Raju’s Cicerone guide to the VF as an ebook - it was a good guide but it underestimated the difficulty of those mountain paths IMO. I’d love to complete the VF - it was glorious and the vibe was very special - but I’ll be doing a lot of research before I do.

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
I walked the VF (started in London) March to June last year (😄 2019). I have a balance disorder which can be a whole theme park of 'fun'. I had a few issues on the section down from Etroubles to Aosta. They weren't insurmountable but were challenging for me when others without such a disorder wouldn't even blink. To make matters worse, it rained that day; slippery conditions & a balance disorder...oh my!
Having said that, I thought it was one of the most beautiful segments of the VF. Although that section took me longer & in parts, my heart was racing, I was swaying with dizziness & my legs felt like jelly, I wouldn't have missed it for anything.
If you live with vertigo, you know your triggers & severity. For me hill/mountain/cliff drop-offs on the left, impact me far more than on the right, the narrowness of the trail & temperature (worse with heat) all affect my condition.
You can take the bus down to Aosta but my suggestion would be to give it a go. If there are two of you (I walked solo) the vertiginous one has support plus it's not the entire day I had problems..only a few short sections. If you start & it's too much, you can always turn back & get the bus.
From memory, I don't think you'll have problems with other sections in Italy. Yes, there are hilly segments (eg Tuscany), climbs (eg up to San Miniato) & some stunning vantage points to be negotiated (eg atop of Montefiascone) but the paths are wide or don't have sudden cliff-like drop-offs or road-walking could be an alternative if necessary.
Enjoy planning!
👣 🌏
Kazrobo, thanks for this. In my experience, folks who don't live with vertigo don't get it. So, it is about what I can accomplish. I'll be looking for options for this section.
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
Not having vertigo, I am not sure what is extreme or not, but perhaps avoid the stage into Verres and also from Passo della Cisa is a bit 'interesting' to say the least although I understand you can take the road into Pontremoli. I didn't know that at the time.. Enjoy and happy planning
Stripey socks, thanks. I had seen the Cisa Pass, down, has a suspension bridge but there is a road option. I will look at options into Verres.
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
I did too, kazrobbo, when I walked with my friend Sally from Aosta to Aulla in Lunigiana in 2017.

The part I found challenging was the section between Nus and Chatillon - in the latter part going into Chatillon the mountain-side path narrowed so much that my hiking trailer Spot was wider than the path and there was a sheer drop on the right hand side. Rocky too - horrid. Sally and I had to turn back and luckily we found the cycle route Into Chatillon.

JohnandDeborah - if you can find a cycle guide to the VF as a back up, walk the cycle sections on those days with challenging terrain. Sally and I did this in an impromptu way - we looked for the blue cycle signs rather than the red and white ones or the little yellow man signs. Some of the roads were very busy which presented another set of problems but I had a fluorescent harness that I wore. The drivers all gave us a wide berth. For us it was just a few days when we were forced to take the cycle route.

Sally and I walked as a spur of the moment thing - I was only recently back from the Camino and she had recently walked from Lausanne to Aosta. The opportunity presented itself to go to the VF so off we went without doing enough research. We had Alison Raju’s Cicerone guide to the VF as an ebook - it was a good guide but it underestimated the difficulty of those mountain paths IMO. I’d love to complete the VF - it was glorious and the vibe was very special - but I’ll be doing a lot of research before I do.

