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Walking through cancer. A thread for inspiration.

2020 Camino Guides

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
No one used to talk about this.
Which is ridiculous, as 1 in 8 of us will have to deal with it at some point.

I am thinking of @Anniesantiago today, as she faces a possible diagnosis.
Anyone who has been through this will know in their gut how that day feels - no matter how long ago it was.

Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I'll start.
I was meant to be walking in 2009.
But.
Surprise.
Instead I spent the summer awaiting a biopsy, and then surgery, then the recovering from it, and finally deciding what next.
The gory details of the story don't matter.
What matters is I can say that there is a far horizon where cancer isn't occupying the entirety of my consciousness.
And I wouldn't live one day differently, cancer included.
Life is precious and fleeting. I know that better now.
Cancer taught me vulnerability opens the heart like nothing else.
It showed me strength I didn't know I had.
And that love is all around us, when we don't try be an island.

The camino is waiting. She will wait as long as you need. But I was fit enough to walk distances surprisingly soon after surgery.
I got off relatively lightly. Not everyone does. But life does go on.
And knowing all that? Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, no matter what the outcome.

Deeply heartfelt prayers, Annie...and for any others, if you are in the same boat.
It's scary as heck, but taking one moment at a time you do get through it...just like on the camino.
May you have all blessings, and may your journey through this culminate in a celebratory Camino...boots on the ground in Spain!
 

Bagobev

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lisbon to Santiago (2017)
As a two time cancer survivor I can say that for me the waiting was the hardest, waiting for doctor appointments, waiting for test results, waiting for treatment: a day can seem like a year. I don't know you Annie but my thoughts are with you.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
I had breast cancer over 15 years ago now - 2 surgeries, chemo, 1 year of one drug, 5 years of another.

I agree 100% that the waiting for a diagnosis is the worst. Once you have a plan in place, it becomes do-able.

For the first week or 2 after diagnosis, I was very sad and upset. Lots of tears. However, one Sunday morning I woke up and thought "I'm going to live, so get on with things." From that point on, I dealt with it matter-of-factly. I even found the experience to be very interesting. Of course that was made easier because I had a good prognosis in spite of it being an aggressive type of cancer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
No one used to talk about this.
Which is ridiculous, as 1 in 8 of us will have to deal with it at some point.

I am thinking of @Anniesantiago today, as she faces a possible diagnosis.
Anyone who has been through this will know in their gut how that day feels - no matter how long ago it was.

Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I'll start.
I was meant to be walking in 2009.
But.
Surprise.
Instead I spent the summer awaiting a biopsy, and then surgery, then the recovering from it, and finally deciding what next.
The gory details of the story don't matter.
What matters is I can say that there is a far horizon where cancer isn't occupying the entirety of my consciousness.
And I wouldn't live one day differently, cancer included.
Life is precious and fleeting. I know that better now.
Cancer taught me vulnerability opens the heart like nothing else.
It showed me strength I didn't know I had.
And that love is all around us, when we don't try be an island.

The camino is waiting. She will wait as long as you need. But I was fit enough to walk distances surprisingly soon after surgery.
I got off relatively lightly. Not everyone does. But life does go on.
And knowing all that? Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, no matter what the outcome.

Deeply heartfelt prayers, Annie...and for any others, if you are in the same boat.
It's scary as heck, but taking one moment at a time you do get through it...just like on the camino.
May you have all blessings, and may your journey through this culminate in a celebratory Camino...boots on the ground in Spain!
Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, this sentence is one to hold onto, thank you VNwalking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
Breast cancer in 2016, Danish Haervejen in 2017, total ankle replacement in 2018. Pause for retirement, cross country move, and becoming a caregiver for my mother-in-law. I’m off again this coming August.

My thoughts, too, are with @Anniesantiago. These major health issues change one’s self image and underscore one’s vulnerability. I find I have to be intentional about maintaining my core sense of strength and confidence — things I always took for granted. But the experience of illness has also made me a more empathetic person and emphasized the importance of the people in my life and the small everyday joys of living. My first Camino made me slow down. Illness made me slow down even more. I am a more loving and giving, if less robust, person, now than I was before the two C’s. I pray that I may meet Annie in person on a future Camino!

Ultreia.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I had a cancer scare many years back, it turned out be benign but the week I waited for the biopsy result to come in was ... My thoughts and prayers are with everybody who deals with this. Hugs from Santiago, SY
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
I walked my first Camino as a way of proving I was alive. Cancer... or any serious life changing illness... serves to remind us all that life is precious and no matter who we are, we’re all vulnerable and susceptible to illness.

I am changed for the better. I value my life and the people that fill my world in a way that I didn’t before.

May we all keep safe. ❤
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
I have had two breast biopsies both benign.

Five years ago autoimmune illness grabbed me. Sixty additional pounds later and now Alzheimer’s caregiver to mom, and driving pops around have been interesting and difficult.

Last year’s five days on camino were so special. A forum member who knew me from thinner, healthier days was surprised I was hobbling up those awful steps next to Cathedral.

I’d rather push on than give in.

Anniesantiago, like the rest of us is: Camino strong.

And: this too shall pass!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Thank you all so much for your wise and comforting words.
You are all so very brave!
I can't tell you how the support on this forum has touched me.
Your stories give me hope and courage, and it's good to hear I'm not the only one who feels the waiting, waiting, waiting is the agonizing bit. I'm not a patient person to begin with ::chuckle:: so this is a kind of torture.

Emotionally, I'm still ok and strangely calm.
Physically, the lump throbs and I want it gone.
Spiritually, I'm good and still grateful to wake up alive each beautiful morning.
I feel blessed to have lived the life I've had and hope for many more Caminos!

