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Luggage Transfer Correos

Walking Poles on Ryanair?

Walkingboy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Ryanair explicitly bans trekking poles from being brought on board in cabin baggage. Even if they did not you might find it hard to get past airport security with them. No doubt others will say that they have walked on board carrying poles without being questioned but the rules are quite clear. If you choose to take the risk then please do not be surprised or angry if and when they are confiscated at the security checks. I think the chances of damage in a checked-in bag are far less than the chances of losing them altogether as a prohibited item. poles-ryanair.jpg
 

Travellingman

Active Member
Regardless of the size of your poles, there is NO WAY you could get them through security and onto the plane. I can't see the problem, since you are taking hold baggage anyway.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
When flying back from Santiago to Málaga last June, they did not let me bring in my 6.5 foot walking staff and my friends' metallic poles; instead they put it in the plane cargo for free. I am not sure they will do this too in other airports, though.
 

pilgrimjonas

Dreamer
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014)
Shvil Israel (2015/16)
Norte (2017)
Português (2018)
Via de la Plata (2019)
As mentioned before, there are two instances to consider. The Airlines security policy, but also the individual Airports security policy. As Bradypus correctly stated, Ryanair will not let you board with trekking poles. But even if an Airline should accept poles, it is still very questionable if the Airport will when passing security. I would always recommend checking them in. Commencing late 2018, Ryanair now has a 10kg checked baggage option for 8€, which I highly appreciate :)
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
Hiking poles are on the prohibited item list. See:

 

Ant

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2014
Norte & Ingles 2015
Mozarabe & VDLP 2016
Portuguese 2017
Levante/VDLP/Salvador/Prim2018
The short answer is No, don't risk it.
 

celticone

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
part Le Puy (2012)
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
Hello Dave
I will be taking poles on Easyjet from Bilbao in May. I have taken poles on Ryanair in the past - mine stick out a little bit. I wrap my whole rucksac in a binbag to avoid straps catching on conveyors etc. However I have seen rucksacs coming from holds without such protection.
If you are still worried you could get a piece of scrap wood or a cardboard tube to protect the protruding parts. Use some bubble wrap too. Obv discard the wood/cardboard on arrival.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
You are only allowed to take them on board if they are a genuine walking aid. When I declared them I was directed to where people are checking in other items e.g.musical instruments etc and they were checked into hold baggage no charge
 

Walkingboy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France
Many thanks for all you replies. I think the answer is no so will have to see if I can either fit them in my rucksack with protection or not take them. Cheers. Dave
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
CF - 2019
I changed to Z type poles as they fold down smaller. Still checked luggage but they fit inside my pack
 

happymarkos

HappyMark
Camino(s) past & future
2013 CF
2014 Le Puy-St Jean. 2014&16 Volunteer St JP
2016 Portuguese
2017 Porto-Santiago
2018
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
One option is to leave them at home and pick up a cheap pair when you arrive. I have the same dilemma and know reasonable poles are readily available for E 20-30 which is a lot less than paying for an extra checked bag. Can leave them behind when finished or if flying out of Santiago often the airline will allow you to take without extra charge. Hope this helps
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances ('10), Portugues ('11), Promitivo ('13), VdlP ('14), Ingles ('16), Torres ('17), Litoral '19
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
Ryanair has no policy on shortened walking poles provided they do not exceed the prescribed baggage size. Airport security in Spain does have a problem with walking poles in cabin luggage. I checked with security at Dublin Airport and they have no problem. I have taken poles through various British airports without any problem.

