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Via de Plata in October

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#1
I fly into Madrid on October 1 and have a train booked to Seville. After reading other threads I am having doubts that I have picked the right time, and there will be nights I will be alone in the albergues. Also I have only walked the Frances once, and others seem to do 3 or 4 other Caminos before attempting the VLDP. Would you recommend I do the Frances again and leave this walk till another time? Thank you.
 

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Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#2
Hi @SallyToms!
Some people walk the VdlP for their first Camino, I wouldn't worry about having walked 'just' one CF.
I don't know what it is like in October but yes, as a route it IS different to the CF - fewer pilgrims, fewer bars etc...
It all just depends on what you want (or think you want) from a Camino.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#3
Hi @SallyToms, and welcome to the forum. The weather in Seville I expect would be good in October - I'm thinking of walking from Madrid next week and my biggest concern is the heat. If you want to play around with looking at average temperatures, this website is great. You can compare a couple of cities.

The Vdlp is a vastly different beast to the CF. I am suspending judgment until I've walked it all - I started from Salamanca earlier this year but was defeated by plantar fasciitis. Hopefully I'll be able to try it again one spring. In Salamanca I met up with two friends who had walked from Seville, and they were not impressed. They found the stages long and difficult, the infrastructure poor, compared to the CF, and far fewer pilgrims. But other members of this forum, whose advice I trust, absolutely love the Vdlp.

I walked the CF three times before I ventured further afield, for no real reason other than convenience. Each time was quite different - different seasons, different people and I tried to stay in different places. I then walked twice from Le Puy, once in autumn, once in spring, then did two more routes in France before coming back to Spain to the Norte. Since the Norte I've walked the CF again twice - and still love it.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#4
The Vdp was our second Camino, we chose it because it is different from the French route, and it remains my favourite. We started from Seville in September and finished before the winter rains set in. The route is more popular in Spring and Autumn so while there will be fewer pilgrims then you are used to, it is unlikely that you would be on your own.

You sound like you are having second thoughts, while I would encourage you to consider alternative routes to the Frances, if you feel the Vpd isn't for you then consider either the Levante (starting in Torledo) or the Portuguese route as its infrastructure and usage has improved considerably in recent years, you'll find plenty of advice and information on these on the forum.
 

Lavdrum

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata-2015
Camino Portugues, Oct. 2016
#5
I fly into Madrid on October 1 and have a train booked to Seville. After reading other threads I am having doubts that I have picked the right time, and there will be nights I will be alone in the albergues. Also I have only walked the Frances once, and others seem to do 3 or 4 other Caminos before attempting the VLDP. Would you recommend I do the Frances again and leave this walk till another time? Thank you.
Hi,
I walked from Seville to Santiago in the autumn of 2015. It was my first Camino. I left Seville on Oct.13th. The weather was fine, up to 25 centigrade some days-hot enough for me. I was never alone, there were about 8 peregrinos at the same stage as I was. After Salamanca the numbers increased somewhat. There was a good sense of camaraderie given that we were so few. I experienced rain on 3 days during my entire walk which concluded about Nov. 13th. I never had any problem finding accommodation in the Albergues. Some of the stages are long so have some food and water with you just in case you arrive in a village where the café-bar is closed for one reason or another. Travel as light as possible, I had a light sleeping bag but quite a few Albergues had blankets. The mornings were cool-a sweatshirt was sufficient when setting out but by midday I was usually in my tee-shirt. It is a great Camino-my favourite so far. I did the Portugués in 2016 and part of the Norte in June-July 2017.
Buen Camino!!
 

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SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#6
Hi @SallyToms, and welcome to the forum. The weather in Seville I expect would be good in October - I'm thinking of walking from Madrid next week and my biggest concern is the heat. If you want to play around with looking at average temperatures, this website is great. You can compare a couple of cities.

The Vdlp is a vastly different beast to the CF. I am suspending judgment until I've walked it all - I started from Salamanca earlier this year but was defeated by plantar fasciitis. Hopefully I'll be able to try it again one spring. In Salamanca I met up with two friends who had walked from Seville, and they were not impressed. They found the stages long and difficult, the infrastructure poor, compared to the CF, and far fewer pilgrims. But other members of this forum, whose advice I trust, absolutely love the Vdlp.

