A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Walking the Camino with Plantar Faciitis

Camino Badges

Michele Smaltz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sarria to Santiago) 2012
Really looking for encouragement. I’ve developed plantar fasciitis in my left foot. I am booked to walk my second Camino this Sept. (Astorga to Santiago). I have been training since January and now I need to stop walking/hiking for a while – which emotionally is taking its toll. Not sure how long the healing will take. I stretch, ice, wear inserts….blah, blah, blah. I guess I just worry about not training and how I will do on the actual walk. I plan on going to the gym and using the elliptical and bike to keep my stamina up (I’m 61). Has anyone walked the Camino with a flare-up? How did it go?
 

santiago_67

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances, Via de La Plata & Camino Portuguese
Future: Via de la Plata
Hi Michele, I developed plantar fasciitis in my right foot last July. I did not see a podiatrist until around the 1st of August. She gave me a set of exercises to do, 6 sessions of ultrasound therapy and a boot to wear at night (to keep my right tendon flexed). She also prescribed new orthotics which I received the week before I left on my Camino (Sept 24). So about 7 weeks of treatment and new orthotics and I was better, but not without some heel pain. Along with my orthotics I also wore some heel cushions in my New Balance boots. Some people say that a true pilgrim has to suffer physical pain - I guess I was a true pilgrim. I walked 335 miles of the Camino - Roncesvalles to Burgos (bus from Burgos to Leon) and then walked from Leon to Santiago. I started off very slowly with just a couple of 6 mile days. Then gradually started to walk longer distances. My longest day was about 16 miles. You will find tons of info on the Internet about plantar fasciitis and treatment along with many YouTube videos. For me, just time and the orthotics helped the most. I also recommend that you walk with trekking poles. I hope this is helpful and that you are able to do the Camino for it is an incredible experience. Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:
W

whariwharangi

Guest
See a physiotherapist soonest. If you still have pain before your trip ... I would recommend making other plans. There is potential for plantar fasciitis to go chronic. There is potential for the limping to cause other joint problems.
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
When mine was at its worst I got a series of shots. Yes they were steroids and I'm not the biggest fan of the stuff but it did wonders. If it ever got as bad as that again I would allow for the shots as a final effort.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
I developed it a few months before I left NZ in 2012. I saw a physio who told me how it was caused and what calf/ankle stretches to use to avoid it in the future. I didn't have to stop walking for too long before I got over it, then I was careful to stretch on future walks. Maybe I was lucky to get over it so quickly, but I was still able to walk fine a few months later on the Cluny route, which is quite demanding.
Margaret
 

Michele Smaltz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sarria to Santiago) 2012
When mine was at its worst I got a series of shots. Yes they were steroids and I'm not the biggest fan of the stuff but it did wonders. If it ever got as bad as that again I would allow for the shots as a final effort.
Thank you for the replies. I will be seeing a physical therapist, get fitted for custom orthotics, and shot(s) if needed. Not going in Sept. is not an option.
 

aghouse

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan on walking the Camino (2015)
Hey Michele! Have you heard about rolling your calves (soleus specifically) with a foam roller/rolling pin? While I was training for a 25k run I started having intense heel pain (especially in the mornings) that went away completely when I took the time to do this technique before and after my runs. Here's a video on how to do it (I would roll the sole of your foot and your calf). It is great for massaging out the tension in your calf which could be a large contributing factor to your plantar fasciitis pain (and if it works you won't have to pay for orthotics :D) Let me know how it goes!

http://www.trekoblog.com/?p=94
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
Lise, thank you so much for the tip about the rubber ball! I will definitely be taking one wherever I go from now on. Other suggestions such as tins of soup etc are a bit ... heavy. I thought about those wide elastic bands, but a ball is even better.
 

sriyantra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances September "2014"
Lise, thank you so much for the tip about the rubber ball! I will definitely be taking one wherever I go from now on. Other suggestions such as tins of soup etc are a bit ... heavy. I thought about those wide elastic bands, but a ball is even better.
Hi, I have posted this elsewhere but will repeat it again. It is an old wives remedy but I am an old wife (44 years today to be exact) but after months of plantar fascitis and after physio and orthotics I was missing out on so much in life that I gave it a go. I was in Rockhampton Australia limping around and a lady told me the following. Every night for 3 months (and I did do it for 3 months) you cut an orange in half and squeeze out the juice - do what you like with that. You put the orange cup on your heel and bandage it up - I put a plastic bag on as well. The pain slowly started to go after 6 weeks but I persisted and by 2 months it had nearly gone. At the 3 month point I had no problems and I haven't had again. It has been 6 years now. I also worked during that period so I was still on my feet every day. Our son is a scientist and so I asked him if he had a theory. He believed the orange cup acted as a splint and that there was probably something in the pith that entered the body through absorption. Worked for me. I even did this on an overnight train trip and the guy opposite had had a fair bit to drink. I think he was ready to swear off it because he thought he was seeing things with me wrapping 1/2 an orange on my foot! My thoughts and prayers are with you because I know how painful it is.

We are first timers leaving from SJPDP in September. If all goes well we should be in Astorga late September/early October.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
I CURED my Plantar Fascitis by going online and researching exercises to prevent it.