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
Jenny, thanks for posting. I've definitely made note of this section! Alternative walking routes, in particular for folks living with vertigo are hardly mentioned. I have yet to see it included in any guidebook (we have both the Terro di Mezzo and Lightfoot). The idea of snagging a cycle map , however, is brilliant. If we're lucky, someone has tracked it for use on maps me. And I'm off to find out more..
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Jenny, thanks for posting. I've definitely made note of this section! Alternative walking routes, in particular for folks living with vertigo are hardly mentioned. I have yet to see it included in any guidebook (we have both the Terro di Mezzo and Lightfoot). The idea of snagging a cycle map , however, is brilliant. If we're lucky, someone has tracked it for use on maps me. And I'm off to find out more..
Cheers JohnandDeborah - very happy to help.
Good luck with the cycle route research and the rest of your planning for the VF.
Buon cammino!
Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
Jenny, thanks for posting. I've definitely made note of this section! Alternative walking routes, in particular for folks living with vertigo are hardly mentioned. I have yet to see it included in any guidebook (we have both the Terro di Mezzo and Lightfoot). The idea of snagging a cycle map , however, is brilliant. If we're lucky, someone has tracked it for use on maps me. And I'm off to find out more..
Another way to check on a trail is to look at Google Earth or Google Maps. If I'm a bit concerned about a section, utilising the satellite & terrain view types can give an indication of whether the path might pose challenges for those of us with vertigo & balance disorders.
I also endorse the solution of @JennyH94 regarding using cycle paths...they can be heaven sent!
Where there's a will, there's a way...
An alternative, even if it means a short hop on public transport, can always be found; you just need to allow extra time for potentially difficult sections or be prepared to change tack (including backtracking). The main thing is to get out there & don't let it stop you.
Don't hesitate to ask if you have any queries. I'll also be interested to find out how you got on!
Best wishes.
👣 🌏
 

Stripey Socks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '13, Via de la Plata '14, Portuguese '16, Via Francigena - Italy '18, Madrid Combo'20
Stripey socks, thanks. I had seen the Cisa Pass, down, has a suspension bridge but there is a road option. I will look at options into Verres.
The suspension bridge was very doable, it was the high, exposed ridge lines with nothing to stop you toppling over the side that made me wonder at the time...:) Mel
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Hello and Happy New Year fellow trekkers! Aiming to walk some or all of the Italian section, we have a question, please. If one lives with severe vertigo, which sections would be a problem; or, do any/all 'lofty' bits have alternative routes? Thx!
from my memory of walking the VF last year and with very slight vertigo problems, I don't remember any sections giving me trouble. however, there were some beautiful paths over steep slopes or with drops on one side.
don't be alarmed at the long list below! these are only potentially problematic sections for which it might be good to have an alternative ready in case of problems.
looking out for the blue bicycle VF path is always a good alternative to the paths, especially in the aosta valley and across the Apennines. I think there are no distinctions in Tuscany where VF follows mainly gravel roads?
almost all of the VF in Tuscany is on the google video.

- going down from GSB pass, the section after La Cantine to the main road descends a beautiful panoramic path over steep slopes
- the descent from Etroubles to Aosta (the one kazrobbo is talking about) was mainly in woods, although the slopes were steep, but the path was wide and only occasionally going very steeply down - these parts were mostly on pastures around villages, especially into and out of Gignod
- between Chambave and Chatillon the path runs often across steep pastures between (abandoned) villages, I loved it
- the second part of the section between Reclou and Verres is a narrow path through scarce woods often on top of a cliff and the descent is a steep knee-killer on a slippery stone-paved road
- the upper route between Donnas and Pont-Saint-Martin (official VF site has now only the lower route along the main road which was not particularly well waymarked last year) along a minor road across steep slopes
- a short section after Pont-Saint-Martin going up to Carema was a lovely panoramic path
- there are ditch sections along canals across the Po plain if that might pose a problem
- the climb to Cassio has open (steep) path sections between Case Storti and Casola-Villa, otherwise it's in the woods
- perhaps avoid the path over Monte Marino by taking the road - that's just before Berceto
- the upper path via Monte Valoria is surely beautifully panoramic (I was in a cloud up there but I believe the photos I've seen) but there are steep slopes on the left - take the waymarked alternative via ostello and up the road
- the descent from the Cisa Pass to Pontremoli was one of the most beautiful sections of the entire VF, imo, but it is panoramic at times
- the path down from the Cisa Pass to the Passo Righetto is in steep woods
- the path from Passo Righetto down to the bottom is steep and on a beautiful panoramic ridge in the upper part, then down a steep stony road, then down some very steep meadows, and there is the suspension bridge at the bottom - but there is a ?waymarked 'historic alternative' which goes via Montelungo Terme
- the upper part of the path into Bibola is across a partly exposed ridge - take the forest road for the last short section
- the descent from Ponzano Superiore to Aulla has some steep exposed paths, but not much
- the section from Avenza to Massa is up on the steep hillside between vineyards but it's a gravel/tarmac road
- especially the first encounter with the rolling hills of Tuscany (not very gently rolling, mind you) is quite panoramic but the slopes are not steep (except those you have to climb, of course)
- the path up to and down from Radicofani can be sometimes exposed, but it's mostly on a wide lane or a road
- do take a look over the panoramic lake from Montefiascone, you are safely behind a wall :)
- I don't remember any problematic sections (except for the lack of waymarks on the most critical part - see my notes in the accommodation list) on the alternative via Ronciglione
- throughout there are sometimes more exposed short sections going into or our of the hilltop-perched villages
 