I'm looking forward to today's doctor visit and I'm praying he will order the biopsy to be done this week so I can have an answer, one way or the other.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
No one used to talk about this.
Which is ridiculous, as 1 in 8 of us will have to deal with it at some point.

I am thinking of @Anniesantiago today, as she faces a possible diagnosis.
Anyone who has been through this will know in their gut how that day feels - no matter how long ago it was.

Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I'll start.
I was meant to be walking in 2009.
But.
Surprise.
Instead I spent the summer awaiting a biopsy, and then surgery, then the recovering from it, and finally deciding what next.
The gory details of the story don't matter.
What matters is I can say that there is a far horizon where cancer isn't occupying the entirety of my consciousness.
And I wouldn't live one day differently, cancer included.
Life is precious and fleeting. I know that better now.
Cancer taught me vulnerability opens the heart like nothing else.
It showed me strength I didn't know I had.
And that love is all around us, when we don't try be an island.

The camino is waiting. She will wait as long as you need. But I was fit enough to walk distances surprisingly soon after surgery.
I got off relatively lightly. Not everyone does. But life does go on.
And knowing all that? Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, no matter what the outcome.

Deeply heartfelt prayers, Annie...and for any others, if you are in the same boat.
It's scary as heck, but taking one moment at a time you do get through it...just like on the camino.
May you have all blessings, and may your journey through this culminate in a celebratory Camino...boots on the ground in Spain!
🙏🏽 🙏🏽 🙏🏽
 

Pelen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018 SJPdP-Logroño)
(2020 Logroño-)
I have had cancer but I was extremely lucky. My mom passed away with intenstins cancer when she was 54. That can be a genetic cancer so I have got checks every 5th year. I was not worried, just happy that they checked me. They checked me by coloscopy. One time the doctor said that I could have CT instead so I was checked with CT. Still no worries. But they found something. :( They made biopsy and the answer was that they could not find any cancer. The thing they found was mostly in my appendix so they decide to take it away because I probably would have problems later.

And it was cancer. A type of appendix cancer. How lucky could I be? Which part of the body except from the appendix do your really not need? :D At last something tiny good came out of my moms death, because of her my cancer was found early and i survived. This cancer had probably been there for a while because it was not visible via coloscopy.

Some years later I walked the camino - of happines.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
No one used to talk about this.
Which is ridiculous, as 1 in 8 of us will have to deal with it at some point.

I am thinking of @Anniesantiago today, as she faces a possible diagnosis.
Anyone who has been through this will know in their gut how that day feels - no matter how long ago it was.

Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I'll start.
I was meant to be walking in 2009.
But.
Surprise.
Instead I spent the summer awaiting a biopsy, and then surgery, then the recovering from it, and finally deciding what next.
The gory details of the story don't matter.
What matters is I can say that there is a far horizon where cancer isn't occupying the entirety of my consciousness.
And I wouldn't live one day differently, cancer included.
Life is precious and fleeting. I know that better now.
Cancer taught me vulnerability opens the heart like nothing else.
It showed me strength I didn't know I had.
And that love is all around us, when we don't try be an island.

The camino is waiting. She will wait as long as you need. But I was fit enough to walk distances surprisingly soon after surgery.
I got off relatively lightly. Not everyone does. But life does go on.
And knowing all that? Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, no matter what the outcome.

Deeply heartfelt prayers, Annie...and for any others, if you are in the same boat.
It's scary as heck, but taking one moment at a time you do get through it...just like on the camino.
May you have all blessings, and may your journey through this culminate in a celebratory Camino...boots on the ground in Spain!
12 years ago I underwent treatment for breast cancer. 4 and 1/2 months of chemotherapy double mastectomies and just when my hair was growing back a follow-up CT scan showed spots in my lungs and my liver. Being a hospice nurse I knew those were the spots that breast cancer can metastasized to. My husband and I had planned to walk the Pacific Crest trail, more than four times the length of the Camino Frances. I was in a quandary because my physician wanted me to wait two months and have a another scan see if anything grew big enough for a biopsy. I had to decide between sitting around and worrying or go ahead and start hiking the Pacific Crest trail. Well I chose to enjoy life. It was hard at first the chemo had really broken down my strong body. I cried everyday because I couldn't do what I used to do and it was so hard. Really upset me to get past so much my frumpy out of shape older women. (I tend to be a little judgmental sometimes 😁 and competitive).
About a month into the trip I was walking and talking with a young man having a great time. I looked back and my husband was way behind us. That was the day I realized Sharon had come back. My reserves were back. 5 months later, I stalled a month, I went and saw my worried doctor who quickly arranged a CT scan. The results were amazing every spot was gone in my lungs and my liver had only a few small ones left. I believe the fresh air and exercise and my decision to eat vegan healed me. Although Spain cured me of being vegan, I continued to walk the Camino every year and will complete my 10th Camino in May. And still no more cancer 14 years later.
 
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Thank you all so much for your wise and comforting words.
You are all so very brave!
I can't tell you how the support on this forum has touched me.
Your stories give me hope and courage, and it's good to hear I'm not the only one who feels the waiting, waiting, waiting is the agonizing bit. I'm not a patient person to begin with ::chuckle:: so this is a kind of torture.

Emotionally, I'm still ok and strangely calm.
Physically, the lump throbs and I want it gone.
Spiritually, I'm good and still grateful to wake up alive each beautiful morning.
I feel blessed to have lived the life I've had and hope for many more Caminos!