DO THE FOLLOWING EVERY DAY RELIGIOUSLY:

1) Get a tennis ball/rolling surface. Deep tissue massage.
2) STRETCHING, STRETCHING BEFORE AND AFTER WALKING IS CRUCIAL.
3) Magnesium before bed (Bananas), Fish Oil, Vitamin B5.
4) Strenghten exercises for the legs (you can do this sitting down)

JUST DO IT. Buen Camino!
 
I agree with the suggestion to get good walking shoes. I had developed plantar fascitis last year. I love to walk and hike and I had just set my tentative dates to walk the Camino with a friend. Between the plantar fascitis and then the development of iron-deficiency anemia, I was devastated. Since the plantar fascitis was getting worse and worse and I'm not much for doctors or one to engage in unnatural treatments if I can help it, and I wasn't ready to admit to getting old (a sentiment that I tie to orthodics!), I bought two pairs of Keens and threw away my ballerina flats. I now walk almost entirely in my Keens. It's a year later and I have very few issues with the plantar fascitis flare-ups. Now, I know that everyone is different, and I'm certainly not a doctor, but my own experience is that it's not always necessary to jump into the most expensive or invasive options available. As for the anemia, unfortunately, I've tried the more natural options (increased iron intake from food and supplements) and I was registering as iron-deficiency anemic even with two supplements a day. I'm having to do infusions at a clinic now and the doctors are testing to determine the cause. I'm still hoping and praying for a non-invasive resolution.
 

Michele Smaltz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sarria to Santiago) 2012
Wow..thank you for the wonderful suggestions. I will get agressive with stretching...and look into different types of walking shoes. I just miss my walks/hikes. Feeling hopeful for Sept.
 

Silvester

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Salvador (2014)
Camino Primitivo (2014)
Camino Muxia (2014)
Camino Fisterra (2014)
For what it's worth - in addition to stretches and ball massage - I started side-sleeping with a small pillow between my knees instead of splinting to keep my feet flexed all night. This was a tip from a therapeutic masseur. I've had no issues whatsoever for over a year now. But of course the inflatable pillow weighs 180g so I'm weighing up whether to use a couple of spare garments instead of taking the pillow! He also advised a second pillow along my spine to stop me rolling to my back - but I'll forego that one as I think my body now remembers to stay put.
 

Piccata

Pedestrian, at best
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Fall, 2012), Primitivo (Fall, 2015), Via de la Plata (Spring, 2016)
As someone who has struggled with Plantar Fasciitis on and off for 18 years, it was also important for me to have "after" shoes with excellent support. For me that was a pair of Chaco sandals, even though they are much heavier than Crocs. I did not have an active flare up before or during my Camino, perhaps because I have followed the advice in John Vonhof's book "Fixing your Feet" for some time. If you are still having an active flare up by the time you leave, there is an alternative to lugging a therapy boot: specialized knee socks that have a strap from the toe to the knee (I can't remember the brand name). These keep your foot flexed while you sleep, and would be a much less heavy and bulky alternative to a therapy boot. Also, be aware that there are many excellent physical therapists in Spain who are (from an American's perspective) very affordable. The word is fisioterapia (or something like that) and you can find them in the phone book of any town of at least medium size. If you don't speak Spanish, have someone at your hotel or albergue call and make an appointment for you if it gets really bad.
 

Olivares

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 1997 (Leon to Santiago); Sections Camino Frances: May 2011, May 2012, May 2013, October 2013, June-July 2014 (Sahagun to Santiago).
I second the suggestion of fisioterapia in Spain. Medicine in Spain is excellent; very, very good Doctors and surprinsingly affordable. Buen Camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
Yes, we have nothing but praise for Spanish health care. French health care is good too.
 

KentuckyJay

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Hiked Leon to Santiago in May, 2014.
Hiked Porto to Santiago in May, 2016.
Really looking for encouragement. I’ve developed plantar fasciitis in my left foot. I am booked to walk my second Camino this Sept. (Astorga to Santiago). I have been training since January and now I need to stop walking/hiking for a while – which emotionally is taking its toll. Not sure how long the healing will take. I stretch, ice, wear inserts….blah, blah, blah. I guess I just worry about not training and how I will do on the actual walk. I plan on going to the gym and using the elliptical and bike to keep my stamina up (I’m 61). Has anyone walked the Camino with a flare-up? How did it go?
Just finished Leon to Santiago. Am 68 years old and have had to deal with plantar for the past 10. Inserts do the trick for me and not the kind you purchase over the counter. Mine are prescription and cost about 80 U.S. Forget about the Brierly stages and walk just as far as you feel like. If your feet get sore after a few miles, simply stop for the day. There are accommodations galore and you will never get bored. Finally, you can also periodically choose to use the local Sherpas to move your pack ahead and just carry a daypack. I did a couple of times to give my aching neck and back a breather. As my new Camino pal Meg from Australia said, "The pack isn't getting the Compostela.) Buen Camino.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
Really looking for encouragement. I’ve developed plantar fasciitis in my left foot. I am booked to walk my second Camino this Sept. (Astorga to Santiago). I have been training since January and now I need to stop walking/hiking for a while – which emotionally is taking its toll. Not sure how long the healing will take. I stretch, ice, wear inserts….blah, blah, blah. I guess I just worry about not training and how I will do on the actual walk. I plan on going to the gym and using the elliptical and bike to keep my stamina up (I’m 61). Has anyone walked the Camino with a flare-up? How did it go?
Omg. I feel like I just wrote this. I too have been suffering from this since May and I'm am so worried and frustrated as I too am off to do my Camino In Sept. It happened after I bought a pair of sneakers that I didn't get fitter for my feet (I should know better) and now I'm paying for it. I have been seeing a physio and got the inserts and new shoes. Watched every video possible and have read as much as I can. I have a whole routine of stretchers that I do morning noon and night. Got a golf ball that has become my friend to roll under my foot. And although I haven't had the steroid shots I was sent to see a specialist about getting that done and his advice was since I am a hiker (and I do loads of hiking) the shots will only hide the pain but will not get rid of the problem. I am so worried as I fly out from Australia on the 27th Sept to Lisbon and I do not want to cancel. As for training well walking has been out. I have only managed max 4km most. I have been doing loads of bike riding and Pilates though so my fitness should be still there. So worried though. I though I would look through the forum and find out if anyone else has had the same problem. Read through all the advice and it is all good advice I guess I'm looking for a magic solution. I will however try the orange cupping as it's the only thing I haven't tried. It might be my magic. Got rid of a nasty bout of influencer by strapping onion under my feet so hey the orange might just work. Good luck Michele on your Camino I do hope you get there and I might just see you in Santiago. Oh and Michele. Bike ride is perfect exercise for hikers as it not only gets that heart rate up you are using all the important muscles you need to work to get you up and down those hills. Xx
Michelle x
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
One thing I did forget to add. I was also told and now doing was to take magnesium at night to help with muscle relaxation and fish oil as it is an anti inflammatory.
 

