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Walking surfaces (and appropriate footwear)

Ashland293

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
 
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trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
Not a ton of asphalt. But very varied surfaces.


Camino paths.jpg
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Actually it's better than 50 / 50 according to the John Brierley Guide.
I just added up the sections.

He categorises the paths on each section into 3 types.

  1. Natural paths. Including gravel 'senda'.
  2. Secondary roads
  3. Main roads.
If I add up all the natural path distances it comes out to 538.1 kms. (69% of the distance).
So about 240 kms of asphalt/concrete.

Though some of those 'natural' paths might also include old roman roads, that can be hard on the feet too!

...
 

Walkerooni

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
Exactly right, Robo. However “natural path” should not necessarily be assumed to be a nice forested path. It may be many km of vertical rock or round shifting boulders on a tough downhill, or deep mud underfoot. All great compared to cobbles or asphalt in my opinion. I remember chatting with people who commented how the movie “The Way” romanticized the walk, as they never showed what they were walking on!
 
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tomnorth

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
I ran the numbers on this based in the Brierley guidebook. I’ve attached a pdf. The answer is the 66% is on a path or track, 27% is on a quiet road and 7% is on a main road.
 

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Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I ran the numbers on this based in the Brierley guidebook. I’ve attached a pdf. The answer is the 66% is on a path or track, 27% is on a quiet road and 7% is on a main road.

Interesting. I have different numbers in my Brierly guide.
He must update the figures each time he rewrites the guide.
But the overall % is similar.
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
Hi Ashland
My advice would be not to use running shoes they are not designed for long distance walking. I say this as an experienced distance runner (14.17 for 5K and 29.58 for 10K) and a Level 4 distance running coach). I have also been on the Camino 4 times completing it 3 times and once coming home ill. I use La Sportiva walking boots and Teva trekking sandals. The terrain is widely varied and the boots give support on rough ground and the sandals are good for the evening and lighter days. Running shoes are good for a maximum of 500 miles and the support will have gone long before this on the Camino. Hope this helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
Hi Ashland
My advice would be not to use running shoes they are not designed for long distance walking. I say this as an experienced distance runner (14.17 for 5K and 29.58 for 10K) and a Level 4 distance running coach). I have also been on the Camino 4 times completing it 3 times and once coming home ill. I use La Sportiva walking boots and Teva trekking sandals. The terrain is widely varied and the boots give support on rough ground and the sandals are good for the evening and lighter days. Running shoes are good for a maximum of 500 miles and the support will have gone long before this on the Camino. Hope this helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
I suggest people use whatever works for them. I found "trail runners" (Merrell Moabs or Hoka One Ones in my case) worked better than hiking boots for me, and many on this forum who have walked multiple long Caminos have reported the same. The Camino is not the same as a long distance run nor is it the same as a long distance wilderness hike like the AT or PCT. It is its own thing.
 
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Kev&Kath

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - Oct/Dec 2021
VdlP - Apr/Jun 2023
Exactly right, Robo. However “natural path” should not necessarily be assumed to be a nice forested path. It may be many km of vertical rock or round shifting boulders on a tough downhill, or deep mud underfoot. All great compared to cobbles or asphalt in my opinion. I remember chatting with people who commented how the movie “The Way” romanticized the walk, as they never showed what they were walking on!
Very true Walkerooni. The descent into Molinaseca never makes it into the promo videos! That one certainly came as a 'surprise' for me!
 

Tandem Graham

E ultreia e suseia, Deus adjuva nos
Past OR future Camino
Bike UK-SdC, Lana
Walk Le Puy-SdC
'22: VDLP
It depends what the OP means by 'running shoes'. Some road runners have very little tread-grip, so risk wearing out and allowing the wearer to slide on wet or loose surfaces.
Some trail runners are great for tread depth and grip but have very little cushioning, so the feet will tire quickly, particularly on hard surfaces including asphalt.
Everyone's feet and gaits are different, but my compromise has been:
* hiking shoes (Lowa Renegade Low) in the colder/wetter seasons OR
* cushioned, breathable trail runners (Hoka Clifton or Speedgoat) or hiking 'sieves' (enclosed chunky sandals, by Keen or Merrell) in the hot and drier seasons.
Whatever shoes you choose, do some trial hikes at home carrying your loaded pack. Much easier to experiment at home than on the trail.
Having said that, Decathlon is a major European sportswear retailer offering choice and value, and many pilgrims visit their stores (eg in Pamplona) in the first week of their Camino, to buy lighter footwear.

