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Via de Plata from Salamanca

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Hoping to walk a Camino Aug. (possible Sept.) 2022. Thinking of the Via de la Plata from Salamanca. I walked the Madrid August 2019. Prefer solitude and was able to tolerate the heat somewhat. Just wondering about possible routes (Salamanca to Astorga? The Sanabres? Ourense?). Have about 3 weeks or so. Not sure I want to take the Frances (if I did, probably only to Sarria, then the train to Santiago). Trying to avoid big crowds, and want to end up in Santiago (don't necessarily have to walk all the way there, and don't need a Compostela). Any advice? Suggestions? THANKS
 
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Roger Hogstrom

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2001 and 2006, Via de la plata 2007,2010,2017,2019. CdM 3 times Ruta de la lana (2021
I walked from Salamanca to Astorga in june 2017. Not much people. From Granja de Moruela, where the routes devides, to Astorga I met no one. Some pictures on that:
 
Last edited:

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Thanks Bro. Great video. Not sure I want to deal with the crowds from Astorga to Sarria, but there is a section I missed the last time and would love to see Samos. Thanks again
 

m108

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2011-2016
Like you, I don't like crowds. I walked from Salamanca to Astorga twice. Wonderful! Take an extra day for Salamanca :). As Roger said, from Granja de Moreruela to Astorga you really do meet someone else exceptionally. And that’s not the only advantage - the way is very beautiful (to me especially because I adore the Meseta). I have a feeling that such an atmosphere used to be on the more crowded Camino when there were no crowds yet. I definitely highly recommend it. In Granja de Moreruela everyone went to Sanabres, so from there to Astorga is a really special experience
 

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Thanks. I was thinking, maybe, of the Sanabres, but Granja to Astorga is starting to sound good too. Peace
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I walked the Sanabres after the VdlP and would strongly recommend it, if you have time and wish to end in Santiago. There are more pilgrims after you end the VdlP, but no crowds like after Sarria. And while you would miss Samos (which I also like, and have stayed there twice) there is the monastery at Oseira to visit, another ancient and beautiful monastery. When I was there, I was given a private tour by an English-speaking monk, attended evening worship in the monastery, and stayed in their albergue.
 

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Thanks so much for the input, it's very helpful. The first time I went, I took a train from Ponferrada to Sarria, missing the section in between. There is something attractive, however, about the Sanabres, which would be a new route completely for me. Thanks again
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Past OR future Camino
Too many to count!
Hello @frbobs. This is the exact Camino I did in 2019. This Camino, unbeknownst to many is also called the Camino Fonseca. This section of the VdlP from Salamanca to Santiago, via the Camino Sanabrés was called the Camino Fonseca after Don Alonso de Fonseca y Acevedo III, a 16th century Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, who established colleges in both cities. He is famous in both!

Salamanca is a fabulous city to start from, well worth a day of exploring, seeing the old and new cathedrals, the university, and the house of shells, as you work off your jet lag. I think you will also greatly enjoy Zamora, several days later, a city full of romanesque churches, and of course the Castle on the hilltop.

I have written extensively on this Camino, and thoroughly enjoyed the Sanabrés route. It is definitely similar to the Primitivo, in its mountainous appeal. When we reached Granja de Moreruela, there were many more pilgrims, as many were only beginning their Caminos from this start of the Sanabrés.

Farther along the Sanabrés, in Santa Marta de Tera, is the oldest known statue of Santiago as a pilgrim, outside and over the door of the Iglesia de Santa Marta de Tera. This is a must-see for any pilgrim! FOr a photo, scroll down, on this page to see it! Be aware that Santa Marta de Tera is a pinch-point for beds, with only a small 14-bed municipal albergue there. The Camino Levante joins the Sanabrés here, so have a back-up plan if you hope to stay here.

