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Viejo Camino de Santiago

ovelha

New Member
Hi!
I've recently done the Portuguese Camino and in Santiago went to a book store and found a litle book with all the Caminos in Spain. And it had this one that I didn't know about.
Does anyone know anything about this "viejo camino"?
Thanks for your reply.
Ovelha


Click on the image to see the full length
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Ovelja:
This is very interesting! I know a lot of the towns listed along that map, and the route goes right through a long string of mountains that feature some of the finest Romanesque churches in Spain... but with a flat plain only a few km. south. Got to wonder what kind of masochist would stick to those peaks and valleys all the way west? Still, I´ve wandered all over a lot of that area, and have seen no sign nor mention of a camino except in La Robla -- and that´s the Camino San Salvador. There are a whole ton of hiking routes and GRs all through these Picos, though. So most likely somebody walked that way to Santiago.

Thanks for sharing something new and different. What is the book, btw?

Reb.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
I thought I recognised this map! My husband bought me a 2010 desk top calender at the Cathedral shop in Santiago, with maps of 12 different routes and a brief description. The Viejo Camino de Santiago is described for February 2010. Below is my translation:
Shortly after the discovery of the remains of the Apostel, pilgrims started to undertake the journey to Santiago. Crossing the Penisular to Compostela was complicated. The route that the actual Camino Francés follows, was too far to the South and the traveller was exposed to the dangers that the Muslim troops threatened, whereas following the costal route was too tortous and in fact, almost impossible, due to the crossing of various rivers. It seems to indicate therefore, that during the 9th, 10th, 11th and beginning of the 12th centuries, the Pilgrims used old tracks and Roman calzadas that were already available between the mountains and valleys of the Pirenean and Cantabrican ranges, over a territory where they could encounter fortified populations defending them from the Muslims. It is a route of great natural beauty, full of history, with beautiful scenery and monasteries, which has remained forgotten over the centuries and there is now an attempt to recuperate it, naming it the Viejo Camino de Santiago. Anne
 

madrid12

member
Hola
I agree with Rebecca, this does sound interesting and we have also been to a few of the places. Salvatierra to Vitoria is part of St Adrians tunnel route which joins the CF at Santa Domingo. I think also there is a route inland off the Camino del Norte at Bilbao inland through Balmaseda to join up at Burgos. We were in Reinosa last year but did not see any waymarking although it did look a good walking area.
Liz
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Time to get out the hiking maps! I will check out what´s walkable between Alar del Rey and Aguilar de Campoo soon as I get out from under the current project(s)... beautiful, tough country, but some of these places are served by the FEVE rail line!

Those early pilgrims were the Genuine Article... and they didn´t even have GoreTex!
 
madrid12 said:
I think also there is a route inland off the Camino del Norte at Bilbao inland through Balmaseda to join up at Burgos
yes, it's long been promoted by the Basque Country tourist people. The main snag with it is that there's no connection on the Castillian side. :-( However, if this group are going to develop it, then it looks like I have to add it to my list. From Retortilla to Aguillar it must be largely the same as the GR73 which is also supposed to be following the Roman road http://pilgrim.peterrobins.co.uk/routes ... esaya.html tho as usual the blog doesn't seem to mention the GR.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
hello!

finally made it to this forum officially! :)

I am planning on walking viejo camino next year as part of my from-home-to-fisterra route.

the source of my route is a wonderful map of (all?) the caminos in spain (waymarked, in research, or only just historically known) that I got a hold on in 2009, but I honestly don't remember where anymore. it has been published that year by Federacion Espanola de Asociaciones de Amigos del Camino de Santiago, and the routes come with a little description and very basic accommodation info.

the route is a bit different then the one ovelha posted above and goes as follows: pamplona, alsasua, salvatierra, victoria-gasteiz, pobes, trespaderne, dobro, escalada, polientes, aguilar de campoo, cervera de pisuerga, castrejon de pisuerga, guardo, cistierna, la vecilla, la robla, riello, fasgas, iguena, ponferrada or villafranca del bierzo.

I buried myself into the research for the past few months, used all the info I could find on the internet, combined various existing routes, and came up with a description with everything that goes with it (sights, beds, etc.). some parts were pretty difficult to make because they are all blotchy on googlemaps (which, btw, rule big time!). all the stuff that others already researched or made belonges to them, there are also links to the sites I used.

here it is: http://camino-medieval.webs.com/Camino% ... public.pdf.

revised description: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1292227/camino files 12/Camino description VIEJO public 12.pdf

I will really very much appreciate any hints, suggestions, corrections, propositions... anyone can provide.

caminka
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Jan Brilleman of this forum has been working on putting together some stages for the Viejo Camino, or the Camino Olvidado, not sure of its "official name."

In addition to the "el camino olvidado" blog that Ovelha mentions, there is another one:
http://rastreando.blogspot.com/2010/05/ ... viejo.html

And on the February 4th entry of the camino olvidado blog you'll see the stages that this group put together along with distances: http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/

I had an email exchange with them,and they told me there are arrows painted up to Cervera de Pisuerga, and that the group hopes to mark three or four more stages over Semana Santa. No albergues de peregrinos, but there are casas rurales, pensiones, and albergues juveniles.

Jan, are you there?
 

jabri

Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999: Holland-Santiago, 2001 Jakobsweg Switzerland, 2002 GR65 Geneva- Le Puy, 2003 2004 2005 GR65, 2006 Camino Aragones
Hi Laurie,
I am surprised there is more!
Now I know why we mixed the names Viejo and Olvidado!

As I understand Camino Olvidado starts in Bilbao (or even in Irun, if you like) and the Camino Viejo starts in Pamplona. The Viejo crosses the Ebro-route and the Tunnel-route and they, the Viejo and the Olvidado, come together at Aguilar de Campo and go on together till Villafranca del Bierzo.

As mentioned by Adolfo de Miguel of
http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/
the Camino Olvidado is signed by yellow arrows from Bilbao till Cevera de Pisuerga, But the Camino Viejo before Aguilar de Campo and after Cevera de Pisuerga is NOT signed that way.