sriyantra

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances September "2014"
I am the orange miracle and I take heaps of magnesium and wish I had known 40 years ago that for some reason my body needs more mag than 'normal'. I have packed enough for the first two weeks and assume I can buy more in Spain. We leave aust on the 1st September so we are excited! Best wishes for your health. Buen camino
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
I am the orange miracle and I take heaps of magnesium and wish I had known 40 years ago that for some reason my body needs more mag than 'normal'. I have packed enough for the first two weeks and assume I can buy more in Spain. We leave aust on the 1st September so we are excited! Best wishes for your health. Buen camino
Thankyou siryantra. I hope I can become the orange miracle too. Have a safe trip and hope all is good with your feet. Buen Camino.
 

robertt

Active Member
I had a bad case of plantar for a couple of years. I cured it by accident walking through very rough country with a pack which was far too heavy. The constant clambering, climbing, sliding and irregular movement through the sandstone country north of Sydney made it go away and it never came back. You have to do everything wrong: go through country which never stays flat or even, carry too much weight and wear heavy, old-style Blundstones. You have to keep it up for days. Come to think of it, the plantar fascitis may be more pleasant than the remedy. But there you have it.

Buen camino

Rob
 

indyinmaine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - SJPdP to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2013
What's better than a golf ball is a prudoc
Omg. I feel like I just wrote this. I too have been suffering from this since May and I'm am so worried and frustrated as I too am off to do my Camino In Sept. It happened after I bought a pair of sneakers that I didn't get fitter for my feet (I should know better) and now I'm paying for it. I have been seeing a physio and got the inserts and new shoes. Watched every video possible and have read as much as I can. I have a whole routine of stretchers that I do morning noon and night. Got a golf ball that has become my friend to roll under my foot. And although I haven't had the steroid shots I was sent to see a specialist about getting that done and his advice was since I am a hiker (and I do loads of hiking) the shots will only hide the pain but will not get rid of the problem. I am so worried as I fly out from Australia on the 27th Sept to Lisbon and I do not want to cancel. As for training well walking has been out. I have only managed max 4km most. I have been doing loads of bike riding and Pilates though so my fitness should be still there. So worried though. I though I would look through the forum and find out if anyone else has had the same problem. Read through all the advice and it is all good advice I guess I'm looking for a magic solution. I will however try the orange cupping as it's the only thing I haven't tried. It might be my magic. Got rid of a nasty bout of influencer by strapping onion under my feet so hey the orange might just work. Good luck Michele on your Camino I do hope you get there and I might just see you in Santiago. Oh and Michele. Bike ride is perfect exercise for hikers as it not only gets that heart rate up you are using all the important muscles you need to work to get you up and down those hills. Xx
Michelle x
What's even better than a golf ball is a product call Rubz. I think it's only available in the US but essentially it's a cross between a golf ball and a porcupine! Those short stubs do miracles after a days walk.
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
What's better than a golf ball is a prudoc

What's even better than a golf ball is a product call Rubz. I think it's only available in the US but essentially it's a cross between a golf ball and a porcupine! Those short stubs do miracles after a days walk.
I will ask my physio tomorrow. Thanks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Sept-Oct (2015), Cammino di Francesco May-June( 2017), Portuguese (2019)
I was having heel pain and went to a physical therapist. Turns out the fat pad in my heel had split so the nerve endings in my heel were contacting the ground...ouch! Treatment was icing and a hard plastic heel cup/taping plus a good orthodic (power step maxx - amazon has best price in US) to help with pronation and has deep heel. The normal plantar fascitis stretches were NOT recommended in my case as I was already over stretching the fascia. Look up "fat pad syndrom" if you have similar symptoms.
 

vgen5122

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (August 19-sept 30,2013) (8/2017)
I walked the camino with Plantar Fasciitis. At times it did bother me. You will meet other people that suffer from the same affliction. I did. With everything you are doing, I think you will do fine. I will not lie to you. There will be days that your body will be ready and able to go, but your feet won't. I think you just have to listen to your feet and you will know when to stop and rest them. Buen Camino.
 

