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Walking with a chronic foot issue

Camino(s) past & future
2012 Sarria to SDC
#1
Hi fellow pilgrims,

My DH (59 yo) and I (58 yo)hope to walk the El Camino Frances in the coming year. In 2012, we walked from Sarria to Santiago and enjoyed it tremendously. However during that walk, I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.

My husband would like to start walking from SJPP. I'm concerned about that stage since it seems one of the most difficult ones. If my foot were to become too painful to walk 10-15 Km/day, I would like to find out if it's possible for me to walk part of the day, then take a taxi or a bus to a town ahead where we'll spend the night. Where would I find information about alternative transportation? I might also consider taxing my pack to reduce the weight on my foot. Is there taxi service in most of the towns?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Emilia
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances , St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra May/ June 2017
Le Puy en Velay - Ales May 2018
#2
I have only just this hour returned from a podiatrist , unfortunately the news was less than welcome . My toe pain , caused by osteoarthritis is essentially untreatable , something that I have suspected for some time .
I have , either through good luck or intuition , already adopted many of the strategies he suggested , strapping , toe gel protectors and footbeds .
By far and away the ' Neatfeet' inner soles I started using some months ago have made the most difference . A thick undersole , supportive arch and resilient foam structure all combine to minimise foot pain .
Obviously you must treat your condition as you see fit , your shoes' inner soles are an obvious place to start .
Failing this there is always the dreaded corticosteroid injection option ,something only you and your physician can decide on .

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...oles-a-comparative-study-of-six-brands.44385/
 
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fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
#4
Hi fellow pilgrims,

My DH (59 yo) and I (58 yo)hope to walk the El Camino Frances in the coming year. In 2012, we walked from Sarria to Santiago and enjoyed it tremendously. However during that walk, I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.

My husband would like to start walking from SJPP. I'm concerned about that stage since it seems one of the most difficult ones. If my foot were to become too painful to walk 10-15 Km/day, I would like to find out if it's possible for me to walk part of the day, then take a taxi or a bus to a town ahead where we'll spend the night. Where would I find information about alternative transportation? I might also consider taxing my pack to reduce the weight on my foot. Is there taxi service in most of the towns?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Emilia
I manage plantars faciitis. It hasn't stopped me from walking. I'm able to stay ahead of it with lots of stretching, massage, compression/taping, and good shoes/insoles.

But I have used both taxi and pack service for a few days in Galicia when I got terribly ill after an emergency tooth extraction (yes, big camino fun-times) but I wanted my partner to keep walking our stages. It was very easy. When I first figured out I could no longer manage walking, we were already 2 hours in. I was able to arrange a taxi at a bar, no problem. I rode with a pack transport guy the next 2 days, arranged at the albergues.

You will have no problem figuring this out on a day-to-day basis on the Camino Frances.
 

RedRuby

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2017)
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2019)
#5
Hi fellow pilgrims,

My DH (59 yo) and I (58 yo)hope to walk the El Camino Frances in the coming year. In 2012, we walked from Sarria to Santiago and enjoyed it tremendously. However during that walk, I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.

My husband would like to start walking from SJPP. I'm concerned about that stage since it seems one of the most difficult ones. If my foot were to become too painful to walk 10-15 Km/day, I would like to find out if it's possible for me to walk part of the day, then take a taxi or a bus to a town ahead where we'll spend the night. Where would I find information about alternative transportation? I might also consider taxing my pack to reduce the weight on my foot. Is there taxi service in most of the towns?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Emilia
Regarding the chronic pain related to Morton's Neuroma, choose hiking boots/shoes with a wide toe box, see a reliable podiatrist for assessment and to perhaps fit you for some orthotics to insert the shoes you wear. If any of your shoes cause pain when you wear them, then ideally stop wearing them as they will only continue to irritate your foot. I speak from experience, and for me, a trip to the podiatrist, wide toe box hiking boots and orthotics provided immense relief.
 