Jan Brilleman
 

jabri

Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999: Holland-Santiago, 2001 Jakobsweg Switzerland, 2002 GR65 Geneva- Le Puy, 2003 2004 2005 GR65, 2006 Camino Aragones
I compared the two descriptions, the one on the Camino Olvidado Blog (http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/) and the one of the Viejo Camino (http://camino-medieval.webs.com/Camino% ... public.pdf.)
From Aguilar de Campo both descriptions use the same route/places, but the Camino Olvidado goes from Congosto (that is after Losada) straight west to Camponaraya and Villafranca del Bierzo, The Viejo Camino goes from Congosto south to Ponferrada.

Jan Brilleman
 

caminka

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jabri said:
I compared the two descriptions, the one on the Camino Olvidado Blog (http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/) and the one of the Viejo Camino (http://camino-medieval.webs.com/Camino% ... public.pdf.)
From Aguilar de Campo both descriptions use the same route/places, but the Camino Olvidado goes from Congosto (that is after Losada) straight west to Camponaraya and Villafranca del Bierzo, The Viejo Camino goes from Congosto south to Ponferrada.

Jan Brilleman

um, yeah, that is because I used their blog/map/description for my description. *smiles sheepishly*
and the reason I made it from congosto to ponferrada is because I intend to walk this one and continue on camino invierno. on my map both variants, to ponferrada and villafranca, are marked, and I also found information on ruta del bembibre o del boeza from astorga to villafranca that passed through congosto (http://www.legionvii.com/reportajes/rep ... 4olano.pdf).

it is wonderful that new stages will be marked! googlemaps in these parts are of low resolution and it was impossible to see the tracks and paths so I had to use roads more often that I would like.

and yes, as mentioned, there are two, camino olvidado and viejo camino that join in aguilar de campoo. what exactly it's called after that, I don't know, but according to the link I posted above it might be viejo (somewhere towards the end is cited an 18C source that referes to viejo camino coming to el bierzo from the north).
 

orionman

New Member
Hello all, In Lakech

thank you very much for putting all of these links and this info online.
im very interested in these alternative routes.
right now i think i would walk (this summer) from irun to bilbao to aguilar de campo to villafranco del bierzo and then take the CF to finisterre.
if possible i would like to take a pass over the picos de europa...
i also like the route caminka describes.
and i considered to take the GR1 but it seems to be very difficult and dangerous at some places. (is this correct??)
the only guide i could find on this one is in Catalan. google this isbn 84-933665-52
and thanks to you guys/girls i found a very interesting link to GR routes through Espagna
http://www.euro-senders.com/web_cas/espanya.htm

but what i wanted to ask is. do you think i would need a tent or no, tougher shoes, clothing for the cold?? other suggestions?? comparing to the camino frances what would i really need to take with me?
also if u know places with a 'special energy' i am open for suggestions.
nothing is fixed yet (actually will never be :lol: )

Ultreija.
Chris.
 

caminka

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Camino(s) past & future
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hello orionman!

if you are going to do camino olvidado bilbao - aguilar - villafranca / bierzo, you can contact this organization which is mappring and waymarking it: http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/20 ... idado.html. so far they have marked it until cervera de pisuerga, but this easter they were supposed to mark further stages. there is a description on their site as far as cervera, and a list for accommodation for the whole route. I used this info for my description in that pdf file.
first three stages are also described here: http://blogs.elcorreo.com/viajes/catego ... o-santiago, plus there are maps.

there is precious few info on GR 1, the best bet is to search according to countries (eg. navarra, burgos, leon). I walked a couple of kms to the east of sos del rey catolico (aragon, I think, just south of sanguesa on camino aragones) and I have studied the part between salinas de anana and espejo. those two don't seem to be difficult but then again, they are not in the proper mountains.
a little more info: http://www.adranana.com/es/turismo_gr1.asp. http://www.turismoburgos.org/index.php? ... ioma=1&L=1. http://www.valpuesta.org/recorrido2.htm.

there are various pages that deal with the historical and modern routes in the spanish mountains that might be worth a look, eg. http://www.oocities.org/es/rutas_antiguas/#_ftn66#_ftn66. also, there are pages that list the trips/excursions of many people, incl. gps tracks and info on profile, length and hrs of walking, eg. this one for GR 220 around pamplona but search for others: http://es.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/view.do?id=1225023, http://es.wikiloc.com/wikiloc/map.do?#l ... 1&tab=0&a=.

definitely tough shoes and clothing for cold(er) weather, but if you plan carefully, you might avoid the tent. from the look on google terrain map, the terrain is obviously more demanding, although the routes do try to stick to the valleys. except for the mountains, of course.

good luck!
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Caminka and Orion...
Did you walk this camino this year?
If you did, please let us know how it turned out for you!
I started another thread re: this/these caminos, not even realizing I had posted on this one a few months ago. So much more info now! Thanks a ton to everyone, this ought to keep me dreaming all through the winter!

Rebekah
 

caminka

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nope, not yet. next year.

I am currently revising my itinerary (done with italy and in provence right now). I will be here more often when I 'come' to spain as there is not that many info on previous countries. that includes camino invierno and all of laurie's comments.

I read through the second book of vazquez de parga et al. Las peregrinaciones a Santiago de Compostela. a fascinating book, accessible here: http://bibliotecadigital.jcyl.es/i18n/consulta/registro.cmd?id=4145&formato=ficha&aplicar=Aplicar.

I came out with a possible explanation for the name 'viejo'. I think that it might refer to the portion of the main roman road between pamplona and burgos that passes more to the north then the route today. what of the 'camino viejo' north of ponferrada I mentioned in one post above? it might have a totally different origin.