I'm looking forward to today's doctor visit and I'm praying he will order the biopsy to be done this week so I can have an answer, one way or the other.
Dear Annie, I wish you well for your journey.
I was diagnosed with high grade bladder cancer 5 or so years ago, followed by 3 years of treatment and ongoing 6 monthly monitoring. My camino experiences provided me with many of the tools needed to deal with this kind of health issue. I was very grateful to have learnt to take things step by step. I have continued my annual pilgrimages right through, fitting them between treatments. My specialist said, I was mad, but now agrees, it was the best thing, I could have done. I feel incredibly thankful every time, I see those yellow arrows again...as others have said, the waiting between appointments and results is the worst part. I downloaded a free insight timer meditation app, as I was too freaked out to sleep. I listened to the same meditation 18 times in a row over 2 or 3 hours, the first night, before I could go to sleep, but it was really helpful and after a week of persisting with this, I got my emotions in hand.
 
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino in 2020
As a two time cancer survivor I can say that for me the waiting was the hardest, waiting for doctor appointments, waiting for test results, waiting for treatment: a day can seem like a year. I don't know you Annie but my thoughts are with you.
I echo all that you have said, Bagobev - the waiting is hard and despite mine being 16 years ago, there are still times when I worry that it will return. Sending you positive energy, Annie, and hoping it will take you through to the Camino - my first will be this year!
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
I echo all that you have said, Bagobev - the waiting is hard and despite mine being 16 years ago, there are still times when I worry that it will return. Sending you positive energy, Annie, and hoping it will take you through to the Camino - my first will be this year!
Buen camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
What a group of amazing, wonderful, courageous survivors!
I love reading your stories!
They give me strength and hope.

Today I got the appointment for the biopsy.
It will be Friday at 2 pm.
Keeping my fingers crossed.
Thank you all again!💓
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
What a group of amazing, wonderful, courageous survivors!
I love reading your stories!
They give me strength and hope.

Today I got the appointment for the biopsy.
It will be Friday at 2 pm.
Keeping my fingers crossed.
Thank you all again!💓
Prayers going out to you!
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Every single story told here deserves a "like/love". They have all been very special to read. Although I have not had cancer, I have played the horrible "waiting game" and I know the angst involved. You are all amazing and I am personally uplifted by your stories. Thank you for sharing them publicly.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
What a group of amazing, wonderful, courageous survivors!
I love reading your stories!
They give me strength and hope.

Today I got the appointment for the biopsy.
It will be Friday at 2 pm.
Keeping my fingers crossed.
Thank you all again!💓
Good luck with your biopsy. Something that got me though the uncertainty and fear is feeling the moment. I tell my hospice patients "All anyone has is the moment they are in and that moment is the same for all of us". As I went through chemotherapy and fear I told myself there's nothing happening right now in this moment I can't handle. So often we worry so much that we're not feeling the peace of the moment we are in. I'm not saying something bad can't happen but each of us has great inner strength when we need it. And even something bad is easier to face moment by moment. ♥
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
The week may feel like suspended time and suspended animation.
What was is no longer.
What will be is unknown.
I hope you can walk in nature, Annie, just feeling into now - and everything that you're feeling. It's a lot to digest, but for now there is a quiet week. If it's nothing, phew. But if it's something things can move pretty quickly. So rest and be gentle with yourself.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
No one used to talk about this.
Which is ridiculous, as 1 in 8 of us will have to deal with it at some point.

I am thinking of @Anniesantiago today, as she faces a possible diagnosis.
Anyone who has been through this will know in their gut how that day feels - no matter how long ago it was.

Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I'll start.
I was meant to be walking in 2009.
But.
Surprise.
Instead I spent the summer awaiting a biopsy, and then surgery, then the recovering from it, and finally deciding what next.
The gory details of the story don't matter.
What matters is I can say that there is a far horizon where cancer isn't occupying the entirety of my consciousness.
And I wouldn't live one day differently, cancer included.
Life is precious and fleeting. I know that better now.
Cancer taught me vulnerability opens the heart like nothing else.
It showed me strength I didn't know I had.
And that love is all around us, when we don't try be an island.

The camino is waiting. She will wait as long as you need. But I was fit enough to walk distances surprisingly soon after surgery.
I got off relatively lightly. Not everyone does. But life does go on.
And knowing all that? Each step is a whisper of thanksgiving, no matter what the outcome.

