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Walk from Porto till Santiago

Dr Ana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future plan: easter week 2019 Santa Semana, Sevilla to Porto direction
#1
Is it enough this walk 100 km for getting el camino stamp? Im new , and would ask which nearest airport after you reach Santiago. How many days we need from Porto to Santiago, please? Thanks in advance and good weather to all
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
#2
Hi, fellow Ana!

There is an airport in Santiago de Compostela, so you can go back home from there.
I walked Porto-Santiago in 2017 and it took me 11 days. I highly recommend spending 2-3 days in Porto, it is an amazing city with great food and wineries. Some people do it as quick as 8-9 days, some take 15. It is a lovely walk anyway.

You need to walk at least 100km to get the Compostelana, a pilgrimage certificate (religious). Walking any other distance you can ask for the Certificate of Distance (non-religious), as pretty as the other one: https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/pilgrimage/certificate-of-distance/

"Stamp" is what you collect along the way when you stop at churches, bars and hotels. You ask them to stamp you credencial.

I hope that helps!
 

Dr Ana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future plan: easter week 2019 Santa Semana, Sevilla to Porto direction
#3
Hi, fellow Ana!

There is an airport in Santiago de Compostela, so you can go back home from there.
I walked Porto-Santiago in 2017 and it took me 11 days. I highly recommend spending 2-3 days in Porto, it is an amazing city with great food and wineries. Some people do it as quick as 8-9 days, some take 15. It is a lovely walk anyway.

You need to walk at least 100km to get the Compostelana, a pilgrimage certificate (religious). Walking any other distance you can ask for the Certificate of Distance (non-religious), as pretty as the other one: https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/pilgrimage/certificate-of-distance/

"Stamp" is what you collect along the way when you stop at churches, bars and hotels. You ask them to stamp you credencial.

I hope that helps!
Thks a lot! Is it flat like valley walk or high mountains. Could i pass May weather without boots? Can you recommand some accomodation on that walk? Nice to meet you
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
#4
Is it flat like valley walk or high mountains. Could i pass May weather without boots? Can you recommand some accomodation on that walk? Nice to meet you
Nice to meet you too!

The walk is mostly flat or gentle hills. The only real climb is Alto da Portela, between Ponte de Lima and Rubiaes.
You can find info on the trail and list of accommodation options here: https://www.gronze.com/camino-portugues

A lovely place to stop is Casa da Fernanda, in Vitorino dos Piaes. She and her family welcome pilgrims every day, the house is cute and the food is great.

There is no real need for boots. May will start to get warm, so more ventilated shoes would work well. Actually, there are A LOT of cobblestone pavement, so I would highly recommend very comfortable, cushioned shoes. I walked late April with the Mizunos I usually go for walks around at home.
 

Dr Ana

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future plan: easter week 2019 Santa Semana, Sevilla to Porto direction
#5
Nice to meet you too!

The walk is mostly flat or gentle hills. The only real climb is Alto da Portela, between Ponte de Lima and Rubiaes.
You can find info on the trail and list of accommodation options here: https://www.gronze.com/camino-portugues

A lovely place to stop is Casa da Fernanda, in Vitorino dos Piaes. She and her family welcome pilgrims every day, the house is cute and the food is great.

There is no real need for boots. May will start to get warm, so more ventilated shoes would work well. Actually, there are A LOT of cobblestone pavement, so I would highly recommend very comfortable, cushioned shoes. I walked late April with the Mizunos I usually go for walks around at home.
I thought to pass walk with some comfortable mocasinas, like i do in jungle. I hate sneakers.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
#6
I thought to pass walk with some comfortable mocasinas, like i do in jungle. I hate sneakers.
Wear what you are used to. There is nothing jungle about the Portuguese trail, though... Do you think the mocasins will work in a lot of road walk, like 20km/day for a few days? I never used those, so I can't help there. But focus on comfort and you should be fine.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#7
Is it enough this walk 100 km for getting el camino stamp? Im new , and would ask which nearest airport after you reach Santiago. How many days we need from Porto to Santiago, please? Thanks in advance and good weather to all
Porto is approximately 250 km from Santiago (This distance varies a few km depending on which route you walk, Coastal or Central). If you only wish to walk 100 km in order to obtain a Compostela, the most practical starting point is Tui, which is right on the Spanish/Portuguese border, and approximately 120 km from Santiago. Tui could be considered the Camino Portugués equivalent of Sarria on the Camino Francés.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#8
I thought to pass walk with some comfortable mocasinas, like i do in jungle. I hate sneakers.
Just be aware that there is a fair amount if cobblestone and road walking, so you want to wear shoes that are also suitable for hard surfaces. I expect the paths are somewhat softer in a jungle.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#9
Is it enough this walk 100 km for getting el camino stamp? Im new , and would ask which nearest airport after you reach Santiago. How many days we need from Porto to Santiago, please? Thanks in advance and good weather to all
I would estimate anywhere from 10 to 13 days walking, depending on how far you like to walk in a day and how many towns you want to stop and see.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#10
I would estimate anywhere from 10 to 13 days walking, depending on how far you like to walk in a day and how many towns you want to stop and see.
It took my wife and I 14 days to walk from Porto to Santiago. We started by walking down the Rio Duoro to the coast, then up the coast to Vila do Conde before heading inland and Joining the central route at Arcos.

And here's a photo of the diabolical granite cobbles (click on the thumbnail below). The cobbles are about 100mm (4 inches) square, and have a very rough surface. Note the absence of a verge on either side of the road at this location, which means no choice but to walk in the roadway. This is quite common in and around the towns and villages. So wearing a bright safety vest is advised. The one redeeming factor of this cobble paving is that even the smallest car sounds like a freight train approaching, which allows you to step off the road or squeeze yourself against the stone or concrete wall which line the road.

IMG_0659.JPG
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#11
It took my wife and I 14 days to walk from Porto to Santiago. We started by walking down the Rio Duoro to the coast, then up the coast to Vila do Conde before heading inland and Joining the central route at Arcos.

And here's a photo of the diabolical granite cobbles (click on the thumbnail below). The cobbles are about 100mm (4 inches) square, and have a very rough surface. Note the absence of a verge on either side of the road at this location, which means no choice but to walk in the roadway. This is quite common in and around the towns and villages. So wearing a bright safety vest is advised. The one redeeming factor of this cobble paving is that even the smallest car sounds like a freight train approaching, which allows you to step off the road or squeeze yourself against the stone or concrete wall which line the road.

View attachment 50640
I am corrected. I took the same route and thought I was taking my time with 13 days. Did you take three days to get to Arcos? I think the first day to Vila Chã was the longest on that Camino for me.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
#12
I am corrected. I took the same route and thought I was taking my time with 13 days. Did you take three days to get to Arcos? I think the first day to Vila Chã was the longest on that Camino for me.
We took our time. First night in Matoshinos, second night in Vila Chã, third night in San Pedro de Rates after joining the central route. We shoot for 20km per day overall, which means some longer, some shorter--the latter was more common on this journey.
 

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