The text of Historia Silensis (c. 1110), where there is the first mention of a pilgrim route in Spain per se, recounts that iter Sancti Iacobi has been secured from the barbarians by Navarrese king Sancho el Mayor from the Pyrenees to castrum Nazara (Nájera) so that peregrini won't have to make a detour via (the land of) Alava. Later Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada (born in Puente la Reina in c. 1170 – 1247 Jun 10), archbishop of Toledo, in De rebus Hispaniae (V, 25) gives the route in more detail: iter Sancti Iacobi quod propter insultus Arabum per Alauam et Asturiarum deuia frequentabant, ab Anagaro per Biruescam et Amaiam immutauit, et per confinia Carrionis donec ad Legionem et Astoricam veniatur (from the course Alava – Asturias to the course Nájera – Briviesca – Amaya – border of Carrión – León – Astorga). This is thought to represent the older route, before it was given the present course by Sancho el Mayor. It is, possibly, what is now known as Viejo Camino, and it followed the course of the roman road from Bordeaux to Astorga, passing Roncesvalles – Pamplona – in Alava the valleys of Araquil and Salvatierra – near Vitoria – across Ebro N of Miranda – Briviesca.
The first possible known traveller on this route was bishop of Oporto who in the 12C travelled from Olorón via Jaca or Estella across Guipúzcoa and Vizcaya per devia montium, vallium atque marium to reach Carrión where he finally encountered publicae viae.

what do you think?

is it possible to relocate this post to a more accessible place? like to the 'other routes to santiago' section? it's a bit of pain searching for it every time.
 
caminka said:
I read through the second book of vazquez de parga et al. Las peregrinaciones a Santiago de Compostela. a fascinating book, accessible here: http://bibliotecadigital.jcyl.es/i18n/consulta/registro.cmd?id=4145&formato=ficha&aplicar=Aplicar.
thanks for this link. I wasn't aware that this was available online. I see they also have the 1927 xlation of Book V of the Codex Calixtinus http://bibliotecadigital.jcyl.es/i18n/c ... .cmd?id=83
plus a 1915 pilgrim's guide to Compostela http://bibliotecadigital.jcyl.es/i18n/c ... md?id=1227

caminka said:
I came out with a possible explanation for the name 'viejo'. I think that it might refer to the portion of the main roman road between pamplona and burgos that passes more to the north then the route today
yes, that's right. The Roman roads remain the backbone of the modern road system to this day. The detour of the Bordeaux-Astorga route via Navarre is well documented, and it's reasonable to assume that pilgrims prior to this used the Roman road, though there's not much documentary evidence from that period.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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Peter Robins said:
I wasn't aware that this was available online.

you have no idea how happy I was when I found that link. the only internet book seller that had it wanted $500!

yeah, roman roads were used well into middle ages wherever they were available. it's the name that is more confusing, and what we today understand under that name. it would require a thourough study to see when the name 'viejo' comes up, where, in what context...

Peter Robins said:
Google maps aren't much use if you don't use roads. Use the IGN maps instead

I do. it's just that, at least in france, many tracks that are marked on IGN are private and blocked, some even don't exist anymore because two fields became one, there are many new roads... I'll yet have to see how this is in spain. and the cams they have on google maps really help with details you just can't pick from a map.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Peter, thank you SO much for listing that link to the maps. They are about five years out of date, but WOW! Superb, and just what we have been looking for online, lo these many years.

I hope I can get back to real life soon.... But how I LOVE maps!
Reb
 

caminka

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I upgraded my description of viejo camino. it's much better now, IMHO.

more detailed, especially the part from la robla to ponferrada which was a bit, er, lacking, distances now usually to/from a village church, main square or some other easily recognizable landmark, fountains listed, all new albergues included (quite a few, actually, although very few pilgrim-only)...

the route from aguilar to cistierna matches the route of camino olvidado (http://elcaminoolvidado.blogspot.com/2011/04/etapa-pendiente-de-reconocer.html) - hopefully there will be further waymarking by the time I will get there!

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1292227/camino files 12/Camino description VIEJO public 12.pdf
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Cervera de Pisuerga and Aguilar are not far from me. Soon as those mountains stop looking so white, I will get up there and have a good look around. There is also a new office opening in Palencia, dedicated to mountain trek tourism... One would hope they would have up-to-date info on the trails up there. I will let you all know what I find.

Reb
 

robermarbe

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1993), Camino del Salvador and Camino Primitivo (2012), Camino Aragonés (2014), Camino Frances (2015)
Hi
Few days ago, I came to spend a few days to the village where my father comes from in the province of León. The name is Quintanilla. I was planning to do the Camino Primitivo but surprisingly I saw that in the door of my house somebody had painted some yellow arrows. I discovered that they belong to the Camino Olvidado. I have changed my mind and instead of the Camino Primitivo I will do the Camino Olvidado from the place where I am. When I finish I will let you know more. I will start this saturday. It is not clear to me if all the route is already marked but anyway it must be impressive. I know this area and the places it goes through are amazing ones.
Cheers
 

caminka

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I've walked viejo camino in august-september 2012. I've enjoyed every part of it, some countryside was truly amazing. but there is limited cheap accommodation (albergues) and sometimes there is only one hostal every 25km or so, so calling in advance and reserving is essential, especially in season!

but, the route I walked, is not all waymarked.

- from Pamplona to Salvatierra there are no waymarks, although this part has most of the albergues
- from Salvatierra to Miranda de Ebro is Camino del Tunel de san Adrian, excellently waymarked with yellow arrows and signposts
- from Miranda de Ebro to Villanueva de la Nia is GR 99 Ruta del Ebro, well waymarked with white-red flashes, round posts and red signposts (here I made some short-cuts on various local PRs and one unwaymarked short-cut from Quintana de Valdeviejo to Pesquera del Ebro)
- from Villanueva de la Nia to Aguilar de Campoo there are no waymarks
- from Aguilar de Campoo to Villafranca del Bierzo is, what is now called, Camino Olvidado or Camino de la Montana or Camino Viejo (which starts in Bilbao if I'm not wrong), and it's mostly well waymarked all the way through (although one badly posted arrow was enough that I ended in Bembibre instead of Losada)

I'll be (re)posting the much corrected description on the net (and the link here) sometime at the start of 2013; camino invierno has the priority here. :)
but if you need any advice or comments before, ask here or send me a PM, I'll be home by next month (smrk!), I'm still on camino frances at the moment.
 

caminka

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aww, reb! :D

so far, I managed to update the accommodatin list for the camino viejo. updating the description is going to take much longer because I have to rewrite and correct practically everything. it's a long route.
there are some new albergues, but some old albergues no longer exist. it always pays to ask for the cheapest bed in hostales, pensiones, casa rurales and hoteles. people are usually nice and helpful. and always call ahead!
there are two to three days with very little accommodation and what there is, is very expensive, so be prepared. that is the stage la robla - pandorado - fasgar - iguena.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_u-gx6K42T7N0pZeVlubDVHa0k/view?usp=sharing

(edited 2018 with the working link!)
 