I overcome the length problem by separating the parts of the poles and placing them inside my rucksack at an angle.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances ('10), Portugues ('11), Promitivo ('13), VdlP ('14), Ingles ('16), Torres ('17), Litoral '19
You are only allowed to take them on board if they are a genuine walking aid. When I declared them I was directed to where people are checking in other items e.g.musical instruments etc and they were checked into hold baggage no charge
Different countries have different rules. Airlines don't check the content of your bag.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vol Pilgm office2015 SJpP-Muxia2016
Pamplona-Finisterra2017 Vol Pilgm House2018 Kerry&Ingles2019
For my first Camino I disassembled my poles then packed them and a pocket knife in a shipping tube just long enough for them. I had no problem checking this in as hold luggage. After the Camino I left them in the courtyard of the Pilgrim office in the designated area for poles and staffs, I felt I was abandoning old friends, I hope someone else used them. Later at the Santiago airport I saw security removing trekking poles from the carry on bags of several pilgrims.
This year I am buying poles in Dublin before starting the Kerry Camino. I hope Connacht Rambler is correct about Ryan Air from Dublin as I plan to use them on the Ingles after the Kerry Camino. I will probably donate them also.
Buen Camino
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I have seen poles taken into cabins on both Ryanair and EasyJet but you can't guarantee you'll be able to.
Try loosening your poles completely and pulling them apart to see if they'll fit in your pack to go in the hold. I have a conventional Leki pole that measures 25" (63.5cm) when closed but, taken apart the longest piece is 21" (53cm) and will fit inside my favoured pack.
I also know somebody who pulled the tungsten tip from a pole (and buried it deep in her pack). When she was told she couldn't take a "sharp pointed" object into the cabin and asked the security team to point out the "sharp" point. They grudgingly allowed her on but, again, you can't guarantee you'll be able to. Mind you she's a formidable Irishwoman and I wouldn't want to argue with her - I once witnessed her taking a Spanish Army major (a doctor) to task over piercing blisters, scary!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
I would take my backpack as carry-on and pack up my poles, knife, etc in a box, mailing tube or cheap duffel and just check in those items. If your checked bag goes missing you only have a few items to replace, not your entire kit.
 
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gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
Take a set. Always use the rubber tips. Take a spare set of tips.
When flying, wrap poles in bubble wrap, strap them to the side of your pack.
 

IngridF

Intrepid Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2015 ,2017, 2019
For my first Camino I disassembled my poles then packed them and a pocket knife in a shipping tube just long enough for them. I had no problem checking this in as hold luggage. After the Camino I left them in the courtyard of the Pilgrim office in the designated area for poles and staffs, I felt I was abandoning old friends, I hope someone else used them. Later at the Santiago airport I saw security removing trekking poles from the carry on bags of several pilgrims.
This year I am buying poles in Dublin before starting the Kerry Camino. I hope Connacht Rambler is correct about Ryan Air from Dublin as I plan to use them on the Ingles after the Kerry Camino. I will probably donate them also.
Buen Camino
Hi When are you walking the Kerry Camino?
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
 

Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés June/July 2018
VdlP- hatching plans
Getting poles home should be less of a problem as some airlines allow you to check them in for free if you have walked the Camino. I flew home from A Coruña with Vueling. They agreed to check in my poles for free but actually checked my bag in for free as it was a safer way to carry my poles. Worth checking as this saved me approx €30. I think Ryanair have a similar policy - and probably the norm if flying home from Santiago.
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Hi Walkingboy,
Just back in U.K. from Camino Mozarabe, flying EasyJet, no problems carrying walking poles as cabin baggage.
In previous years have deployed large, very lightweight zip-up bag in which went backpack, roll mat and walking poles : as hold baggage. (Bag carried in backpack when walking!)
Further consideration: is the additional cost for hold baggage (to carry scissors, say) not more than the price of making a purchase when at destination?
Bon Camino,
Paul
 

Paul J W

Paul J
Camino(s) past & future
Miscellaneous camino routes since 2000.
Walking this month the Camino Mozarabe (from Almeria) I flew to/from Malaga. My poles are telescopic.
I have, though, experienced “challenges” by the authorities at SdeC airport re walking poles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Part of (2018)
Primitivo (2019)
Finistere (2019)
Ryanair explicitly bans trekking poles from being brought on board in cabin baggage. Even if they did not you might find it hard to get past airport security with them. No doubt others will say that they have walked on board carrying poles without being questioned but the rules are quite clear. If you choose to take the risk then please do not be surprised or angry if and when they are confiscated at the security checks. I think the chances of damage in a checked-in bag are far less than the chances of losing them altogether as a prohibited item. View attachment 53242
I flew back from Santiago to Madrid last year with my walking stick in my backpack. The RyanAir person at the check-in advised me that I was welcome to take it out if I wanted to have it in the cabin. I left it in the bag. I assume it's all about who is on duty during your flight.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I flew back from Santiago to Madrid last year with my walking stick in my backpack. The RyanAir person at the check-in advised me that I was welcome to take it out if I wanted to have it in the cabin.
That sounds quite unusual, given that it was in Santiago airport and at a Ryanair desk. Did your walking stick look like a typical hiking pole or like a traditional walking aid?
 