For lots more information and photos, I'd be honored if you check out the Via de la Plata Introduction to aid you in your Camino!
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Be aware that Santa Marta de Tera is a pinch-point for beds, with only a small 14-bed municipal albergue there. The Camino Levante joins the Sanabrés here
The Camino Levante joins the VdlP at Zamora. The next town north of there on the VdlP is Montamarta. Santa Marta de Tera is north of Tabara on the Sanabres, so not very close to where the Levante joins the VdlP. I have walked the VdlP and the Sanabres, to Santiago, and am planning to walk the Levante, as soon as possible. Is it possible that you have confused Montamarta and Santa Marta de Tera? I never had any trouble finding accommodation on the VdlP or the Sanabres, walking fairly late in the fall. I spent one night in Montamarta, 19 km north of Zamora on the VdlP and another night several days later in Santa Marta de Tera on the Sanabres.
 

RodlaRob

Oz Member
Past OR future Camino
Torres (2016) Portuguese (2016)
Solitude.....Camino Torres begins in Salamanca. But may be too quiet for you.? Once it joins Camino Portuguese in Ponte de Lima welcome to plethera Pilgrim !🤣
Camino Torres also gives you the opportunity to change to other routes along the way. Using local buses probably a great way to do this also.
Good luck to anyone wanting a quiet Camino when the Floodgates open.
.....and Elle don't you tell anyone about Camino Teresiano! 🤫
 
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NicP

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Via de la Plata, Seville to Santiago 2016; Camino Frances May 2020 - postponed by COVID
I walked from Seville to Astorga then along the frances after that.... it was very quiet in April / May 2016.... I imagine it'd still suit somebody who doesn't like crowds. In fact, the entire Via de la Plata was perfect for somebody who wants a quiet route - that's why I chose it, and I was p;leased that I did. One of these days I'll try and get back for the Sanabres, but the next one for me is the Frances from SJPDP.... Good luck and Buen Camino!
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Past OR future Camino
Too many to count!
Is it possible that you have confused Montamarta and Santa Marta de Tera? I never had any trouble finding accommodation on the VdlP or the Sanabres, walking fairly late in the fall. I spent one night in Montamarta, 19 km north of Zamora on the VdlP and another night several days later in Santa Marta de Tera on the Sanabres.
Hi there @Albertagirl, yes it is always possible that I am confused! Ha ha. But alas, I did not confuse the two towns, just the place where the Levante joined the VdlP. It is indeed, in Zamara, where for us, the number of pilgrims picked up a lot, even in October of 2019. And indeed, there are only 14 beds in the albergue in Santa Marta de Tera, and several pilgrims had to walk to Camarzana de Tera, 5 km away in order to find a hotel. Thanks for the correction!
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances Portuguese Finisterre Muxia Ingles Mozarabe VldP Sanabres Serrana Salvador Norte Espiritual
Hi there @Albertagirl, yes it is always possible that I am confused! Ha ha. But alas, I did not confuse the two towns, just the place where the Levante joined the VdlP. It is indeed, in Zamara, where for us, the number of pilgrims picked up a lot, even in October of 2019. And indeed, there are only 14 beds in the albergue in Santa Marta de Tera, and several pilgrims had to walk to Camarzana de Tera, 5 km away in order to find a hotel. Thanks for the correction!
But maybe you were thinking of the Camino Sureste,, parallels and crosses over the Levante,, because that joins the via de la Plata at Benavente and then there is a link through to Santa Marta de Tera
 

James P

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Sep/Oct 2015
C Primitivo Sep / Oct 2016
Portugese Sep/Oct 2017
VdlP, Muxia 2018
Hoping to walk a Camino Aug. (possible Sept.) 2022. Thinking of the Via de la Plata from Salamanca. I walked the Madrid August 2019. Prefer solitude and was able to tolerate the heat somewhat. Just wondering about possible routes (Salamanca to Astorga? The Sanabres? Ourense?). Have about 3 weeks or so. Not sure I want to take the Frances (if I did, probably only to Sarria, then the train to Santiago). Trying to avoid big crowds, and want to end up in Santiago (don't necessarily have to walk all the way there, and don't need a Compostela). Any advice? Suggestions? THANKS
Salamanca, Sanabres, Ourence best. Quite and beautiful. I really enjoyed this route
 