GlenysP

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St Jean Pied de Port "April 2011" and plan to walk Camino Frances from SJPdP "September 2015"
#7
I've walked the Camino from SJPdP twice. I have terrible neuropathy of the feet and get weekly acupuncture, which has changed my life. (I can now stand in a coffee or bank queue for more than 60 seconds without pain at 9/10.) I walked in Ecco boots which gave better support, and double socked, and massaged my feet each night. Some days I walked in tears because of the extreme nerve pain and because my very fit and 'healthy' husband has Younger Onset Dementia diagnosed in his 50s, we had to walk together. So I often pushed myself. But I soon learnt that other new Camino friends would walk with him and I could catch a taxi or a sometimes a bus, even if it was for only a few kms. Walking on the concrete through the larger cities was the toughest, so that's why I'd sometimes catch the taxi for just that section. I'd meet him at a designated Alburgue, and we each had a phone with a Travelsim, too. In April 2011, I organised daily transport for my backpack from day 5 because some days I couldn't handle both the pain from my feet and the weight. In September 2015, taxis averaged about €1 per kms and on those days, I saved on the backpack transportation cost of a few €s. I got to practise my Spanish with the driver. The shortest walk in 2011, was day 1, from SJPdP to Hunto, about 2.6 kms. The longest was 32 kms in 2015. Even over the Pyrenees you can walk to Orisson in two sections stopping the night at Hunto, then the next day walk to Orisson. The next day they will organise a taxi for you to Roncesvalles, with everyone else's backpacks. In 2011 I walked it, but chose not to in 2015. After Orisson there's probably no or little opportunity to connect with the taxi if you can't continue that section. Buen Camino
 

GlenysP

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St Jean Pied de Port "April 2011" and plan to walk Camino Frances from SJPdP "September 2015"
#8
Taxis are easily found for the rest of the Camino. Buses may daily or only run twice a week so don't assume (like I did once). Some places have trains.
 

TaijiPilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2011), Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2017), Camino Muxia (2017)
#9
Hi fellow pilgrims,

My DH (59 yo) and I (58 yo)hope to walk the El Camino Frances in the coming year. In 2012, we walked from Sarria to Santiago and enjoyed it tremendously. However during that walk, I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.

My husband would like to start walking from SJPP. I'm concerned about that stage since it seems one of the most difficult ones. If my foot were to become too painful to walk 10-15 Km/day, I would like to find out if it's possible for me to walk part of the day, then take a taxi or a bus to a town ahead where we'll spend the night. Where would I find information about alternative transportation? I might also consider taxing my pack to reduce the weight on my foot. Is there taxi service in most of the towns?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Emilia
I have a Mortons neuroma/metatarsal issue on my left foot and walked from Loen to Santiago in 2011 and from St. Jean to Santiago in 2015. It is doable. While training, I tested a variety of metatarsal pads and inserts to see if they would help and which were best. Then I found New Balance supportive cushioning insoles (IUAS3810) specifically with metatarsal support and I have used these in all my shoes since. This worked for me, and I also used trekking poles for uphills and downhills. I averaged 10 - 15 miles per day. Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances & Finisterre (Sep-Oct 2016)
#10
I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.
I have Morton's Neuroma in both feet (but the left is much worse), and walked from SJPdP to Finesterre in Autumn 2016 (38 walking days).
A number of years ago my podiatrist had me try some metatarsal pads and then gave me orthotics with custom pads for the neuromas. She also ensured that wore had shoes with a wide toe box.
Prior to the orthotics, I couldn't handle walking more than 1 km, and more vexingly, couldn't complete more that 2 ski, runs without excruciating pain.
On 'The Way', I had a few days where I was in pain at the end of the day, but not as excruciating as in the past.
So, I recommend that you talk to your Podiatrist re: the various treatment options, and in my case the the orthotics have just become my normal shoe inserts :)
PS. My walking shoes are Salomon Escape Aeros - lightweight trail shoes
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France 2015
Camino Portuguese 2017
#11
Regarding the chronic pain related to Morton's Neuroma, choose hiking boots/shoes with a wide toe box, see a reliable podiatrist for assessment and to perhaps fit you for some orthotics to insert the shoes you wear. If any of your shoes cause pain when you wear them, then ideally stop wearing them as they will only continue to irritate your foot. I speak from experience, and for me, a trip to the podiatrist, wide toe box hiking boots and orthotics provided immense relief.[/QUOTE
We met a woman on our last Camino who showed us how to tie our boots, which already had wide toe boxes, in order to optimize toe room but keep the boots nice and snug on hills, especially downhill. I wish I could explain here. Basically the laces weren't cross-crossed for the first couple of rows but then were snug around the ankles and double tied to hold the laces tight. It was so helpful and we showed the technique to many other pilgrims along the way.
Good luck and Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances & Finisterre (Sep-Oct 2016)
#12
We met a woman on our last Camino who showed us how to tie our boots, which already had wide toe boxes, in order to optimize toe room but keep the boots nice and snug on hills, especially downhill. I wish I could explain here.
I totally forgot the lacing :)
It sounds like she used a similar lacing approach to mine.
I use a 'Surgeon's knot' above the second loop to lock off the toe box and a Low-Cut Shoe Heel Lock at the top.
http://www.backpacker.com/gear/common-hiking-boot-lacing-techniques

And please ensure that your walking shoes are at least 1/2 size larger than your normal shoes as you will get swelling, which will compound the pressure on the Morton's neuroma.