I walked the CF three times before I ventured further afield, for no real reason other than convenience. Each time was quite different - different seasons, different people and I tried to stay in different places. I then walked twice from Le Puy, once in autumn, once in spring, then did two more routes in France before coming back to Spain to the Norte. Since the Norte I've walked the CF again twice - and still love it.
Thank you Kanga. My other option was the Madrid, SAN Salvador then Primitivo as I have 6 weeks. All my info is on VLDP but it is the long and difficult stages you mentioned and closed cafes in villages. Sounds like I will always have to have a bocadillo hidden in my backpack!
 

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#7
The Vdp was our second Camino, we chose it because it is different from the French route, and it remains my favourite. We started from Seville in September and finished before the winter rains set in. The route is more popular in Spring and Autumn so while there will be fewer pilgrims then you are used to, it is unlikely that you would be on your own.

You sound like you are having second thoughts, while I would encourage you to consider alternative routes to the Frances, if you feel the Vpd isn't for you then consider either the Levante (starting in Torledo) or the Portuguese route as its infrastructure and usage has improved considerably in recent years, you'll find plenty of advice and information on these on the forum.
Thank you for your positive report on the vldp and it is your favourite, very good to hear that.
 

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#8
Hi,
I walked from Seville to Santiago in the autumn of 2015. It was my first Camino. I left Seville on Oct.13th. The weather was fine, up to 25 centigrade some days-hot enough for me. I was never alone, there were about 8 peregrinos at the same stage as I was. After Salamanca the numbers increased somewhat. There was a good sense of camaraderie given that we were so few. I experienced rain on 3 days during my entire walk which concluded about Nov. 13th. I never had any problem finding accommodation in the Albergues. Some of the stages are long so have some food and water with you just in case you arrive in a village where the café-bar is closed for one reason or another. Travel as light as possible, I had a light sleeping bag but quite a few Albergues had blankets. The mornings were cool-a sweatshirt was sufficient when setting out but by midday I was usually in my tee-shirt. It is a great Camino-my favourite so far. I did the Portugués in 2016 and part of the Norte in June-July 2017.
Buen Camino!!
Great to hear positive reports. I tell myself if I am hating it I can go back to the Frances. But once I start am sure I will want to go on, and the towns along the way look spectacular. Will definitely be careful with my packing, my dodgy knee demands it. Thank you.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#9
Consider starting in Merida, especially if time is an issue. I walked from Seville to Astorga in the spring, enjoying it thoroughly. I especially liked the part from Merida to Salamanca. Then if you choose to do so, it is easy to get from Salamanca to Leon or another point on the Camino Frances.

I am functional in Spanish and consider myself fairly self-reliant, so the VDLP really appealed to me.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#10
Consider starting in Merida, especially if time is an issue. I walked from Seville to Astorga in the spring, enjoying it thoroughly. I especially liked the part from Merida to Salamanca.
Good advice if time is an issue, and a special part of the route, did you spy the Roman Bath just 14kms out of Merida, it's just a normal looking old house on the way,with a discrete Therma sign by the door... But inside a wonderful authentic bathing experience and massage await...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#11
Good advice if time is an issue, and a special part of the route, did you spy the Roman Bath just 14kms out of Merida, it's just a normal looking old house on the way,with a discrete Therma sign by the door... But inside a wonderful authentic bathing experience and massage await...
I saw the house with its sign, but didn't go in. Maybe next time!
 
#12
Here is a repeat offender! The Plata was my second Camino after the Francés. I have subsequently returned on three occasions and have done parts in the summer, fall and winter.

Albergues:
Infrastructure has improved over the years (walked first time summer 2011, last time summer 2016). And although there are more albergues, it is nothing compared to the Frances.

Stages:
Should you wish to walk stages of 15 km then the Plata would be a problem. I like long stages but I know that other forum member have walked shorter stages. Check the threads here on the Forum for ideas.

Weather:
I walked during October (arrived in Santiago November 3rd) and had lovely weather up until Santiago! I believe we took out a poncho twice. I always carry a fleece for a cool morning but only needed it further north and as someone already mentioned, only in the morning.

