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Visigothic jewel south of Burgos

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
I've just visited Santa María de Lara, a rare visigothic church of c650AD in the sierra de la Demanda, south of Burgos. It's an amazing building, just outside the village of Quintanilla de las Viñas. The walls are covered with intricate stylised carvings showing plants, birds, vines and dogs. Inside is what is believed to be the earliest representation of Christ in Spain, and a sun and moon which later would probably raise questions of paganism from any sharp-eyed Inquisitor. After the reconquista, in about 880AD, it was restored, possibly with funding from Doña Mumadona, mother of Fernán González, the count of Castille.

Well worth a detour
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Just did some googling and it looks amazing. I will definitely try to take this detour when I walk the Ebro. Are you doing this on foot, Alan? Did you sleep in Mercerreyes and then veer off the Lana to see the church? When you have time, I'd love to hear the details. I'd take Visigothic over the Burgos cathedral any day! Thanks so much for letting us know about the side trip, you just keep making me add days to my plan. Laurie
 

Margaret Butterworth

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)
I'd really like to see this in May 2016. Is it possible to get there (or part way there) by public transport from Burgos?
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
Are you doing this on foot, Alan? Did you sleep in Mercerreyes and then veer off the Lana to see the church?
Yup, very nice albergue in Mecerreyes, loads of beds, well-equipped kitchen, fridge etc, €5 (empty). Then over the hill and about 3-4 hours walk to Quintanilla de las Viñas, incidentally passing the dolmen of Cubillejo (c3000BC), and some dinosaur footprints if it's all getting too modern for you.

Fairly sure there's no public transport to the village, but there probably is to Mambrillas de Lara, on the main road about 5km closer to Covarrubias.

Next stop Burgos and my first ever (brief) encounter with the Camino Francés.IMG_20151101_063637.JPG
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
The carvings are spectacular. Thank you for the heads up.
 
C

Castilian

Guest
Is it possible to get there (or part way there) by public transport from Burgos?
Therpasa (www.therpasa.es) quotes Quintanilla de las Viñas among its destinations from Burgos but looking at the schedules and at the time quoted from Quintanilla de las Viñas to Mambrillas de Lara, it seems to me they don't leave you in the town but at the junction of road N-234 with the provincial road heading to Quintanilla de las Viñas (i.e.: roughly 4 kms away from Quintanilla de las Viñas) but that's just what it seems to me so I could be wrong... Anyway, I would suggest to get in touch with Therpasa to know where's the stop at Quintanilla de las Viñas (or its surroundings) and confirm whether it leaves you in the town or several kms out of it.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I love this place, and I can get there easily from here in the car. I also know of a really cool Visigothic burial complex in Gumiel, somewhat nearby, and a set of hermit caves... a full day's worth of Visigoth. And while you're in the neighborhood, there's the Arroyo de Lobos... Let's go!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
Book me in for the sightseeing trip next year.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I love this place, and I can get there easily from here in the car. I also know of a really cool Visigothic burial complex in Gumiel, somewhat nearby, and a set of hermit caves... a full day's worth of Visigoth. And while you're in the neighborhood, there's the Arroyo de Lobos... Let's go!
I'm telling you, Reb,
You need to offer a Soria/Burgos romanesque/visigothic tour in conjunction with the December clean-up. Who could resist that double whammy?
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
I just learned how to bookmark...this looks wonderful. A jewel of a Visigothic church plus a dolmen and Dino footprints?!
 

Tulle

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999 Burgos-SDC, 2003 Leon-SDC, 2007-2012 Le Puy-SDC, 2014 Burgos-Covarrubias, Camino Ingles 3 times
If you walk the nice Camino de San Olav from Burgos to Covarrubias you walk through this area:)
 

Tulle

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999 Burgos-SDC, 2003 Leon-SDC, 2007-2012 Le Puy-SDC, 2014 Burgos-Covarrubias, Camino Ingles 3 times
Yes, there are so many interesting options...
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
I've just visited Santa María de Lara, a rare visigothic church of c650AD in the sierra de la Demanda, south of Burgos. It's an amazing building, just outside the village of Quintanilla de las Viñas. The walls are covered with intricate stylised carvings showing plants, birds, vines and dogs. Inside is what is believed to be the earliest representation of Christ in Spain, and a sun and moon which later would probably raise questions of paganism from any sharp-eyed Inquisitor. After the reconquista, in about 880AD, it was restored, possibly with funding from Doña Mumadona, mother of Fernán González, the count of Castille.