Seabeggar

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Mozarabe
I am flying Ryan Air in May & will not chance poles as cabin or loose hold luggage. The simplest option is some folding z poles (not telescoping, too long) My Lekis fold down to 40cm. I suspect if you try to add extra hold luggage now you have booked you will pay a premium, so invest the money in some new Z poles.
 

Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
Yes walking sticks alway seems to be a issue for a lot of pilgrims in carry-on bagage.

It is not the sticks that is the consern, it is when they outside and not collapsed. AND if they still have this hard metal points.

Now - if they hard metal points has been REMOVED it is not an sevurityissue.
AND if the collapsed stick applayed to the airlines limits INSIDE your backpack there is not any problem.

As I see it your collapsed sticks with removed points schould fit into ypur backpack diagonel as the limit is 55cms.

I always carry my sticks inside my backpack, and never has it been a problem.

Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Part of (2018)
Primitivo (2019)
Finistere (2019)
That sounds quite unusual, given that it was in Santiago airport and at a Ryanair desk. Did your walking stick look like a typical hiking pole or like a traditional walking aid?
A modern light-weight one that folds up.
 

Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
A modern light-weight one that folds up.
Francois did you take the sharp hard metal point off???
You see excatly that is the question.
If you dont they are not accepted - if you did no problem. As long as they are Inside your backpack and are under the critical 55cms
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
A modern light-weight one that folds up.
Francois did you take the sharp hard metal point off???
You see exactly that is the question.
My question was whether it was recognisable as a walking aid or as hiking gear. It's still not clear to me. I asked because this happened in the Santiago airport of all places and their desk staff even encouraged someone to take it into the cabin.

Odd if it was hiking gear. Or if the passenger didn't have his leg in plaster cast.

Not at all odd if it was a modern light-weight walking aid, whether it folds up or not.
 
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verose

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014
When flying back from Santiago to Málaga last June, they did not let me bring in my 6.5 foot walking staff and my friends' metallic poles; instead they put it in the plane cargo for free. I am not sure they will do this too in other airports, though.

My experience with Ryanair for the last 6 years that they put them in the hold for free. Never had any trouble retrieving several pairs of poles at the destination.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
The simple answer is no. The Ryanair luggage regulations specifically prohibits walking or skiing poles in the cabin, and you need a doctor's note to be able to take a walking stick if you have mobility problems. Not sure why any security staff would allow you into the cabin with long sticks with pointed metal ends and frankly I am glad they don't. Also the security staff at Santiago airport are notorious for confiscating poles, and many airlines will put them in the hold for you for free, so just ask before you try to get them past security in your bag.
Also not sure why pilgrims have adopted this throwaway attitude to poles, there is often a mention of 'buy there and leave them in Santiago' - well if you don't want to take them home, where are you planning on dumping them? Who will be responsible for recycling or disposing of them? I know the pilgrim office in Santiago has a lot of leftover poles, so if you land in Santiago en route to Sarria or the Inglés, maybe see if they have a pair you can use for the week?
Mine are Pacerpoles with a large, angled grip, so I can't just buy when I get there. I post them to my first accommodation (always send them a message or call to let them know), it is cheaper than checking them in on two flights, and I would never put my pack in the hold. Then in Santiago I post them back to myself again using the binbag and printed label I have carried with me, and just need to borrow some packing tape at the post office. Safe, cheap, easy.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
When flying back from Santiago to Málaga last June, they did not let me bring in my 6.5 foot walking staff and my friends' metallic poles; instead they put it in the plane cargo for free.
My experience with Ryanair for the last 6 years that they put them in the hold for free.
Thank you both for this confirmation. Putting walking poles in the hold for free is a policy of all airlines departing from Santiago de Compostela.

So no need to throw away your poles in Santiago, no need to post them to your home address, no need for an advance purchase of a checked baggage allowance just for your poles.
 