Last edited:

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Hello and Happy New Year fellow trekkers! Aiming to walk some or all of the Italian section, we have a question, please. If one lives with severe vertigo, which sections would be a problem; or, do any/all 'lofty' bits have alternative routes? Thx!
I'm confused..vertigo is an accumulation of calcium in the inner ear. If you suddenly lie on the affected side you get and immediate spinning effect. It has nothing to do with height, in fact commonly experienced in bed. Acrophobia..which i've also acquired!..seems to be more what you have
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
I'm confused..vertigo is an accumulation of calcium in the inner ear. If you suddenly lie on the affected side you get and immediate spinning effect. It has nothing to do with height, in fact commonly experienced in bed. Acrophobia..which i've also acquired!..seems to be more what you have
Omar, thanks for the clarification. In my case, more aptly height vertigo or the sensation of dizziness triggered by heights - frighteningly real, you're doubtless aware, and I'd add a bit risky walking along steep edges. Most of us who live with it understand the simpler vertigo.
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
from my memory of walking the VF last year and with very slight vertigo problems, I don't remember any sections giving me trouble. however, there were some beautiful paths over steep slopes or with drops on one side.
don't be alarmed at the long list below! these are only potentially problematic sections for which it might be good to have an alternative ready in case of problems.
looking out for the blue bicycle VF path is always a good alternative to the paths, especially in the aosta valley and across the Apennines. I think there are no distinctions in Tuscany where VF follows mainly gravel roads?
almost all of the VF in Tuscany is on the google video.

- going down from GSB pass, the section after La Cantine to the main road descended a beautiful panoramic path over steep slopes
- the descent from Etroubles to Aosta (the one kazrobbo is talking about) was mainly in woods, although the slopes were steep, but the path was wide and only occasionally going very steeply down - there parts were mostly on pastures around villages, especially into and out of Gignod
- between Chambave and Chatillon the path runs often across steep pastures between (abandoned) villages, I loved it
- the second part of the section between Reclou and Verres is a narrow path through scarce woods often on top of a cliff and the descent is a steep knee-killer on a slippery stone-paved road
- the upper route between Donnas and Pont-Saint-Martin (official VF side has now only the lower route along the main road which was not particularly well waymarked last year) along a minor road across steep slopes
- a short section after Pont-Saint-Martin going up to Carema was a lovely panoramic path
- there are ditch sections along canals across the Po plain if that might pose a problem
- the climb to Cassio has open (steep) path sections between Case Storti and Casola-Villa, otherwise it's in the woods
- perhaps avoid the path over Monte Marino by taking the road - that's just before Berceto
- the upper path via Monte Valoria is surely beautifully panoramic (I was in a cloud up there but I believe the photos I've seen) but there are steep slopes on the left - take the waymarked alternative via ostello and up the road
- the descent from the Cisa Pass to Pontremoli was one of the most beautiful sections of the entire VF, imo, but it is panoramic at times
- the path down from the Cisa Pass to the Passo Righetto is in steep woods
- the path from Passo Righetto down to the bottom is steep and on a beautiful panoramic ridge in the upper part, then down a steep stony road, then down some very steep meadows, and there is the suspension bridge at the bottom - but there is be a ?waymarked 'historic alternative' which goes via Montelungo Terme
- the upper part of the path into Bibola is across a partly exposed ridge - take the forest road for the last short section
- the descent from Ponzano Superiore to Aulla has some steep exposed paths, but not much
- the section from Avenza to Massa is up on the steep hillside between vineyards but it's a gravel/tarmac road
- especially the first encounter with the rolling hills of Tuscany (not very gently rolling, mind you) is quite panoramic but the slopes are not steep (except those you have to climb, of course)
- the path up to and down from Radicofani can be sometimes exposed, but it's mostly on a wide lane or a road
- do take a look over the panoramic lake from Montefiascone, you are safely behind a wall :)
- I don't remember any problematic sections (except for the lack of waymarks on the most critical part - see my notes in the accommodation list) on the alternative via Ronciglione
- throughout there are sometimes more exposed short sections going into or our of the hilltop-perched villages
Caminka, this is brilliant! Thank you for taking the time to put it together. Not at all put off, knowing what to expect and thereby better able to plan, lessens any anxieties.
 

JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
Another way to check on a trail is to look at Google Earth or Google Maps. If I'm a bit concerned about a section, utilising the satellite & terrain view types can give an indication of whether the path might pose challenges for those of us with vertigo & balance disorders.
I also endorse the solution of @JennyH94 regarding using cycle paths...they can be heaven sent!
Where there's a will, there's a way...
An alternative, even if it means a short hop on public transport, can always be found; you just need to allow extra time for potentially difficult sections or be prepared to change tack (including backtracking). The main thing is to get out there & don't let it stop you.
Don't hesitate to ask if you have any queries. I'll also be interested to find out how you got on!
Best wishes.
👣 🌏
Kazrobo, A good reminder that we have options. Although we need to remind ourselves, at times, there is no shame in utilizing alternatives.
 

Harington

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
Hello and Happy New Year fellow trekkers! Aiming to walk some or all of the Italian section, we have a question, please. If one lives with severe vertigo, which sections would be a problem; or, do any/all 'lofty' bits have alternative routes? Thx!
There are no vertical drops or cliff edges in the Italian section. The path from the Great St Bernard to St Rhémy is steep, but not vertiginous. One can take a gentle road down from the Cisa Pass (not the main road), turning left about 1km after the Pass. The only other slight difficulty would be the steep climb between Aulla and Sarzana, but there are no vertical drops or narrow ledges. Good luck.
 

Galloglaigh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VdT (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VnS (ToDo)
One can take a gentle road down from the Cisa Pass (not the main road), turning left about 1km after the Pass.
As far as I can remember, that turn is the cycle route. Breathtaking views but not vertiginous. The only danger is from the locals who think there is no-one else on the road.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm confused..vertigo is an accumulation of calcium in the inner ear. If you suddenly lie on the affected side you get and immediate spinning effect. It has nothing to do with height, in fact commonly experienced in bed. Acrophobia..which i've also acquired!..seems to be more what you have
I have had, and sometimes have, both of these, all benign in my case. You've described their differences quite well.
 

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
I walked the VF (started in London) March to June last year (😄 2019). I have a balance disorder which can be a whole theme park of 'fun'. I had a few issues on the section down from Etroubles to Aosta. They weren't insurmountable but were challenging for me when others without such a disorder wouldn't even blink. To make matters worse, it rained that day; slippery conditions & a balance disorder...oh my!
Having said that, I thought it was one of the most beautiful segments of the VF. Although that section took me longer & in parts, my heart was racing, I was swaying with dizziness & my legs felt like jelly, I wouldn't have missed it for anything.
If you live with vertigo, you know your triggers & severity. For me hill/mountain/cliff drop-offs on the left, impact me far more than on the right, the narrowness of the trail & temperature (worse with heat) all affect my condition.
You can take the bus down to Aosta but my suggestion would be to give it a go. If there are two of you (I walked solo) the vertiginous one has support plus it's not the entire day I had problems..only a few short sections. If you start & it's too much, you can always turn back & get the bus.
From memory, I don't think you'll have problems with other sections in Italy. Yes, there are hilly segments (eg Tuscany), climbs (eg up to San Miniato) & some stunning vantage points to be negotiated (eg atop of Montefiascone) but the paths are wide or don't have sudden cliff-like drop-offs or road-walking could be an alternative if necessary.
Enjoy planning!
👣 🌏
I discovered the same thing, "hill/mountain/cliff drop-offs on the left" I though it was just a personal thing and had no basis, I was curious never the less, so I wonder if one is left handed, would experience the opposite.
 