Pilgrims:
Although I have walked in the heat of the summer and in winter (February) I still found pilgrims in albergues, albeit a handful. I was never alone on this Camino. That may not be the case on another less travelled Camino such as the Mozárabe or the Levante - I know from experience!

I'd say go for it and if for whatever reason you decide it is not for you, take a bus elsewhere. ALSA has a fantastic network of bus lines. There is another bus company that runs a route around there but forgot the name.

Don't hesitate to ask anything else you may want to know, there are many members who have walked this Camino.

Cheers
LT
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
#13
Good advice if time is an issue, and a special part of the route, did you spy the Roman Bath just 14kms out of Merida, it's just a normal looking old house on the way,with a discrete Therma sign by the door... But inside a wonderful authentic bathing experience and massage await...
Oh Yes - I spent a whole afternoon wallowing in the lovely water and enjoying the special treat - don't miss it
 

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#14
Consider starting in Merida, especially if time is an issue. I walked from Seville to Astorga in the spring, enjoying it thoroughly. I especially liked the part from Merida to Salamanca. Then if you choose to do so, it is easy to get from Salamanca to Leon or another point on the Camino Frances.

I am functional in Spanish and consider myself fairly self-reliant, so the VDLP really appealed to me.
I have nearly 6 weeks so I will have a lot of options. I think a spring Camino will be next on my bucket list.
 

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#15
Here is a repeat offender! The Plata was my second Camino after the Francés. I have subsequently returned on three occasions and have done parts in the summer, fall and winter.

Albergues:
Infrastructure has improved over the years (walked first time summer 2011, last time summer 2016). And although there are more albergues, it is nothing compared to the Frances.

Stages:
Should you wish to walk stages of 15 km then the Plata would be a problem. I like long stages but I know that other forum member have walked shorter stages. Check the threads here on the Forum for ideas.

Weather:
I walked during October (arrived in Santiago November 3rd) and had lovely weather up until Santiago! I believe we took out a poncho twice. I always carry a fleece for a cool morning but only needed it further north and as someone already mentioned, only in the morning.

Pilgrims:
Although I have walked in the heat of the summer and in winter (February) I still found pilgrims in albergues, albeit a handful. I was never alone on this Camino. That may not be the case on another less travelled Camino such as the Mozárabe or the Levante - I know from experience!

I'd say go for it and if for whatever reason you decide it is not for you, take a bus elsewhere. ALSA has a fantastic network of bus lines. There is another bus company that runs a route around there but forgot the name.

Don't hesitate to ask anything else you may want to know, there are many members who have walked this Camino.

Cheers
LT
Thanks LT. I like hearing stories like yours and Thankyou for all the info on weather and stages. I did read one blog where the person said they were the only one in the albergue but that doesn't seem likely. Yes I'm impressed by those who can do 40km stages but that won't be me lol. Longest on Frances was 34, I will just have to plan well for this one.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
#16
Here is a repeat offender! The Plata was my second Camino after the Francés. I have subsequently returned on three occasions and have done parts in the summer, fall and winter.
I'm another repeat offender. I caught the camino bug on the VdlP, which was my first camino (and my second and the Sanabrés part of my 3rd, 4th, 6th and (I hope, this autumn) 7th). I tend to start late in October when the albergues are much emptier, and often empty, but that was leaving Seville on All Soul's or even once into November. Even then, there were usually people in the albergues at Fuenterroble, Salamanca and Zamora, and most of the xunta ones in Galicia.

I don't know if I've been lucky or it's always like that in the autumn, but I have never experienced a single drop of rain in Extremadura, and one year I had no rain between Seville and Sanabria, within sight of Galicia (where it made up for the earlier drought ...).