Buen Camino!
 
Past OR future Camino
2011 (Sarria to Santiago) 2013 (St. Jean to Burgos); 2014 (Burgos to Santiago); Portuguese (2018)
If by "hard surfaces" you mean sidewalk type concrete, the Frances has some, but not tons, of this -- mostly going into and out of larger cities. Concrete-like roads on the Camino are fairly rare.

But please realize that there is not a lot of what I think of as natural path (e.g., through the woods) surfaces on the Frances. There is a lot of gravel. I just re-walked the Frances in October/November and found myself longing for asphalt because my feet hurt from the gravel. Sometimes there was an option to walk in the street on gravel and I did that.

What works for me -- one pair of lightweight hiking mid-rise boots or trailrunners. Be sure your shoes have a good (newish) hiking depth soles. I buy my Camino shoes a full size bigger than what I wear for shorter hikes, On my 2021 Camino, I grabbed a somewhat older pair and had to add a second layer of insert so that the gravel did not hurt my feet so much. Thank heavens my shoes were big enough to accommodate two layers of inserts.

For my back-up footwear, I bring Teva sandals (a good adjustable lightweight pair that is built for hiking). I use these for showering/laundry and they are supportive enough to wear during the day if I need a break from my regular hiking shoes.

Mistakes from prior Caminos -- flip-flops (not sturdy enough as back-up and, when forced to be used as back-ups due to swollen feet -- painful) and closed toe hiking sandals (again -- if your feet are swollen and/or you have blisters on your toes, these can be useless or at least painful).

Note -- the asphalt is not nearly as appealing in the warmer months.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
I found "trail runners" (Merrell Moabs or Hoka One Ones in my case) worked better than hiking boots for me, and many on this forum who have walked multiple long Caminos have reported the same.
I call my Moab's walking or hiking shoes but beyond this quibbling they worked well for me on a 350 mile trek from Barcelona to Pamplona. They still have life in them even with months of pre-camino use and two years use post-camino. I bought them a half size larger but I'm considering getting my next pair a full size larger. And my sizing & buying was done after soon after a few hours hiking with older boots.
 
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John Ferguson

Member
Past OR future Camino
The French Way May/June (2015) Complete.
Completed Porto Way from Lisbon May(2017).
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
I found the Way to be very aggressive. I had a trail runner and they broke down half way through. On my second Way I wore a ankle hiking boot, and although they were heavy, they met the need.
 

Rick M

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 22)
Sept 21
Hi Ashland
My advice would be not to use running shoes they are not designed for long distance walking. I say this as an experienced distance runner (14.17 for 5K and 29.58 for 10K) and a Level 4 distance running coach). I have also been on the Camino 4 times completing it 3 times and once coming home ill. I use La Sportiva walking boots and Teva trekking sandals. The terrain is widely varied and the boots give support on rough ground and the sandals are good for the evening and lighter days. Running shoes are good for a maximum of 500 miles and the support will have gone long before this on the Camino. Hope this helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
Running shoes are ideal for walking the Camino, I have done it multiple times in standard training shoes and would not consider anything else. You're right about durability though. The Saucony's I used to wear needed replacing before I got to the end. My current New Balance BFF will go the distance.....until one day they inevitably change the recipe on the plastic and I have to find a new BFF.

That said, I don't recommend them - I don't recommend anything. I wear them because they allow me to walk every day without blisters, plantar fasciitis, or any of the other critical injuries that pilgrims face. Every pilgrim needs to find a shoe, boot, sandal, or paper bag that works for them. They are all good choices, as long as the pilgrim is comfortable. There is nothing about the trail itself that demands "sturdy" footwear, the Camino is a walk in the park. A really long walk in the park.
 