Well worth a detour
 

jbear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC march-may 2015
I've just visited Santa María de Lara, a rare visigothic church of c650AD in the sierra de la Demanda, south of Burgos. It's an amazing building, just outside the village of Quintanilla de las Viñas. The walls are covered with intricate stylised carvings showing plants, birds, vines and dogs. Inside is what is believed to be the earliest representation of Christ in Spain, and a sun and moon which later would probably raise questions of paganism from any sharp-eyed Inquisitor. After the reconquista, in about 880AD, it was restored, possibly with funding from Doña Mumadona, mother of Fernán González, the count of Castille.

Well worth a detour
Thank you for the tip. Next time I'm in Burgos this will be on my list of things to see.
 
Camino(s) past & future
starting on October 31 2015
Looks fantastic..I'm a church spotter of Train spotting proportions...so this is on the list...Just returned from first leg of Camino up to Burgos and completely missed this wonderful sounding place...my main disappointment on Camino was number of churches not open or with unpredictable opening times...Eunate for example...any timings for this one ??????
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
I want to see this church and also the dolmens and the dinosaur prints. Can you tell us where the latter two sites are?
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
Hi there:

Here are some details on the dinosaur footprints, which are only a km or so from the visigothic church:

http://www.tierradelara.es/Pueblos/Quintanilla de las vinas/quintanilla_de_las_vinas_cultural.html

And the dolmen is in open countryside near the village of Cubillejo de Lara, not far from Lara de los Infantes, perhaps 2 hours from Santa María de Lara: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=40337

Santa María de Lara is closed Monday and Tuesday and "the last weekend of each month" - as November 1 fell on a Sunday this year, I wasn't sure whether that meant the last full weekend of October or the weekend of October 31-November 1, so made sure to get there by Friday October 30, just in case. Opening hours vary between summer and winter: http://www.mambrillasdelara.es/turismo-y-ocio/monumentos/ermita-visigótica-de-nuestra-señora-de-las-viñas
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi there:

Here are some details on the dinosaur footprints, which are only a km or so from the visigothic church:

http://www.tierradelara.es/Pueblos/Quintanilla de las vinas/quintanilla_de_las_vinas_cultural.html

And the dolmen is in open countryside near the village of Cubillejo de Lara, not far from Lara de los Infantes, perhaps 2 hours from Santa María de Lara: http://www.megalithic.co.uk/article.php?sid=40337

Santa María de Lara is closed Monday and Tuesday and "the last weekend of each month" - as November 1 fell on a Sunday this year, I wasn't sure whether that meant the last full weekend of October or the weekend of October 31-November 1, so made sure to get there by Friday October 30, just in case. Opening hours vary between summer and winter: http://www.mambrillasdelara.es/turismo-y-ocio/monumentos/ermita-visigótica-de-nuestra-señora-de-las-viñas
Alan, if I am walking from Mercerreyes, will I pass both the dolmen and the footprints? I'm hoping to that maybe there will be a Camino Frances detour group -- we could meet up in Santo Domingo de Silos, and then take your three days to Burgos. Probably pipe dreams, but I am always looking for ways to find a pilgrim or two on my caminos.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Castilian, I have Alan's GPS tracks and have found that there is a nice casa rural in Mondubar, so a detour to Quintanilla is definitely in my plans!

