Search 57,387 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

Virtual/planning thread: Caminos Girona, Catalán, and Aragonés - Part 2: Montserrat - Santa Cilia

Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
This is a continuation of a virtual/planning thread that began at the coast, a little South of the French border. You can find that thread here.

Montserrat is where Gronze starts the Cami Catalan, but of course it can be walked from Barcelona, which is roughly due south.

It looks to be an astonishing place to visit and stay, especially for the museum and the chance to attend Vespers/Lauds.
20210821_142301.jpg

Here is the website of the Abbey:
There is a school associated with the monastery for boys in the choir:
The Escolania de Montserrat is a liturgical choir whose music project focuses on rendering service to the Sanctuary of Montserrat. At the same time, it is a centre for the Christian and moral education for the boys who perform in the choir. Based in the heart of Catalonia, it has revived the centuries-old tradition of a Benedictine school whose origins lie in the 13th century, and is one of the oldest institutions of its kind in Europe.

The boys who attend the Escolania receive a very thorough education during their stay at Montserrat, based on theoretical stdies as well as the practical experience yhey acquire while studying, singing, and travelling.

There is an albergue and a hotel. The former has been closed because of covid, so do check the abbey website for up-to-date information.

It is a piece of cake getting here from Barcelona: take the train and then (!!) a funicular up to the monastery.
FGC trains to Montserrat depart from Barcelona-Plaça Espanya Station every hour from 08.26 am.
The R5 (Barcelona - Manresa) line also links with the Montserrat cable car and rack railway stations.

If you choose to walk, it can be done in two stages. You will find the southern approach to this range of mountains is a challenging climb (the approach is easier from the north)!
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Day 1. Montserrat - Igualada (28.2km)
After the drama and grandeur of Montserrat, the walk today is relatively untaxing, all downhill.

One of the first places we come to is the Ermita de Santa Cecilia (5.5km), which has been turned into an art institute:
Pilgrim rates? I don't know.
It looks beautiful, and has history.
It's about here that we stop backtracking on the way up from Manresa and head west. There are a couple of places to stop for r&r, after this.

So for a break, or alternative stopping points for those who want a shorter first day our options are either:
Sant Pau (14.6km)
As the stage between Montserrat and Igualada is arduous for a first day (33km by google maps) and unless you leave Montserrat fairly early, you might want to look at staying at El Celler de la Guardia, Sant Pau de la Guàrdia (https://elcellerdelaguardia.cat/+34937710323), where they have an albergue in an out building. I contacted them through their FB page. I saw the albergue rooms, which looked comfortable. The innkeeper was very hospitable (and sympathetic, as I had been pickpocketed in the train up to Montserrat from Barcelona). This would break it up to a Sant Pau to Igualada stage of 15km and one of 18-19km from Montserrat to Igualada.
Or Castelloli (19.5km):
On the camino 9 kilometers before Igualada is the town of Castellolí. It has a new albergue with 10 beds although it only has 5 available right now due to covid precautions. It appears to be open. The details you want to know can be found using this short thread:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/new-albergue-in-castelloli.71010/
With a shorter walk you could spend more sightseeing time in Monserrat.

@peregrina2000 warns us of a long slog into Igualada, so be warned. Perhaps it is the contrast to where we just were that makes it feel onerous.

There is an albergue in Igualada, though at present it seems shut because of Covid.
Here are some other options:
for anyone looking for places to stay in Igualada or nearby, here is what I found in addition to the albergue:

Canaletas http://restaurantcanaletes.com/ (has a pensión in addition to the restaurant, but looks to be on the outskirts)
Casa Ramón -- not too much info: http://www.infohostal.com/guia/barcelona/igualada/alojamiento/13992/pension-casa-ramon.html
Casa Gonzalez -- 15 Carrer de Sebastiá Artés (though its google streetview does not look at all inviting)
the hotel America on the north side of Igualada where a single can be had for 48 euro. I have stayed there and, while dated, the room was comfortable and the staff very pleasant. I have also found a more centrally located pension, Casa Gonzalez at Carrer de Sebastià Artés, 15, +34938031153 but it does not look open to me.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
So glad to see you are forging ahead with Part 2!

I don’t have much to add to what you’ve said, except that there is a lot of asphalt. Even though you are walking alongside those amazing rock formations, mountains, whatever they are called, it is asphalt. LT and I walked through Igualada, but I remember that the albergue is across the street from a strange looking castle-like building. It’s a big town with plenty of services.

I have to confess that the next few days of walking are pretty much a blur in my mind. LT and I had arranged to start walking together in Montserrat, and the first few days were a fairly endless stream of conversation as we got to know each other. And after the first few days, we got into the routine of walking out of town together and then off she went. We would reunite either at a coffee break or the end of the day. I have clearer memories of what those days were like since I was alone and paying more attention!
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Even though you are walking alongside those amazing rock formations, mountains, whatever they are called, it is asphalt.
And downhill, which compounds the pounding.

Laurie, do you have any memory of the Ermita de Santa Cecilia? It looks beautiful (Romanesque, natch.)
20210821_194156.jpg
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Past OR future Camino
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
I have passed by the Ermita at Santa Cecilia on my three times through. It is a lovely and human-sized building, but was always closed and no sign of it being open for anything. I took breaks there in its little courtyard/cloister as it was shaded and peaceful. On one occasion I encountered a RC students group from one of the universities, who were having a study and prayer session-- I took a corner for my restorative orange, and they invited me over to talk with them, as they had not run into a Real Live Pilgrim™ before. Several of them spoke English and translated into Castilian (I spoke French with one of the Catalan-speakers and it seemed to be generally understood) and we had an interesting discussion-- one of them was looking at doing the Ignaciano later that year.

As far as the slog into Igualada is concerned, it certainly felt like a slog. The first time I did it was when I walked from Montserrat so after about 7 or 8 hours walking I was not in good shape. This was the time, which I've recounted on another thread, where I encountered some sex trade workers waiting for the shift change at a nearby factory-- one of them, a Bulgarian and former teacher, had very good English and offered me services (specified, but I'll spare readers). I replied that I was a pilgrim and anxious to get to my hotel in Igualada and she replied that there was a discount for pilgrims! Shades of the middle ages. I thanked her for her kind offer but needed to keep moving. Her two other colleagues looked less cheerful but I wished them Buenos Dias on the way into the town.

An acquaintance of mine who helps at a legal clinic in Madrid told me that it was important to have greeted the two other workers, as it is a recognition of their humanity. Too many people give them no courtesy or, I imagine, much worse.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Santa Cecilia was closed when I passed by also. I stayed the night in Castellolí before Igualada. I could not conjure up one memory of Igualada until I checked my pictures. I had only one pic and it was of a silly sign with an elephant but I remember taking it at an engineering college where I stopped to use a restroom. This doesn't say much positive about the town.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Thanks @VNwalking , it's fun to walk down memory lane although I must say that FB reminded me of our Camino not so long ago. It's hard to believe that @peregrina2000 and I met for the first time in Monserrat after several years contact on the Forum.

I started in Barcelona and walked to Monserrat in two days (via Sant Cugat de Valles). The 5 km climb up is to this day the toughest of all my Caminos and that includes both the Salvador and Primitivo!

I don't remember having the endless grain fields bother me as much as Laurie but I must admit that the latter section in Aragón is quite a bit nicer!

Ultreia!
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
it's fun to walk down memory lane
Any useful memories that bubble up as we go along are most welcome!
The 5 km climb up is to this day the toughest of all my Caminos and that includes both the Salvador and Primitivo!
OMG. That's saying something becaise you're no wimp.
Hard because...?
Steep? Rocky? Relentless? Scary? All of the above?