Deeply heartfelt prayers, Annie...and for any others, if you are in the same boat.
It's scary as heck, but taking one moment at a time you do get through it...just like on the camino.
May you have all blessings, and may your journey through this culminate in a celebratory Camino...boots on the ground in Spain!
Hi VN Walking and a big Camino hug to anyone going through this illness, recovering from it, or close to someone affected by it. I did my first Camino in 2018, and as you all know, we are frequently asked why we are doing the Camino. I wasn't forthcoming at first, I didn't want to bother anyone else with my trials and tribulations. But eventually, as people opened up to me, I then opened up to them. This happened on many occasions throughout my epic 44 days on the CF.
I met fellow sufferers in various stages of recovery or mourning a loss of a loved one who was taken by this illness, or other similar tragedy.
For me, walking my first Camino enabled me to open up about how it affected me, cry lots of tears, scream lots of screams and laugh out loud at still being alive and fighting to get well again.
I was shocked in January 2017 with a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer, having started to feel some unusual abdominal pains about 6 months earlier.
An operation quickly followed, scary but necessary. That removed the tumour and re-plumbed my pipework, it's amazing what medical science can achieve. Unfortunately, due to risk of further metastasis, I had 6 months of chemotherapy to nuke anything left lurking around inside - it was that treatment that really did the damage to me, physically, mentally and emotionally.
The Camino I walked was a much needed healing process, a safety release valve, a love injection, a gift from the universe and I can truly say that now, almost 3 years after my initial diagnosis and operation, I have managed to recover about 95% of the "old me" if you like. It's this "old me", always positive, full of energy, willing to try new things etc., who I had somehow lost through the impact of the illness and treatments. I had become a shadow of my former self, anxious, delicate, lacking confidence, feeling down and often tearful.
But it wasn't just the Camino that helped me recover, it was also the love of my wife, children, family and friends. However, it was the Camino aquaintences, friends and places that gave me the opportunity to let it all go, a massive discharge of negative emotions to the stars in the Milky Way above and the brown earth that I trod each day. It was a way of proving to myself that I could reach a difficult goal and overcome obstacles, and above all enjoy the wonder of life for as long as I can. We are all mortal beings, so life is a ticking clock; but we waste so much time on meaningless activity or non-activity. The illness brings all that into a very sharp, unavoidable focus. The Camino enables time and space to make the transition, the necessary transformation, to discover or re-discover your true self; at the very least to be brave and take on the new journey with an open heart and mind, a yielding and soft approach but with a strong spirit to say: just do it!
Buen Camino perigrin@, whoever you may be, no matter what you have to face, or what you've been through. Whether you choose to share it or not, we are all just passengers on this rock, passing through to another destination. On walking the Camino, it's often said: it's not the destination that is important, it is the journey. Choose love over hate, choose good over evil, choose laughter over anger, choose positivity over negativity, embrace it all and find your way to walk below the stars above, feel your feet on the ground, let go your fears, welcome each day as another gift to try and be the best you can to yourself and all those around you.
Maybe on my next Camino I will meet one of you, maybe not, but I feel we are all connected. In our day-to-day lives we may often lose this feeling of connectedness, the Camino is a great remedy for anyone needing to reconnect with their soul, inner-self, to feel close to nature and the wonder of existence and share some of the feeling with other mortal beings who may walk with you a little way along the path of life.
 
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MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
12 years ago I underwent treatment for breast cancer. 4 and 1/2 months of chemotherapy double mastectomies and just when my hair was growing back a follow-up CT scan showed spots in my lungs and my liver. Being a hospice nurse I knew those were the spots that breast cancer can metastasized to. My husband and I had planned to walk the Pacific Crest trail, more than four times the length of the Camino Frances. I was in a quandary because my physician wanted me to wait two months and have a another scan see if anything grew big enough for a biopsy. I had to decide between sitting around and worrying or go ahead and start hiking the Pacific Crest trail. Well I chose to enjoy life. It was hard at first the chemo had really broken down my strong body. I cried everyday because I couldn't do what I used to do and it was so hard. Really upset me to get past so much my frumpy out of shape older women. (I tend to be a little judgmental sometimes 😁 and competitive).
About a month into the trip I was walking and talking with a young man having a great time. I looked back and my husband was way behind us. That was the day I realized Sharon had come back. My reserves were back. 5 months later, I stalled a month, I went and saw my worried doctor who quickly arranged a CT scan. The results were amazing every spot was gone in my lungs and my liver had only a few small ones left. I believe the fresh air and exercise and my decision to eat vegan healed me. Although Spain cured me of being vegan, I continued to walk the Camino every year and will complete my 10th Camino in May. And still no more cancer 14 years later.
Spain cured your veganism - hahahaha, I know what you mean. Great inspiration to read your story, thank you for a wonderful reply.
 
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MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
What a group of amazing, wonderful, courageous survivors!
I love reading your stories!
They give me strength and hope.

Today I got the appointment for the biopsy.
It will be Friday at 2 pm.
Keeping my fingers crossed.
Thank you all again!💓
Wishing you all the best. I went on my own, because in all honesty I never expected to be told I had cancer. Big mistake, I should have gone with someone. If you can, go with your partner, a family member, a friend or a fellow pilgrim soul. Whatever the resulting news, it will make it easier to walk out of there.
Because I was on my own I didn't really listen properly to the various things they told me. If I had someone with me, then they could have helped me by taking notes or something. They also could have held my hand or hugged me. I had to go home on my own, I didn't tell my wife until she came home from work later that day.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
My wife had breast cancer in 2017, and after her operation and chemotherapy, is in remission.
We decided to walk the Camino in 2018, in thanksgiving.
We left her original family home in Switzerland on 9 June, followed the Via Gebennensis, the Via Podiensis, the Voie Nive-Bidassoa, the Camino del Norte, arriving in SdC on 30 October. 2178km in 133 days.
She finds walking is therapeutic, yet her medication makes her tired. So I planned our Camino around short stages, staying mostly in private rooms to give her comfort, and booked everything ahead to give her certainty.
This year, we're spending a week in SJPdP as volunteers, and then flying to Lisbon to walk the Caminho Português.
She is my inspiration!
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
My wife had breast cancer in 2017, and after her operation and chemotherapy, is in remission.
We decided to walk the Camino in 2018, in thanksgiving.
We left her original family home in Switzerland on 9 June, followed the Via Gebennensis, the Via Podiensis, the Voie Nive-Bidassoa, the Camino del Norte, arriving in SdC on 30 October. 2178km in 133 days.
She finds walking is therapeutic, yet her medication makes her tired. So I planned our Camino around short stages, staying mostly in private rooms to give her comfort, and booked everything ahead to give her certainty.
This year, we're spending a week in SJPdP as volunteers, and then flying to Lisbon to walk the Caminho Português.
She is my inspiration!
Congratulations, I am also a cancer survivor. I have walked the Camino 9 times and feel healthier each time.
2 questions, when are you volunteering in St Jean and where? My husband and I will be there in May volunteering at Beilari.
Also what medication is your wife on? And how long is she expected to be on it?
My doctor wanted me to go on Arimidex for 5 years which I declined because it only lowered my risk of reoccurrence by 15% and exercise lowered it by 30% and exercise had no negative side effects? I am a nurse so I know there's many different kinds of cancer. But I've also learned the hard way that doctors often don't tell you you have options. That said, it sounds like you have a good plan that works for you. A buen Camino and many more to come.,♥
 