Mérida is a delight, with the entrance to town via the longest bridge in the Roman Empire, Cáceres amazing, with its palaces built by conquistadors with the spoils of the new world, Galisteo, with it intact defensive walls, and minaret converted into church spire, the solitary grandeur of the arch of Cáparra, the first sight of the twin cathedrals of Salamanca, from a couple of hours out, the glut of glorious Romanesque in Zamora, Cistercian ruins at Granja de Moreruela, Visigothic traces in Tábara, a Templar church tower in Mombuey, cliff hugging church and castle in Puebla de Sanabria, the earliest known statue of Santiago in Santa Marta de Tera, hot baths in Ourense, a handful of monks singing vespers in the huge monastery at Oseira, the first sight of the Pico Sacro above Santiago. I could go on (and I have a bit). The landscape is, in places pretty amazing too, as is the local food in most of the areas you pass through, and pilgrims are still sufficiently unusual (2329 started from Seville last year) for you to be your own conversation piece with the locals.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#17
Thanks LT. I like hearing stories like yours and Thankyou for all the info on weather and stages. I did read one blog where the person said they were the only one in the albergue but that doesn't seem likely. Yes I'm impressed by those who can do 40km stages but that won't be me lol. Longest on Frances was 34, I will just have to plan well for this one.
A week ago I have finished my albergues and distances list for VdlP and according to gronze.com the longest stage without albergue (or anything else) is from Casar de Caceres to Canaveral with 33,2km. All other stages between the albergues are under 30km.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#19
Readings some of these comments has brought back so many memories of this route. It also reminds me of my fellow walkers. I am not good with crowds and am glad we did the French route back when it was less crowded. But on the vdp you end up walking with the same group for days if not weeks, gathering more as you go, a bit like moss. This is because there are less options so you all start and end up at the same place each day. We all rubbed along and gave each other space, we tended to leave in the morning at different times so often walked without seeing each other and got together over a drink at the end of the day.

I sometimes wonder what Daisy the Dutchwoman, the King of the Hunzas and our three Amigos are doing these days, and I remember the torment of poor Gerald who was torn between wandering with his Camino mates or getting up early and taking off with the flying kiwis. It was a sad day when we finally out walked them and left them behind, still snoozing in the bunks till 9am, with Gerald pacing the floor and realising he'd never make it to Finisteree at this rate. But we did get to see them again in Santiago, at the train station when we were on our way back. They made it in the end.
 

MariannaP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2011, Frances 2012, Portugese 2013, De Levante 2015, Mozarabe, VDLP 2016
#20
Thanks to all for sharing all the info and memories. I'm findimng it very useful and timely. I'm leaving to Spain in two weeks (my 6th trip) and I always combine walking with volunteering. This time, I will be volunteering (my 5th posting) in Salamanca Oct 15-31. I fell in love with VDLP last year, after walking Zamora to Astorga. This year, I want to do some more of this camino. Having only 3 weeks, though, I won't be able to acomplish the whole missing part, Sevilla to Zamora. So here is my question to you, who have walked VDLP - would you recommend Sevilla to Merida or rather Merida to Zamora? (I've been "customizing" my caminoes over last few years and I'm OK with taking a bus as needed).
Thanks for any other tips.

(SallyToms - perhaps I'll meet you in Salamanca).
 

MariannaP

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2011, Frances 2012, Portugese 2013, De Levante 2015, Mozarabe, VDLP 2016
#21
A week ago I have finished my albergues and distances list for VdlP and according to gronze.com the longest stage without albergue (or anything else) is from Casar de Caceres to Canaveral with 33,2km. All other stages between the albergues are under 30km.
I just did the same. Also on Gronze, etapa 13, I found there was an albergue in Embalse del Ancantara, 600 m off the camino, E25.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#22
I just did the same. Also on Gronze, etapa 13, I found there was an albergue in Embalse del Ancantara, 600 m off the camino, E25.
That is not correct unfortunately! (Unless something surprising has happened in the last few months.) It has been closed for years, due to some waste/water disposal issue, and the fishing lodge does not accommodate pilgrims.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#23
I just did the same. Also on Gronze, etapa 13, I found there was an albergue in Embalse del Ancantara, 600 m off the camino, E25.
@C clearly has it right. That's why I mentioned it as the longest stage. Don't know for how long the Embalse de Alcantara albergue is closed now but I'm sure it has been two years at least.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#24
@C clearly has it right. That's why I mentioned it as the longest stage. Don't know for how long the Embalse de Alcantara albergue is closed now but I'm sure it has been two years at least.
. This is a real shame as that great iron bunker was a a welcome stop after a long day on the road.
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
#25
I have a love/hate relationship with these threads... they remind my of my VdlP walk and I love those memories... but they remind me of my VdlP walk and I miss it :D

I can only echo all that has been said... the VdlP is not the CF but I loved it... a year ago I was getting so excited with just a few weeks to go before I started.