I'd be tempted to take the cablecar. Which is why you are fit and I am less so. 🙃
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I don't remember having the endless grain fields bother me as much as Laurie
Sounds like I was a whiner, and I’ll admit it, I found the endless BROWN DEAD grain fields :p a bit depressing. Some of my best camino memories involve walking through emerald green grain fields, often with big splotches of bright red poppies. It was mid June when we walked, though, not early spring, so I should have been prepared. I would love to do this camino starting from Montserrat in early to mid May.

As far as the Ermita de Santa Cecilia goes, my mind draws a blank. You can conclude from that fact that LT is such an engaging conversationalist that my attention was diverted away from one of my favorite things in the world!
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Sounds like I was a whiner, and I’ll admit it, I found the endless BROWN DEAD grain fields :p a bit depressing.
Same here but in late October and early November the crops had been harvested and the fields plowed. There were many orchards along the way and when the trees are in bloom in spring it must be spectacular.
 

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
OMG. That's saying something becaise you're no wimp.
Hard because...?
Steep? Rocky? Relentless? Scary? All of the above?
I have in fact walked this route up to Montserrat twice. Steep? Yes. Rocky? Yes. Relentless? Certainly. Scary? Perhaps, if you look down in certain areas where there is a narrow path and nothing between you and the long decline to the bottom. Despite all of this, it is a spectacular Camino stage and is highly recommended. I would not say that it was my most challenging day of walking on various Camino routes: that honour belongs to walking the Dragonte.
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Here are two views of Cervera that I captured from afar —- one with mud fields, one with brown stubble fields. I know that’s jumping ahead, but just imagine what those fields would look like in spring!
In fact this is the only route I have ever walked in the springtime (as I prefer to walk in the cooler temperatures starting at the end of September). The fields in the springtime, as you imagined, were awash in glowing colours. Aside from the numerous pink and white blossoms on the local fruit trees, the fields were carpeted with red and orange poppies and yellow mustard blossoms. It was a feast for the eyes to be sure!
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Welcome @lindam!
It's super to have so many people here contributing who have boots on the ground information.

Relentlessly steep. But not unduly scary, unless you're not ok with heights. Got it.
I got curious, so here is more information about the mountains themselves - geology, flora and fauna:

Here's the link to the geological map, for the geophiles among us:
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
just imagine what those fields would look like in spring!
The fields in the springtime, as you imagined, were awash in glowing colours. Aside from the numerous pink and white blossoms on the local fruit trees, the fields were carpeted with red and orange poppies and yellow mustard blossoms. It was a feast for the eyes to be sure
May is when you walked, right, Laurie?
I'd have imagined that to be spring, but maybe April is better. When did you see it like this, Linda?
(I'm hoping @Sitkapilgrim will also chime in, with more boots on the ground impressions.)
 
Last edited:

Faye Walker

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF 2014, CF 2018, CP 2019 from Coimbra
I have been twice to Monserrat. The first time was with my beloved son, in 2007 on a trip that involved work in Barcelona and the chance of a lifetime for him to join me. We were at the highest hermitage on the available walking trail for day visitors and I encouraged him to imagine the mindset of being cloistered there… with nothing between the Monk and his God. Somewhere I have a gorgeous photo of him, curls blowing in the wind coming over the mountain.
We also went to the museum and saw the famous Black Marys that were on display there at the time… the largest scallop shell I’ve ever seen, and gilded too… and we were absolutely lucky to hear the famous Boys’ Choir practicing.
4 years later I went again, but this time with beloved Spouse, and it was, frankly mostly a pilgrimage for the *cheese* made at the monastery; it is called Mato, and I swear that next time I eat it I will walk from Barcelona to Monserrat to have it (embellished with fresh cinnamon and local honey). I cannot recommend it highly enough.
I have returned to rock climbing in the last month (after 18 months away from it) and I sincerely hope to be among those sending the rock above the monastery when I am next there. I will work it in as part of my Camino Catalan. Date undetermined…
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Ah, ok. My mistake! So May, especially early, might be the sweet spot. April is lovely for blooming fruit trees, but Easter makes for more crowded walking.

*cheese* made at the monastery; it is called Mato, and I swear that next time I eat it I will walk from Barcelona to Monserrat to have it (embellished with fresh cinnamon and local honey). I cannot recommend it highly enough.
Oh boy. Another reason to come here. As if we needed one.

And back to Igualada, Laurie is not the only one talking about a challenge it presents:
I stopped for a coffee and snack in Castelloli (Bar Cal Betes on the right) walked the interminable length of Igualada (needing Laurie’s map to find the correct route leading out of town) and walked on to the village of Jorba. I didn’t mind the industrial area approach to Igualada, and the exit through residential areas had interesting modern architecture. It was the middle portion of city that I found challenging, probably because I lost the yellow arrows and just headed west.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Igualaga has a bevy of specialty museums:
Leather, muleteer, and railway - take your pick.

It's also got
Mediaeval walls, amazing church with baroque carved and gilded altar. Lots of modernist, noucentisme and renaixencia architecture. Amazing stained glass in one of the pharmacies. Lots of squares. Arches with shops in covered walk ways. Stunning late C20 cemetery.
(From a Tripadvisor review.)
Here's the town's own website:

Food? Any ideas?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, VN, I had no idea that Igualada had all these interesting places. Just another way in which Catalunya’s wealth reveals itself. Ah, if I ever walk again…..

That leather museum looks very interesting — it’s in an old tannery. Another one for me to add to the thread on museums in industrial sites! The link is to a page in English describing its history.


The RR museum is a model RR museum, in case there are any aficionados out there.

And the Muleteer museum is devoted to (from the website): The Muleteer Museum- Antoni Ros’ Collection explains the evolution of transport of goods or people by using animal energy, and at the same time it shows you the relations among several professions that made possible the development of muleteers’ fact in our region.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Not specific to caminos, but still a wealth of interesting information is this site listing industrial museums in Catalunya, which was a link embedded in the Leather museum site:
 

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
When did you see it like this, Linda?
We began from our home in Barcelona about the second week of May. We had intended to leave earlier but had a surprise visit from a Camino friend from Australia who came to spend a few days with us. Luckily, it was a cooler than usual spring and early summer as I had been somewhat dreading the hot days that would likely be awaiting us as we got closer to Santiago.
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Past OR future Camino
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
Same here but in late October and early November the crops had been harvested and the fields plowed. There were many orchards along the way and when the trees are in bloom in spring it must be spectacular.

I have walked this stretch (three times?? I need professional help) in September, October, and the last days of May, and found the springtime experience exceptional. It was like a combination of a stroll in the Garden of Eden, and an early renaissance painting. The fields were bursting with wildflowers-- I showed some of my photos to a friend with much Life Experience, and he suggested that you should not do this stretch in spring while on pyschedelic drugs. I asked why, and he said that they would not be necessary.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Any useful memories that bubble up as we go along are most welcome!

OMG. That's saying something becaise you're no wimp.
Hard because...?
Steep? Rocky? Relentless? Scary? All of the above?

I'd be tempted to take the cablecar. Which is why you are fit and I am less so. 🙃
It didn't help that it was just my second day and that the climb was after about 30 km (I got lost at one point). I just remember stopping every 100 meters to rest, something I never do when climbing. It was also quite warm if I recall correctly.

By the way, there are several ways up, I managed to find the toughest one 😂
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
As far as the Ermita de Santa Cecilia goes, my mind draws a blank.
That will be because you went on the path that goes past San Benet, on the "official" camino. You can see San Benet from Santa Cecília, about 200m lower down, and hear its melodious bells.