Old Kiwi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Trail runners every time. I walked into my sports shoe shop and they had New Balance T590 v4 on special at half price. I bought them and they turned out to be perfect for me. SJPDP to Finisterre with hardly any wear. I already have another pair for my next Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
  1. Natural paths. Including gravel 'senda'.
  2. Secondary roads
  3. Main roads.
If I add up all the natural path distances it comes out to 538.1 kms. (69% of the distance).
So about 240 kms of asphalt/concrete.
I think almost every meter in Galicia is on crushed rock (hormigón), which he calls gravel, and which he includes in his "natural paths" category. IMHO, gravel is a very different kettle of fish than a "natural path." It is much more like pavement, because it produces the same kind of repetitive foot strike that is such a trigger of tendonitis. Others may be lucky and have bodies that are not sensitive to long distance hard surface walking, so I apologize if I appear like a whiner every time I point this out.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
When you get home, the sound you'll remember is the crunch crunch crunch of walking on limestone chip gravel. You'll also remember the clicking but that will be from the metal tips of walking poles on concrete - its a very distinctive sound.
Yes you will walk on some concrete and tarmac, and sometimes there is a choice, in which case I usually take a path over the road even if it is slightly longer.
But you will walk on a lot of gravel. I found it fine for my feet, far better than concrete or cobbles.
I do ensure I have plenty of cushioning, and I dont care if my shoes wear out completely. They have always lasted the whole Camino though.
All feet are different, I wore running shoes for my first two and they were fine, and sandals on my last Camino. Im now a sandal convert, I had no problems with stones, was able to use my orthotics, had plenty of cushioning, saved on washing socks, and had cooler feet overall.
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
My advice would be not to use running shoes they are not designed for long distance walking.
Unless, of course, they are the most comfortable fit for the design of your feet.

Running shoes may not be as durable as other types, in terms of keeping their comfort level/cushioning, so don't start a long Camino with an old pair. But I would not sacrifice comfort for durability.

Edited to add: Somewhere after about 600-800 km, I do notice that some of the cushioning has gone. If I were planning a 1000 km walk, I would look into ways to arrange a new pair. But that inconvenience wouldn't stop me from wearing the comfy shoes as long as they were comfortable. If sturdier trail runners were equally comfortable, I would take them in the first place.
 
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CA_Pilgrim

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
El Camino Real de California
Camino Frances (2017)
What works for me -- one pair of lightweight hiking mid-rise boots or trailrunners. Be sure your shoes have a good (newish) hiking depth soles. I buy my Camino shoes a full size bigger than what I wear for shorter hikes, On my 2021 Camino, I grabbed a somewhat older pair and had to add a second layer of insert so that the gravel did not hurt my feet so much. Thank heavens my shoes were big enough to accommodate two layers of inserts.
This is what works for me too. When you buy hiking shoes a full size larger (wide cut Merrell Moabs in my case), there is enough room in the shoe to accommodate extra padding under the shoe's inset (or orthotic in my case). This extra cushioning makes the pounding on pavement less irritating to the feet and it softens the impact of loose rock trails. I need a flat insert cushion so that my custom-made orthotics ride flat. I used to use Dr. Scholz Air Pillow inserts but have recently switched to a thicker flat memory foam insert that works much better. Here's the one on Amazon that works well for me. Note that you can trim it to fit your shoe.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Hi Ashland
My advice would be not to use running shoes they are not designed for long distance walking. I say this as an experienced distance runner (14.17 for 5K and 29.58 for 10K) and a Level 4 distance running coach). I have also been on the Camino 4 times completing it 3 times and once coming home ill. I use La Sportiva walking boots and Teva trekking sandals. The terrain is widely varied and the boots give support on rough ground and the sandals are good for the evening and lighter days. Running shoes are good for a maximum of 500 miles and the support will have gone long before this on the Camino. Hope this helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
I respectfully disagree.
I LOVE wearing trail runners and have done so for every one of my Caminos.
But this is one of the most discussed topics on any Camion forum.
Boots, in my opinion, are over-kill UNLESS you are a person who has grown up wearing them.
Flexible soles and light weight, combined with quick drying properties make trail runners my favorite Camino shoe.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I respectfully disagree.
I LOVE wearing trail runners and have done so for every one of my Caminos.
But this is one of the most discussed topics on any Camion forum.
Boots, in my opinion, are over-kill UNLESS you are a person who has grown up wearing them.
Flexible soles and light weight, combined with quick drying properties make trail runners my favorite Camino shoe.