Mary Kate

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte to Santiago and Finisterre/Muxia (Sep/Oct 2014)
Omg. I feel like I just wrote this. I too have been suffering from this since May and I'm am so worried and frustrated as I too am off to do my Camino In Sept. It happened after I bought a pair of sneakers that I didn't get fitter for my feet (I should know better) and now I'm paying for it. I have been seeing a physio and got the inserts and new shoes. Watched every video possible and have read as much as I can. I have a whole routine of stretchers that I do morning noon and night. Got a golf ball that has become my friend to roll under my foot. And although I haven't had the steroid shots I was sent to see a specialist about getting that done and his advice was since I am a hiker (and I do loads of hiking) the shots will only hide the pain but will not get rid of the problem. I am so worried as I fly out from Australia on the 27th Sept to Lisbon and I do not want to cancel. As for training well walking has been out. I have only managed max 4km most. I have been doing loads of bike riding and Pilates though so my fitness should be still there. So worried though. I though I would look through the forum and find out if anyone else has had the same problem. Read through all the advice and it is all good advice I guess I'm looking for a magic solution. I will however try the orange cupping as it's the only thing I haven't tried. It might be my magic. Got rid of a nasty bout of influencer by strapping onion under my feet so hey the orange might just work. Good luck Michele on your Camino I do hope you get there and I might just see you in Santiago. Oh and Michele. Bike ride is perfect exercise for hikers as it not only gets that heart rate up you are using all the important muscles you need to work to get you up and down those hills. Xx
Michelle x
This could be me too! I began training in my new shoes in March, developed pain ..... custom made orthotics which have just been corrected finally (I hope) to deal with my gait and a bone spur in my heel, so I'm nowhere near as fit as I wanted to be by now. :( Also, plantar fasciitis (all in my right foot) and am trying the orange peel, eating bananas and taking magnesium tablets. Tried pilates and body balance in the local gym and managed to hurt my back so had to leave off that and it's fine now. Now that the orthotics are ok (?) I can finally begin looking for shoes ... So, yes, I'm getting a bit anxious about my Camino beginning on Sept 10th, but have decided that I'll go at my own pace and take as long as it takes! :) I'm planning to do the Camino del Norte and wondered about changing to the Frances because I gather the albergues are shorter distances apart. Still seven weeks to go so we'll see. I'm sure those of us who are slower will have our own good Camino experience and meet (and keep up with) those we are meant to meet. As many say here, 'the Camino provides'. Buen Camino.
Mary
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
I was having heel pain and went to a physical therapist. Turns out the fat pad in my heel had split so the nerve endings in my heel were contacting the ground...ouch! Treatment was icing and a hard plastic heel cup/taping plus a good orthodic (power step maxx - amazon has best price in US) to help with pronation and has deep heel. The normal plantar fascitis stretches were NOT recommended in my case as I was already over stretching the fascia. Look up "fat pad syndrom" if you have similar symptoms.
Ouch that sounds terrible. I had mine ultra sound so they could see exactly what was going on and there were two micro tears
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
I walked the camino with Plantar Fasciitis. At times it did bother me. You will meet other people that suffer from the same affliction. I did. With everything you are doing, I think you will do fine. I will not lie to you. There will be days that your body will be ready and able to go, but your feet won't. I think you just have to listen to your feet and you will know when to stop and rest them. Buen Camino.
Thankyou the reassurance is good.
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
This could be me too! I began training in my new shoes in March, developed pain ..... custom made orthotics which have just been corrected finally (I hope) to deal with my gait and a bone spur in my heel, so I'm nowhere near as fit as I wanted to be by now. :( Also, plantar fasciitis (all in my right foot) and am trying the orange peel, eating bananas and taking magnesium tablets. Tried pilates and body balance in the local gym and managed to hurt my back so had to leave off that and it's fine now. Now that the orthotics are ok (?) I can finally begin looking for shoes ... So, yes, I'm getting a bit anxious about my Camino beginning on Sept 10th, but have decided that I'll go at my own pace and take as long as it takes! :) I'm planning to do the Camino del Norte and wondered about changing to the Frances because I gather the albergues are shorter distances apart. Still seven weeks to go so we'll see. I'm sure those of us who are slower will have our own good Camino experience and meet (and keep up with) those we are meant to meet. As many say here, 'the Camino provides'. Buen Camino.
Mary
Oh I do hope it heals for you. I hate that feeling of not sure if able to do it. I have done the Del Norte and there are a lot of ups and downs and yes some distances to travel. The first week is (to me) the hardest as the hill are vicious and if there has been rain then the mud makes it harder. But very very beautiful walk. Travel safe. Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Hola Michelle (and anyone else with sore feet):
There's an old medical phrase "pain is nature's warning" - your feet really are the vehicle by which you achieve your Camino. So any prolonged / chronic pain can not be ignored. The stretching exercises and orthotics as well as additional cushioning between your feet and your shoes/boots are all recommended. Hopefully you have seen a podiatrist and had some sessions with the physio. If you still have pain, only you can judge how bad it is - say after a training walk, or a gym session. Putting up with the pain is one thing - but what you need to know is "will I do irrevocable damage" to my feet. If the medicos tell you YES then reconsider, if NO then start out with short days - say 10/12 km per day. As for having to walk the whole 780 km - well that again is something only you will be able to determine. Don't feel that you have let yourself down if you decide to have a few days rest, take a bus 100 km to cut out the really tough places. You only have to walk the last 100 km to qualify for your Compostela (BTW ignore anyone who tells you your not a true pilgrim if you do not suffer pain - the Camino is a challenge - but its YOUR Camino do it however you want!!) Buen Camino :)o_O:rolleyes:
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
Hola Michelle (and anyone else with sore feet):
There's an old medical phrase "pain is nature's warning" - your feet really are the vehicle by which you achieve your Camino. So any prolonged / chronic pain can not be ignored. The stretching exercises and orthotics as well as additional cushioning between your feet and your shoes/boots are all recommended. Hopefully you have seen a podiatrist and had some sessions with the physio. If you still have pain, only you can judge how bad it is - say after a training walk, or a gym session. Putting up with the pain is one thing - but what you need to know is "will I do irrevocable damage" to my feet. If the medicos tell you YES then reconsider, if NO then start out with short days - say 10/12 km per day. As for having to walk the whole 780 km - well that again is something only you will be able to determine. Don't feel that you have let yourself down if you decide to have a few days rest, take a bus 100 km to cut out the really tough places. You only have to walk the last 100 km to qualify for your Compostela (BTW ignore anyone who tells you your not a true pilgrim if you do not suffer pain - the Camino is a challenge - but its YOUR Camino do it however you want!!) Buen Camino :)o_O:rolleyes:
Great advice. My concern has been long term as I do hike a lot and also have the Via Francegena in my next year. It's my passion and don't want to compromise my feet in anyway. I have done the dr physio etc and still am. I guess I will have to judge it as it comes.
 