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Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Past OR future Camino
Too many to count!
But maybe you were thinking of the Camino Sureste,, parallels and crosses over the Levante,, because that joins the via de la Plata at Benavente and then there is a link through to Santa Marta de Tera
Thank-you @Martyduc, for the attempted save, however interesting, but this is not what I was thinking. To be sure, I am not exactly sure what I was thinking!! 🤣 🤣
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hoping to walk a Camino Aug. (possible Sept.) 2022. Thinking of the Via de la Plata from Salamanca. I walked the Madrid August 2019. Prefer solitude and was able to tolerate the heat somewhat. Just wondering about possible routes (Salamanca to Astorga? The Sanabres? Ourense?). Have about 3 weeks or so. Not sure I want to take the Frances (if I did, probably only to Sarria, then the train to Santiago). Trying to avoid big crowds, and want to end up in Santiago (don't necessarily have to walk all the way there, and don't need a Compostela). Any advice? Suggestions? THANKS
I haven't walked the VDLP but if Covid allows I will be starting in Sevilla in October. As @ RogerHogstrom wrote he did not see anyone from Gronja to Astorga he was alone. I have also read that from other pilgrims on the fourm. You have walked the CF before and you do not want crowds. If the Camino is open in September you know it will be crowded when you arrive in Astorga. Probably will be a shock to the system. Gronze has 16 stages from Salamanca to Santiago. My stage breakdown which is much mellower (But which I most certainly will not follow but is fun to plan. Who knows what happens and by that time I will be walking longer stages if possible) has 23 stages from Salamanca. I too like quieter stages so that is why my stages are on the Sanabria. Buen Camino and lets hope you are on the VDLP leading the way for me.
 

frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Hey Elle! Thanks so much for all the info, I will most happily check out the link you included. I did hear of the Fonseca (also the name of a good cigar), I just didn't realize it's the route I was thinking about. I've been wanting to see Salamanca (particularly having fallen in love with Segovia), it's a direct train from Madrid, I'll have between 3 and 4 weeks, so started thinking... It has been wonderful to get so much advice and input. It's a way off, but I love to plan, and it looks like (for now) the Fonseca would be a wonderful way to go. Thanks again. Peace, Bob 🐙
 
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frbobs

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2014)
Camino Portugues-(2017)
Camino Madrid (August 2019)
Hello @frbobs. This is the exact Camino I did in 2019. This Camino, unbeknownst to many is also called the Camino Fonseca. This section of the VdlP from Salamanca to Santiago, via the Camino Sanabrés was called the Camino Fonseca after Don Alonso de Fonseca y Acevedo III, a 16th century Archbishop of Santiago de Compostela, who established colleges in both cities. He is famous in both!

Salamanca is a fabulous city to start from, well worth a day of exploring, seeing the old and new cathedrals, the university, and the house of shells, as you work off your jet lag. I think you will also greatly enjoy Zamora, several days later, a city full of romanesque churches, and of course the Castle on the hilltop.

I have written extensively on this Camino, and thoroughly enjoyed the Sanabrés route. It is definitely similar to the Primitivo, in its mountainous appeal. When we reached Granja de Moreruela, there were many more pilgrims, as many were only beginning their Caminos from this start of the Sanabrés.

Farther along the Sanabrés, in Santa Marta de Tera, is the oldest known statue of Santiago as a pilgrim, outside and over the door of the Iglesia de Santa Marta de Tera. This is a must-see for any pilgrim! FOr a photo, scroll down, on this page to see it! Be aware that Santa Marta de Tera is a pinch-point for beds, with only a small 14-bed municipal albergue there. The Camino Levante joins the Sanabrés here, so have a back-up plan if you hope to stay here.

For lots more information and photos, I'd be honored if you check out the Via de la Plata Introduction to aid you in your Camino!
Didn't realize Pilgrimage Traveler was your site. I've been on it a number of times. Thanks, it's awesome.
 

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