Whatever you decide have a fabulous walk! :cool:
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#26
So here is my question to you, who have walked VDLP - would you recommend Sevilla to Merida or rather Merida to Zamora? .
This is a timely question as I have just been debating a similar thing with my daughter as we plan our return to the vdp next year. Points to note are:
Route from Seville is long flat and can be hot, but Italica is just out of Seville and well worth a visit, had to do a double take as it featured heavily in a recent episode of Game of Thrones.
Walking across the long bridge into Merida is a real treat, and then of course there are all the ruins, a great museum and a restored Roman bath just outside the city... So how could you miss Merida. On the way to Salamanca you get the joy of visiting Caceres and the Caparra Arch.
Salamanca, goes with out saying is a wonderful place, and the alburge by the cathendral was a welcoming and lovely place to stay, and the walk from there to Zamora is only a couple of days.
If I had to choose, then I would probably say the walk from Merida to Zamora is the more interesting and one that captures the spirit of this route best.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#27
would you recommend Sevilla to Merida or rather Merida to Zamora?
Definitely Merida to Zamora! (Your 2 options are quite different in length. Merida to Salamanca would be my choice if I had limited time.)
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#28
Definitely Merida to Zamora! (Your 2 options are quite different in length. Merida to Salamanca would be my choice if I had limited time.)
Good point, correct me if I am wrong, but it's 230km from Seville to Merida, around 300km from Merida to Salamanca and 70kms between Salamanca and Zamora.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#29
@SallyToms
You have received much useful advice and information from persons who have walked the VdlP, but as someone who has not yet done so, I think that I can give you what you want. I am also taking the train to Seville on Oct. 1 to walk this route, spending two nights in Seville, then beginning a leisurely 50 day walk to Santiago via the VdlP and the Camino Sanabres. I like to average 20 km a day, so unless you are much faster we are sure to see one another along the trail. I have tentatively planned my stops and am pleased to see that there are very few days when I must walk more than 25 km and, as @KinkyOne says, only one stage where there is no accommodation for more than 30 km. I cannot guarantee that you will enjoy this walk; indeed, I cannot guarantee that I will. But I am still looking forward to it tremendously as my next adventure as a camino pilgrim. I wish you "Buen camino," hoping to do so in person soon. If you want to discuss a possible meeting, send me a pm (personal message) using the inbox function at the top right of the screen. I tried to send you a message, but perhaps you are not familiar with this function.
Mary Louise
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#30
I am also taking the train to Seville on Oct. 1 to walk this route, spending two nights in Seville, then beginning a leisurely 50 day walk to Santiago via the VdlP and the Camino Sanabres
Nice to see you back on the forum, and getting ready for another Camino. I expect you will like this route, and the 50-day allowance is good.
 
Last edited:

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#31
@SallyToms
You have received much useful advice and information from persons who have walked the VdlP, but as someone who has not yet done so, I think that I can give you what you want. I am also taking the train to Seville on Oct. 1 to walk this route, spending two nights in Seville, then beginning a leisurely 50 day walk to Santiago via the VdlP and the Camino Sanabres. I like to average 20 km a day, so unless you are much faster we are sure to see one another along the trail. I have tentatively planned my stops and am pleased to see that there are very few days when I must walk more than 25 km and, as @KinkyOne says, only one stage where there is no accommodation for more than 30 km. I cannot guarantee that you will enjoy this walk; indeed, I cannot guarantee that I will. But I am still looking forward to it tremendously as my next adventure as a camino pilgrim. I wish you "Buen camino," hoping to do so in person soon. If you want to discuss a possible meeting, send me a pm (personal message) using the inbox function at the top right of the screen. I tried to send you a message, but perhaps you are not familiar with this function.
Mary Louise
@Albertagirl
Thank you for your lovely reply. Wonderful to know I will have a friendly face to meet and share some Tapas in Seville. I have sent you a PM
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#33
@VNwalking
Thank you for your kind greetings. And thank you also to all those whose blogs and other information about the VdlP have made possible my planning and my confidence in walking this route. Among them I thank @peregrina2000, @C clearly, @SYates, @Anemone del Camino and especially @LesBrass, whose blog about her fall VdlP last year encouraged me to buy rainpants, and @KinkyOne for sending me his detailed information on the route. I do not plan to blog or post while walking, but if I find any particular challenges, I shall post about them to help other walkers, following the kind example of so many others. Thanks again.
Mary Louise
P.S.: I am leaving on my travels tomorrow morning, which is why I am posting this now.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#34
@VNwalking
Thank you for your kind greetings. And thank you also to all those whose blogs and other information about the VdlP have made possible my planning and my confidence in walking this route. Among them I thank @peregrina2000, @C clearly, @SYates, @Anemone del Camino and especially @LesBrass, whose blog about her fall VdlP last year encouraged me to buy rainpants, and @KinkyOne for sending me his detailed information on the route. I do not plan to blog or post while walking, but if I find any particular challenges, I shall post about them to help other walkers, following the kind example of so many others. Thanks again.
Mary Louise
P.S.: I am leaving on my travels tomorrow morning, which is why I am posting this now.
Have a nice Camino, Mary Louise!!!
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
#35
...And thank you also to all those whose blogs and other information about the VdlP have made possible my planning and my confidence in walking this route. Among them I thank @peregrina2000, @C clearly, @SYates, @Anemone del Camino and especially @LesBrass, whose blog about her fall VdlP last year encouraged me to buy rainpants....
Ah, thank you! Have an amazing walk... enjoy the fantastic sunrises and the smell of the grass in the morning dew and the history and... well... stay safe and buen camino!
 

SallyToms

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Muxia Oct 2016
Via de Plata to Caceres 2017
Portuguese 2017
Ingles 2017
#36
Update on my Camino. I unfortunately got very bad blisters sightseeing in my sandals in 35' heat at the end of day one. I walked on till just after Caceres but couldn't manage the long distances. So I bussed to Astorga and did short distances to Sarria. Then I caught 2 trains and a bus (train from Sarria to Ourense then Vigo absolutely beautiful) down to Porto. I did the internal Portuguese route to Santiago which I loved although it pays to check if albergues in the smaller towns are open in November. I still had days left so caught the bus from Santiago to Ferrol and walked the Ingles in 5 days which was wet, hilly but spectacular. The people I met along the way and the beautiful places made my mixed up Caminos a very special experience.
 

hel&scott

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
#37
Sorry to hear blisters busted your Vdp experience, but glad to hear you recovered enough and filled your time by doing sections of other routes. We started in Ferrol one very wild and wet November, and your points on the English Way are well made. Hope you don't get too much of a shock when you return home, we are currently sweltering in drought down here in the Southern Hemisphere.
 

JAL

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014
Le Puy-St. Jean 2015
Via Francigena 2016
Norte/Primitivo 2016
Via de la Plata 2017
#38
Hi,

I walked the VDLP this past October, from Seville to Santiago via the Sanabres option. I walked Sep. 27 through Nov. 1 with no rest days.

The first 2 weeks in Andalusia and Extremadura were really hot, hitting 36 repeatedly,<<this is statistically anomalous for this time of year>> but by I think Laza, I was seeing frost for several hours in the morning. Never saw much rain, but I would highly recommend an umbrella for sun, mine was a lifesaver in the south.

I saw a fair amount of pilgrims the first two weeks, a few on the trail and quite a few in the albergues, but it got pretty lonesome the second half, and I had albergues to myself a few times, and many totally solo walking days. There is a flat boring stretch in the middle that I think people skip over and it was just getting late in the season for walking by late October.

Others have said as much, but make sure and leave each morning with a ton of water and food, and never pass up a chance to refill. Plan your day and following day carefully as an error in planning can be downright dangerous on certain stages of the VDLP.

Overall, it is a beautiful, challenging, and rewarding camino, with each day bringing a changing beauty as you move from South to North.

Considering the potential of springtime flooding, I think October is a good choice all things considered.

let me know if you have any questions.

John
 

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