michryan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Del Norte 2011,Portuguese 2014, many different hikes throughout the world,Via Francegena 2015.
Great news! My foot is getting better I'm so happy. :). Done all the things that needed doing but have to say I think what was my magic was my ball. Thanks indyinmaine. That suggestion was fantastic. I walked 10 km's on Wednesday then did it again on Thursday and my foot is feeling good. Couldn't get passed 4kms a week ago. Hope the rest of you who are struggling with plantar fasciitis have success as I have. Again thanks to all that helped. :) :)
 

indyinmaine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - SJPdP to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2013
Can you let me know whether the ball you recommend is hard or soft or what size it is, please? This site doesn't say. I'd like to see if I can get it in UK but on Amazon there are so many sizes and types I'm confused. Thanks.
Mary
It's hard and the size of a golf ball. What it does is loosen the tight muscles and stimulate the circulation in the soles of your feet. They run about $6 here in the States.
 

peachluck

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
My 1st Camino begins Sept. 8, 2014.
SJPP to Santiago, Muxia, Fisterra, and ends in Lisbon.
Great video! Very accurate!

I'm a PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE THERAPIST who's specialized in DEEP TISSUE, SPORTS MASSAGE on athletes and hardcore hikers for over 20 years. I am very good at helping injuries and relieving pain, especially plantar fasciitis, shin splints, tight IT bands, leg cramps, lower back pain, etc.

I will be offering 10 - 20 min MASSAGES along the way to tired pilgrims focusing on problem areas: FEET, LEGS, HIPS, BACK, and SHOULDERS.
10 min - 10€,
15 min - 15€
20 min - 20€
My goal is to help fellow pilgrims in need, so I'm charging low rates that budgeted pilgrims can comfortably afford. My rates in the real world are substantially higher.

Starting Sept 8th 2014 in SJPP, I will be embarking on a long Camino to Santiago, Muxia, Finistere, and, God willing, ending in Lisbon.

Please look me up and say hi. This is my first Camino and I look forward to making new friends. I have a blue backpack with a bright yellow happy face reflector. I'll be wearing a black baseball cap and five finger shoes.
 

Mary Kate

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte to Santiago and Finisterre/Muxia (Sep/Oct 2014)
Great video! Very accurate!

I'm a PROFESSIONAL MASSAGE THERAPIST who's specialized in DEEP TISSUE, SPORTS MASSAGE on athletes and hardcore hikers for over 20 years. I am very good at helping injuries and relieving pain, especially plantar fasciitis, shin splints, tight IT bands, leg cramps, lower back pain, etc.

I will be offering 10 - 20 min MASSAGES along the way to tired pilgrims focusing on problem areas: FEET, LEGS, HIPS, BACK, and SHOULDERS.
10 min - 10€,
15 min - 15€
20 min - 20€
My goal is to help fellow pilgrims in need, so I'm charging low rates that budgeted pilgrims can comfortably afford. My rates in the real world are substantially higher.

Starting Sept 8th 2014 in SJPP, I will be embarking on a long Camino to Santiago, Muxia, Finistere, and, God willing, ending in Lisbon.