Santa Cecília is very lovely, right under one of the more spectacularly jagged of the sacred mountain's ridges. The "Espai d'art Sean Scully" was closed for covid when I went past. Which was probably a good thing as I've met the artist a couple of times and mildly dislike both him and his (to my eyes) somewhat formulaic abstracts. Never quite got over hearing him claiming to have "inherited the mantle of Mondrian".

San Benet from near Santa Cecília:

IMG_20201020_131852.jpg

Santa Cecília:

IMG_20201020_125450.jpg
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Getting back to getting to Monserrat, I put in a lot of time this morning trying to find a video showing any hike to the monastery from base of the mountain. Of the numerous videos of hiking Monserrat it seems that 95% of them are about the monastery area or getting from there to the peak. But I did find one that shows the way up that I did from Monistrol de Monserrat. There is a bit of drone footage too.
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
That will be because you went on the path that goes past San Benet, on the "official" camino.
Yay, @alansykes is back — we’ve missed you, but you’ve come at the perfect time.

I did not know anything about an alternative to the official camino. And I can’t find any trails of yours in the area on wikiloc. So can you point us in the direction of something showing the routing? Is it a short detour or part of a longer alternative.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
I second the enthusiastic welcome, Alan!
That will be because you went on the path that goes past San Benet, on the "official" camino. You can see San Benet from Santa Cecília, about 200m lower down, and hear its melodious bells.
But now I'm confused, or my map is missing something. Or both.
What you describe looks like something one could do going towards Montserrat from Manresa but not in the other direction:
Screenshot_20210822-230211_OsmAnd.jpg
(Turquoise lines are camino tracks, one leading N to Manresa, the other W to Ingualada: the pointer is Sant Benat, and Santa Cecelia is the other orange marker, almost directly west but higher in elevation.)

Never quite got over hearing him claiming to have "inherited the mantle of Mondrian".
I am censoring my sputtering comment.
(Thank you for the heads-up.)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
But I did find one that shows the way up that I did from Monistrol de Monserrat. There is a bit of drone footage too.


That’s a great video because it shows the actual trail. Did you take a train to Monistrol? Or bus? Surely there is good public transport. I cannot imagine doing it in such heat though.


That will be because you went on the path that goes past San Benet, on the "official" camino. You can see San Benet from Santa Cecília, about 200m lower down, and hear its melodious bells.

What you describe looks like something one could do going towards Montserrat from Manresa but not in the other direction:

AHA! I do remember stopping at a big monastery the day I was walking with the Cervera amigos into Montserrat. Since they were only doing a day trip, many went inside to buy sweets, if I’m remembering correctly.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Except the Francés
I did not know anything about an alternative to the official camino. And I can’t find any trails of yours in the area on wikiloc. So can you point us in the direction of something showing the routing?
I'm sorry, I got confused: your wikiloc that shows your arrival at Montserrat from Manresa went past San Benet, and you left the next for Igualada vía Santa Cecília. I took a route called the camí de les Ermites Romàniques, which goes straight up to Santa Cecília, mostly on GR4 (the northern torquoise line on the screen grab @VNwalking shows) from Manresa.

Sadly I mostly wasn't using wikiloc last autumn, as it seemed to drain my battery with excessive speed. The only one I managed to save was the energetic day from Els Hostalets d'en Bas to l'Esquirol which might be useful to see how not to do it (unless you don't mind walking up a cliff).
 
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
That’s a great video because it shows the actual trail. Did you take a train to Monistrol? Or bus? Surely there is good public transport. I cannot imagine doing it in such heat though.
It also shows that it can be done by most peregrinos. He and his companion did it in a hour and a half in high heat and neither fell off the trail.

I got to Monistrol the hard way. I walked all the way from Barceloneta, and from Terrassa that day.

Almost there:
IMG_20191021_175814.jpg

@VNwalking earlier asked for details of the trip to Monserrat and I intend on supplying them but I have to fight a greater inclination to read posts than write them.

There is great public transportation from Barcelona by train (or maybe it is commuter rail). Use the line R53 to either Aeri de Monistrol or Monistrol de Monserrat just a bit further. From Aeri you connect to the cable car. I think you can get a package deal in Barcelona but that must not be worth it for peregrinos who aren't making the return trip. From the Monistrol station ask for the nearest bridge across the river, get some refreshment and look for the signs pointing to Monistir de Monserrat to take the path shown in the video.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
I assume that this is NOT the way you went up, @LTfit?
If @LTfit walked the same route we did to get up to Montserrat, then no this is NOT the route taken. It looks considerably easier in the video than the trail we followed.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
If @LTfit walked the same route we did to get up to Montserrat, then no this is NOT the route taken. It looks considerably easier in the video than the trail we followed.
The mystery deepens.
It might be a good thing to identify the way you and @LTfit went, to warn off the faint of heart and the less super-fit. If Lee found it hard, it's HARD.
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Learn Spanish for the Camino
Enhance your Camino experience by learning about the Spanish language and culture.
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
It's obviously confusing:
There are at least 5 paths up to Monserrat. 1 starting from Monistrol near the start of the rack railway that splits halfway up into Camí del tres quarts gr-96 and Camí de les aigues gr5, from near the aero/cable car/ gondola, and from Olesa the gr-6, sender de Montserrat, and the gr-5/6.1.
From the thread Laurie mentioned:
I have found that there are three routes from Barcelona to Monserrat. One goes through the valley and the other two through the sierra de Collserola via Sant Cugat and Terrassa. One of these routes is the GR6 and the other is a camino with yellow arrows from the Amics of Terrassa.
Routes: foll0wing the GR 6 entirely from the Laberinto de Horta (outskirts of Barcelona) or a combo of the GR 6 and other marked routes (what I will do).
I started at Laberinto de Horta. Very steep part up then down with rocks.
Up to Monserrat was a bitch especially as I added an hour to an already 34 km walk from Les Fonts.

Also:
And here is the report after walking.
There is lots of great info here if you intend to walk from Barcelona! No need to repeat it all here, but just to enthusiastically recommend this thread for planning purposes.

There is also:
And

Looking ahead again, I stumbled upon this:
After Monserrat though one thing to be prepared for is the first 70kms about 80% (maybe 90%) of the route is on paved road. The roads are fortunately largely devoid of traffic, but it is hard on the feet.
Be warned.
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I have more to add about the way I took up to the Monserrat monastery. I closely watched the video I posted earlier. Just past 1:20 in the video I see the hikers leaving Monistrol by following a sign indicating that they are going up GR5/GR96. A little bit beyond 2:20 in the video I see the staircase for the first time and a sign indicating that the GR5 goes up the stairs. There is also a yellow arrow painted on a nearby rock. As I wrote earlier, this is the way that I went up. Using the terms GR5, GR96 and Monserrat I found a number of Wikiloc tracks.

I posted the video here:

If you go to this place on Google Maps and use Streetview to rotate the image you can see the sign for the trails GR5 and GR96 that lead out of town and up to Monestir de Monserrat.

Carrer de la Font, 13
https://maps.app.goo.gl/oertpwCGg5EeZQhp9
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Yay, Annie! Welcome!!

Day 2. Igualada - La Panadella (22 km)
Many would elect to stay not in Igualada, but 7 km further on in Jorba, which makes for two rather than three days from Montserrat to Cervera. Alternatively, Igualada to Cervera is about 37 km, within the realm of possibility for some of us. But we'll break the day into two shorter ones for the rest of us peregrinos/as tortugas.

