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Very Lost, please help.

2020 Camino Guides

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
I walked in 2012 with the maps from the Norse pilgrim site, which was structured differently then, their accommodation list and Alison Raju's guidebook (the first edition). The route was pretty well marked, and I don't recall any particular sections that were an issue, although the departure from Oslo was a little finicky. If you cannot get the trip planner to work, I don't know that there are many other English language resources than Alison's guidebook. That, the current accommodation guide, and download the maps from the web site (rather than using the trip planner) seem to be your best options.

As to where to stay, when I have a little more time, I will give you a PQD on my take, but in the meantime, look for stuff from @lovingkindness, @Bradypus, and @Purky. I apologize to others who have done this route for my poor memory, but these three have stuck in my mind.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
There was a thread here a couple years ago that detailed someone's year long walk from Norway to Santiago. You may find it with some hunting and and while she went through Germany and France, it may have helpful info.

I just now used Trondheim in the search feature of this site and a lot of results popped up, so there may be some nuggets of wisdom.

Happy planning.
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
I walked in 2012 with the maps from the Norse pilgrim site, which was structured differently then, their accommodation list and Alison Raju's guidebook (the first edition). The route was pretty well marked, and I don't recall any particular sections that were an issue, although the departure from Oslo was a little finicky. If you cannot get the trip planner to work, I don't know that there are many other English language resources than Alison's guidebook. That, the current accommodation guide, and download the maps from the web site (rather than using the trip planner) seem to be your best options.

As to where to stay, when I have a little more time, I will give you a PQD on my take, but in the meantime, look for stuff from @lovingkindness, @Bradypus, and @Purky. I apologize to others who have done this route for my poor memory, but these three have stuck in my mind.
Thanks for the feedback. I'll look down every avenue I can to get more info. Lucky for me... I still have a little over 7 months :). I'll definitely look into those names!
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
There was a thread here a couple years ago that detailed someone's year long walk from Norway to Santiago. You may find it with some hunting and and while she went through Germany and France, it may have helpful info.

I just now used Trondheim in the search feature of this site and a lot of results popped up, so there may be some nuggets of wisdom.

Happy planning.
Thanks! I literally just made an account on this forum. Guess I was a bit eager to post for info, rather than taking some time to search on the forum :p. I'll try searching ! Thanks for the wishes!!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
There was a thread here a couple years ago that detailed someone's year long walk from Norway to Santiago. You may find it with some hunting and and while she went through Germany and France, it may have helpful info.

I just now used Trondheim in the search feature of this site and a lot of results popped up, so there may be some nuggets of wisdom.

Happy planning.
@lovingkindness walked from Trondheim to Santiago starting in 2010, and provided a wonderful record of that journey here. I will embarrass her by acknowledging that she is one of my hero's on this forum for the adventures she pursues, and her generosity in helping others, particularly with help on the routes in and near Scandinavia.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I guess it was more than a couple years ago! Thanks @dougfitz
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Thanks! I literally just made an account on this forum. Guess I was a bit eager to post for info, rather than taking some time to search on the forum :p. I'll try searching ! Thanks for the wishes!!
all the very best in planning and doing your walk :) I am praying for you :)
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
Incidentally, there are a lot of Norwegian here on the site, so specific, local enquiries (or pleas for the use of a washing machine or shower while you're walking) may be answered here...
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
@dougfitz I walked the Olavsleden from Sundsvall (Baltic coast of Sweden) and not the Gudbrandsdalen. Afraid that I have nothing useful to add on this one.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
I have had a quick look at the accommodation list - so many more places than when I walked this route. However, some that I think should be a must visit, even if you don't stay at them:

Arteid Vestre - stabbur (traditional storehouse) converted to have a kitchen and bedroom upstairs.
Johannesgarden - just a nice place to stay
Sygard Grytting - classic stay in the old pilgrim building
Budsjord Pilegrimsgard - similar to Sygard Grytting
Plasstoggo - I didn't stay here, but wished that I had
HÆVERSTØLEN - wonderful pilgrim house
Meslo Gard - I stayed in the stabbur, but there is accommodation in the farmhouse as well
Sundet Gard - another delightful stabbur - meal was brilliant

Without knowing how far you want to walk, it is difficult for me to make recommendations beyond the places I have listed. There seem to be many more options, and if you are camping, you will have far more flexibility than I did.
 