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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I have a friend from Pamplona who is very interested in doing at least a part of the route this spring. Now I only need Caminka´s guide.. and someone to come and watch the Peaceable while I am away.
A new route to scan and plan through the cold days of winter. Life is good!
Reb.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Caminka,
With your guide, this camino is probably shooting to the top of my 2014 list! I have been able to open your accommodations document, but I can't open the guide you just posted. The message I get is

Error (403)
It seems you don't belong here! You should probably sign in. Check out our Help Center and forums for help, or head back to home.

Am I doing something wrong? Thanks so much for doing this, I can't wait to read it. Laurie
 

caminka

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now it's working? I was in such a hurry to put in up that I forgot to 'url' it. Ifeel so embarassed now.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Still get the same error message.

I was up in that neighborhood today, saw one of the trailer markers east of Aguilar de Campoo. It is spectacular country, full of Romanesque churches, undiscovered jewels.

Reb.
 

caminka

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so it's partly working. I added reb and laure who sent the requests.
but I don't like this solution. I want everyone to have access without me having to grant permission.

I don't get it why the accommodation list and the guide for invierno are working (are they working for you too?) but the description for viejo is not. they are all on dropbox and the links were made the same way!

I'll try again.

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_u-gx6K42T7N0pZeVlubDVHa0k/view?usp=sharing

http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1292227/camino files 12/Camino description VIEJO public 13.pdf
 
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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Wow, what an information-packed document! It should keep me dreaming right into springtime!

Thanks a TON, Caminka! I hope someday I have enough time and energy to do at least "my" stretch of this camino.

Reb.
 

caminka

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Rebekah Scott said:
Wow, what an information-packed document! It should keep me dreaming right into springtime!
ooo, thanks, reb! please let me know if you find any typos. I do read and reread and reread again, but some always slip past.

Rebekah Scott said:
Evidently, a big group from the Leon Amigos group were up on the Viejo in February, hiking a portion in the snow! There are a couple of accounts here, in their latest newsletter:
cool. more people up there the better. looks really beautiful in the snow.
 

caminka

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I thought to post my stages of viejo, to help people organize their camino a little better. my guide purposefully avoids this, to give as much freedom of planning as possible, but I know that sometimes some people prefer a bit less choice (like the popular stages on frances).
and, let's face it, I need a good dose of camino memories! :)

pamplona - villanueva de arakil, 31km via irurtzun
a fairly long day on sometimes difficult former gr21 (waymarks removed). requires some orientation skills. casa rural irigoen with superb treatment, atmosphere, and food. HP for 27E. two houses with blasones with scallops in the village.

villanueva de arakil - monasterio zamartze, 8km
an unplanned stay, excavations in monasterio (roman waystation and medieval graves, some with scallops), and a car visit to santuario de aralar. but monasterio zamartze doesn't usually accommodate people - perhaps that might change in the future? otherwise, I would recommend going as far as alsasua (29km).

monasterio zamartze - puerto de lizarraga, 23km
a majestic day almost literally straight up from huarte arakil to beriain (1000m climb in less then 6km) with a superb view all around, fog permitting, then a solitary and somewhat longish descent to puerto lizarraga. the only water in huarte arakil! hostal in puerto lizarraga 50E per room.

puerto de lizarraga - alsasua, 20km
a walk on panoramic ridge then a descent through beautiful forest to alsasua. in albergue juvenil ring the right bell. 17E.

alsasua - salvatierra, 24km
into the plain of vitoria-gasteiz, past a stunning dolmen. pension hose mari with special pilgrim price, 15E. now there should also be pilgrim albergue. superb tourist info office.

salvatierra - vitoria-gasteiz, 28km
fairly long day if you want to see at least a few must-sees in vitoria (catedral, casco antiguo, museo naipes, many churches). pension la paz, special price 25E. but there is now albergue in the centre.

vitoria-gasteiz - puebla de arganzon, 22km
up and down portillo san miguel. albergue with microwave.

puebla de arganzon - miranda de ebro, 19km
taking care after estavillo to go right (for burgos, not santo domingo de la calzada), then after arminon there are two options, left newer and passing a dolmen, right older and the last kms before miranda not waymarked anymore. both more or less the same in length. albegue juvenil with microwave. BB 11.50E.

miranda de ebro - banos de sobron, 24km
joining gr 99 ruta del ebro. the first canyon. hostal durtzi, 25E.

banos de sobron - quintana martin galindez, 21km
I opted for the road, gr 99 goes up and down the mountains. hostal valle tobalina, 30E. there is now albergue, too, a bit out of town.

quintana martin galindez - trespaderne, 23km
superb bridge, town, castle, panorama of frias, recommended for a rest day. in trespaderne there is only hostal jose luiz, 28E.

trespaderne - quintana de valdevieso, 24.5km
two magical gorges, a fantastic romanesque church, and friendly people. be persistent for a dorm bed in albergue arte y natura, at first they tried to sell me the most expensive double. 18E.

quintana de valdevieso - pesquera de ebro, 23.5km
a superb example of roman/medieval/old raised road, a curious dolmen with a round chambre and a fine view of canon del ebro. casa rural arco, 42E.

pesquera de ebro - orbaneja del castillo, 25km
majestic canon del ebro, very picturesque orbaneja, superb panoramas. casa rural abuelo very friendly and with kitchen, but buy supplies in pesquera. 25E.

orbaneja del castillo - polientes, 18.5km
leaving canon del ebro, another fine romanesque church. friendly pension sanpatiel came with free laundry done by the lady of the house, 30E.

polientes - villanueva de la nia, 16km
there are expensive options further on if this is too short. another fine church. good food in posada cazador, the only in the village, 24E.

villanueva de la nia - aguilar de campoo, 27.5km
leaving ebro and gr 99, not waymarked. after the climb out of the valley vast plains. hotel villa de aguilar in centre, 35E. hostal cortez may be cheaper if they answer the phone.

aguilar de campoo - cervera de pisuerga, 27.5km
joining camino olivdado and yellow arrows. but lost them after quintanilla de corvio, should keep more to the left. in cervera very friendly tourist office. albergue is further 1.5km north and was full. hostal pineda, 20E (ask for low price).