Manicka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lisboa-Santiago-Muxia-Finisterre in 2018.
Volunteer in ACC office 2018.
Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I haven´t (yet) myself. Nevertheless, here is my experience:
I went to my first Camino Portuguese (Lisboa - SDC) in 2018 with my son Jonathan. It was tremendous experience, both the camino and going one month with my son. We returned home happy and very close to each other. Two weeks after our return Jonathan was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia and very bad prognosis.
I had planned to return to the Camino (Primitivo) in spring 2019, but one week before my departure my brother died of cancer. I did not depart.
I am still trying to understand. It seems to me that we are supposed to go through "valley of shadows" to find out what´s important in our life, to find the right "self", to understand that we are never alone. But it hurts.
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (2009), French Camino (2011), Via de la Plata (2012), Camino Inglês (2014),
I had surgery for lung cancer last April, luckily caught early...I´ve just bought my ticket for Madrid for this April, my 5th Camino. Thinking of you Anniesantiago.
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Congratulations, I am also a cancer survivor. I have walked the Camino 9 times and feel healthier each time.
2 questions, when are you volunteering in St Jean and where? My husband and I will be there in May volunteering at Beilari.
Also what medication is your wife on? And how long is she expected to be on it?
My doctor wanted me to go on Arimidex for 5 years which I declined because it only lowered my risk of reoccurrence by 15% and exercise lowered it by 30% and exercise had no negative side effects? I am a nurse so I know there's many different kinds of cancer. But I've also learned the hard way that doctors often don't tell you you have options. That said, it sounds like you have a good plan that works for you. A buen Camino and many more to come.,♥
We will be at the Pilgrims office (Accueil des Pèlerins) at 39 rue de la Citadelle from 4 to 11 May.
The medication is Tamoxifen for 10 years.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
We will be at the Pilgrims office (Accueil des Pèlerins) at 39 rue de la Citadelle from 4 to 11 May.
The medication is Tamoxifen for 10 years.
I will be in Santiago a few days during that same time. Maybe I will see you in the Pilgrim office.
 

OTH86

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
Have you faced cancer and walked it off?
Please share your story.

I haven´t (yet) myself. Nevertheless, here is my experience:
I went to my first Camino Portuguese (Lisboa - SDC) in 2018 with my son Jonathan. It was tremendous experience, both the camino and going one month with my son. We returned home happy and very close to each other. Two weeks after our return Jonathan was diagnosed with a rare form of leukemia and very bad prognosis.
I had planned to return to the Camino (Primitivo) in spring 2019, but one week before my departure my brother died of cancer. I did not depart.
I am still trying to understand. It seems to me that we are supposed to go through "valley of shadows" to find out what´s important in our life, to find the right "self", to understand that we are never alone. But it hurts.
I'm so sorry to hear about your cancer experiences - they are every bit as much about facing cancer for you as for your family members. I DO hope you will return to the Camino!
Take care of yourself!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I am still trying to understand. [...] But it hurts.
Yes. Indeed.
One thing cancer taught me is how truely vulnerable we all are. And how common cancer is. Because we're born, we die. Everyone. And there's no escaping that. Nor can we know how and when that will happen. These are very painful truths, but better to know them than not.
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018 (across Pyrenees, then Sarria to SdC), CF 2019 (SJPdP to Finisterra & Muxia), CI 2019
About six years ago I was diagnosed with Stage 4 prostate cancer - PSA over 250 and Gleeson scores of 8 to 10 (you either know this stuff or can look it up). At the time, I was told that the only good news was that it wasn't in the bones, "yet." The CT scan was ugly.

I was basically given 18 months without treatment. Even with treatment, the odds weren't good (28% survival rate at 5 years).

The hardest part for me was telling my wife and teenage children (especially since my father had died of cancer at the age of 45, when I was 21).

It would be nice to say that all went well, but life likes to throw you curves. One of the many was almost losing my family when a Douglas first tree slammed down on my wife's car while they were coming home from a local ski resort a couple of years later. Many of you have probably read about my wife's Camino 2 years after the accident (and she just completed a second one last year).

A complete lifestyle change led to my eliminating sugar from my diet and going vegan (you should read my cookbook, "Camino Eats for the Solo Vegan"). Yes, one can walk across Spain and remain vegan, just not easily.

Another change was to finally do many of the things I had been putting off. I wrote some novels, learned the basics of how to play a guitar, improved my Spanish (still not fluent), and resumed traveling. Three caminos in two years. This year, another bucket list item: New Zealand.

Growing up overseas, living through two civil wars, volunteering in an ad hoc refugee camp on the edge ofa war zone, then several years as a cop (where I was almost killed several times and had a fellow cop killed just days after working out with him), you could probably say that death was not a stranger to me. It wasn't, but, life was.

I am embracing life as much as possible now, working through my bucket list, and striving, in the words of Breaker Morant, to "live every day as if it were your last, as one day, you're sure to be right."

Getting diagnosed with cancer is scarier than living with it. I wrote a line above the door to Bar Elvis last July that I stole from "The Way," which I feel all of us, especially cancer patients, should live by; "You don't choose a life, you live one."