I would agree @Anniesantiago .

Though I have walked 2,000 kms on Camino so far wearing lightweight boots.

I am desperate to cut the weight on my feet and wear trail runners, but have yet to find anything that is even close to the comfort of my boots.

I've bought three pairs of trail runners so far and still searching :(
I have Hokka, Altra and La Sportiva so far.

I don't really think it's about the brand or shoe style, but all about the fit.

If I 'had' to choose one of these three, so far it would be the Hokka.
But still not as comfortable as my boots.

I'll wear them on my next Camino though, as the reduced weight is necessary for my bad knees.

...
 
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alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
2009-2019: More than I remember...
To respond to the original question of the OP:

To my recollection, after many times on the CF, it is mostly not on asphalt. The CP (from Porto) is mostly on cobblestones: Very hard on your feet. From Lisboa: Much asphalt and highway walking. Bad. The VdlP is mostly not on asphalt. Just from my memory.
 
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Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I would agree @Anniesantiago .

Though I have walked 2,000 kms on Camino so far wearing lightweight boots.

I am desperate to cut the weight on my feet and wear trail runners, but have yet to find anything that is even close to the comfort of my boots.

I've bought three pairs of trail runners so far and still searching :(
I have Hokka, Altra and La Sportiva so far.

I don't really think it's about the brand or shoe style, but all about the fit.

If I 'had' to choose one of these three, so far it would be the Hokka.
But still not as comfortable as my boots.

I'll wear them on my next Camino though, as the reduced weight is necessary for my bad knees.

...
But you have yet to try New Balance on the SL-2 shoe last.
I'm tellin' you - it's da bomb!
 
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Ashland293

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future
Running shoes are ideal for walking the Camino, I have done it multiple times in standard training shoes and would not consider anything else. You're right about durability though. The Saucony's I used to wear needed replacing before I got to the end. My current New Balance BFF will go the distance.....until one day they inevitably change the recipe on the plastic and I have to find a new BFF.

That said, I don't recommend them - I don't recommend anything. I wear them because they allow me to walk every day without blisters, plantar fasciitis, or any of the other critical injuries that pilgrims face. Every pilgrim needs to find a shoe, boot, sandal, or paper bag that works for them. They are all good choices, as long as the pilgrim is comfortable. There is nothing about the trail itself that demands "sturdy" footwear, the Camino is a walk in the park. A really long walk in the park.
Rick M, BFF?
 

Rick M

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 22)
Sept 21
Rick M, BFF?
BFF = Best Friend Forever

I find myself "dating" shoes, since finding just the right one is a constant struggle for me. I have to walk multiple days back to back before for I KNOW that a shoe is ready to be my partner on Camino. Then we are in a committed relationship, and it becomes my BFF. Bliss, I buy many pairs. Then a year or two later, the manufacturer "dumps" me by producing a new and improved version of the shoe - same model number - but with a mark 5, or type C, or whatever update and a new look. It's a new shoe. I generally find that it's not quite right for me, the bloom is off the rose, and I'm back in the shoe dating game again, looking for my new BFF. I bought six pairs of my current BFF last summer before it got improved and the relationship soured. I have two and a half pairs left....just enough to get me through my spring Camino. Then I'm back on the street again, with a hungry eye (and uncomfortable feet), looking for The One, my new BFF.

And yes, I have a half dozen pairs of shoes in the closet that I garden, shop, have a drink, or go to a show in. We were close for a while, and I like them, but they just don't quite make me feel like I can walk pain free for a month in them. We're just friends.
 