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Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
I fly out on the 20 March with Ryanair. I have booked my rucksack as hold luggage due to sharps and other stuff in it. I would like to take my walking poles on as cabin luggage which are about 60 cm when collapsed. Has anybody taken theirs on and was there a problem? They are too long to fit in my rucksack and would poke out of the top leaving them prone to being broken or injuring the staff. Cheers. Dave
My poles are 60cm when collapsed so were too big for the 55CM bag, I found I could pull the poles apart so the longest piece was less than 55cm so could fit in the bag.
Another problem with Ryanair is you do not know what their baggage rules are from day to day.
For my return from Santiago I have had to, unfortunately, book with Ryanair for one segment and have opted to check the bag.
Normally I would not use Ryanair if someone paid me, but in this case the flight was about 300GBP cheaper.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
We put our Z-fold poles inside our backpacks when we flew Ryan Air from Frankfurt to Porto last April and back. No problems. Had paid for premium seating, so could have checked them for free, but didn't need to. Spain has more of a problem with the poles than Portugal perhaps?
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
@Jodean I'm glad that worked for you, but if you look at Ryanair's cabin luggage policy you are not allowed to take them onto the plane. I have spoken to security staff at several airports and all of them have told me they would never allow walking poles or anything that could be construed as a weapon into the cabin, so I wish people would stop telling these stories about how they have cleverly got away with breaking the rules which are after all there for our protection. If you fly Ryanair, or most other airlines, you should either check the poles in, with or without the pack, or you could post the poles to your first destination. And if you don't, don't be surprised if they tell you to go back and check them in for a fee or confiscate them!
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
I wasn't planning on breaking the rules. I had an extra bag for them to check, but they just waved us on board with the bag and the pack. Both coming and going. This wasn't a case of let me see how I can break the rules.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
@Jodean Fair enough, you were at least prepared to check them, but every year the forum is full of stories of how people got their poles on the plane, and someone will be arriving at an airport expecting that to go smoothly and get a big surprise. Please everybody, be prepared to check your poles or post them rather than take the chance to have them confiscated!
 

Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
Hiking poles are on the prohibited item list. See:

Funny enough. I travel several times to caminos and aldo throug Stansted UK.
And infact I asked the security in UK and they respond that there was no problem.
On the other hand I saw a note somewhere in Casa forum that EU made a rule that walkingsticks in fact is to be allowed.
I traveled 7 times out og Santiago with my sticks collapsed and the point taken off. BUT today they would not allowed them. And asking about dokumentation he would (could not) give it.
Please advise

And here is my question:
Can somebody in here assist me with any docomentation for yes or no to the sticks INSIDE your backpack.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Can somebody in here assist me with any docomentation for yes or no to the sticks INSIDE your backpack.
Time for someone to post the standard forum reply into this thread, I think ...
 
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nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
OK. Walking poles are in general NOT allowed into the plane. They are on the list of prohibited items on the Ryanair website. The fact that some people get away with it does not mean it is allowed. Collapsing them changes nothing. Tucking them into the pack changes nothing. Taking the tip off and then carrying it in the same pack changes nothing. They are on the list of prohibited items. But by all means keep doing it until they get confiscated if you can afford it. I have Pacerpoles and post them to my first accommodation - cheaper than checking them, safer than risking having them confiscated.
 
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Espee84

...
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés June/July 2018
VdlP- hatching plans
As above. This has been covered many times before on the forum. Worth being aware that some/?many airlines will check your poles in for free on your return journey if you have done the Camino (including Vueling from A Coruña - for info). Worth calling airline to check.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
In Santiago, security will not let any walking poles through in ones rucksack
However if you go to the desk of your airline, they will put them in the hold for free.....applies to all airlines....this is special for Santiago only....not sure if they need proof of having walked the Camino...any Camino..they may need to see Camino passport or compestela..though not sure about this.
Stansted security will not allow walking poles in ones rucksack any longer.
Annette
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Found it! Ryanair terms and conditions for carriage:

8.4.9 Pointed/edged Weapons & Sharp Objects must be carried in checked baggage; pointed or bladed articles capable of causing injury, including axes & hatchets, cleavers, arrows and darts, crampons (grappling iron, hooked bar of iron, or plate with iron spikes used in mountaineering), harpoons & spears, ice axes & ice picks, ice skates, knives with blades of more than 6 cms including lockable or flick knives, ceremonial, religious and hunting knives, made of metal or any other material strong enough to be used as a potential weapon, meat cleavers, machetes, open razors and blades (excluding safety or disposable razors with blades enclosed in cartridge), sabres, swords and swordsticks, scalpels, scissors with blades more than 6 cms as measured from the fulcrum, ski and walking/hiking poles, throwing stars, tradesman's tools with a blade or a shaft of more than 6 cms that have the potential to be used as a pointed or edged weapon, e.g. drills and drill bits, box cutters, utility knives, all saws, screwdrivers, chisels, crowbars, hammers, pliers, wrenches/spanners, blow torches.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
On the other hand I saw a note somewhere in Casa forum that EU made a rule that walking sticks in fact is to be allowed. [...] Can somebody in here assist me with any docomentation for yes or no to the sticks INSIDE your backpack.
I recently travelled through Santiago airport and paid particular attention as this topic comes up from time to time and can generate inaccurate or conflicting comments.
  • Prohibited items in cabin baggage according to current EU legislation are:
    • objects with a sharp point or sharp edge capable of being used to cause serious injury including [short list of items by way of example but no mention of walking poles]
    • objects capable of being used to cause serious injury when used to hit, including [short list of items by way of example but no mention of walking poles]
So, walking poles are neither explicitly included nor explicitly excluded in the list of prohibited items in cabin baggage. In previous EU law, now no longer in force, they were included in such a list as "ski and walking/hiking poles" and many incarnations of this expired list are living long and happy lives on the internet.​
  • In Santiago airport - I've never seen this elsewhere - there is a notice just before you enter the security screening area that says that they regard walking poles as objects with a sharp point and/or as blunt objects that can be used for hitting and injuring another person. I think the notice is only in Spanish. I didn't write it down, perhaps someone can remember the exact wording?
This means: Santiago airport classifies walking poles in any shape or form as prohibited items in cabin baggage. [I know about walking aids but they are not a topic here].