IMG_20190710_183911.jpgIMG_20190710_183911.jpg

Prostate cancer has no cure. I'm terminal, but, then again, we all are since birth. Some of us just recognize that more clearly, especially when it's thrown into our faces.

I guess what I'm trying to say to Anniesantiago is don't take counsel in your fears. Life is what it is, and only you can dictate to life how you'll live it. Buena suerta y buen camino.
 
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gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
Just diagnosed. Unbeknownst (if there is such word) t me I've been walking through cancer since I first began in 2018. Couldn't figure out why it was taking me all day to walk the same distance as a morning this past October. Good to read so many stories here of survivors. And my prayers for those who are still fighting the fight.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Just diagnosed. Unbeknownst (if there is such word) t me
Oh, no! You too?
I am very sorry, @gerip. This is not a club any of us would have chosen to join in a million years, but welcome anyway.
There is a big silver lining to this cloud...love and kindness become much more accessible and much more important....
May your journey be smooth and may you be well!
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Oh, no! You too?
I am very sorry, @gerip. This is not a club any of us would have chosen to join in a million years, but welcome anyway.
There is a big silver lining to this cloud...love and kindness become much more accessible and much more important....
May your journey be smooth and may you be well!
Well put VNwalking, I agree. It seems for some of us the silent stalker caught us unawares, so now the Camino walker comes to do some repairs.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Just diagnosed. Unbeknownst (if there is such word) t me I've been walking through cancer since I first began in 2018. Couldn't figure out why it was taking me all day to walk the same distance as a morning this past October. Good to read so many stories here of survivors. And my prayers for those who are still fighting the fight.
Gerip, I hope those of us who have contributed to this thread have been of some help. I think we can all say that we are here for eachother, in one way or another. No doubt you will have your own family and friends to help you fight the fight.
As well as those suffering from the illness, the family and close friends are also affected, they often just don't know what to say or do for their loved one who is going through this. Not everyone is comfortable talking about it, and often fear and anger are emotions that can surface from time to time. I never really managed to release the frustrations and other negative emotions, even a year after my tumour removal and 6 months after chemo had ended. But somehow that first day arriving in SJPP was like a catalyst for a much needed process of healing, which continues to this day. I live in wonder and gratitude for life. I feel like another Camino might just be around the corner!
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Not everyone is comfortable talking about it, and often fear and anger are emotions that can surface from time to time.
Yes.
It's normal for these emotions to arise.
But sometimes it feels as though everyone around you just wants you to be brave and positive.
So if you have someone in your constellation of friends and family who is ok with you being real...that person is worth their weight in gold.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
[QUOTE="VNwalking, post: 816726, member:] Because we're born, we die. Everyone.
[/QUOTE]

Sorry VNwalking.

I am not everyone.

I will never die.

I’ll just pass away!
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
Whatever lies ahead, I hope to be able to use the experience in support of others who walk with/are recovering from cancer.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Yes.
It's normal for these emotions to arise.
But sometimes it feels as though everyone around you just wants you to be brave and positive.
So if you have someone in your constellation of friends and family who is ok with you being real...that person is worth their weight in gold.
Yes, this is quite common, but they just wish us the best and are trying to do/say something to help. We may not feel very positive or brave at the time they say this, but I think it all helps. Of course, having someone to just listen or hold your hand or help you put your socks on etc can be just the simple act of kindness and compassion that is much appreciated. We had adopted a rescue kitten, who had the habit of laying on my stomach (where I had thr operation) and purring away. It was magical, it was if she knew I needed some healing vibrations!
 

Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
I crashed and burnt on my post chemo Camino. (Neck lump). I was walking on adrenalin, the treatment had destroyed my thyroid functionality. I didn't know that. I'd suggest not rushing into hard walking after the severe poisoning that is chemotherapy. It's six years ago now and it was my last attempt at walking to Santiago. I ended up in a taxi to the airport and took the first plane home. No Compostela for me. I wasn't laughing about it then and I'm still somewhat miffed that my pilgrimage ended so ignominiously. C'est la vie.

Rome has been my holiday destination of choice these last five years. The food is better and the churches are bigger, more dramatic, and have better art. It's an ill wind . . .
 

fiona12

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Feb (2013)
We had adopted a rescue kitten, who had the habit of laying on my stomach (where I had thr operation) and purring away. It was magical, it was if she knew I needed some healing vibrations!
Animals do heal and are more aware than we will ever understand.
My partner (healthy, fit 53 years old) had a heart attack. Stent was fitted and we were back on the farm after a few days. We went and sat on the ground against an anthill among our Nguni cattle, as we often did. The cows gathered around us. One by one, ten of them came and sniffed all around John's head and shoulders, staring into his face. Then suddenly one cow pushed another forward as though telling her to move along. Before we could move back, the one in front carefully leaped over us (like a show horse). How she never touched us, was amazing. Then an old cow (one of my favourites) came forward, stared for some time into my face, then licked my knee and went on her way.

This happened 12 years ago, yet to this day I get goosebumps thinking about it. I felt as though I received the most special blessing.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
What an amazing experience!
But I'm not surprised.
Cows are underappreciated...and it's true that many other beings are sensitive to things we humans can't detect. Dogs have been known to sniff out cancer, for example. And they have a radar that detects need for comforting....
 