Ashland293

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future
BFF = Best Friend Forever

I find myself "dating" shoes, since finding just the right one is a constant struggle for me. I have to walk multiple days back to back before for I KNOW that a shoe is ready to be my partner on Camino. Then we are in a committed relationship, and it becomes my BFF. Bliss, I buy many pairs. Then a year or two later, the manufacturer "dumps" me by producing a new and improved version of the shoe - same model number - but with a mark 5, or type C, or whatever update and a new look. It's a new shoe. I generally find that it's not quite right for me, the bloom is off the rose, and I'm back in the shoe dating game again, looking for my new BFF. I bought six pairs of my current BFF last summer before it got improved and the relationship soured. I have two and a half pairs left....just enough to get me through my spring Camino. Then I'm back on the street again, with a hungry eye (and uncomfortable feet), looking for The One, my new BFF.

And yes, I have a half dozen pairs of shoes in the closet that I garden, shop, have a drink, or go to a show in. We were close for a while, and I like them, but they just don't quite make me feel like I can walk pain free for a month in them. We're just friends.
I thought that was the model, which model new balance did you prefer for walking?
 

Rick M

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 22)
Sept 21
Not everyone appreciates my sense of humor. My current shoe is a New Balance 840v4, no longer available in my size and width. This does not matter, because you do not have my feet! The 860 and 880 are close, but no cigar. The 990 was totally wrong on the arches. The 1520 is the most comfortable shoe I ever tried on, but I can't walk more than a kilometer in it without discomfort in the hips due to the stiffer sole changing my gate.

Really, you do need to try for yourself. Half of the population will find a Nike they like (heel cups wrong for me) or an Addidas (toe box wrong shape) that they can try on, fit, and be happy with. I'm just not that lucky, maybe you are. I'm sure the people touting Altra's and Hoka's and whatever love them, and they work great for them on many Caminos. I wish they fit me, but they don't. Maybe they will fit you.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
BFF = Best Friend Forever

I find myself "dating" shoes, since finding just the right one is a constant struggle for me. I have to walk multiple days back to back before for I KNOW that a shoe is ready to be my partner on Camino. Then we are in a committed relationship, and it becomes my BFF. Bliss, I buy many pairs. Then a year or two later, the manufacturer "dumps" me by producing a new and improved version of the shoe - same model number - but with a mark 5, or type C, or whatever update and a new look. It's a new shoe. I generally find that it's not quite right for me, the bloom is off the rose, and I'm back in the shoe dating game again, looking for my new BFF. I bought six pairs of my current BFF last summer before it got improved and the relationship soured. I have two and a half pairs left....just enough to get me through my spring Camino. Then I'm back on the street again, with a hungry eye (and uncomfortable feet), looking for The One, my new BFF.

And yes, I have a half dozen pairs of shoes in the closet that I garden, shop, have a drink, or go to a show in. We were close for a while, and I like them, but they just don't quite make me feel like I can walk pain free for a month in them. We're just friends.
I understand that situation exactly. I usually buy 2 when I find THE ONE, now 'the one' is so elusive, I think I need to buy 4.
 
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Peregrinopaul

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
VdlP(2012) Madrid(2014)Frances(2015) VdlP(2016)
VdlP(2017)Madrid/Sanabres/Frances reverse(2018)
Seems like most people have ignored the thread title.
 

Ashland293

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future
Not everyone appreciates my sense of humor. My current shoe is a New Balance 840v4, no longer available in my size and width. This does not matter, because you do not have my feet! The 860 and 880 are close, but no cigar. The 990 was totally wrong on the arches. The 1520 is the most comfortable shoe I ever tried on, but I can't walk more than a kilometer in it without discomfort in the hips due to the stiffer sole changing my gate.

Really, you do need to try for yourself. Half of the population will find a Nike they like (heel cups wrong for me) or an Addidas (toe box wrong shape) that they can try on, fit, and be happy with. I'm just not that lucky, maybe you are. I'm sure the people touting Altra's and Hoka's and whatever love them, and they work great for them on many Caminos. I wish they fit me, but they don't. Maybe they will fit you.
I hear you, I’ve tried Homs not a fan. Most of my sneakers are New Balance,
 
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Ashland293

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future
I hear you, I’ve tried Homs not a fan. Most of my sneakers are New Balance,
Big fingers, switch from New Balance to Hoka was not a fan. Back to NB, have 990 and 860v11, love the 990 but can do long distance plus they are very heavy. But I do like the 860v11, just concerned with them wearing down half way thru the Camino.
 