Good Luck
TrevorB
 
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017
#13
I wrote this a while ago (2015) -- I started a thread, but am not sure how to link it here.


So I walked the camino with my 14 year old son in March/April of this year. Before I left I was concerned with my feet as I often had heel pain if I stood still for over 5 minutes or walked with a load. I damaged my feet badly in 1987 in a 12 foot fall while rock climbing (I was being stupid.. but that's another story.). For two years I walked on the balls of my feet, not my heels. I saw all kinds of foot specialists. Slowly my heels improved, but never healed completely.-- Then, I saw a sports doctor before I left for Spain-- in the hopes of stronger pain killers than ibuprofen-- but the Dr suggested physical therapy, saying he thought that by walking on the balls of my feet, some foot muscles had weakened. -- So there I was weeks later, walking the camino, and my feet were killing me. The blisters and impact on my toes (my shoes were too small), overwhelmed any pain in my heels. I took ibuprofen regularly, even to sleep.(I ended up loosing both my big toe nails.) Sometimes when I was walking my feet would cramp up, but then they'd get better. I kept walking. At night, I swear I could feel my feet healing. -- In Santiago, my too small shoes were tossed in the bin, and I appropriated my son's shoes, and left him to walk in his sandals. His shoes were heaven! -- Since I've gotten home, I have had no problem in standing. My feet literally touch the ground differently than they did. My guess is that walking for days and days on end increased muscle size and strength. I ordered hiking shoes (men's shoes) that have more toe room than women's, and they're a size and half bigger than I used to wear. I find I really hate my once beloved mephisto clogs, because they squish my toes and remind me of the hated too-small-hiking shoes I wore for weeks. My feet are wider now and I seem to want to use my toes more when I walk. The idea of wearing heels is appalling. -- I am wondering if anyone else experience new foot strength on coming home, and the need to toss out most of their shoes. -- For me, having strong healthy feet after almost 30 years is a miracle. --
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2012 Sarria to SDC
#14
Thank you everyone for your great comments and suggestions. I'm going to try several of them and see what works.

A podiatrist made orthotics for my shoes but they never fit properly. I tried to get him to make them fit better un successfully. I have found a couple of over the counter inserts that work ok. I have time to prepare and try all your suggestions.

It makes me happy to hear all the success stories of pilgrims with foot issues. I was afraid I was not going to be able to do El camino.

Thanks again for your help!

Emilia
 

martyseville

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
a/a
#15
I manage plantars faciitis. It hasn't stopped me from walking. I'm able to stay ahead of it with lots of stretching, massage, compression/taping, and good shoes/insoles.

But I have used both taxi and pack service for a few days in Galicia when I got terribly ill after an emergency tooth extraction (yes, big camino fun-times) but I wanted my partner to keep walking our stages. It was very easy. When I first figured out I could no longer manage walking, we were already 2 hours in. I was able to arrange a taxi at a bar, no problem. I rode with a pack transport guy the next 2 days, arranged at the albergues.

You will have no problem figuring this out on a day-to-day basis on the Camino Frances.

Good post. I do the same with mine. Manage plantars faciitis. Stretch. Inserts.
Try to be in the best health as possible before starting Camino.

I see podiatry doctor often. Now have bunion on right small toe. Just got wider shoes. Also, had podiatrist made orthotics for my shoes. Terrible fit. So never wore them. Got shoes that work for ME and good inserts. Coupled with stretching, light pack, losing weight and getting in shape....I am much better off now.

I use Super Feet in my shoes. Got rid of the heavy duty boots. Now using trail runners..Solomons.

When it gets so bad that I cannot walk such distances, then I will bike it. Hopefully.

As mentioned on this forum many times...travel light. Good shoes. Take care of your feet. Pray.

Last Camino I ate too much Vitamin "I" to ward off pain. Drank too many beers. I no longer take Vitamin "I" Bad stuff.

I am glad lacing was mentioned. Too tight = bad foot pain for me. Especially in greater left toe. Too loose = blisters. You have to find "that lacing" that works for you. there are a few "lock" lace methods out there. Try and see if it helps.