cervera de pisuerga - castrejon de la pena, 21km
including a detour to valle de tosante and an almost roundabout route via traspena de la pena because I wanted to see the cruceiro and the church (which was open!). got a special offer in casa rural uncar, 25E.

castrejon de la pena - guardo, 23.5km
more or less joining the main road. albergue is 1.2km further on the route west of centre, call ahead. in centre pension garmar not too recommended. lodged by a super friendly couple.

guardo - punete almuhey, 15km
after the main road an ok waymarked stretch through woods. friendly casa rural muria, 25E.

puente almuhey - cistierna, 25km
camino goes north to santuario velilla, but I opted for the main road because I had a sick afternoon and night. for albergue key go to ayuntamiento or call a phone number posted on the door.

cistierna - bonar, 23.5km
a short 'detour' south with ruta vadiniense, but the split clearly waymarked. then the route follows a minor road which I eluded by a mountain bike route. in bonar also albergue. hostal ines, 20E.

bonar - la robla, 31km
a long day with lots of main road walking. the second part which is off the road might be blocked because of the new railway construction. for albergue call in advance, or stop by the tourist office (open till 14h), it's 500m north of the route. has kitchen.

la robla - pandorado, 32km
another long day with lots of main road walking. construction of the new industrial buildings at magdalena obliges you to stay on the main road. after leaving the road after riello you need sharp eyes to spot the very few arrows on the first 500m of the climb. call ahead to casa rural resthy to arrange for a two-night stay and transportation back and to fasgar. it has a kitchen. 60E.

pandorado - fasgar (pandorado), 26km
some tracks, still lots of side road. practically no supplies, only two bars on the route, but a few fountains. again casa rural resthy in pandorado, 60E + 30E for the transport.

fasgar - iguena, 20km
a beautiful day up to campo de santiago de martin moro then down, here a bit stony and precarious, to iguena. enough springs. hostal here closed! call ahead for casa rural begona, with kitchen. 30E.

iguena - bembibre, 27.5km
after quintana de fuseros and its fountain a long and lonely stretch to labaniego where all fountains were dry but there were poeple to ask for water. after it watch out for an arrow where you have to descend right to go to losada. I went left and ended in bembibre. hostal carmen, 25E.

bembibre - ponferrada, 18km
I followed the main road because I didn't know there is a much more beautiful path from san miguel de duenas on. albergue in ponferrada has fountain, showers and wcs in the courtyard open all day.
 

navarro

Active Member
Hi!
I've recently done the Portuguese Camino and in Santiago went to a book store and found a litle book with all the Caminos in Spain. And it had this one that I didn't know about.
Does anyone know anything about this "viejo camino"?
Thanks for your reply.
Ovelha


Click on the image to see the full length
 

navarro

Active Member
Hello: There are two routes named as camino olvidado. The first one begins in Bilbao and it is documented and has a defined path.
The other must have link Pamplona to these path at Aguilar de Campoo about 130 miles. This path is in fact forgotten, there are no marks or signals only the tows, villages tat it´s known that the way crossed.
It begins at Pamplona and links historic tows as Vitoria, Frías, Poza de la Sal, Amaya y Aguilar de Campoo very important places in the Middle Age.
Following this places I am trying to know where the path runs with the help of google earth. Sometimes there were old mule-drivers paths that have been disappeared for ever.
 

navarro

Active Member
I thought to post my stages of viejo, to help people organize their camino a little better. my guide purposefully avoids this, to give as much freedom of planning as possible, but I know that sometimes some people prefer a bit less choice (like the popular stages on frances).
and, let's face it, I need a good dose of camino memories! :)

pamplona - villanueva de arakil, 31km via irurtzun
a fairly long day on sometimes difficult former gr21 (waymarks removed). requires some orientation skills. casa rural irigoen with superb treatment, atmosphere, and food. HP for 27E. two houses with blasones with scallops in the village.

villanueva de arakil - monasterio zamartze, 8km
an unplanned stay, excavations in monasterio (roman waystation and medieval graves, some with scallops), and a car visit to santuario de aralar. but monasterio zamartze doesn't usually accommodate people - perhaps that might change in the future? otherwise, I would recommend going as far as alsasua (29km).

monasterio zamartze - puerto de lizarraga, 23km
a majestic day almost literally straight up from huarte arakil to beriain (1000m climb in less then 6km) with a superb view all around, fog permitting, then a solitary and somewhat longish descent to puerto lizarraga. the only water in huarte arakil! hostal in puerto lizarraga 50E per room.

puerto de lizarraga - alsasua, 20km
a walk on panoramic ridge then a descent through beautiful forest to alsasua. in albergue juvenil ring the right bell. 17E.

alsasua - salvatierra, 24km
into the plain of vitoria-gasteiz, past a stunning dolmen. pension hose mari with special pilgrim price, 15E. now there should also be pilgrim albergue. superb tourist info office.

salvatierra - vitoria-gasteiz, 28km
fairly long day if you want to see at least a few must-sees in vitoria (catedral, casco antiguo, museo naipes, many churches). pension la paz, special price 25E. but there is now albergue in the centre.

vitoria-gasteiz - puebla de arganzon, 22km
up and down portillo san miguel. albergue with microwave.

puebla de arganzon - miranda de ebro, 19km
taking care after estavillo to go right (for burgos, not santo domingo de la calzada), then after arminon there are two options, left newer and passing a dolmen, right older and the last kms before miranda not waymarked anymore. both more or less the same in length. albegue juvenil with microwave. BB 11.50E.

miranda de ebro - banos de sobron, 24km
joining gr 99 ruta del ebro. the first canyon. hostal durtzi, 25E.

banos de sobron - quintana martin galindez, 21km
I opted for the road, gr 99 goes up and down the mountains. hostal valle tobalina, 30E. there is now albergue, too, a bit out of town.

quintana martin galindez - trespaderne, 23km
superb bridge, town, castle, panorama of frias, recommended for a rest day. in trespaderne there is only hostal jose luiz, 28E.

trespaderne - quintana de valdevieso, 24.5km
two magical gorges, a fantastic romanesque church, and friendly people. be persistent for a dorm bed in albergue arte y natura, at first they tried to sell me the most expensive double. 18E.

quintana de valdevieso - pesquera de ebro, 23.5km
a superb example of roman/medieval/old raised road, a curious dolmen with a round chambre and a fine view of canon del ebro. casa rural arco, 42E.