And since Alan visited both of these sites, I'm assuming that his gps tracks will take me there if I just follow blindly. :)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I've just visited Santa María de Lara, a rare visigothic church of c650AD in the sierra de la Demanda, south of Burgos. It's an amazing building, just outside the village of Quintanilla de las Viñas. The walls are covered with intricate stylised carvings showing plants, birds, vines and dogs. Inside is what is believed to be the earliest representation of Christ in Spain, and a sun and moon which later would probably raise questions of paganism from any sharp-eyed Inquisitor. After the reconquista, in about 880AD, it was restored, possibly with funding from Doña Mumadona, mother of Fernán González, the count of Castille.

Well worth a detour
Alan, I have a question about your walking route from Mondúbar to Burgos. I am hoping to make it into town for an 11 am bus (long story), and see that your wikiloc route was 18.8 km. Googlemaps shows three alternatives that are different from your route, and they are all in the 15 km range. Those few kms might be a nice cushion to have, so I'm wondering if you have any insight into how these routes are different from what you did, and also why you chose the route you did.

thanks, LaurieScreenshot 2016-01-21 09.55.12.png
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
Alan, I have a question about your walking route from Mondúbar to Burgos. I am hoping to make it into town for an 11 am bus (long story), and see that your wikiloc route was 18.8 km. Googlemaps shows three alternatives that are different from your route, and they are all in the 15 km range. Those few kms might be a nice cushion to have, so I'm wondering if you have any insight into how these routes are different from what you did, and also why you chose the route you did.
I think I followed the camino de San Olaf from Modúbar de San Cibrián to Burgos, which may explain why it was slightly longer than your routes, which look very pleasant as well as significantly shorter. "My" route was mostly on a vía verde, right into the centre of town, and joined the Ruta de la Lana a few km outside of Burgos. The San Olav route is marked from Covarrubias, where it leaves the Lana, to the new chapel of St Olav and the visigothic Santa María de Lara, skipping Mecerreyes, and saving a few km.

I liked the Cerca de Doña Jimena in Modúbar de San Cibrián: very comfortable (almost luxurious, and I think not expensive), with a decent bar/restaurant. The social centre bar, a couple of 100 yards away, was also lively and fun - full of people of all ages covered in Hallowe'en blood and costumes when I was there.
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I think I followed the camino de San Olaf from Modúbar de San Cibrián to Burgos, which may explain why it was slightly longer than your routes, which look very pleasant as well as significantly shorter. "My" route was mostly on a vía verde, right into the centre of town, and joined the Ruta de la Lana a few km outside of Burgos. The San Olav route is marked from Covarrubias, where it leaves the Lana, to the new chapel of St Olav and the visigothic Santa María de Lara, skipping Mecerreyes, and saving a few km.

I liked the Cerca de Doña Jimena in Modúbar de San Cibrián: very comfortable (almost luxurious, and I think not expensive), with a decent bar/restaurant. The social centre bar, a couple of 100 yards away, was also lively and fun - full of people of all ages covered in Hallowe'en blood and costumes when I was there.
Sorry to keep pestering you Alan. If I am going to walk Santo Domingo to Mondubar in two days, would it then make more sense to spend the first night in Covarrubias instead of Mercerreyes? If I'm looking at the maps right, it seems like all that going to Mercerreyes does for me is add more kms to the next day into Mondubar.

And when you mention the via verde, are you talking about the river walk into Burgos or does this via verde extend out into the country? Because if I walk from Modubar to Cardenadijo, I will then connect with the San Olav if it's marked anyway. :)
 
C

Castilian

Guest
If I am going to walk Santo Domingo to Mondubar in two days, would it then make more sense to spend the first night in Covarrubias instead of Mercerreyes? If I'm looking at the maps right, it seems like all that going to Mercerreyes does for me is add more kms to the next day into Mondubar.
Mecerreyes is closer to Modúbar de San Cibrián but I don't think there's a signed route linking them because the St. Olav Way doesn't go through Mecerreyes and the Ruta de la Lana doesn't go through Modúbar de San Cibrián.