Hope for the best. Bless you.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#16
@jagushemi I can so sympathise with the foot problem. I had Morton's neuroma caused by years of wearing shoes that had too narrow a toe box for my wide and small feet. Podiatrist did all sorts of fancy taping and packing of my feet followed by extremely expensive orthotics all of which had no effect whatsoever. So in 2015 I consulted Dr Google (absolutely not recommended) and discovered Topo shoes. Got myself a pair and found that walking the camino in them completely cured the plantar fasciitis I also had as well as keeping the Morton's neuroma at completely managable levels. My feet did and still do go numb but rarely painfully and nowhere near to the point where I had to stop walking.
Also I laced my shoes by the Altra method and that helped as well.
https://www.altrarunning.com/blog/running-tips/run-technique/lacing-technique/. Plus I used elastic laces and I think they helped as well.
On returning from the camino I found that I had to keep wearing Topo or rather the Altra shoes that I now wear if doing anything that involves walking because my feet no longer cope in anything else. But that's OK because if it means my feet aren't complaining then I don't mind looking like a little hobbit almost regardless of the occassion.
My advice on this forum is rarely specific but in this case I would like to suggest that you try a pair of Altra Lone Peak 3.0 https://www.altrarunning.com/women/lone-peak-30 and give them a good test to see if they suit your feet and can improve your foot problems.
All the very best for a very buen camino for you and your husband.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
2012 Sarria to SDC
#17
@jagushemi I can so sympathise with the foot problem. I had Morton's neuroma caused by years of wearing shoes that had too narrow a toe box for my wide and small feet. Podiatrist did all sorts of fancy taping and packing of my feet followed by extremely expensive orthotics all of which had no effect whatsoever. So in 2015 I consulted Dr Google (absolutely not recommended) and discovered Topo shoes. Got myself a pair and found that walking the camino in them completely cured the plantar fasciitis I also had as well as keeping the Morton's neuroma at completely managable levels. My feet did and still do go numb but rarely painfully and nowhere near to the point where I had to stop walking.
Also I laced my shoes by the Altra method and that helped as well.
https://www.altrarunning.com/blog/running-tips/run-technique/lacing-technique/. Plus I used elastic laces and I think they helped as well.
On returning from the camino I found that I had to keep wearing Topo or rather the Altra shoes that I now wear if doing anything that involves walking because my feet no longer cope in anything else. But that's OK because if it means my feet aren't complaining then I don't mind looking like a little hobbit almost regardless of the occassion.
My advice on this forum is rarely specific but in this case I would like to suggest that you try a pair of Altra Lone Peak 3.0 https://www.altrarunning.com/women/lone-peak-30 and give them a good test to see if they suit your feet and can improve your foot problems.
All the very best for a very buen camino for you and your husband.

Heda,

Thank you for all the informaiton. I will research these two types of shoes and see what I can find in the USA.

My toes are numb, but when I walk significant distances, my foot becomes painful. Most of my shoes have a wide toe box. I can't stand any other shoe anymore.

I'm going to try the suggestions posted here and train before we decide to go.

Thanks again!
 

rovergirl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April (1017)
#19
Hi fellow pilgrims,

My DH (59 yo) and I (58 yo)hope to walk the El Camino Frances in the coming year. In 2012, we walked from Sarria to Santiago and enjoyed it tremendously. However during that walk, I developed a Morton's neuroma in my left foot, which is scaring of a nerve between the toes. Since then, I have some issues walking when the nerve gets irritated. I would love to hear about pilgrims who have chronic foot problems and how they managed.

My husband would like to start walking from SJPP. I'm concerned about that stage since it seems one of the most difficult ones. If my foot were to become too painful to walk 10-15 Km/day, I would like to find out if it's possible for me to walk part of the day, then take a taxi or a bus to a town ahead where we'll spend the night. Where would I find information about alternative transportation? I might also consider taxing my pack to reduce the weight on my foot. Is there taxi service in most of the towns?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Emilia
Emilia,