Bear in mind that It's relatively flat, so the longer stages are less onerous than we might otherwise imagine. The teo possibilities look like: Montserrat-Jorba-Cervera versus Montserrat-Igualada-La Panadella-Cervera. The two stage version has the advantage of ending each day in an actual village.
As Laurie says:
We also walked from Montserrat to Jorba, rather than stopping in the albergue in Igualada. This was actually on the advice of some members of the Cervera amigos group, and it had the benefit of equaling the days from Montserrat to Cervera (by that I mean that the stages from Montserrat to Jorba and Jorba to Cervera are roughly equal).

But assuming we've stayed in Igualada...
So Jorba, 7km from Igualada, is our first (and most sizeable) stop of the day, with several eating options.

If you elect to walk here in one go from Montserrat and stay in the albergue here, heads-up:
Two years ago, with my daughter.we did the Huesca route and stayed at the Albergue in Jorba, had a fine meal, one of the best three on all the Caminos I've done (( in total).

This year, I walked 34/35 km from Montserrat to Jorba, rather then stopping mid-way, to enjoy a fine meal again. Surprise! "Rick" the hospitalero said that since I was the only perigrino, it wasn't worth his while to prepare a meal. Last time there was only the two of us. This time, he also caters to large parties (this time a First Communion party for local children and their families) he was just finishing this event. He remembered me from the last time, We both are chefs, but still no meal. He said go to a restaurant in the village - they don't start preparing meals until 9, only snacks. The point being, why advertise on your price list meals are offered, and then refuse because not enough.
We also arrived (on a Saturday to be fair) kand the priest was obviously much more interested in feeding his communion dinner than taking care of us In fact, he told us that the opening time was 6 pm (that's true, Eroski says that though we hadn't seen it), but he let us in so we could shower and go down the road to the restaurant.

It would have been absolutely no problem to serve us leftovers after the dinner was over, but oh well. I think the problem is that his "dinner business" has gotten pretty big and he now doesn't have as much interest in us pilgrims. But the place was clean and it did give us a much better walk into Cervera the next day.

Here are the other eating possibilities in Jorba:
Bares, restaurantes y tiendas (including a large Bon Area up at the truck stop) a pie de carretera. Small, friendly local bakery. Bar/restaurante La Gallega, Ctra. N-II. Tel. 938-078-014 (Marisa. Cerrado los domingos). Albergue juvenil y de peregrinos en la antigua rectoría. Plaça de la Font, 3 (24 plazas) Tels. Josep 651-344-7438 y 938-094-101. 10 euros, good kitchen (equipped with cooktop and fridge), welcoming host with a free bottle of wine but not usually available until 6 pm. Try calling ahead to get in sooner. El hostal Jorba (sin habitaciones) (Tel. 938-090-052) está a 4,3 km pasado el pueblo y siguiendo el camino.

About 7km farther along from Jorba ww come to Santa Maria del Cami:
The church of Santa Maria del Camí, located in the municipality of Argençola, was initially the chapel of a hospital located at the foot of the old royal road of Aragon (Wikipedia)
It sounds like this has been replaced by a modern strucure. Right nearby is the Ermita Mare de Déu del Camí, with a curious round window visible from the street. Apparently it's used as an agricultural warehouse.

In SMdC, Google maps shows a place to eat (Can Llobet takeaway) and a B&B (Can Llobet Turisme Rural Bed and Breakfast).

Then we continue roughly parallel to the Careterra, sometimes following it closely, sometimes deviating a bit until we get to La Panadella. It has:
Varios bares y restaurantes. El hostal Bayona (Tel. 938-092-011) hace descuento a los peregrinos (40 euros double and 22 euros single) en el menú y en el alojamiento.

There's obviously not much here as it's basically a highway rest stop. Eat and sleep will be our entertainment tonight, and writing up our day's impressions to post on the Forum. 🙃
 
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I don’t have much to add to what you’ve said, except that there is a lot of asphalt. Even though you are walking alongside those amazing rock formations, mountains, whatever they are called, it is asphalt.
That was partially to blame for a problem I experienced on the way to La Panadella where my left knee often gave way. It dropped me to the ground three times. I had well broken-in boots and an arch support and had walked many training miles with them. Finally I tried a trick I had used before for a different problem and stuffed tissue under the insole to reinforce the arch support. The next day went way better and I had no problems during the rest of the walk.
 
Last edited:
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
There's obviously not much here as it's basically a highway rest stop.
You are 100% right about that one — La Panadella has a few streets emanating off the intersection with the rest stop but none looked very enticing or even habitable. But the café itself was just fine. We coincided with a busload of school kids headed to Barcelona to fly to Menorca, I believe, for a school trip. Some of the girls wanted to practice English and insisted that I take a picture and send it to them. Since this all happened in 2015, I would be surprised if I was able to figure that out, but maybe I did.

EDD73949-323D-4242-AD43-09FA392A7A56.jpeg
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
There's obviously not much here [in La Panadella] as it's basically a highway rest stop. Eat and sleep will be our entertainment tonight, and writing up our day's impressions to post on the Forum. 🙃
Neighboring the Hostel Bayona is the Hostel Parada. The Parada is no longer in the business although the sign remains up.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
La Panadella has a few streets emanating off the intersection with the rest stop but none looked very enticing or even habitable
Turns out this place has a past.
Nearby there's the Torre de la Panadella, that guarded the low col and the East-West road here.

It's a ruin now, but
In 1242 Guillen de Pujalt gave it as a testament to the monastery of Santes Creus, a donation that was confirmed and ratified by Guillen de Cervera in 1252. In 1325 the place and term belonged to the king.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Day 3. La Panadella - Cervera (15.9 km or alt. route 15.1)
Today we pass through a string of villages:
Pallerols (4.3 km),
Sant Antoli i Vilanova (5.9 km),
Els Hostalets (6.5 km),
and Sant Pere dels Arquells (9.2 km).

The way looks straightforward, more or less following the Autovia on its southern side.
@peregrina2000 said this about the day:
The next 15-18 kms to Cervera [from La Panadella] were extremely nice, through a few towns with very nice restored churches, plazas and fountains, nice wooded areas, some of the time on agricultural paths.

At Sant Pere dels Arquells, the camino ducks across to the other side of the autovia, but at this point it is also possible to follow the PR-C 141 which heads more directly to Cervera, over hill and dale an alternative that is quieter and 0.8km shorter (Edit. Map in next post).

There are a number of small (and old) churches along the way:
Sant Jerome de Pallerols
20210824_152312.jpg

Off the camino to the right a little way before Sant Antoli Vilanova is the village of Pomar, with Sant Pau de Pomar.
Sant Pau is a church in the center of Pomar (Segarra) protected as a cultural asset of local interest . There are no documentary references to the church before 1300, although there is information about this place and the castle of Pomar since 1101. Due to the precariousness of construction, the bells were removed about forty years ago.
20210824_150208.jpg

In Sant Antoli i Vilanova, the Església de Sant Isidre is off the camino on the lefthand side; it dates from the 11th C. (the more modern Esglesia Sant Antoli is right on the camino):
The original construction of this church had a single nave structure, topped with a semicircular apse and an access door to the south wall. Between the 14th and 15th centuries, a second nave was added on the south side, which annulled the old Romanesque access door and a north façade was opened.
20210824_151757.jpg 20210824_151818.jpg 20210824_151836.jpg

Also of interest in Sant Pere dels Arquells is an old mill right in the middle of the village, the Moli Sant Pere:
20210824_142323.jpg
The church in the village dates to the 11th C.
Nearby is a place to stay:
Ca La Marga
Carrer Sant Pere, 10, 25213 Sant Pere dels Arquells, Lleida

In addition to a the churches, we walk through a gauntlet of small ruined castles:
First, on our left at the top of Sant Antoli is the (wait for it...) Castell de Sant Antoli. It's from the 11th C, but is not much to look at.