pesquera de ebro - orbaneja del castillo, 25km
majestic canon del ebro, very picturesque orbaneja, superb panoramas. casa rural abuelo very friendly and with kitchen, but buy supplies in pesquera. 25E.

orbaneja del castillo - polientes, 18.5km
leaving canon del ebro, another fine romanesque church. friendly pension sanpatiel came with free laundry done by the lady of the house, 30E.

polientes - villanueva de la nia, 16km
there are expensive options further on if this is too short. another fine church. good food in posada cazador, the only in the village, 24E.

villanueva de la nia - aguilar de campoo, 27.5km
leaving ebro and gr 99, not waymarked. after the climb out of the valley vast plains. hotel villa de aguilar in centre, 35E. hostal cortez may be cheaper if they answer the phone.

aguilar de campoo - cervera de pisuerga, 27.5km
joining camino olivdado and yellow arrows. but lost them after quintanilla de corvio, should keep more to the left. in cervera very friendly tourist office. albergue is further 1.5km north and was full. hostal pineda, 20E (ask for low price).

cervera de pisuerga - castrejon de la pena, 21km
including a detour to valle de tosante and an almost roundabout route via traspena de la pena because I wanted to see the cruceiro and the church (which was open!). got a special offer in casa rural uncar, 25E.

castrejon de la pena - guardo, 23.5km
more or less joining the main road. albergue is 1.2km further on the route west of centre, call ahead. in centre pension garmar not too recommended. lodged by a super friendly couple.

guardo - punete almuhey, 15km
after the main road an ok waymarked stretch through woods. friendly casa rural muria, 25E.

puente almuhey - cistierna, 25km
camino goes north to santuario velilla, but I opted for the main road because I had a sick afternoon and night. for albergue key go to ayuntamiento or call a phone number posted on the door.

cistierna - bonar, 23.5km
a short 'detour' south with ruta vadiniense, but the split clearly waymarked. then the route follows a minor road which I eluded by a mountain bike route. in bonar also albergue. hostal ines, 20E.

bonar - la robla, 31km
a long day with lots of main road walking. the second part which is off the road might be blocked because of the new railway construction. for albergue call in advance, or stop by the tourist office (open till 14h), it's 500m north of the route. has kitchen.

la robla - pandorado, 32km
another long day with lots of main road walking. construction of the new industrial buildings at magdalena obliges you to stay on the main road. after leaving the road after riello you need sharp eyes to spot the very few arrows on the first 500m of the climb. call ahead to casa rural resthy to arrange for a two-night stay and transportation back and to fasgar. it has a kitchen. 60E.

pandorado - fasgar (pandorado), 26km
some tracks, still lots of side road. practically no supplies, only two bars on the route, but a few fountains. again casa rural resthy in pandorado, 60E + 30E for the transport.

fasgar - iguena, 20km
a beautiful day up to campo de santiago de martin moro then down, here a bit stony and precarious, to iguena. enough springs. hostal here closed! call ahead for casa rural begona, with kitchen. 30E.

iguena - bembibre, 27.5km
after quintana de fuseros and its fountain a long and lonely stretch to labaniego where all fountains were dry but there were poeple to ask for water. after it watch out for an arrow where you have to descend right to go to losada. I went left and ended in bembibre. hostal carmen, 25E.

bembibre - ponferrada, 18km
I followed the main road because I didn't know there is a much more beautiful path from san miguel de duenas on. albergue in ponferrada has fountain, showers and wcs in the courtyard open all day.
 

navarro

Active Member
I cant understand why you need to climb up to Beriain and later go down to Alsasua. From Zamarze to Alsasua there are, 16 km , 10 miles and very plain.
 

navarro

Active Member
you have no idea how happy I was when I found that link. the only internet book seller that had it wanted $500!

yeah, roman roads were used well into middle ages wherever they were available. it's the name that is more confusing, and what we today understand under that name. it would require a thourough study to see when the name 'viejo' comes up, where, in what context...



I do. it's just that, at least in france, many tracks that are marked on IGN are private and blocked, some even don't exist anymore because two fields became one, there are many new roads... I'll yet have to see how this is in spain. and the cams they have on google maps really help with details you just can't pick from a map.
 

navarro

Active Member
In Spain there are some reasons for explaining the lost of paths.
a) a farmer buys some fiels and get it all in one. Or sometimes grows over the path. The literal trslation for the spanish expression is "he has eaten the path" If nobody pass through it along, or claim for it , (I think the period time is 20 years). The path dessapears. Now with the administrative controls by aereal photographies an informatic programs is difficult to do.
b) The concentration of fields. All the fields in a deteminated area form a pool and the old paths dissapear and new paths are built.
c) The new infraestructures, motorways, channels, reservoirs, railways.
d) the lack of utilisation or use. Specially in areas where people has gone out to live in tows.
I´m preparing a route based on the old map of the beginning and I have had many problems to see the paths. I use Iberpix ( the official map) an Google Earth, but not ever i can see a well defined path.
 

navarro

Active Member
nope, not yet. next year.

I am currently revising my itinerary (done with italy and in provence right now). I will be here more often when I 'come' to spain as there is not that many info on previous countries. that includes camino invierno and all of laurie's comments.

I read through the second book of vazquez de parga et al. Las peregrinaciones a Santiago de Compostela. a fascinating book, accessible here: http://bibliotecadigital.jcyl.es/i18n/consulta/registro.cmd?id=4145&formato=ficha&aplicar=Aplicar.

I came out with a possible explanation for the name 'viejo'. I think that it might refer to the portion of the main roman road between pamplona and burgos that passes more to the north then the route today. what of the 'camino viejo' north of ponferrada I mentioned in one post above? it might have a totally different origin.