And when you mention the via verde, are you talking about the river walk into Burgos or does this via verde extend out into the country?
It extends out into the country. It's (a part of) the Vía Verde Santander-Mediterráneo, if you want to look for info about it.
 

alansykes

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Except the Francés
If I am going to walk Santo Domingo to Mondubar in two days, would it then make more sense to spend the first night in Covarrubias instead of Mercerreyes? If I'm looking at the maps right, it seems like all that going to Mercerreyes does for me is add more kms to the next day into Mondubar.
I suppose it probably does. Mecerreyes has a pleasant albergue with a well equipped kitchen, and there is a tienda in the town (the restaurant was closed and the bar did no food). Santo Dominigo to Covarrubias would be a very short day (I think I got into town just after midday, despite having breakfast after matins in Santo Domingo), so it might be better to go on the San Olav Way, perhaps to Mambrillas de Lara (which has a casa rural), only 5km from Santa María de Lara, and much closer to Modúbar de San Cibrián. You would miss the dolmen, but it's not heart-stopping. Another alternative, if you wanted to stay in Covarrubias, would be to detour to see the ruins of the monastery of San Pedro de Arlanza.

The vía verde I took was on disused railway tracks from Modúbar de la Emparedada into central Burgos via Cardeñadijo, roughly 12km - the 6km from Modúbar de San Cibrián to Modúbar de la Emparedada was mostly alongside a stream, if I remember rightly. I think it was all on the San Olav (and the Lana from around Cardeñadijo): but it's still 18km, so if you need to be at Burgos bus station by 11am, you'd probably be better off following one of the shorter google routes you found.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks, Alan and Castilian. My plan is now to take the road route from Modúbar de San Cibrian (I am just seeing that there are THREE Modubars on this route!) to Cardeñadijo, first on BU-V-8011 to Carcedo, then alongside the BU-800 to Cardeñadijo. From Cardeñadijo to Burgos, it looks like I will be on an asphalted pedestrian/bike path
http://sendasdeburgos.blogspot.com/2014/07/via-verde-del-santander-mediterraneo-de.html

The other issue has to do with Mercerreyes. I've been comparing maps and gps tracks, etc, and it seems I was wrong (no surprise there) on my first calculation of distances from Mercerreyes as opposed to Covarrubias.

I THINK Mercerreyes to the church at Quintanilla as shown on Alan's GPS is 13, whereas from Covarrubias the Camino San Olav route shows 17. That means that the Mercerreyes route is actually shorter than the San Olav route.

So, I'm now thinking that Alan's suggestion about walking to Covarrubias, visiting the town and church, and then walking on 10 more on the Camino San Olav to Mambrillas makes the most sense. I'll have to see if I can find a casa rural there.

Buen camino, Laurie
 
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Tulle

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999 Burgos-SDC, 2003 Leon-SDC, 2007-2012 Le Puy-SDC, 2014 Burgos-Covarrubias, Camino Ingles 3 times
Hi, Tulle, have you walked this camino from Burgos to Covarrubias?
Yes, I walked there with friends in June 2014. A very nice little camino:) No albergues though, so we stayed in pensiones which we booked beforehand. We did not see any other pilgrims, but there had been other Norwegians before us. It was very nice to be Norwegian in Covarrubias!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Yes, I walked there with friends in June 2014. A very nice little camino:) No albergues though, so we stayed in pensiones which we booked beforehand. We did not see any other pilgrims, but there had been other Norwegians before us. It was very nice to be Norwegian in Covarrubias!
Sorry to be a pest, Tulle, but I wonder if you remember your stages and the names of the places you stayed. I will probably sleep in Santo Domingo de Silos in the albergue, then walk on the Ruta de la Lana to Covarrubias, and there start the Camino San Olav. I think that the night before Burgos will be the Cerca de Doña Jimena in Modúbar de San Ciprián. In between Covarrubias and Modúbar, there is reported to be a casa rural, http://www.caminodesanolav.es/es/contenido/?iddoc=22, which would be a good day from Santo Domingo de Silos. Any information you have would be great, thanks much, Laurie
 

Tulle

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1999 Burgos-SDC, 2003 Leon-SDC, 2007-2012 Le Puy-SDC, 2014 Burgos-Covarrubias, Camino Ingles 3 times
No pestering at all, we are here to share, aren' t we:)) I have tried to send some information in a private conversation, I hope I have done it correctly. If nothing reaches you, you' d better tell me!
 