Rick M

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 22)
Sept 21
Big fingers, switch from New Balance to Hoka was not a fan. Back to NB, have 990 and 860v11, love the 990 but can do long distance plus they are very heavy. But I do like the 860v11, just concerned with them wearing down half way thru the Camino.
I have not put enough miles on the 860 to give you any real evidence. The 840 does go the distance (just!) but that is no guarantee for its cousin. When I was wearing Saucony, I replaced them near the end, but before finishing. What a relief. Two thoughts: (A) Take two pairs, the 860 is a very light shoe. Use one for your "clean evening wear" and the other for your "dirty trail" wear. When (if?) the dirty one wears out, toss it, switch over, and buy some crocs for the evening. Option B is to buy new shoes in Leon. If you wear a common size, you can just pick up a fresh pair there. Either way, your concern is quite valid. I also am curious about the 860's durability, just for the record. The shoes you take should be tested once at home to make sure there are no defects (it happens), but otherwise brand new out of the box when you start out on Camino.

Final option. I walk enough in daily life to measure the durability of a shoe in a few months, without going on Camino. Start your training walks in the 860, and give it a month. You'll have a pretty good read on how well it's standing up by then.
 

WGroleau

Wandering Weirdo
Past OR future Camino
2015 & 2016 (partial)
Camino de Santiago French route, how much of the walking surface is asphalt/concrete or other surface?

Reason for question is footwear, I’m bring trail runner, great tread won’t wear, but they are very noisy walking on hard surface and the clicking drive me nuts.

So I want to bring a second pair of running shoes.
I walked a LOT in dress shoes without blisters. But three days in the city of Cardiff, got really bad blisters, so I tossed them in a charity bin and switched to some a pilgrim had abandoned in Villamayor. What were they? I don't know how to distinguish among tennis shoes, running shoes, etc. But that sort of thing. Those treated me well for thousands of kilometers on foot and bicycle.
 
F

Former member 99942

Guest
The final answer are these until June of 22
Link 1

After June of 22 get these

New model for long distance

There you go. Problem solved :).

All joking aside I would highly recommend these Saucony shoes. A little more rigid then your typical trail runner, very protective, yet still light weight and breathable. After testing a lot of shoes I liked them better than Brooks Cascadia and Caldera, Hoka challenger and speedgoat, or anything by Nike.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Hi Robo -
Have you now settled on the new shoes that you’re taking on the VDLP?
Buen Camino!
Not yet........

I can't find anything as comfortable as my old Salomon boots :rolleyes:

It's a toss up between Hoke and Altra. Both have their good points.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Past OR future Camino
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Not yet........

I can't find anything as comfortable as my old Salomon boots :rolleyes:

It's a toss up between Hoke and Altra. Both have their good points.
Best of luck Robo … that perfect pair of shoes is out there waiting for you … the Camino provides!
 
Past OR future Camino
cf (2), de la plata, cp. (2003 -2018)
When you get home, the sound you'll remember is the crunch crunch crunch of walking on limestone chip gravel. You'll also remember the clicking but that will be from the metal tips of walking poles on concrete - its a very distinctive sound.
Yes you will walk on some concrete and tarmac, and sometimes there is a choice, in which case I usually take a path over the road even if it is slightly longer.
But you will walk on a lot of gravel. I found it fine for my feet, far better than concrete or cobbles.
I do ensure I have plenty of cushioning, and I dont care if my shoes wear out completely. They have always lasted the whole Camino though.
All feet are different, I wore running shoes for my first two and they were fine, and sandals on my last Camino. Im now a sandal convert, I had no problems with stones, was able to use my orthotics, had plenty of cushioning, saved on washing socks, and had cooler feet overall.
Alas! no one seems to mention that the nice open sandals are not much fun when slipping thru the cow shite :)

Buen camino

:)

Samarkand.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Alas! no one seems to mention that the nice open sandals are not much fun when slipping thru the cow shite :)

Buen camino

:)

Samarkand.
Fortunately I havent had that experience either in sandals or running shoes..
We have a family dairy farm, so I'm well used to that smell though - nothing is worse than getting it in your hair!
 
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