The text of Historia Silensis (c. 1110), where there is the first mention of a pilgrim route in Spain per se, recounts that iter Sancti Iacobi has been secured from the barbarians by Navarrese king Sancho el Mayor from the Pyrenees to castrum Nazara (Nájera) so that peregrini won't have to make a detour via (the land of) Alava. Later Rodrigo Jiménez de Rada (born in Puente la Reina in c. 1170 – 1247 Jun 10), archbishop of Toledo, in De rebus Hispaniae (V, 25) gives the route in more detail: iter Sancti Iacobi quod propter insultus Arabum per Alauam et Asturiarum deuia frequentabant, ab Anagaro per Biruescam et Amaiam immutauit, et per confinia Carrionis donec ad Legionem et Astoricam veniatur (from the course Alava – Asturias to the course Nájera – Briviesca – Amaya – border of Carrión – León – Astorga). This is thought to represent the older route, before it was given the present course by Sancho el Mayor. It is, possibly, what is now known as Viejo Camino, and it followed the course of the roman road from Bordeaux to Astorga, passing Roncesvalles – Pamplona – in Alava the valleys of Araquil and Salvatierra – near Vitoria – across Ebro N of Miranda – Briviesca.
The first possible known traveller on this route was bishop of Oporto who in the 12C travelled from Olorón via Jaca or Estella across Guipúzcoa and Vizcaya per devia montium, vallium atque marium to reach Carrión where he finally encountered publicae viae.

what do you think?

is it possible to relocate this post to a more accessible place? like to the 'other routes to santiago' section? it's a bit of pain searching for it every time.
 

navarro

Active Member
In the last 9 C is highly unprobably that "The Camino Viejo" could go trough Briviesca because that area was border between moors and cristians. That is the reason of the route goes more to north. Later the "camino frances is moved to south crossing by Nájera but not going trough Sto Domingo. There is an old way called "camino de los romanos" "route of romans" that goes fro Hormilla , next to Nájera, to Briviesca "via italia in Hispaniam " joining with the way from Vitoria, "ab Astúrica Burdigalam
Later when Sto Domingo built the bridge the route was deviated by Sto Domingo de la Calzada straight to Burgos.
 
J

Julio Santiago

Guest
I thought to post my stages of viejo, to help people organize their camino a little better. my guide purposefully avoids this, to give as much freedom of planning as possible, but I know that sometimes some people prefer a bit less choice (like the popular stages on frances).
and, let's face it, I need a good dose of camino memories! :)

pamplona - villanueva de arakil, 31km via irurtzun
a fairly long day on sometimes difficult former gr21 (waymarks removed). requires some orientation skills. casa rural irigoen with superb treatment, atmosphere, and food. HP for 27E. two houses with blasones with scallops in the village.

villanueva de arakil - monasterio zamartze, 8km
an unplanned stay, excavations in monasterio (roman waystation and medieval graves, some with scallops), and a car visit to santuario de aralar. but monasterio zamartze doesn't usually accommodate people - perhaps that might change in the future? otherwise, I would recommend going as far as alsasua (29km).

monasterio zamartze - puerto de lizarraga, 23km
a majestic day almost literally straight up from huarte arakil to beriain (1000m climb in less then 6km) with a superb view all around, fog permitting, then a solitary and somewhat longish descent to puerto lizarraga. the only water in huarte arakil! hostal in puerto lizarraga 50E per room.

puerto de lizarraga - alsasua, 20km
a walk on panoramic ridge then a descent through beautiful forest to alsasua. in albergue juvenil ring the right bell. 17E.

alsasua - salvatierra, 24km
into the plain of vitoria-gasteiz, past a stunning dolmen. pension hose mari with special pilgrim price, 15E. now there should also be pilgrim albergue. superb tourist info office.

salvatierra - vitoria-gasteiz, 28km
fairly long day if you want to see at least a few must-sees in vitoria (catedral, casco antiguo, museo naipes, many churches). pension la paz, special price 25E. but there is now albergue in the centre.

vitoria-gasteiz - puebla de arganzon, 22km
up and down portillo san miguel. albergue with microwave.

puebla de arganzon - miranda de ebro, 19km
taking care after estavillo to go right (for burgos, not santo domingo de la calzada), then after arminon there are two options, left newer and passing a dolmen, right older and the last kms before miranda not waymarked anymore. both more or less the same in length. albegue juvenil with microwave. BB 11.50E.

miranda de ebro - banos de sobron, 24km
joining gr 99 ruta del ebro. the first canyon. hostal durtzi, 25E.

banos de sobron - quintana martin galindez, 21km
I opted for the road, gr 99 goes up and down the mountains. hostal valle tobalina, 30E. there is now albergue, too, a bit out of town.

quintana martin galindez - trespaderne, 23km
superb bridge, town, castle, panorama of frias, recommended for a rest day. in trespaderne there is only hostal jose luiz, 28E.

trespaderne - quintana de valdevieso, 24.5km
two magical gorges, a fantastic romanesque church, and friendly people. be persistent for a dorm bed in albergue arte y natura, at first they tried to sell me the most expensive double. 18E.

quintana de valdevieso - pesquera de ebro, 23.5km
a superb example of roman/medieval/old raised road, a curious dolmen with a round chambre and a fine view of canon del ebro. casa rural arco, 42E.

pesquera de ebro - orbaneja del castillo, 25km
majestic canon del ebro, very picturesque orbaneja, superb panoramas. casa rural abuelo very friendly and with kitchen, but buy supplies in pesquera. 25E.

orbaneja del castillo - polientes, 18.5km
leaving canon del ebro, another fine romanesque church. friendly pension sanpatiel came with free laundry done by the lady of the house, 30E.

polientes - villanueva de la nia, 16km
there are expensive options further on if this is too short. another fine church. good food in posada cazador, the only in the village, 24E.

villanueva de la nia - aguilar de campoo, 27.5km
leaving ebro and gr 99, not waymarked. after the climb out of the valley vast plains. hotel villa de aguilar in centre, 35E. hostal cortez may be cheaper if they answer the phone.

aguilar de campoo - cervera de pisuerga, 27.5km
joining camino olivdado and yellow arrows. but lost them after quintanilla de corvio, should keep more to the left. in cervera very friendly tourist office. albergue is further 1.5km north and was full. hostal pineda, 20E (ask for low price).

cervera de pisuerga - castrejon de la pena, 21km
including a detour to valle de tosante and an almost roundabout route via traspena de la pena because I wanted to see the cruceiro and the church (which was open!). got a special offer in casa rural uncar, 25E.

castrejon de la pena - guardo, 23.5km
more or less joining the main road. albergue is 1.2km further on the route west of centre, call ahead. in centre pension garmar not too recommended. lodged by a super friendly couple.