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 1/2 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
No pestering at all, we are here to share, aren' t we:)) I have tried to send some information in a private conversation, I hope I have done it correctly. If nothing reaches you, you' d better tell me!
Tulle, could I have the information as well?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Ivar just posted a list of the "top ten bookmarked threads" and it looks like this thread is number 2! So I'm wondering if there are lots of people out there who are going to go to Santo Domingo de Silos this year. If so, let me know if you might be doing this in early June. @anniethenurse and I hope to be reaching Santo Domingo coming from the Ruta de la Lana coming in from the south, and we will then take a slight detour to go to Burgos on the Camino San Olav. It'd be a three day walk as I described above. So if you are interested in perhaps taking a bus to Santo Domingo and then walking back to Bugos, let us know. It'd be fun to have a little gaggle of pilgrims taking this detour. Buen camino, Laurie
 

Cathryn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances March (2016)
Boy, Laurie, if I were doing my Camino in June, I would be right there with you!!I've been contemplating doing just about what you've suggested (though your facility with maps, "wikilocs" etc. leaves me in the dirt (note to self: how am I going to learn all this stuff before March 20?!)). I would be doing this all alone; for the very first time in my preparation (after 20 years of dreaming/planning) I'm feeling a bit "unsure" (meaning SCARED!).You guys are all so knowledgeable about the different caminos and how to navigate them. I've spent the last month in the library reading about Spanish history and Romanesque Architecture. Probably would have been better learning navigation and Spanish. Any suggestions on tutorial on GPS navigation and translating it to Google maps, with the milage/time for walking? That is a new one to me.

But I am so excited!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Boy, Laurie, if I were doing my Camino in June, I would be right there with you!!I've been contemplating doing just about what you've suggested (though your facility with maps, "wikilocs" etc. leaves me in the dirt (note to self: how am I going to learn all this stuff before March 20?!)). I would be doing this all alone; for the very first time in my preparation (after 20 years of dreaming/planning) I'm feeling a bit "unsure" (meaning SCARED!).You guys are all so knowledgeable about the different caminos and how to navigate them. I've spent the last month in the library reading about Spanish history and Romanesque Architecture. Probably would have been better learning navigation and Spanish. Any suggestions on tutorial on GPS navigation and translating it to Google maps, with the milage/time for walking? That is a new one to me.

But I am so excited!
Ha ha ha. Cathryn, you are probably the only person on this forum who would think I have any facility with maps or wikiloc. It's obvious that you haven't been on the forum long, or you would have seen some of my idiotic questions. :) I am a pretty clueless technologically challenged pilgrim.

On the Frances, you do not need to know anything about wikiloc, GPS tracks, or anything beyond being able to look at the arrows and follow them. I know you have been researching all the Romanesque and Visigothic churches near the camino, but maybe that's just contributing to the anxiety. You're not going to see all that Spain has to offer on your first (or on your twentieth) Camino. So, if it were me, I would maybe get a kindle version of the Davidson/Gitlitz book (I carried it on my first Camino and that was silly -- it is ridiculously heavy, but I have heard there is now a kindle/mobile version). And then just focus on seeing all the little jewels you will pass (or will be within a stone's throw of) on the Camino Frances. There's enough of the Romanesque on the camino to fill you with awe. And many people just walk right by, because they aren't interested or because they don't know about it. The Davidson book will keep you informed every step of the way.

One thing to consider as you plan all these detours is that as you are walking, you are likely to develop strong ties with a group, your "Camino Family." Are you going to want to pop off for a bunch of side trips and then start over to rebuild social ties with new people? You may want to on some occasions, it may be a good way to disconnect from a bunch of rotten apples (that does happen every now and then), but it's probably more likely that you will have strong bonds with a group that you don't want to lose. But never fear, there are plenty of places on the Camino, so you can have your cake and eat it too. And if you can find a pal or two who wants to detour to Santo Domingo de Silos or San Miguel de la Escalada (easy to do by taxi during a rest day in Leon, for example), those may be nice ways to break up the walking and give your body a rest.