I will be starting the Camino in mid-April from SJPDP. About six months ago, I started developing pain in the toes of my left foot. I spoke to my podiatrist about it last month, and he said it was Morton's neuroma. From the information sheet he gave me, I noted that one should avoid any footwear that compresses the toes. I realized I had a pair of leather slippers, which exacerbated the pain whenever I wore them. I stopped wearing them, and switched to a pair of softer slippers with lots of toe room. Two weeks later, the pain is essentially gone. My hiking shoes also have ample toe room, so I guess I am good to go.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
#20
Regarding the chronic pain related to Morton's Neuroma, choose hiking boots/shoes with a wide toe box, see a reliable podiatrist for assessment and to perhaps fit you for some orthotics to insert the shoes you wear. If any of your shoes cause pain when you wear them, then ideally stop wearing them as they will only continue to irritate your foot. I speak from experience, and for me, a trip to the podiatrist, wide toe box hiking boots and orthotics provided immense relief.
Absolutely agree with all that! I developed Morton's neuroma weeks before departing for Camino in 2015. Cortisone injection was effective in reducing but not eliminating pain, as was tweaking of orthotics. Residual pain was manageable and became my Camino mantra - I have nerve pain but I am still able to walk and walk it through.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#21
I can understand your situation - I think my complaint with my left foot was akin to yours. I have to say I am 10000% in agreement with the comments by @RedRuby and I have to say I have already implemented most if not all off the points she notes. When you have "a foot issue" the best professional advice from the foot professionals is essential. Whilst you may wish to walk all the camino with your friend/lover/husband if it does become to painful then yes take the taxi - to get to your room that night; or let him start in the morning and you join him for the last 10-15 km of the day. Buen Camino
 

ouroboros

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St. Jean to Santiago (2012)
Camino Portuguese Porto-Santiago (2017)
#22
I have plantar fibromas on both feet...big lumps of scar tissue on my arches, a fairly rare condition. I had them before the camino, but they don't bother me, except my arches are super stiff in the morning. I have a stiff metatarsal bone in my left big toe, which causes me to supinate on my left foot, causing pain and calluses. My left foot is wider than my right and left ankle is less flexible and prone to injury. We each have our bag of issues to carry--mine included a very large foot care medical bag just in case, which I did not need, but other pilgrims did!

I have paid my first of several visits to the podiatrist to be sure I am ok for my upcoming camino on the Portugese Way.

I walked the whole Frances with no problems, no blisters. My feet got very muscular and larger!

My solutions:
~Wide toe box and lightweight boots, one and one half size larger than feet (men's boots)
~Lacing technique and lambswool in the boots,
~two pairs socks ( silk liners),
~Aertrex orthotics with metatarsal pad support (best remedy of all) The insoles and shoe size and shape are critical!
~foot massage,
~I will bring sports tape this time in case....

If you are concerned about starting at Saint Jean Pied de Port, and getting to Roncevalles has some difficult downhill terrain, why not start in Pamplona? Urban center, plenty of taxis, supports, resources for the start of your camino until you feel more confident.
All the best,
and godspeed on your Camino!
 

edwards142

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
willing to go in year (2019)
#23
Well the chronic foot issues are generally originates or alleviates more when you don’t follow the foot care routine carefully. Well there are many easy foot care regime that can enhance the natural beauty of your feet, works as pain reliever, gives protection against fungal and bacterial infection.
bestfootcare.webnode.com
Don’t ignore your foot problems and get knowledge of the issue that arising to your beautiful feet.
Read more at :
 
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Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
#24
Not quite so, depending on which joint.

I have implants in both my big toe joints. Works great, as long as I keep walking. If I have a few days where I cannot walk, the scar tissue starts acting up. Remedy: a good long walk

Smaller joints can be fused.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - 2014
Portuguese - 2016
Chemin St Jacques - TBD
Via Francigena - TBD
#25
I have plantar fibromas on both feet...big lumps of scar tissue on my arches, a fairly rare condition. I had them before the camino, but they don't bother me, except my arches are super stiff in the morning. I have a stiff metatarsal bone in my left big toe, which causes me to supinate on my left foot, causing pain and calluses. My left foot is wider than my right and left ankle is less flexible and prone to injury. We each have our bag of issues to carry--mine included a very large foot care medical bag just in case, which I did not need, but other pilgrims did!

I have paid my first of several visits to the podiatrist to be sure I am ok for my upcoming camino on the Portugese Way.

I walked the whole Frances with no problems, no blisters. My feet got very muscular and larger!

My solutions:
~Wide toe box and lightweight boots, one and one half size larger than feet (men's boots)
~Lacing technique and lambswool in the boots,
~two pairs socks ( silk liners),
~Aertrex orthotics with metatarsal pad support (best remedy of all) The insoles and shoe size and shape are critical!
~foot massage,
~I will bring sports tape this time in case....

If you are concerned about starting at Saint Jean Pied de Port, and getting to Roncevalles has some difficult downhill terrain, why not start in Pamplona? Urban center, plenty of taxis, supports, resources for the start of your camino until you feel more confident.
All the best,
and godspeed on your Camino!
I also have plantar fibroma. Very painful toe burning on one foot. Besides grin and bear it I have found that Kuru shoes have provided some relief.
 