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kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
CP(2015)
St Olavs Way Norway(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF(2019)
Israel (2020)
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
I walked St Olav's Way Oslo to Trondheim in May-June 2016. I used Alison Raju's guidebook (published through MuseumsForlaget)...& yes, there were 'issues' with it as indeed there are with the path itself.
I did not camp but stayed in a wide variety of accommodation.
Feel free to PM me or post any queries here...always happy to help.
Good luck with your planning 🙂
👣 🌏
 
Last edited:

happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
I have an app on my phone called maps.me that works off satellites. Provided you have downloaded the maps for the area in advance it will show you exactly where you are. Used it yesterday in the New Forest walking and was way off the track so used maps.me and it showed exactly where I was and the nearby faint trails.
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Reality is frequently inaccurate
I found the suggestion of stages by the writer of the Dutch guide to the Norwegian St. Olav's Way very helpful, if only to get a feel for the distances and possibilities involved. I'll add it to this post. The Dutch guide is written by Ria Warmerdam and from 2016 (online updates on her site) and all the German pilgrims I met were very jealous of the great maps, photos and height profiles provided in this guide.

But the earlier mentioned "Pilgrim Road to Trondheim. Oslo to Nidaros Cathedral" guide by Alison Raju (2015) is still the only English guide that I know of. I also used the accommodations list along the Gudbrandsdalen path from the pilegrimsleden.no site. Very comprehensive and up to date, so quite useful.

Bringing a tent, sleeping bag and jetboil is also the way I went myself. The only way I could afford spending three weeks in Norway. I had a budget of about 900 euros and it was tight. I did, however, spend slightly more than two nights per week in a hostel or B&B, so your spending may vary. But more cash equals more possibilities.

Like @happymarkos I also use maps.me and in this case a KML file of the St. Olav's Way I still have on my computer. I'll happily share it, if you have use for it. Any other questions, either here or via PM, feel free to ask!

stages_norway.jpg
 

jayobrien

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2016
I walked in 2012 with the maps from the Norse pilgrim site, which was structured differently then, their accommodation list and Alison Raju's guidebook (the first edition). The route was pretty well marked, and I don't recall any particular sections that were an issue, although the departure from Oslo was a little finicky. If you cannot get the trip planner to work, I don't know that there are many other English language resources than Alison's guidebook. That, the current accommodation guide, and download the maps from the web site (rather than using the trip planner) seem to be your best options.

As to where to stay, when I have a little more time, I will give you a PQD on my take, but in the meantime, look for stuff from @lovingkindness, @Bradypus, and @Purky. I apologize to others who have done this route for my poor memory, but these three have stuck in my mind.
will follow this with interestas I would love to do
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
will follow your thread with interest. For the past few years have toyed with the idea of St Olav's Way
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
I have had a quick look at the accommodation list - so many more places than when I walked this route. However, some that I think should be a must visit, even if you don't stay at them:

Arteid Vestre - stabbur (traditional storehouse) converted to have a kitchen and bedroom upstairs.
Johannesgarden - just a nice place to stay
Sygard Grytting - classic stay in the old pilgrim building
Budsjord Pilegrimsgard - similar to Sygard Grytting
Plasstoggo - I didn't stay here, but wished that I had
HÆVERSTØLEN - wonderful pilgrim house
Meslo Gard - I stayed in the stabbur, but there is accommodation in the farmhouse as well
Sundet Gard - another delightful stabbur - meal was brilliant

Without knowing how far you want to walk, it is difficult for me to make recommendations beyond the places I have listed. There seem to be many more options, and if you are camping, you will have far more flexibility than I did.
That's wonderful. Thanks for the recommendations. I'll look into them. I'm walking the full 600plus KM, so if I have reccomendations for even a section of the walk it's awesome. I don't lack the financial means to stay in the places, I just wanna sleep outdoors for the added experience :). I know that staying in places with people and meeting people is also part of the experience so I'll definitely look into every place you mentioned!
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
I found the suggestion of stages by the writer of the Dutch guide to the Norwegian St. Olav's Way very helpful, if only to get a feel for the distances and possibilities involved. I'll add it to this post. The Dutch guide is written by Ria Warmerdam and from 2016 (online updates on her site) and all the German pilgrims I met were very jealous of the great maps, photos and height profiles provided in this guide.