The screening staff at Santiago airport also asks - at least they asked me - whether you have a laptop or walking poles in your backpack. Again something I've never been asked in any other airport as they usually just ask about laptops.

BTW, I travelled without poles.
 
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verose

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014
In Toulouse in France the Ryanair checkin desk person insisted that poles <were permitted>. At the extensive security line I was sent back to Ryanair desk who refused to believe that security would not permit walking poles. Checking the poles on their own then became a logistic nightmare as Ryanair wouldn’t put them in a plastic bin. At Madrid airport I was told the same at Iberia checkin: poles permitted. Security sent me back to check them in. Iberia now declared that one backpack and one pair of poles is 2 pieces of luggage!!! and wanted to charge for the extra ‘baggage’. Solution: use the plastic wrap service - have poles and backpack wrapped into <one> piece of luggage to check in.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Found it! Ryanair terms and conditions for carriage:

8.4.9 Pointed/edged Weapons & Sharp Objects must be carried in checked baggage; pointed or bladed articles capable of causing injury, including axes & hatchets, cleavers, arrows and darts, crampons (grappling iron, hooked bar of iron, or plate with iron spikes used in mountaineering), harpoons & spears, ice axes & ice picks, ice skates, knives with blades of more than 6 cms including lockable or flick knives, ceremonial, religious and hunting knives, made of metal or any other material strong enough to be used as a potential weapon, meat cleavers, machetes, open razors and blades (excluding safety or disposable razors with blades enclosed in cartridge), sabres, swords and swordsticks, scalpels, scissors with blades more than 6 cms as measured from the fulcrum, ski and walking/hiking poles, throwing stars, tradesman's tools with a blade or a shaft of more than 6 cms that have the potential to be used as a pointed or edged weapon, e.g. drills and drill bits, box cutters, utility knives, all saws, screwdrivers, chisels, crowbars, hammers, pliers, wrenches/spanners, blow torches.
Congrats! Did you sell your stuff, by the way????
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I added my poles to my back bag then I wrapped them and bag with ceran foil and then dropped them of at the baggage check in. No problems now. In case you are mobility impaired and have an official document you may have a good chance they let it with you on board, but otherwise why bother just check them in with your bag.
 

Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
[Q

  • In Santiago airport - I've never seen this elsewhere - there is a notice just before you enter the security screening area that says that they regard walking poles as objects with a sharp point and/or as blunt objects that can be used for hitting and injuring another person. I think the notice is only in Spanish. I didn't write it down, perhaps someone can remember the exact wording?
This means: Santiago airport classifies walking poles in any shape or form as prohibited items in cabin baggage. [I know about walking aids but they are not a topic here].

It is correct that walking poles WITH SHARP POINTS is pohibited. BUT and there is a but. If the walking poles do NOT have sharp points they will not be a wapon. And at the AENA gives the securitystaff opportunity to check the walking poles if the have a sharp point or not. And again if not it is not a wopan.