So, just know that being scared is part of the routine, even people who have done this many times are anxious and a bit apprehensive before starting out, but once you take the first steps, that all melts away and you just focus on the present and doing what you went to Spain to do. March 20 is coming up, and I can't wait to hear how it goes for you!
 

Cathryn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances March (2016)
Ha ha ha. Cathryn, you are probably the only person on this forum who would think I have any facility with maps or wikiloc. It's obvious that you haven't been on the forum long, or you would have seen some of my idiotic questions. :) I am a pretty clueless technologically challenged pilgrim.

On the Frances, you do not need to know anything about wikiloc, GPS tracks, or anything beyond being able to look at the arrows and follow them. I know you have been researching all the Romanesque and Visigothic churches near the camino, but maybe that's just contributing to the anxiety. You're not going to see all that Spain has to offer on your first (or on your twentieth) Camino. So, if it were me, I would maybe get a kindle version of the Davidson/Gitlitz book (I carried it on my first Camino and that was silly -- it is ridiculously heavy, but I have heard there is now a kindle/mobile version). And then just focus on seeing all the little jewels you will pass (or will be within a stone's throw of) on the Camino Frances. There's enough of the Romanesque on the camino to fill you with awe. And many people just walk right by, because they aren't interested or because they don't know about it. The Davidson book will keep you informed every step of the way.

One thing to consider as you plan all these detours is that as you are walking, you are likely to develop strong ties with a group, your "Camino Family." Are you going to want to pop off for a bunch of side trips and then start over to rebuild social ties with new people? You may want to on some occasions, it may be a good way to disconnect from a bunch of rotten apples (that does happen every now and then), but it's probably more likely that you will have strong bonds with a group that you don't want to lose. But never fear, there are plenty of places on the Camino, so you can have your cake and eat it too. And if you can find a pal or two who wants to detour to Santo Domingo de Silos or San Miguel de la Escalada (easy to do by taxi during a rest day in Leon, for example), those may be nice ways to break up the walking and give your body a rest.

So, just know that being scared is part of the routine, even people who have done this many times are anxious and a bit apprehensive before starting out, but once you take the first steps, that all melts away and you just focus on the present and doing what you went to Spain to do. March 20 is coming up, and I can't wait to hear how it goes for you!
 

Cathryn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances March (2016)
Thanks for the insightful -- and encouraging! -- reply! Strange: I couldn't find the kindle version of G&D on the UK Amazon site, but it is on Amazon US! Great suggestion! Yes, I'm capable of wanting to do/see too much, but it's all just so fascinating! And I hope we meet sometime on one or another Camino!
 

Cathryn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances March (2016)
Ha ha ha. Cathryn, you are probably the only person on this forum who would think I have any facility with maps or wikiloc. It's obvious that you haven't been on the forum long, or you would have seen some of my idiotic questions. :) I am a pretty clueless technologically challenged pilgrim.

On the Frances, you do not need to know anything about wikiloc, GPS tracks, or anything beyond being able to look at the arrows and follow them. I know you have been researching all the Romanesque and Visigothic churches near the camino, but maybe that's just contributing to the anxiety. You're not going to see all that Spain has to offer on your first (or on your twentieth) Camino. So, if it were me, I would maybe get a kindle version of the Davidson/Gitlitz book (I carried it on my first Camino and that was silly -- it is ridiculously heavy, but I have heard there is now a kindle/mobile version). And then just focus on seeing all the little jewels you will pass (or will be within a stone's throw of) on the Camino Frances. There's enough of the Romanesque on the camino to fill you with awe. And many people just walk right by, because they aren't interested or because they don't know about it. The Davidson book will keep you informed every step of the way.