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino in 2020
Hi VN Walking and a big Camino hug to anyone going through this illness, recovering from it, or close to someone affected by it. I did my first Camino in 2018, and as you all know, we are frequently asked why we are doing the Camino. I wasn't forthcoming at first, I didn't want to bother anyone else with my trials and tribulations. But eventually, as people opened up to me, I then opened up to them. This happened on many occasions throughout my epic 44 days on the CF.
I met fellow sufferers in various stages of recovery or mourning a loss of a loved one who was taken by this illness, or other similar tragedy.
For me, walking my first Camino enabled me to open up about how it affected me, cry lots of tears, scream lots of screams and laugh out loud at still being alive and fighting to get well again.
I was shocked in January 2017 with a diagnosis of stage 3 colon cancer, having started to feel some unusual abdominal pains about 6 months earlier.
An operation quickly followed, scary but necessary. That removed the tumour and re-plumbed my pipework, it's amazing what medical science can achieve. Unfortunately, due to risk of further metastasis, I had 6 months of chemotherapy to nuke anything left lurking around inside - it was that treatment that really did the damage to me, physically, mentally and emotionally.
The Camino I walked was a much needed healing process, a safety release valve, a love injection, a gift from the universe and I can truly say that now, almost 3 years after my initial diagnosis and operation, I have managed to recover about 95% of the "old me" if you like. It's this "old me", always positive, full of energy, willing to try new things etc., who I had somehow lost through the impact of the illness and treatments. I had become a shadow of my former self, anxious, delicate, lacking confidence, feeling down and often tearful.
But it wasn't just the Camino that helped me recover, it was also the love of my wife, children, family and friends. However, it was the Camino aquaintences, friends and places that gave me the opportunity to let it all go, a massive discharge of negative emotions to the stars in the Milky Way above and the brown earth that I trod each day. It was a way of proving to myself that I could reach a difficult goal and overcome obstacles, and above all enjoy the wonder of life for as long as I can. We are all mortal beings, so life is a ticking clock; but we waste so much time on meaningless activity or non-activity. The illness brings all that into a very sharp, unavoidable focus. The Camino enables time and space to make the transition, the necessary transformation, to discover or re-discover your true self; at the very least to be brave and take on the new journey with an open heart and mind, a yielding and soft approach but with a strong spirit to say: just do it!
Buen Camino perigrin@, whoever you may be, no matter what you have to face, or what you've been through. Whether you choose to share it or not, we are all just passengers on this rock, passing through to another destination. On walking the Camino, it's often said: it's not the destination that is important, it is the journey. Choose love over hate, choose good over evil, choose laughter over anger, choose positivity over negativity, embrace it all and find your way to walk below the stars above, feel your feet on the ground, let go your fears, welcome each day as another gift to try and be the best you can to yourself and all those around you.
Maybe on my next Camino I will meet one of you, maybe not, but I feel we are all connected. In our day-to-day lives we may often lose this feeling of connectedness, the Camino is a great remedy for anyone needing to reconnect with their soul, inner-self, to feel close to nature and the wonder of existence and share some of the feeling with other mortal beings who may walk with you a little way along the path of life.
Beautifully written ; thank you.
 

DwainS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances(2020)
One year ago, Jan 19,2019 I started my cancer treatments. The radiation burnt my thyroid out of commission so taking medication to rectify that situation. Have a couple big doctor appointments in March and May and if all goes well I hope to start my Camino Frances September 2020. I also lost my sister a few years back to cancer so hopefully this walk will be for the both of us. Just trying to go forward and I hope this pilgrimage will help me accomplish this. Buen Camino.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
One year ago, Jan 19,2019 I started my cancer treatments. The radiation burnt my thyroid out of commission so taking medication to rectify that situation. Have a couple big doctor appointments in March and May and if all goes well I hope to start my Camino Frances September 2020. I also lost my sister a few years back to cancer so hopefully this walk will be for the both of us. Just trying to go forward and I hope this pilgrimage will help me accomplish this. Buen Camino.
I am also a cancer survivor and will be walking in September. I hope we meet up.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Maybe we can wear a pink ribbon on our packs or hats to identify others who have lived through this, or are still dealing with it? (I dislike the word 'survivor,' for some reason. I lived through that experience. Now I'm living other experiences. It's dramatic but no need to hang on to the drama after the fact. It was. That's all...)
 

AJGuillaume

Pélerin du monde
Camino(s) past & future
Via Gebennensis (2018)
Via Podiensis (2018)
Voie Nive Bidassoa (2018)
Camino Del Norte (2018)
Maybe we can wear a pink ribbon on our packs or hats to identify others who have lived through this, or are still dealing with it? (I dislike the word 'survivor,' for some reason. I lived through that experience. Now I'm living other experiences. It's dramatic but no need to hang on to the drama after the fact. It was. That's all...)
Or paint our shells pink, @VNwalking ?
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
One year ago, Jan 19,2019 I started my cancer treatments. The radiation burnt my thyroid out of commission so taking medication to rectify that situation. Have a couple big doctor appointments in March and May and if all goes well I hope to start my Camino Frances September 2020. I also lost my sister a few years back to cancer so hopefully this walk will be for the both of us. Just trying to go forward and I hope this pilgrimage will help me accomplish this. Buen Camino.
DwainS, I honestly cannot think of anything better you can do after what you have been through. The Camino experience will give you ups and downs, but it will also give you lots of time for reflection and bit by bit you'll be able to release some of the negative energy that may have affected you through it all.

Don't look for it, don't force it, just be open and enjoy the simplicity of walking from A to B, looking for a meal, sharing moments with others, looking for a bed each night (but don't expect to sleep much!), walking into Churches along the way, reading messages left by others for loved ones written on stones or bits of paper (many will hit you hard, others will make you laugh and smile), listening to others' stories (many of which will inspire you to continue fighting and living life as fully as you can).