Please look me up and say hi. This is my first Camino and I look forward to making new friends. I have a blue backpack with a bright yellow happy face reflector. I'll be wearing a black baseball cap and five finger shoes.
Have a wonderful Camino. I'm sure many will appreciate your help.
Mary
 

molly.carey59

New Member
Really looking for encouragement. I’ve developed plantar fasciitis in my left foot. I am booked to walk my second Camino this Sept. (Astorga to Santiago). I have been training since January and now I need to stop walking/hiking for a while – which emotionally is taking its toll. Not sure how long the healing will take. I stretch, ice, wear inserts….blah, blah, blah. I guess I just worry about not training and how I will do on the actual walk. I plan on going to the gym and using the elliptical and bike to keep my stamina up (I’m 61). Has anyone walked the Camino with a flare-up? How did it go?
Are your inserts made of copper? I have heel pain and I can honestly say after just 2 days, it's much better.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
Hi Guys I am new to this thread,but have a feeling I will look in on this a lot more and be taking tips from you all. I have just being diagnosed with Plantar Faciitis by my doctor, it had flared up before my recent camino(Montpellier to SDC) but decided that it was a passing pain and I was determined to go anyway. I was generally ok for the 1st two weeks, there being a lot of rough and uneven surfaces, but after Toulouse where there is more flat surfaces and particularly on the Aragones route my heel took a pounding. When I get clear time I am going to read through this thread, So thanks for all your contributions and Buen Camino
 

peachluck

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
My 1st Camino begins Sept. 8, 2014.
SJPP to Santiago, Muxia, Fisterra, and ends in Lisbon.
Something to consider.... I too have a bit of plantar fasciitis from overuse/over exercise. Rubbing my feet and Achilles' tendon a couple times a day for a few minutes goes a long ways in relieving pain, as does stretching those areas.

For walking long distances I have found wearing compression socks specifically geared towards plantar fasciitis helps a lot! They reduce swelling and pain, at the same time support the arch. Compression socks are designed for athletes. They are light weight, thin, quick drying, and can be found on amazon.com for less $ than good hiking socks. They may prove to serve those with foot pain far better on the Camino than expensive hiking socks. They can be worn alone or underneath other socks. Food for thought...

I'm personally bringing 2 pairs with me.
 

peachluck

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
My 1st Camino begins Sept. 8, 2014.
SJPP to Santiago, Muxia, Fisterra, and ends in Lisbon.
Have a wonderful Camino. I'm sure many will appreciate your help.
Mary
Thanks Mary,
I hope to see you out there. Have a great day! :)
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
A common problem with what might be a simple solution...

If you have stairs or a sturdy box in your home and a backpack, timely relief for plantar fasciitis may be possible, according to a new study of low-tech treatments for the condition.

Plantar fasciitis, the heel pain caused by irritation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot, can be lingering and intractable. A recent study of novice runners found that those who developed plantar fasciitis generally required at least five months to recover, and some remained sidelined for a year or more.

More here...

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/15/heel-pain-treatment/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
 
Last edited:

Dennis D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - 2014
Francés - 2015
Francés - 2016
Francés - 2017
Francés - 2018
Francés - 2019
(2020 - ?)
Thanks for sharing. I'll give it a try. Buen Camino !
 

joeboybollo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (Sept.2014)
Inglese-(Sept.2015)
A common problem with what might be a simple solution...

If you have stairs or a sturdy box in your home and a backpack, timely relief for plantar fasciitis may be possible, according to a new study of low-tech treatments for the condition.

Seems like a good ,cheap answer to this annoying condition.I have just returned from a short(Sarria-SdeC) Camino and if the blisters were not enough Plantar Fasciitis made things more difficult.Stretching etc. had little effect and I do not like pain relief medication unless it is absolutely necessary. Thanks for this sole tip
Plantar fasciitis, the heel pain caused by irritation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot, can be lingering and intractable. A recent study of novice runners found that those who developed plantar fasciitis generally required at least five months to recover, and some remained sidelined for a year or more.

More here...

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/15/heel-pain-treatment/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
A common problem with what might be a simple solution...

If you have stairs or a sturdy box in your home and a backpack, timely relief for plantar fasciitis may be possible, according to a new study of low-tech treatments for the condition.

Plantar fasciitis, the heel pain caused by irritation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot, can be lingering and intractable. A recent study of novice runners found that those who developed plantar fasciitis generally required at least five months to recover, and some remained sidelined for a year or more.

More here...

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/15/heel-pain-treatment/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
@jirit, great recommendation from the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports article. Thanks.

As an aside, the NY Times article misquotes the PLOSone article. The original article identified the maximum time to full recovery for the relatively small sample (12) suffering plantar fasciitis in a larger study (254) as 308 days, well under the 'year or more' quoted in the newspaper article.
 

backpack45scb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2001 CF, 04-6 LP, 07 Port, 08-10 Arles, 11 Mozá,12-13 Gen-LP. 00-10 PCT, 15 Norte, 16 Primi
Both my wife and I have been afflicted with PF at various times. We've both hiked and backpacked thousands of miles. We got PF mostly in the earlier days, but now it is just there lurking, waiting for us to get careless and forget our normal precautions.

Use of a firm insert like green Superfeet, and avoidance of hard surfaces are two precautions. The pulling the toes towards the shin stretch will make a dramatic difference if you do it in the morning before getting up, and also whenever you take a break during your hiking day. Position is not too critical when doing this stretch, i.e. it is ok to bend your knees if needed to reach your toes. Just gently pull them towards your knee for 20 to 30 seconds.
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
A physio I went to suggested very similar heel raising/lowering to me some years ago. Seemed to be quite effective.
Margaret
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
This year was the first time I experienced this rather painful health challenge. The thing that seemed to work the best echos what was said above: each morning and each evening I spent five to ten minutes exercising each of my feet. Crossing my legs while sitting I would take the toes/front of the the foot and bend them back toward the leg and hold them there for a slow count of ten. I would repeat that two more times and then change feet and then repeat.