guardo - punete almuhey, 15km
after the main road an ok waymarked stretch through woods. friendly casa rural muria, 25E.

puente almuhey - cistierna, 25km
camino goes north to santuario velilla, but I opted for the main road because I had a sick afternoon and night. for albergue key go to ayuntamiento or call a phone number posted on the door.

cistierna - bonar, 23.5km
a short 'detour' south with ruta vadiniense, but the split clearly waymarked. then the route follows a minor road which I eluded by a mountain bike route. in bonar also albergue. hostal ines, 20E.

bonar - la robla, 31km
a long day with lots of main road walking. the second part which is off the road might be blocked because of the new railway construction. for albergue call in advance, or stop by the tourist office (open till 14h), it's 500m north of the route. has kitchen.

la robla - pandorado, 32km
another long day with lots of main road walking. construction of the new industrial buildings at magdalena obliges you to stay on the main road. after leaving the road after riello you need sharp eyes to spot the very few arrows on the first 500m of the climb. call ahead to casa rural resthy to arrange for a two-night stay and transportation back and to fasgar. it has a kitchen. 60E.

pandorado - fasgar (pandorado), 26km
some tracks, still lots of side road. practically no supplies, only two bars on the route, but a few fountains. again casa rural resthy in pandorado, 60E + 30E for the transport.

fasgar - iguena, 20km
a beautiful day up to campo de santiago de martin moro then down, here a bit stony and precarious, to iguena. enough springs. hostal here closed! call ahead for casa rural begona, with kitchen. 30E.

iguena - bembibre, 27.5km
after quintana de fuseros and its fountain a long and lonely stretch to labaniego where all fountains were dry but there were poeple to ask for water. after it watch out for an arrow where you have to descend right to go to losada. I went left and ended in bembibre. hostal carmen, 25E.

bembibre - ponferrada, 18km
I followed the main road because I didn't know there is a much more beautiful path from san miguel de duenas on. albergue in ponferrada has fountain, showers and wcs in the courtyard open all day.

Thank you so very much, what a piece of work. It is very likely that I will walk this Camino next year, the only question is should I bring a tent? I usually walk 40km+ per day, hence accommodation/villages unlikely to be in synchronism with my end-of-the-day all the time.
Que mi Apóstol te dé las Gracias,
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Revisiting this thread, and thinking ahead to 2019.
Thank you again, @caminka , for the abundance of information!
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Thank you for bringing this up, VNwalking! And caminka for so much detailed information! I did not know about this thread - am thinking ahead to 2019 or even 2020 and noting down as much as I can. Found this a few days ago:

http://www.elcaminoolvidado.com/

I think they are the people actually working on the waymarking and should have the latest updates.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
@pelerine, thank you very much for this link!! It's a super resource.

Only one comment to add, because the nomenclature here is a little confusing (someone please correct me if I'm wrong...):
The Olvidado starts in Bilbao, while the Viejo starts in Pamplona. At Aguilar de Campoo the two ways meet and the Viejo/Olvidado continue as a single route to either Ponferrada or Villafranca del Bierzo.
Both ways are marked - from Pamplona and from Bilbao - but I believe by different groups.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Yes, I noticed that they start as two different caminos and come together at Aguilar - p? of the oh, so detailed 53 p. document which caminka published and which I have just printed out for easy reference. The pleasure of planning! Will see what comes off it all! It is a long way off.....
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Only one comment to add, because the nomenclature here is a little confusing (someone please correct me if I'm wrong...):
The Olvidado starts in Bilbao, while the Viejo starts in Pamplona. At Aguilar de Campoo the two ways meet and the Viejo/Olvidado continue as a single route to either Ponferrada or Villafranca del Bierzo.
Both ways are marked - from Pamplona and from Bilbao - but I believe by different groups.

yes, this is correct. although, I am not sure if the camino viejo is the official denomination or not, I hope it becomes. (based on the 10C description of monk gundisalvo.)

Yes, I noticed that they start as two different caminos and come together at Aguilar - p? of the oh, so detailed 53 p. document which caminka published and which I have just printed out for easy reference. The pleasure of planning! Will see what comes off it all! It is a long way off.....

there is also a new guide for olvidado from cistierna onwards from the end of 2017, following the new mountain route. you can find it here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/guide-to-olvidado.52042/.

and I believe laurie mentioned somewhere that ender is writing a new guide for the whole of olvidado.
 
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VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
ender is writing a new guide for the whole of olvidado.
Yes! See this post:
Hola, soy Ender.
De momento no esta señalizado el camino Olvidado desde Pamplona y no tengo pensado señalizarlo.
Si lo esta desde Bilbao.
Hace 2 semanas terminé la señalización por Burgos.
El año pasado termine la señalización de toda la parte de León con sus variantes.
Puedo dejaros una pequeña guía que estoy elaborando pero que aún no esta finalizada.
Seguro que os a servir para hacer este precioso camino.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1WOYKMhxISI9TOBUhuJAhS4uWTob7N161

Esto es de la parte Leonesa.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1Tgoqwis3kTsT-nsB-75qVqieu5lfzkx4

Desde Boñar hay dos variantes una por el valle que nos lleva a La Robla y otra por la montaña que pasa por Vegacervera, el bosque del faedo, los calderones en piedrasechas, lugares especialmente bonitos.
Recomiendo encarecidamente la variante de Vegacervera.
Un saludo a todos y buen camino
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Brillant! Thank you, caminka and VNwalking, for this info. Am copying it all into my Olvidado planning folder for careful reading at a later date.
 

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Camino(s) past & future
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
Now this is the third time I have tried to round up the loose details of this Viejo Camino from the Pamplona start.
With some luck I will take that route some fine day.
Today it was Caminka´s route plan thart gave me new hope !
Thanks...
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Now this is the third time I have tried to round up the loose details of this Viejo Camino from the Pamplona start.
With some luck I will take that route some fine day.
Today it was Caminka´s route plan thart gave me new hope !
Thanks...

you're welcome.
if you need a pdf, pm me or @VNwalking. (my guide has not been updated since 2012, but I assume that not that much has changed.) definitely look into accommodation beforehand, to be sure it's still in business.
you can also look over my wikiloc tracks (caminka), with the obvious exception of the one up to beriain (a real treat and well worth it).
 

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