Despite the unpleasant experiences you have been going through, you'll suddenly feel awash with gratitude that you are alive and you can truly get to know yourself in ways you've never imagined.

Your patience will get challenged from time to time, so be soft and gentle with yourself and others. It's all part of the journey. I didn't always manage it, but I quickly realised my mistakes and used to say to myself: Oh no, for that moment of negative reaction I've just burned my Camino brownie points for the day! I then went to apologise immediately to the person I had upset, and ignored the fact that they had upset me. There are going to be moments when we or others are tired, irritated due to lack of sleep or painful injuries, so we will not always be on our best behaviour with eachother.

Over 30 to 40 days you will find incredible internal resources that will begin to transform you, possibly forever.
Buen Camino mi amigo
 

DwainS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances(2020)
DwainS, I honestly cannot think of anything better you can do after what you have been through. The Camino experience will give you ups and downs, but it will also give you lots of time for reflection and bit by bit you'll be able to release some of the negative energy that may have affected you through it all.

Don't look for it, don't force it, just be open and enjoy the simplicity of walking from A to B, looking for a meal, sharing moments with others, looking for a bed each night (but don't expect to sleep much!), walking into Churches along the way, reading messages left by others for loved ones written on stones or bits of paper (many will hit you hard, others will make you laugh and smile), listening to others' stories (many of which will inspire you to continue fighting and living life as fully as you can).

Despite the unpleasant experiences you have been going through, you'll suddenly feel awash with gratitude that you are alive and you can truly get to know yourself in ways you've never imagined.

Your patience will get challenged from time to time, so be soft and gentle with yourself and others. It's all part of the journey. I didn't always manage it, but I quickly realised my mistakes and used to say to myself: Oh no, for that moment of negative reaction I've just burned my Camino brownie points for the day! I then went to apologise immediately to the person I had upset, and ignored the fact that they had upset me. There are going to be moments when we or others are tired, irritated due to lack of sleep or painful injuries, so we will not always be on our best behaviour with eachother.

Over 30 to 40 days you will find incredible internal resources that will begin to transform you, possibly forever.
Buen Camino mi amigo
Thanks very much for your encouragement and thoughtful insight in what I might experience on this trip. I'am a chef in a busy restaurant and we all know how hectic than can be and it was hard after my treatments. Just need to get out on the open trail and reflect on the last few years. Thanks again.
 

fiona12

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Feb (2013)
What an amazing experience!
But I'm not surprised.
Cows are underappreciated...and it's true that many other beings are sensitive to things we humans can't detect. Dogs have been known to sniff out cancer, for example. And they have a radar that detects need for comforting....
I agree absolutely
 

Oxford Alice

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(Bits of) Camino Frances (2001)
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Frances (2018)
I discovered a lump in my groin whilst doing the CF in 2014. Back home I was diagnosed with Hodgkin's Lymphoma. Hooked up to the chemo, I hoped and prayed to get through it. I did. In 2018 I walked again in a spirit of thankfulness to God for restoring my health. I leave on 2 April 2020 to walk again for two friends who are battling cancer; one was my 'Camino Sister' in 2018. And so it goes.
 

GaryAus

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF December 2017
Thank you all for sharing your stories. I have been quite affected by them. It’s all still quite raw for me currently. I was due to leave for the Camino Portuguese in March 2020 but my wife was diagnosed with breast cancer last October. If the Camino was a life experience, then the cancer experience has been one to. You learn that it truly is one day at a time and that love and support is all around. I will get back to the Camino Portuguese eventually and will walk into SdC next time to give thanks for my wife’s returned good health, with the current delay but a blimp on a longer journey for the both of us.
Buen Camino
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
You learn that it truly is one day at a time and that love and support is all around
It is always so, but we unknowingly project ourselves into an imagined future, and try so hard to be independent. Cancer cures one of those illusions...

I will get back to the Camino Portuguese eventually and will walk into SdC next time to give thanks for my wife’s returned good health, with the current delay but a blimp on a longer journey for the both of us.
May it all go well for you both, Gary. That arrival in Santiago will be especially sweet.
 

Manicka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lisboa-Santiago-Muxia-Finisterre in 2018.
Volunteer in ACC office 2018.
I'm so sorry to hear about your cancer experiences - they are every bit as much about facing cancer for you as for your family members. I DO hope you will return to the Camino!
Take care of yourself!
I plan to return. Most probably Primitivo and O Camiño Verde' crossover. I believe that walking the camino is the best way to overcome difficult questions. I do not expect to understand, just walk. And, may be, return more composed.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk around 2022
thank you for sharing your experience. A couple years ago I posted about my worries walking the Camino post broken ankle. In the past year I have been diagnosed with lymphoma and lost my father in law to that same disease. My prayers and hopes today are for health and strength for as long as possible so that I can one day walk the Camino. Preferably, before chemotherapy. I am in awe of others who have made this journey. Buen Camino.
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
Thank you all so much for your stories.
I go for my second opinion tomorrow and my lumpectomy is on Wednesday.
Your courage is inspirational and gives me a lot of hope.
Buen Camino - and I think I WILL paint my shell pink!
Last summer, my 88 year-old mom sailed through her lumpectomy with little to no pain.

You’ll be just fine.

Peace and love.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Thank you all so much for your stories.
I go for my second opinion tomorrow and my lumpectomy is on Wednesday.
Your courage is inspirational and gives me a lot of hope.
Buen Camino - and I think I WILL paint my shell pink!
Thanks for reminder, Annie. Candle is glimmering away as I write...
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)

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