bobbogram

Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte San Sebastián to Santiago; Portuguese Lisbon to Porto; Porto to Santiago; Geneva west
BPPV is no fun, if that’s the cause of your vertigo. If your inner ears get clogged with particulate from dehydration or other cause, that might be the problem. This works for me.
1578160430268.jpeg
You do just the opposite for the left ear. It gets the particulate off the cilia (?) in your inner ear. I hope this helps.

Grisly
 

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
BPPV is no fun, if that’s the cause of your vertigo. If your inner ears get clogged with particulate from dehydration or other cause, that might be the problem. This works for me.
View attachment 68280
You do just the opposite for the left ear. It gets the particulate off the cilia (?) in your inner ear. I hope this helps.

Grisly
Thanks,
Vigo
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2012
CP 2015
St Olavs Norway 2016
88T Japan 2017
PWC/VF 2019
Israel 2020 X
Wales CP 21?
KK?
VdlP?
I discovered the same thing, "hill/mountain/cliff drop-offs on the left" I though it was just a personal thing and had no basis, I was curious never the less, so I wonder if one is left handed, would experience the opposite.
Balance problems on a particular side is a real thing. I hadn't considered the LH / RH aspect (I'm R handed) before & it has never been mentioned by my ENT specialist but in my case, it is more about which ear has the problem. This in turn impacts areas of the brain which try to compensate for the lack/loss of balance.
There are tests which can be undertaken to diagnose the cause, but unless the technology has improved, they aren't pleasant! Probes in your ears & deliberately causing dizziness (& nausea..) to measure balance responses are two of them. However having a correct diagnosis (I was originally incorrectly diagnosed with Meniere's disease) has been incredibly significant in helping me recognise, cope & adapt to situations often encountered while walking. Apart from narrow paths, drop-offs, etc, things like negotiating rocky sections, tree roots or even walking across a bridge (with water flowing underneath) causes issues for me. It certainly adds a layer of complexity to the chosen trail...it's never a 'walk in the park'!
👣 🌏
 

Viggen

Vigo
Camino(s) past & future
CF June 2015
CP June 2017
Del Norte, Finisterre / Muxia Oct 2017
VDLP 2018
VF, SBP to Rome 2019
Thanks for sharing
 

Donovan

Active Member
The idea of snagging a cycle map , however, is brilliant. If we're lucky, someone has tracked it for use on maps me. And I'm off to find out more..
JohnandDeborah, you can download both the walking track and the cycle track for the entire Italian section from the viefrancigene.org website. I downloaded onto Maps.me. Having the two options side by side on the map was useful for daily planning, though in the end I used only the walking track. Starting from Aosta I found the track pretty much 100% accurate and it was particularly useful in towns where waymarking can be a bit indifferent.
 
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JohnandDeborah

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 200k 2015, CP & Finisterre 400k 2019, VF 400k 2020, CF 250k 2021
JohnandDeborah, you can download both the walking track and the cycle track for the entire Italian section from the viefrancigene.org website. I downloaded onto Maps.me. Having the two options side by side on the map was useful for daily planning, though in the end I used only the walking track. Starting from Aosta I found the track pretty much 100% accurate and it was particularly useful in towns where waymarking can be a bit indifferent.
Donovan, Good to know about the cycle track, thanks. We hear repeatedly that maps.me is a good option for offline use, especially with reports that the official vf app tends to crash.
 

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