Camino(s) past & future
20th August 2014
#26
I walked camino in 2014 and close to burgos had to stop for couple of days with ankle pain. Went to clinic they said tendonitis. Started walking again after 2 days and nearing Leon ahad to go to clinic again with it. They again said tendonitis and either go home or rest for a week. I booked in somewhere for 5 nights then continued on in pain on ibuprofen and strapping. Finished Camino and went home. 2 weeks later still had the pain, went to hospital in Ireland and MRI showed I had a broken ankle.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#27
Almost finished Camino #3 with chronic foot issues. Achilles Tendonitis and shin splints before starting and picked up knee problems the last few days.

#1 ibruprofen under doctors advice re dosage etc.

Then various tapes and elastic supports.

Cortisone shots before i leave home.

Lots of stretching

Icing.

And trips to physios along the way.

I.e. if you want walk, you'll find ways to manage it ;)
 

Lurch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
looking at 2018-2019
#28
Not quite so, depending on which joint.

I have implants in both my big toe joints. Works great, as long as I keep walking. If I have a few days where I cannot walk, the scar tissue starts acting up. Remedy: a good long walk

Smaller joints can be fused.
Watch having your toe joints frozen. Has the number 2&3 toes left foot done. Problems arise when you bump into something. The toes can’t bend and take the full force of the hit. Different doc cut the tendons on toe #4, works better. I had hammer toes, for lack of a more medical term.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
#29
Almost finished Camino #3 with chronic foot issues. Achilles Tendonitis and shin splints before starting and picked up knee problems the last few days.

#1 ibruprofen under doctors advice re dosage etc.

Then various tapes and elastic supports.

Cortisone shots before i leave home.

Lots of stretching

Icing.

And trips to physios along the way.

I.e. if you want walk, you'll find ways to manage it ;)
Bravo and thanks for advice. Realise it's an individual experience but it's good to know your shin splints pre-Camino were not Camino-ending...
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
#30
Bravo and thanks for advice. Realise it's an individual experience but it's good to know your shin splints pre-Camino were not Camino-ending...
They can be....
On advice from our Physio we carried a foam roller and use it every day...
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#31
I suffer from metatarsal pain (ball of the foot), starting at about 10K. I got orthotics for my Altra Lone Peak shoes and part way into the day, I switch to my Chaco sandals. I mostly end up wearing the sandals. I stopped regularly and elevated my feet while resting. I ordered some metatarsal pads from Hapad and super-glued them onto the beds of my sandals (they are self-adhesive, but super glue makes them really stick). The pads are placed *below* the balls of the feet; between the ball of the foot and the arch. This raises the ball of your foot a bit, which makes your toes bend down instead of collapsing, which causes the pain.

I didn't always walk pain-free, but managed 20-25 (occasionally 30) kilometers a day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct 2015 Le Puy - to Conques, Tui - Santiago. May/June 2017 Conques to SJPP
#33
I suffer from metatarsal pain (ball of the foot), starting at about 10K. I got orthotics for my Altra Lone Peak shoes and part way into the day, I switch to my Chaco sandals. I mostly end up wearing the sandals. I stopped regularly and elevated my feet while resting. I ordered some metatarsal pads from Hapad and super-glued them onto the beds of my sandals (they are self-adhesive, but super glue makes them really stick). The pads are placed *below* the balls of the feet; between the ball of the foot and the arch. This raises the ball of your foot a bit, which makes your toes bend down instead of collapsing, which causes the pain.

I didn't always walk pain-free, but managed 20-25 (occasionally 30) kilometers a day.
Another ingenious Pigrim.
 
#34
When I went to the podiatrist (the best in town) for orthotics after my Camino, he was jealous and told me that the Camino is on his "Bucket List." Now the question is how to get him to come with me next time!!
ref how to get him to come with yo. First thing is to turn your mobile off, look him in the face and say something like "hey do you fancy doing the Camino with me next year"
 

Nekodemus

Certified insane
Camino(s) past & future
Been there, done that. Keep coming back.
Most likely addicted.
#35
Watch having your toe joints frozen
One doc suggested just that for another toe. One of those I'm_a_doctor,_so_I'm_(at_least)_a_demi_god types. They look so utterly gobsmacked when you reject their recommendations as useless. Then hes spent a minute or so, telling me that he wasn't angry with me for not accepting his ... :rolleyes:
 

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