I don't recall exactly how long I had to exercise, but it was certainly several months. Regardless the exercise made it bearable and allowed me to walk with minimal discomfort. I quickly concluded that his had the potential to seriously disrupt one's life and I wanted to part in it. Though I no longer suffer from pain, I continue to exercise my feet a few times each week.
 
If you can't lift your body up with that leg yet, I would recommend the exercise that I tried. I would stand on a stair with the heal off and then lower my body. It's likely not the same full stretch as you would get with the towel lift approach, but gets in a good stretch. I was able to resolve my own plantar fasciitis issue using this exercise a few times daily within a few months.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
The excersise the New York Times describes worked for me. When I tried it 1st time I could feel something giving/releasing straight away in the left inner heel arch area, within 2 weeks of daily practising it I had forgotten about the complaint. Walked at least 50km of the Cote d' Opal at the end of October with no problems, however after buying some mids at the weekend, I have started to feel it again so back to the practice.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

karenfromcali

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances March/April 2014, Camino Frances Feb/March 2015. Camino Frances Feb/March 2016.
VERY much appreciated as I am struggling with this now and my camino is in 9 weeks. Have been wearing a brace at night, supports in my shoes and the recommended exercises with little relief. Will try this and pray it works.
Thank you.
 

hieudovan

DoVanHieu
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2012), VdLP (2014), CF (2017), Rota Vincentina (2018), Le Puy (2020)
A common problem with what might be a simple solution...

If you have stairs or a sturdy box in your home and a backpack, timely relief for plantar fasciitis may be possible, according to a new study of low-tech treatments for the condition.

Plantar fasciitis, the heel pain caused by irritation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot, can be lingering and intractable. A recent study of novice runners found that those who developed plantar fasciitis generally required at least five months to recover, and some remained sidelined for a year or more.

More here...

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/09/15/heel-pain-treatment/?_php=true&_type=blogs&_r=0
Thanks. I'd discovered this exercise but it did not include the rolled towel under the toes. I will now include the towel under the toes part in my exercise. BTW, this exercise is also effective with Achilles tendon "problems."
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
I bashed my feet in a fall while rock climbing in 1988. I have foot pain when I stand up for too long-- plantar fasciitis is the diagnosis, but the result of direct injury, not strain. Orthotics hurt! Hard shoes hurt. Soft cushy shoes with good arch support (transferring weight to the arch) helps. I am currently giving physical therapy yet another try. (My last attempt was in 1995.) He is suggesting gel inserts for my shoes, and I'm getting some today. Do they have gel inserts in Spain? If so at what stores? Pharmacies? I have to have to pack extras. Thanks!

We leave for our camino on March 20th. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SdeC: Oct 2011; SJPP-Leon, Oct 14; Tomar (PO)/SJPP Oct 15
It seems there are many versions of PF and I imagine each has its own specific cure but I developed it the first time I did the camino and afterwards I saw doctors, psysios, did exercises and tried standard orthotics bought in shops etc. all to no avail so eventually went to a podiatrist. He tested my feet on an electronic pad on the floor which I had to walk over several times and then he was able to show me my foot fall on the computer. Needless to say each foot had a different pattern and both were way off the norm. He reckoned I may well have had this deficiency since birth and only advancing age and walking the camino exposed it. Two different orthotics were made for my feet (and I have 2 pairs - one for boots which are slightly larger than the pair I use always in other shoes). They have transformed my walking which I now do pain free even on tarmac as on the camino, which I have done again since. Not only has the pain disappeared but I found that I was less tired at the end of a day's walking which I put down to walking better probably through not compensating for the pain. Incidentally these tailor made orthotics were not cheap. However, other things being equal they have undoubtedly considerably extended my walking life. Another gift of the camino!
 

Saramago

Pat
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - Spring (2014)
Frances- Spring (2015)
I bashed my feet in a fall while rock climbing in 1988. I have foot pain when I stand up for too long-- plantar fasciitis is the diagnosis, but the result of direct injury, not strain. Orthotics hurt! Hard shoes hurt. Soft cushy shoes with good arch support (transferring weight to the arch) helps. I am currently giving physical therapy yet another try. (My last attempt was in 1995.) He is suggesting gel inserts for my shoes, and I'm getting some today. Do they have gel inserts in Spain? If so at what stores? Pharmacies? I have to have to pack extras. Thanks!