One thing to consider as you plan all these detours is that as you are walking, you are likely to develop strong ties with a group, your "Camino Family." Are you going to want to pop off for a bunch of side trips and then start over to rebuild social ties with new people? You may want to on some occasions, it may be a good way to disconnect from a bunch of rotten apples (that does happen every now and then), but it's probably more likely that you will have strong bonds with a group that you don't want to lose. But never fear, there are plenty of places on the Camino, so you can have your cake and eat it too. And if you can find a pal or two who wants to detour to Santo Domingo de Silos or San Miguel de la Escalada (easy to do by taxi during a rest day in Leon, for example), those may be nice ways to break up the walking and give your body a rest.

So, just know that being scared is part of the routine, even people who have done this many times are anxious and a bit apprehensive before starting out, but once you take the first steps, that all melts away and you just focus on the present and doing what you went to Spain to do. March 20 is coming up, and I can't wait to hear how it goes for you!
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
The other issue has to do with Mercerreyes. I've been comparing maps and gps tracks, etc, and it seems I was wrong (no surprise there) on my first calculation of distances from Mercerreyes as opposed to Covarrubias.

I THINK Mercerreyes to the church at Quintanilla as shown on Alan's GPS is 13, whereas from Covarrubias the Camino San Olav route shows 17. That means that the Mercerreyes route is actually shorter than the San Olav route.
Tulle, could I have the information as well?
Me, too, Tulle, please?
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Therpasa (www.therpasa.es) quotes Quintanilla de las Viñas among its destinations from Burgos but looking at the schedules and at the time quoted from Quintanilla de las Viñas to Mambrillas de Lara, it seems to me they don't leave you in the town but at the junction of road N-234 with the provincial road heading to Quintanilla de las Viñas (i.e.: roughly 4 kms away from Quintanilla de las Viñas) but that's just what it seems to me so I could be wrong... Anyway, I would suggest to get in touch with Therpasa to know where's the stop at Quintanilla de las Viñas (or its surroundings) and confirm whether it leaves you in the town or several kms out of it.
There's a bus stop on the N-234, about 4 kms away. Mambrillas is right near the highway so more easily accessible by bus...but it's about the same distance (maybe a bit further) from Quintanilla de las Viñas.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
Wow! I will definitely visit that place, I will spend 4 days in Covarrubias in June, attending a Viking wedding at the Summer Solstice, it will definitely be an experience!
 

ACL

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camino Portugese, Camino Zagora
Thanks for the tip-off. It's on my list!
 

navarro

Active Member
I've just visited Santa María de Lara, a rare visigothic church of c650AD in the sierra de la Demanda, south of Burgos. It's an amazing building, just outside the village of Quintanilla de las Viñas. The walls are covered with intricate stylised carvings showing plants, birds, vines and dogs. Inside is what is believed to be the earliest representation of Christ in Spain, and a sun and moon which later would probably raise questions of paganism from any sharp-eyed Inquisitor. After the reconquista, in about 880AD, it was restored, possibly with funding from Doña Mumadona, mother of Fernán González, the count of Castille.

Well worth a detour
I visited it this summer. If you enjoy with this kid of monuments, dont forget to visit Santa Maria del Arco at Tricio 4 Km from Nájera. and a little far San Millán de Suso Abot 20 km from Nájera.

https://www.google.es/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=6&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwit1Z3bgpTQAhVYFMAKHd3ADaIQFgg-MAU&url=http://cienleguasalaredonda.blogspot.com/2016/09/por-donde-nacio-castilla-tierras-de-lara.html&usg=AFQjCNHQDAtBfGkOAqOzE1zkrASLDR-8EA&sig2=iveqv30E44ECscsjhBwPcQ&bvm=bv.137904068,d.d24
 

VNwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Wow, @navarro, I got so excited looking at your link:
Because that is exactly what I was wondering about when I began this thread!:
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/tired-of-company-are-you-up-for-an-adventure.40899/
After walking from Santo Domingo to Silos back to Burgos via Santa Maria de Lara, it looked like such a wonderful alternative way between Najera and Burgos that would take in more of this remarkable and very historic landscape.
And voila! There it is. Wonderful. It would be fantastic if you could (pretty please?) go over to that thread and give us a few of your impressions in English!
 

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