Then to our right right after the crossing if we elect to follow the camino across the careterra is the more imposing Castell de Timor.
20210824_144526.jpg 20210824_144602.jpg
This website prefaces its description with this warning:
Very damaged. Accessible, although it is quite dangerous to walk around the ruined interior of this building, as it is not at all unlikely that something falls on our heads, or the floor we step on collapses.
Don't say you weren't warned. 😁
Here's part of their description:
Currently the site is completely abandoned and in a dilapidated state. Its origin is in a castle documented from the 12th century , on which this 17th or 18th century farmhouse was built, inhabited until the second half of the 20th century.

Finally, what's left (not a lot) of the Castell de Montpaó is on a hill just past Sant Pere de Arqiells; we can check this out from the PR-C 141 (it's the intermeduate point on the map in the next post):
Located at the top of the hill, surrounded by vegetation and in a dilapidated state, we are presented with the remains of two types of terraced structures. On one side to the west, there is a broken wall filled with irregular stone and mortar, of strong power.

On the high side, located in the highest area there is a semicircular structure of apparatus better formed by ashlars, which is part of the structure of a defensive tower.

The Montpaó lineage appears documented from the year 1112, and soon linked to Sant Pere dels Arquells.

The remains found in this place tell us about two different construction moments. The defense tower built in the 11th century and the remains of the demolished wall correspond to an old farmhouse from the 17th or 18th century, which has been abandoned and demolished throughout the 20th century. ”

Cervera is a bigger place than all the hamlets we've walked through, with an albergue and a very friendly group of amics (see @peregrina2000's comment above).

I haven't gotten much further than this in terms of information about places to stay; depending on the vets amongst us to chime in with food and accommodation suggestions!
 

Attachments

  • 20210824_150208.jpg
    20210824_150208.jpg
    518.3 KB · Views: 1
  • 20210824_150235.jpg
    20210824_150235.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 5
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Here's a map of that alternative route in purple; camino tracks are in turquoise):
Screenshot_20210824-170331_OsmAnd.jpg

And here are a few exerpts from @peregrina2000 's post about the day, and Cervera, which sounds like a nice place.

Getting into Cervera requires heading up a pretty steep bunch of steps to the old fortified town, and finding the streets that are hidden and somewhat tunnel-like. The mysterious atmosphere added to the tradition of witches and witchcraft in the town, which has been exploited by the town for touristic purposes
The albergue in Cervera is very nice. It is in the Residencia de la Sagrada Familia, where some nuns still live. Pilgrims have a huge section of one floor, which consists of a long hallway with private curtained off individual rooms, and bathrooms and showers at the end. This was the place where the novitiates used to live, but my bet is there have been no novitiates here for decades. The sisters remaining are extremely gracious and kind, some must be well into their 90s. 10€
Bonpreu grocery story (a cooperative) with good prices and quality.
 
Last edited:
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have a very hard time comparing maps on different websites, and cannot do an overlay, so I can’t offer any comments about the differences between the possible alternative and the official waymarked route. I remember that as we were getting close to Cervera, LT was a bit annoyed, I think, that my GPS insisted we walk along the side of some plowed field. To this day I have no idea if we were on the right track or if this was one of my many newbie challenges using the GPS. This was my second year trying to use it, and Gunnar wasn’t at the ready on the phone from Belgium to help. So I had some difficulty. (doing this day by day is bringing them all back to me, a rehashing of my GPS failures!)

But the amics of Cervera have posted a track and that would be the one I would follow if I were going today.


Lots of private places, but the albergue is very nice. The old novitiates wing. And Gronze does not show it as closed for covid.

AC738956-EEE4-44F6-BEAC-5D3C38F2A317.jpeg B838EB06-B80A-4E27-9F3A-DB3C855CEF66.jpeg
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
But the amics of Cervera have posted a track and that would be the one I would follow if I were going today
It's a bit of both, taking you to the Castell de Montpaó, as on my purple line, but then going closer to the autovia again rather than heading to the PR-C 141 from there. I can't take a screenshot, but if you use the topographic overlay on Wikiloc, it shows the PR-C 141 as a dashed pink line, a straighter shot to Cervera. There must be a reason the amics go the zig-zaggy way, but it's not clear on the map.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Getting back to getting to Monserrat, I put in a lot of time this morning trying to find a video showing any hike to the monastery from base of the mountain. Of the numerous videos of hiking Monserrat it seems that 95% of them are about the monastery area or getting from there to the peak. But I did find one that shows the way up that I did from Monistrol de Monserrat. There is a bit of drone footage too.
I have hiked from the Monastery to the peak. It was a beautiful hike! Good trail. Looking forward to walking the entire route to Pamplona. Hope to figure out how many days it will take me to get to the Aragones Route from Montserrat doing stages around 22k or less each day. Thanks so much for this thread!
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Just putting this here as a placemarker moving us along - but I have gathered no information yet. Please stay tuned! Or feel free to chime in. No-one who's walked this route seems to have many recomnendations about places to eat - does this mean nothing stands out in your memories?

Day 4. Cervera - Linyola (36.8 km)
(@AJGuillaume, pkease don't be concerned: there are shorter stage alternatives: Tarrega 12.4, or off camino Vilagrassa 15.7)
The Vilagrassa stop is along the leg of the Cami Catalan headed to Zaragosa; it would be very easy at this point to cut over to the northern leg we are following.
 

AJGuillaume

Pèlerin du monde
Past OR future Camino
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Day 4. Cervera - Linyola (36.8 km)
(@AJGuillaume, pkease don't be concerned: there are shorter stage alternatives: Tarrega 12.4, or off camino Vilagrassa 15.7)
Thank you @VNwalking , my darling slow walker would have asked me to investigate short stages. ☺️
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Thank you @VNwalking , my darling slow walker would have asked me to investigate short stages. ☺️
Your wish is my command, @AJGuillaume!

Here are a few accounts of the day harvested from people's threads here on the Forum:
General impressions:
This was not a terribly inspiring walk, but it was almost all off road.
Flattish land with cereal crops, some flooded with irrigation water. Almond trees in bloom

12km takes us to Tarrega, and it looks likek a great place to have second breakfast:
There is a great “self-service” pastry shop/café on the right just 3 blocks before turning off the main Rambla street in Tarrega to the right onto the Huesca route. There is a rather fancy frutería opposite on the left. I recommend the café.

Be mindful of where you are going, because Tarrega is where the two variants of the Cami Catalan split! We will take the right fork toward Huesca/Jaca. But if you want to stay the night in Vilagrassa, take the left here:
This is also where the Camino Catalán splits -- left to Lleida/Lérida, then Zaragoza and Logroño, and to the right, Huesca, San Juan de la Peña and onto the Aragonés at Santa Cilia de Jaca.

Linyola2.jpg

If you intend to stay here in Tarrega, there is an albergue:
First part to Tarrega, where there is a new albergue, supposedly very nice, in an old home donated by its now deceased owner for use as an albergue.
El albergue Ca n’Aleix (Pl. del Carme, 5. Tel. 973-314-635) hace descuento a los peregrinos. Es necesario reservar con antelación. (No accesible durante la Fira del Teatre en septiembre) Reservation needed. Look for the sign "Ca n'Aleix" on the building, which is next (left of) to an ATM (Caixa bank?) and is at the far end of the placa from the split of the camino where you first entered the placa. We didn't have any luck searching the address "Pl. del Carme, 5".
or a more upmarket alternative:
Pension Habitaciones Sant Pere Claver, C. Sant Pere Claver , 15, open 13h , 44 euros double. Habitaciones Maria Sole, Ave. Raval del Carme, 77, first floor, 30 euros double 680 771 975.