We leave for our camino on March 20th. :)
I bought gel inserts at a sport store in Zubiri last year and at a pharmacy in Lourdes some years ago so can only presume they are available widely. I also spotted them at a sport store in Burgos while buying something else as they were right behind the cash register. Good luck and Buen Camino.
 

santiago_67

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Camino Frances, Via de La Plata & Camino Portuguese
Future: Via de la Plata
I was on the mend, but not fully recovered from plantar fasciitis when I walked the Camino in 2013. I had orthotics and gel/rubber inserts that I took with me and wore in Spain - I bought some other rubber inserts a couple of times along the way - almost every small village/pueblo has at least one pharmacy. The pharmacies along the Camino stock up on all the items that pilgrims need. Buen Camino!
 

elskedeen1

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan: Camino Frances 2017
Really looking for encouragement. I’ve developed plantar fasciitis in my left foot. I am booked to walk my second Camino this Sept. (Astorga to Santiago). I have been training since January and now I need to stop walking/hiking for a while – which emotionally is taking its toll. Not sure how long the healing will take. I stretch, ice, wear inserts….blah, blah, blah. I guess I just worry about not training and how I will do on the actual walk. I plan on going to the gym and using the elliptical and bike to keep my stamina up (I’m 61). Has anyone walked the Camino with a flare-up? How did it go?
I too have been suffering with severe plantar fasciitis courtesy of my employer not allowing is to sit in the hallways to chart. I am a nurse and 11.25 hours on my feet have caused a severe plantar fasciitis. My podiatrist had ordered a TENS unit for home use to help with my fascitis. I have also purchased new shoes from Hoka One One. They are extremely well cushioned and when I'm standing the weight is not on my heels. They have helped tremendously. Good luck on your walk. My goal is to walk the Camino to celebrate out 40th wedding anniversary in 2017. God willing my feet will not wreak havoc on my Camino.
 

Xandrae

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lake Tahoe Railroad (2016)
Placerville (2019)
In addtion,freeze a golf ball and massage the fascia. Roll the frozen golf ball under the foot, starting from the front and working your way back. Put good pressure on each spot—the medial, center and lateral positions—for 15 seconds before moving to the next area. Then, roll the ball back and forth over the entire foot.


www.westsidepodiatry.ca
604 876 8838
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
Thankfully I've never suffered from this, but it can stop a walk/hike/run in its tracks and prevent further forward progress. I know a couple people who suffer from this, its a painful problem for those who have to deal with it. Hopefully this article will help a few people here on this forum.

LINK TO STORY => http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/exercise/the-real-reason-you-have-plantar-fasciitis-and-how-to-fix-it-20150721


Plantar fasciitis can bring down even the strongest men. In sports, we see athlete after athlete sidelined because of this particular malady — a maddening diagnosis that can make one dread just getting out of bed to walk to the bathroom. It can be excruciating, and follows you around with no respite.

For as common as plantar fasciitis is, little is understood in the medical field about the causes of it. There is, however, consensus on what it is technically, an irritation or inflammation in the plantar fascia often accompanied by tiny tears in the fascia itself. While I agree that plantar fasciitis is an overuse injury, I have my own theory on the true cause.

In my clinical work, I have seen plantar fasciitis develop because people are not using their posterior chain efficiently while walking or running. I see two main issues associated with this foot pain: lack of hip extension and/or overuse of the soleus (your lower calf muscle), both of which cause your feet to get tight and your plantar fascia to overwork. Step after step, day after day, your gait is not efficient and forces are not transferred properly through the body, leading to injury.

Almost everyone needs to open up their hip flexors. We all know that sitting too much is wreaking havoc on our bodies, and there has been a spate of articles detailing all of the disheartening facts. In addition to all the other issues, tight hip flexors will cause a lack of hip extension and cause glutes to work inefficiently.

Here's a routine that will release your hip flexors, soleus, and get you back on track:

Hip Flexor ReleaseFor this release, use two lacrosse balls taped together.

  • Lay on your stomach and place the double lacrosse ball just below your hip bone.
  • Lean a tolerable amount of weight onto the lacrosse balls.
  • Bend the knee on the side of the release back to a 90 degree angle.
  • Swing your leg side to side in a tolerable range of motion.
  • Repeat this in 30-second to two-minute intervals.
Hip Thrust

  • Holding two dumbbells, lie with your upper back flat on a bench or table with your legs and low back off the edge and feet on the ground.
  • Place the dumbbell on your hips.
  • Dip your glutes down and then thrust back up, squeezing your glutes through the movement.
  • To make it more challenging, add a band around your knees just below the knee.
Calf Release

  • Sit with your calf on top of the lacrosse ball.
  • Place your other leg over the one you are releasing and roll yourself up and down over the ball.
  • Once you find a spot that is tender, stop and point your foot up and down for 30 seconds.
Plantar Fascia Release

  • Standing with a lacrosse ball or golf ball: Place the ball on the bottom of your foot.
  • With weight placed through your leg, gently roll the ball under your foot.
  • Once you find a spot that is tender, stop and point your toes up and down.
  • Roll on the ball for one to two minutes.
Calf Raises

  • Stand with chest against a stability ball, rested on a wall, legs straight out behind you until heel isn’t touching the floor.
  • Shift your weight all to one leg with the other leg resting on the back of the working leg. Slightly bend your knee.
  • Go up on your toes, then come all the way back down until heel touches the floor.
  • Repeat the motion with working leg straight. Perform exercise with foot pointing straight and foot turned outwards.
  • If this is too difficult, you can perform with both feet on the ground.


Read more: http://www.mensjournal.com/health-fitness/exercise/the-real-reason-you-have-plantar-fasciitis-and-how-to-fix-it-20150721#ixzz3gzzaPZhr
Follow us: @mensjournal on Twitter | MensJournal on Facebook


 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Latest posts

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 162 15.3%
  • May

    Votes: 261 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 81 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 22 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 304 28.6%
  • October

    Votes: 129 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top