But the earlier mentioned "Pilgrim Road to Trondheim. Oslo to Nidaros Cathedral" guide by Alison Raju (2015) is still the only English guide that I know of. I also used the accommodations list along the Gudbrandsdalen path from the pilegrimsleden.no site. Very comprehensive and up to date, so quite useful.

Bringing a tent, sleeping bag and jetboil is also the way I went myself. The only way I could afford spending three weeks in Norway. I had a budget of about 900 euros and it was tight. I did, however, spend slightly more than two nights per week in a hostel or B&B, so your spending may vary. But more cash equals more possibilities.

Like @happymarkos I also use maps.me and in this case a KML file of the St. Olav's Way I still have on my computer. I'll happily share it, if you have use for it. Any other questions, either here or via PM, feel free to ask!

View attachment 65703
Woooow. That is incredible! Thank you so much!! The KML file also sounds amazing!! I most likely will have future questions. But I'm sooo excited to read your journey and look into this dutch guide website. (Thank goodness for google translate!! :p)
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
I have an app on my phone called maps.me that works off satellites. Provided you have downloaded the maps for the area in advance it will show you exactly where you are. Used it yesterday in the New Forest walking and was way off the track so used maps.me and it showed exactly where I was and the nearby faint trails.
On it! Will download and learn to use! Thanks for the suggestion :D
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
Have you tried: https://pilegrimsleden.no/en/
It is a Norwegian page, but you can choose english language. Welcome to Trondheim, my hometown.
Yes I have tried this site. I've actually emailed them for help. They responded quickly. They said they know their site is hard to use and are currently working on a revamped version that will be ready in December! Very excited for that :). Thanks for the suggestion though. I'm super excited to make it to your hometown !
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
I know that staying in places with people and meeting people is also part of the experience so I'll definitely look into every place you mentioned!
Don't expect to find too many other people in the early stages, and even towards the end you might find yourself walking alone for much of the time. I think I met two other pilgrims before Hamar, a few more before Lillehammer, and again before Oppdal. I passed a large organised group at Meslo Gard, and a couple of priests a few days later. I walked for an hour or so with other pilgrims on two or three days, and walked with an Alaskan woman one afternoon. There were only about six or seven nights where I stayed in places with other pilgrims along the way. Don't expect it to be like the Camino.
 
Last edited:

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I was recently introduced here to a translation site that appears much more useful than google ... deepL.com ... you may find it useful. Some other posters swear by using chome as their browser as it will automatically translate webpages for you.
 

helen1710

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
future
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
Have a look at Michelle Ryan’s blog - Walkingtwobytwo.
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
I am pondering walking the Gudbrandsdalen path for next September so this is very useful. Thanks everybody.

does anyone know what numbers are like at that time of year?
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Reality is frequently inaccurate
I am pondering walking the Gudbrandsdalen path for next September so this is very useful. Thanks everybody.

does anyone know what numbers are like at that time of year?
I've read that 408 pilgrims went all the way from Oslo to Trondheim in 2017. 1040 walked the last 100 km and claimed the Olav Letter in that same year. But numbers are rising. When I talked to Joar in Nørgar Voll, who keeps score of the pilgrims who pass there, he estimated that roughly 800 pilgrims for 2019 would come through his village. He was expecting about a thousand in 2020.
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
I've read that 408 pilgrims went all the way from Oslo to Trondheim in 2017. 1040 walked the last 100 km and claimed the Olav Letter in that same year. But numbers are rising. When I talked to Joar in Nørgar Voll, who keeps score of the pilgrims who pass there, he estimated that roughly 800 pilgrims for 2019 would come through his village. He was expecting about a thousand in 2020.
Thanks. About the same as one day on the Camino Frances next year then!
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Thanks. About the same as one day on the Camino Frances next year then!
An average day. On a very busy day there might be more than 3,000 Compostelas handed out. I walked another of the Olavsleden routes in 2016 - from Sundsvall in Sweden. In the whole of the 17 days and 500+km of my walk to Trondheim I met a total of 3 other pilgrims walking, and two of those were a couple travelling together.
 