OR.........???????
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
OR.........???????
There’s a considerable body of discussion about if, when and how a walking pole might be a weapon on this forum and elsewhere. Quite impressive actually 😉. My take on it is simple: there are information notes in Santiago airport about walking poles (I’m talking about the physical airport and not their website) that I had never seen in other airports and I was asked by security staff whether I had poles in my backpack which I had never been asked elsewhere. That’s all I’m willing to contribute to this question. 😊
 

Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
There’s a considerable body of discussion about if, when and how a walking pole might be a weapon on this forum and elsewhere. Quite impressive actually 😉. My take on it is simple: there are information notes in Santiago airport about walking poles (I’m talking about the physical airport and not their website) that I had never seen in other airports and I was asked by security staff whether I had poles in my backpack which I had never been asked elsewhere. That’s all I’m willing to contribute to this question. 😊
Just been there last week but never saw any signs about walking poles is pohibited IN carru-on lugage.
Couldbyou tell where???
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Just been there last week but never saw any signs about walking poles is pohibited IN carru-on lugage. Could you tell where???
Shortly before you enter the area with the security lines: at the counter where you can dispose of liquids (see photo) and on the glass screen or door directly before the security area (just text and I didn’t take a photo).

B6903917-31DD-4400-B071-B84CADF503D9.jpeg
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Funny enough. I travel several times to caminos and aldo throug Stansted UK.
And infact I asked the security in UK and they respond that there was no problem.
On the other hand I saw a note somewhere in Casa forum that EU made a rule that walkingsticks in fact is to be allowed.
I traveled 7 times out og Santiago with my sticks collapsed and the point taken off. BUT today they would not allowed them. And asking about dokumentation he would (could not) give it.
Please advise

And here is my question:
Can somebody in here assist me with any docomentation for yes or no to the sticks INSIDE your backpack.
@Flem, the current situation has been addressed more than adequately, but you might be interested in a little recent history. A few years ago, the TSA drafted a revision of the carry-on rules that relaxed many of the more draconian provisions that had been introduced over the years in response to various terrorist incidents using or on aircraft. This included relaxing the rules on walking poles. As it transpired, while other restrictions were relaxed, those relating to walking poles were not.

And as an aside, and I haven't checked this recently but it was the case when I last did check, walking poles are listed in the section of restrictions relating to items that might be used as a striking weapon. It is not, as some people here seem to think, because they have sharp points that might be used as a cutting or piercing weapon. So the nature and shape of the points would not be particularly relevant to any discussion on whether banning them from the cabin is a sensible thing to do.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
@Flem, I usually don’t quote from airport websites but will make an exception for Barajas in Madrid because I think they are up to date and clear on this controversial forum topic (walking poles and specific Spanish airports). They say: there is no definite list of prohibited items; it’s up to the security personel; your airline may allow an item in cabin luggage but security will not and vice versa. They explicitly say that walking poles are “ambiguous objects”.

No hay una lista concreta o definitiva de objetos peligrosos debido a su ambiguedad (bastones, trípodes, accesorios deportivos, etc.); la decisión final queda en manos del personal de seguridad.

Recuerde que el hecho de que su aerolínea acepte ciertos artículos ambiguos cómo equipaje de mano, éstos pueden no ser admitidos en la zona de seguridad en los controles de seguridad posteriores, o viceversa
.

 
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Flem

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 - 2019 several caminos (7 differents)
Thanks a lot for your info. And kind of interesting does the info not mentioned walking poles.
And saying that it also is kind of interesting that in the AENA's rules for airport security gives the staff oppotunity to check if the walking poles is a wapon or not. If i.e. you take of the sharp point og the walking poles it do not apply as dangerous further more if it is inside your carry-on luggage.
And as all walking poles are rejected I ask myself is this just a securehysteria at the Guardia Civil?? And that is a big problem for travelers.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Thanks a lot for your info. And kind of interesting does the info not mentioned walking poles.
And saying that it also is kind of interesting that in the AENA's rules for airport security gives the staff oppotunity to check if the walking poles is a wapon or not. If i.e. you take of the sharp point og the walking poles it do not apply as dangerous further more if it is inside your carry-on luggage.
And as all walking poles are rejected I ask myself is this just a securehysteria at the Guardia Civil?? And that is a big problem for travelers.
"Some do, some don't"
"Some will, some won't"
We all have stories to tell re poles in rucksacks!

Honestly Flem, why is this a problem for travellers?
Just put the poles in the hold..or, as I said earlier, all airlines flying from Santiago will put poles in the hold for free...a special confession for pilgrims I believe.

Also there are many threads .....with answers on this subject on the forum so why be driving yourself mad for answers that may not suit you.

Whether it's hysteria , or not,on the part of the Guardia Civil is hardly relevant ..they are the ones getting you through security and I certainly wouldn't argue with them
Best wishes
Annette
 

OLDER threads on this topic


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