Away from the main drag after Tarrega, there are several small villages we walk through, with some options for refreshment:
In A Fuliola, we had a nice stop for a cold drink,
137,4 9,9 Tornabous
Bares.

140,9 3,5 La Fuliola
Bares y tiendas de comestibles. Restaurante en la carretera.

144,8 3,9 Ermita del Remei
Bar-restaurante.
This last place., Castell del Remei looks like a flash bodega:
Welcome to Castell del Remei, a property which has been a strategic settlement throughout history and today has the most ancient winery of fine wines in Catalonia,

Here we can take a detour to the left to go to the village of Valverd, off the camino about 3km. Here there are two possible accommodations:
Casa Rural La Mascura
Mascia Cal Bola
A further km or so brings us to a refuge for waterbirds, Estany d'Ivars Vila-Sana. I'm going!
This is a short side trip and well worth the extra steps; Valverd is also a very pleasant alternative to staying in Linyola. You can drop your pack in there at the CR, and stroll to the lake with only your binoculars, field guide. and camera.

Here's a map of the detour as far as Valverd. You can see the lake just South of the village:
20210826_164854.jpg

In Linyola there is old-school pilgrim accommodation!
In Linyola, there is no albergue and no private accommodation, but Josep Caba offers acogida (shelter) to pilgrims in his old complex of farming buildings (the farm seems to have been eaten up by modern development but the little set of buildings and unused farm implements are still there). He is an extremely nice man, offers this as a favor, wants no money, and we were very grateful.
Calle Anselmo Clave 11 (Tel. 973-57-50-30 or 626-66-35-45) Daughter’s phone (apparently the one to call): 696725326.
Heads-up, though, because it may not always be available:
The albergue in Linyola often has agricultural workers staying there--- when you call, you will find out if this is the case at the time. Two other alternatives in the pueblo,
but there are alternatives:
Habitaciones Piñol, where a very basic room cost me 15€ in 2007, and a posh but very comfortable casa rural, Cal Rotes, where I was able to get a midweek rate of 50€ after some discussion--- the spa is extra.
In Linyola I had meant to sleep in el señor Josep Caba’s refugio, unheated and with no blankets, but I met 2 other pilgrims in the streets in Linyola who asked me to share the cost of the 3 bed apartamento turistico. So that is what I did.
Apartamento turístico con precios especiales para peregrinos: Teresa Pinyol (Tel. 679-183-943). Friendly local woman greeted us on the church square with a gift of walnuts and freshly baked empanadas. A real welcome gift on a long Sunday!
 
Last edited:

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Just putting this here as a placemarker moving us along - but I have gathered no information yet. Please stay tuned! Or feel free to chime in. No-one who's walked this route seems to have many recomnendations about places to eat - does this mean nothing stands out in your memories?

Day 4. Cervera - Linyola (36.8 km)
(@AJGuillaume, pkease don't be concerned: there are shorter stage alternatives: Tarrega 12.4, or off camino Vilagrassa 15.7)
The Vilagrassa stop is along the leg of the Cami Catalan headed to Zaragosa; it would be very easy at this point to cut over to the northern leg we are following.
I have walked this route a few times with my husband. As we prefer to prepare our own meals along the way (using either the kitchen facilities made available to us or the small stove we carry with us), I can't comment on suggested places to eat. Other than in some of the larger communities on this route, it would likey be dificult to find local options. There were often days when we had to be sure to carry all food supplies as there were no options for purchasing groceries while en route.

If one choses to stay in Tarrega, I can hghly recommend an Airbnb where we have stayed twice: <div class="airbnb-embed-frame" data-id="20351005" data-view="home" style="width:450px;height:300px;margin:auto"><a href="https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/203510...45b-829c-d91f1b09167a&amp;source=embed_widget">View On Airbnb</a><a href="https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/203510...45b-829c-d91f1b09167a&amp;source=embed_widget" rel="nofollow">Habitación con encanto centrico</a><script async="" src="https://www.airbnb.com/embeddable/airbnb_jssdk"></script></div>. The place is spotless, has a lovely private terrace and the host is warm and friendly, providing anything you might want as a pilgrim. The second time we stayed at her place, she presented us with slices of coca as a welcome back upon our arrival.
 

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
lindam said:
El albergue Ca n’Aleix (Pl. del Carme, 5. Tel. 973-314-635) hace descuento a los peregrinos. Es necesario reservar con antelación. (No accesible durante la Fira del Teatre en septiembre) Reservation needed. Look for the sign "Ca n'Aleix" on the building, which is next (left of) to an ATM (Caixa bank?) and is at the far end of the placa from the split of the camino where you first entered the placa. We didn't have any luck searching the address "Pl. del Carme, 5".

It is important to be aware that the above facility is not currently open to pilgrims (as a result of Covid). This may change but I did note about a month ago that it was still not an option as a place to stay in Tarrega.
 
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
The place is spotless, has a lovely private terrace and the host is warm and friendly, providing anything you might want as a pilgrim. The second time we stayed at her place, she presented us with slices of coca as a welcome back upon our arrival.
Lovely to have another option! And a very pilgrim-friendly one! Gràcies, @lindam !

And yes, thank you...at this time it's prudent to contact any accommodation to make sure it's open.
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
It's obviously confusing:

From the thread Laurie mentioned:




Also:

There is lots of great info here if you intend to walk from Barcelona! No need to repeat it all here, but just to enthusiastically recommend this thread for planning purposes.

There is also:
And

Looking ahead again, I stumbled upon this:

Be warned.
While I’ve been lost on every Camino I walked on except the Primitivo (and the single stage of the Portugues I walked), so clearly not a good judge, trying to get to Monserrat wins for overall failed attempts to get there from here. I got lost twice getting to monistrol before finally accepting offer of ride to train so I could go back to my hotel in Barcelona. Two different days of taking train back to monistrol to try to climb, getting lost part way up, retracing steps, getting pointed to a different path by local, getting lost and repeat. I think my final success route is similar to the one on the video Rick posted but I couldn’t swear to it—I remember more stairs but it may have just felt like it…and being really glad I wasn’t going to have to walk DOWN off the mountain as once I was done exploring I was taking the cable car. I was also glad no one was walking in the opposite direction as I wouldn’t want to squeeze past in some parts…although at those points I may have been off the route.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Oh no, a road spilt. Someone please watch for my backpack happily moving down the wrong path and call me back 😱
I can’t figure out how to post old photos that are stored in the old google/picasa archive. Does this link work? If so, it shows you the split. I would not say it is very well done.

 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
I can’t figure out how to post old photos that are stored in the old google/picasa archive. Does this link work? If so, it shows you the split. I would not say it is very well done.

Didn’t for me but I suppose the worst that could happen is I end up 7km off the way and someone turns me around. Wouldn’t be the first time 🙄
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
I can’t figure out how to post old photos that are stored in the old google/picasa archive. Does this link work? If so, it shows you the split. I would not say it is very well done.