Camino(s) past & future
First 2016
Latest Camino Torres 2019
An average day. On a very busy day there might be more than 3,000 Compostelas handed out. I walked another of the Olavsleden routes in 2016 - from Sundsvall in Sweden. In the whole of the 17 days and 500+km of my walk to Trondheim I met a total of 3 other pilgrims walking, and two of those were a couple travelling together.
How as was it apart from that? I met three other people between Salamanca and Ponte De Lima in May but the Camino itself was not through remote areas.

Did you have trouble finding places to stay?
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Did you have trouble finding places to stay?
I walked in May and many accommodation places were closed. There could be long stages without either accommodation or food. But I carried a tent and camped most nights. This is not a problem in Sweden and Norway where local law and customs allow this. I believe that there are now more places to stay along the route but the walking season is quite short.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Your proposal to stay 3.5 months in those countries set off alarm bells! Are you aware of the Schengen Area? If not, you should take a close look at this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area
With relatively rare exceptions, U.S. passport holders are limited to 90 days in any sliding 180 day period in the Area. A dual citizenship with a Schengen country will exempt you from the limitation as will a number of other special situations. There is a long-term tourist visa but apparently this is difficult to obtain. See #5 "Long-term tourist visa" here:
https://iamaileen.com/how-to-legally-stay-longer-in-europe-schengen-countries/

But maybe you're aware of all that!
 

mrpeanutisclassy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2017)
St Olav's Way (2020)
Actually no. I wasn't aware. Which is prwtty ignorant of me. That's a major bummer. Good thing you let me know though. I suppose Ill have to take less breaks inbetween all my hikes, and plan out all my routes getting places, now that there's a clock on it. Booooo. Sucks. But very very good to know! Thanks so much for that!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Starting May 18th in Burgos to Santiago
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
Hi,

Please have a look at our web page
Lot´s of good info here.

And hopefully- i will be one of the volunteers receiving you at the end of that journey in Trondheim.

best

Håvard Karlsen
 

inmari

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2013)
El Camino de San Olav, Burgos - Covarrubias (2014)
Pamplona - SdC (2015)
Hi,

So I've done the Camino de Santiago. By no means do I mean to say it was easy... but in the sense of gathering information before leaving... it was incredibly easy. I plan to do the St. Olav's way, The Gudbrandsdalen Path, this summer 2020. The entire way. It's incredibly difficult to me to find things to prepare. Santiago had guidebooks that were so precise, and helped me prepare. The trip planner on the St. Olav's way website is so hard to navigate. Everytime I sit down to plan, I get up to give up minutes later. I'm spending 3.5 months in Norway, Austria, Italy and Slovenia. Majority of that time in Norway completing this path.

Does anyone have any information as to where I can get my hands on a more detailed way I can get knowledge. In Spain I ran into issues like getting an infection in my feet, but because I was too dumb to actually read my guidebook a few nights in advance, I landed myself in towns with nothing open because they were too small or it was Sunday. I want to be more prepared this time. That Allison book, I heard was not very accurate and its only avaliable in far away countries.

If there is anyone out there who has done the entire way and can shed some light on the path, that would be so appreciated. I'm going with a tent, sleeping bag, and jetboil. Hoping to spend 1 or 2 nights in a hotel/refugio/whatever every week for showers. I just want a list of the most common places to start and stop everyday.

Thanks for the time reading :)
Sen me a pm, I live close to the trail just outside Oslo, and I hav walked the western alternative a few times.
 

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When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 8 0.7%
  • March

    Votes: 47 4.1%
  • April

    Votes: 173 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 279 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 85 7.4%
  • July

    Votes: 23 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 25 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 327 28.5%
  • October

    Votes: 142 12.4%
  • November

    Votes: 16 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
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