@VNwalking kindly posted the picture from your thread. I probably will miss that column all together 🙄 most of the time I got lost was in cities, sensory overload. One spectacular exception was in the woods on the Norte in April, when my guidebook told this SoCal beach-town raised pilgrim to be sure to turn at the two beech trees 🙄
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Didn’t for me but I suppose the worst that could happen is I end up 7km off the way and someone turns me around. Wouldn’t be the first time 🙄
So can anyone tell me how to take a picture off the google photos online archive and post it? When I click on it, the “save photo” option comes up, but it doesn’t actually goes to my photos, all it does is save the link, which apparently no one else can see.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
@VNwalking kindly posted the picture from your thread. I probably will miss that column all together 🙄 most of the time I got lost was in cities, sensory overload. One spectacular exception was in the woods on the Norte in April, when my guidebook told this SoCal beach-town raised pilgrim to be sure to turn at the two beech trees 🙄
Oops, I posted before reading the next installment. Where did VN post that picture? I can’t seem to find it.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
can anyone tell me how to take a picture off the google photos online archive and post it? When I click on it, the “save photo” option comes up, but it doesn’t actually goes to my photos, all it does is save the link, which apparently no one else can see.
One quick way is to take a screenshot of it.
I don't use google photos online archive so I'm no help. But presumably you can downloa it? @Rick of Rick and Peg and @Doughnut NZ will know.
Just in case I added the pic to the quote. It seemed important!
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Slices of coca? That should help with the walking.
Coca: A Catalan speciality, can be either sweet or savoury. A thin crust topped with a variety of different ingredients such a grilled peppers, aubergine, anchovies, tomatoes, etc. Sweet coca is generaly topped with candied fruits and pine nuts or almonds. The gift of a savoury version was a welcome treat at the end of a Camino stage.
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Past OR future Camino
2022
I can’t figure out how to post old photos that are stored in the old google/picasa archive. Does this link work? If so, it shows you the split. I would not say it is very well done.

Eggbert_0005.jpg
I downloaded this photo from an old picasa album via the photo archive. I might go back and write down what I did a bit later but I just followed the instructions.

I did have to "touch" the photo about 3-4 times, each time going down another level in the archive until I got to the actual photo.

Perhaps that is what you need to do. Keep touching the photo until this no longer changes anything and then click the menu on the right side and choose download.

Edit: That is Bruce, btw, a beautiful champagne coloured cat that just turned up and adopted us one day. We did try to find his owners but were unsuccessful and so he lived out the rest of his life with us and is buried under one of our lemon trees
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Past OR future Camino
2022
So can anyone tell me how to take a picture off the google photos online archive and post it? When I click on it, the “save photo” option comes up, but it doesn’t actually goes to my photos, all it does is save the link, which apparently no one else can see.
Your photo should also be much easier to find at https://photos.google.com/
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Coca: A Catalan speciality, can be either sweet or savoury. A thin crust topped with a variety of different ingredients such a grilled peppers, aubergine, anchovies, tomatoes, etc. Sweet coca is generaly topped with candied fruits and pine nuts or almonds
Like pizza, @lindam ? And can it be found in bars or restaurants, or is it one of those things you only make at home?
 

Doughnut NZ

From Aotearoa New Zealand
Past OR future Camino
2022
View attachment 107759
I downloaded this photo from an old picasa album via the photo archive. I might go back and write down what I did a bit later but I just followed the instructions.

I did have to "touch" the photo about 3-4 times, each time going down another level in the archive until I got to the actual photo.

Perhaps that is what you need to do. Keep touching the photo until this no longer changes anything and then click the menu on the right side and choose download.

Edit: That is Bruce, btw, a beautiful champagne coloured cat that just turned up and adopted us one day. We did try to find his owners but were unsuccessful and so he lived out the rest of his life with us and is buried under one of our lemon trees
Oops wash my mouth out! That is Eggbert. A different ginger male who also adopted us but much earlier while I was in my early 20's.

Smartest cat I knew, he used to hangout on my road going motorcycle and had taught himself to urinate down the plug hole in the bathtub.

Here he is in context.
Eggbert_0001.jpg

Edit: Sorry but my foray into the picasa photo archive sent me off on a trip down memory lane.
 
Last edited:

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Oh dear, we are straying far from the Camino. Please members, keep it on topic or take it to PM.
 
Learn Spanish for the Camino
Enhance your Camino experience by learning about the Spanish language and culture.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

lindam

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, VDLP, Invierno, Portuguese, Madrid, Ingles, Fisterra, Muxia, Catalan/Aragones/Loyola Norte
Like pizza, @lindam ? And can it be found in bars or restaurants, or is it one of those things you only make at home?
Yes, similar to pizza. You would be most likely to find it in bakeries. As is is best when fresh, in order to retain the slight crispiness to the crust. I do not know if you would find it in restaurants or bars but perhaps in cafes where you might see it on display along with other pastries. Regional variations exist, I love the Catalan type.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Regional variations exist, I love the Catalan type.
I see what you mean.
Looking around at some of the recipes online, it looks like you can buy the base ready made. How to have fun in an albergue!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Your photo should also be much easier to find at https://photos.google.com/
Very off topic, but Bruce is gorgeous, @Doughnut NZ ! Thanks for the tutorial. Did it work @peregrina2000?

Yes, look, I will insert it myself! I guess I have never been to that site, because I saw that my many thousands of photos have a scrollable year timeline over on the right side that makes it all so easy!

C475CDD5-E3CD-4E2E-BCBA-3B4FD1AAB008.jpeg

Since this photo has now been posted multiple times no forum member now has any reason to wander onto the wrong branch of the camino at this crucial intersection.

Thanks again to the kind members who regularly provide help when I hit the tech wall.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
Since this photo has now been posted multiple times no forum member now has any reason to wander onto the wrong branch of the camino at this crucial intersection
Wanna bet? ;)
I might miss it scanning for pastellerias, or places to find cocas. Paying attention will be important.....
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
One quick way is to take a screenshot of it.
I don't use google photos online archive so I'm no help. But presumably you can downloa it? @Rick of Rick and Peg and @Doughnut NZ will know.
Just in case I added the pic to the quote. It seemed important!
Well it certainly is unless one of our virtual band wants to be assigned to keeping an eye on me as I follow a bunny in the wrong direction

edit: although I suppose it can be the same person assigned to keeping me from knocking on doors looking for a key to the little locked church 🙄
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
We're escaping a heat wave at home by camping in the mountains where internet access is sparse. I'm writing this in camp to dispatch in case a hike brings us to a signal. I'm assuming the posts have come to Linyola. I'll likely be posting this without reading any posts since my last one.

In Linyola Sr. Josep Caba has set up an albergue in an agricultural compound he has in town, a gate leading to an open area surrounded by buildings. Upstairs in one he has about a half dozen beds and a kitchen area. When I was there most beds were damp and musty but mine was fine. I can't remember what I had for dinner that night, maybe I had a big lunch on the way, anyway I didn't examine the kitchen and I can't report on it. The toilet and shower room downstairs was in fine condition. In the map I hope to be able to attach you can see that you will not be far from the town plaza where you can find places to eat.

Sr. Caba lives a walk aways from his albergue but he checks you in at his home so don't do what I did and call him when you get to the compound, it will double his walk. Near his home is the bar Josep Planes Gispert. On my way out of town in the morning some patrons outside, seeing that I was a pilgrim, told me that Sr. Caba was inside having breakfast with friends in the back. Of course I went in to thank him for his hospitality but the point I want to make is that this bar would be a good place to meet Sr. Caba. Try to call before getting to town and if you catch him suggest the bar as a meeting spot. If you don't contact him before reaching town then go to the bar and ask if he is there. If he isn't then make a call from there. Still no luck? Have something there and call again.

On the satellite map I hope to attach the orange-yellow line is Rocjumper's Wikiloc track through Linyola. I'm not sure if it was following any yellow arrows. The colored dots were added by me. The top red-orange one is at the town plaza, the lower green dot is at the bar Josep Planes Gispert and the lowest magenta dot is at Caba's compound.

Bar: Carrer Pons i Arola, 32, Linyola
Compond: Carrer Anselm Clavé, 9, Linyola

I don't have Sr. Caba's telephone number to add here at the moment but it is available on the Gronze website. I don't know if he speaks English but he does understand broken Spanish.

While I was the only pilgrim checked into the place I was not the only one staying there. In the middle of the night I heard someone coming up the stairs. "Quien es?" In English the response was from a grandson of Sr. Caba's. He was in town and sleeping off a drunk. In the morning I reported the visit and with the perfect comedic timing of a sit-com
Sr. Caba and a friend looked at each other, smiled and said his name at the same time.


Screenshot_20210823-120639-01.jpeg Screenshot_20210823-115905-01~2.jpeg
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
We're escaping a heat wave at home by camping in the mountains where internet access is sparse. I'm writing this in camp to dispatch in case a hike brings us to a signal. I'm assuming the posts have come to Linyola. I'll likely be posting this without reading any posts since my last one.

In Linyola Sr. Josep Caba has set up an albergue in an agricultural compound he has in town, a gate leading to an open area surrounded by buildings. Upstairs in one he has about a half dozen beds and a kitchen area. When I was there most beds were damp and musty but mine was fine. I can't remember what I had for dinner that night, maybe I had a big lunch on the way, anyway I didn't examine the kitchen and I can't report on it. The toilet and shower room downstairs was in fine condition. In the map I hope to be able to attach you can see that you will not be far from the town plaza where you can find places to eat.

Sr. Caba lives a walk aways from his albergue but he checks you in at his home so don't do what I did and call him when you get to the compound, it will double his walk. Near his home is the bar Josep Planes Gispert. On my way out of town in the morning some patrons outside, seeing that I was a pilgrim, told me that Sr. Caba was inside having breakfast with friends in the back. Of course I went in to thank him for his hospitality but the point I want to make is that this bar would be a good place to meet Sr. Caba. Try to call before getting to town and if you catch him suggest the bar as a meeting spot. If you don't contact him before reaching town then go to the bar and ask if he is there. If he isn't then make a call from there. Still no luck? Have something there and call again.

On the satellite map I hope to attach the orange-yellow line is Rocjumper's Wikiloc track through Linyola. I'm not sure if it was following any yellow arrows. The colored dots were added by me. The top red-orange one is at the town plaza, the lower green dot is at the bar Josep Planes Gispert and the lowest magenta dot is at Caba's compound.

Bar: Carrer Pons i Arola, 32, Linyola
Compond: Carrer Anselm Clavé, 9, Linyola

I don't have Sr. Caba's telephone number to add here at the moment but it is available on the Gronze website. I don't know if he speaks English but he does understand broken Spanish.

While I was the only pilgrim checked into the place I was not the only one staying there. In the middle of the night I heard someone coming up the stairs. "Quien es?" In English the response was from a grandson of Sr. Caba's. He was in town and sleeping off a drunk. In the morning I reported the visit and with the perfect comedic timing of a sit-com
Sr. Caba and a friend looked at each other, smiled and said his name at the same time.


View attachment 107816 View attachment 107817
At the start of your tale I thought to myself “nope, no, uh uh, I learned on the Frances: no muni albergues and no private albergues where the owner doesn’t sleep there. That’s how I ended up with drunks trying to climb into my bed my mistake. Nope, let’s see what else there is for accommodations”. Then I read the rest of your story. Yep, there’s got to be a Marriott somewhere nearby…
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
And a dangerous one, because any local seeing you will assume you're headed for Zaragosa on purpose and won't say anything.
Forewarned is forearmwd.
;)
When I would purposely go off track, to see some “now neglected” little church or pretty amazing basilica, or giant ball of string, people would always try to turn me around 🙂
 
Past OR future Camino
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
In Linyola, there is also the Restaurant Hotel Cal Rotes, a very agreeable casa-rural-type place where I stayed some years ago-- Carrer Isabel II, 19, +34973714456, at the corner of Cristofol Colon, about two streets south of the parish church. I had some of the local wine (Castell REmei, mentioned above) and it was very agreeable.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
While I was the only pilgrim checked into the place I was not the only one staying there. In the middle of the night I heard someone coming up the stairs. "Quien es?" In English the response was from a grandson of Sr. Caba's. He was in town and sleeping off a drunk.
We walked into the compound, saw the lovely adjacent house (which I think his daughter lives in) and got our hopes up.

We also met a grandson of Sr. Caba’s. He was holed up in a room downstairs, seemingly using the getaway as a place to smoke undetected. Since there are five or six years between our walks, I think it could be the same kid, because I remember a young teen.

One of my favorite (and most told) anecdotes from this camino was when I asked @LT if she was going to wash her clothes in the sink in the downstairs bathroom. Her response — “No, because the sink is dirtier than my clothes.”

I don’t mean to sound ungrateful or critical, because it is a really nice gesture to open up a place for peregrinos to stay. I don’t remember damp and musty beds, but I think my next night in Linyola will be spent where @oursonpolaire stayed. Hopefully, it will still be in business — hard to imagine what a 3 *** hotel is doing in this town.
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
We walked into the compound, saw the lovely adjacent house (which I think his daughter lives in) and got our hopes up.

We also met a grandson of Sr. Caba’s. He was holed up in a room downstairs, seemingly using the getaway as a place to smoke undetected. Since there are five or six years between our walks, I think it could be the same kid, because I remember a young teen.

One of my favorite (and most told) anecdotes from this camino was when I asked @LT if she was going to wash her clothes in the sink in the downstairs bathroom. Her response — “No, because the sink is dirtier than my clothes.”

I don’t mean to sound ungrateful or critical, because it is a really nice gesture to open up a place for peregrinos to stay. I don’t remember damp and musty beds, but I think my next night in Linyola will be spent where @oursonpolaire stayed. Hopefully, it will still be in business — hard to imagine what a 3 *** hotel is doing in this town.
i hope so...I tried looking up hotels and while there seemed to be a two-star and 3-star, neither website worked. would it be impossible to walk a bit further, or a bit less, and have additional bed options?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
i hope so...I tried looking up hotels and while there seemed to be a two-star and 3-star, neither website worked. would it be impossible to walk a bit further, or a bit less, and have additional bed options?
If you can walk a 37 km day, I would carry on to Balaguer — it’s a really pretty riverside town with lots of services. I don’t think there’s anything before. But there is an apartment rental option in Linyola as well, according to Gronze. It’s on booking. That must be the place that @lindam stayed. I would head there.
 
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
If you can walk a 37 km day, I would carry on to Balaguer — it’s a really pretty riverside town with lots of services. I don’t think there’s anything before. But there is an apartment rental option in Linyola as well, according to Gronze. It’s on booking. That must be the place that @lindam stayed. I would head there.
Balaguer it is! Thanks!! Edit: happily wandering that way in search of sleeping options and dreaming of grilled trout 🙂
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
And there's a lake. With birds. 😊
The website shows lots of activities there, so it's worth checking the calendar to see what's on. I would guess all the nearby CRs fill up.
And @peregrina2000, this may be why there's the *** accommodation in Linyola.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Except for that short detour to Valverd, where there are 2 CRs. That's what I would choose.
How am I supposed to remember that? It was posted 40 posts ago! Seriously, that’s a great idea, VN. But I don’t find anything that suggests that any of those places (there are three or four that I see actually) rent single rooms, they all seem to be whole house rentals.

I think that if the hotels are closed, I’d try to stay in the apartments that @lindam found in Linyola.
 
Last edited:
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 101 ratings
Downloads
15,194
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,873
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,673
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top