A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Camino Forum Donation

Walks in Germany

ShelleyS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP 9/20/17
Hello fellow pilgrims!
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.

All information is appreciated!
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
Hello fellow pilgrims!
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.

All information is appreciated!
Hi Shelley
Lots of info on this forum.
Do a search of member @SYates for her posts and info on ‘Via Regia’ in Germany.
Annie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Hello fellow pilgrims!
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.

All information is appreciated!
Hi Shelly,
The Rheinstag trail from Bonn to Wiesbaden is a wonderful walk
It's about 320km long and passes through lovely towns and villages
Wonderful scenery...sometimes walking just beside the Rhine, and sometimes on the path above the river.
And the people we met were extremely nice, kind and helpful.
We loved this trail
Best wishes
Annette
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
hi Shelley.

I am rather hooked on the German camino's and plan to walk more in the future. I have walked both the Via Regia (lots of info on this forum, just use the search function) and the Elisabethpfad (from Eisenach to Marburg). I wrote a little report about the latter, >
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/elisabethpfad-eisenach-–-marburg.55924/

I you have any further questions about these routes, I am happy to answer them. Marc
 

Athena Atterdag

time&space traveller
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017,2018)
Via Turonensis (Paris-Chartres,2018)
Camino de Invierno (Dec2018/Jan2019)
Hi Shelley,

Consider the Romantic Road and/or the German Fairy Tale Road.

I didn't walk either of them, but I've travelled in both regions and visited some of the towns. The scenery is exceptionally beautiful, and the towns very picturesque!

It might be difficult to choose, so I'll add my personal opinion: while the scenery is equally spectacular along both routes, I liked the towns on the Romantic Road more. Nördlingen, Dinkelsbühl, and Rothenburg ob der Tauber are among my absolutely favourite German towns! The towns I visited on the Fairy Tale Road seemed to be much less well cared for, and Alsfeld in particular left a very depressing impression on me.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hello fellow pilgrims!
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.

All information is appreciated!
I really enjoyed the Via Regia from Goerlitz to Vacha, also known as the Oekumenischer Pilgerweg.
Similarly the Via Baltica from Swinemuende to Luebeck and then heading south on the Via Scandinavica.
This year I plan to walk the Malerweg and Saxonian wine trail.
More info on www.gittiharre.blogspot.com
Happy to answer questions.
 

ShelleyS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP 9/20/17
Thanks to everyone for the helpful replies.
If I walk one of the routes in Germany, it would be in early July of 2019. I hope to visit the small town of Damme Germany where my grandmother was born. I thought it would be a plus to walk for a week or 10 days somewhere in Germany. I walked the Frances in the fall of 2017.

Question: Of the routes in Germany, which ones am I likely to see other pilgrims? I will be walking solo and would like to walk where I would see other pilgrims at times, knowing that it won't be like the Frances.

Also: Which routes would I find lodging most available for walkers?

Again, thank you all for your input!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Definitely the Oekumenischer Pilgerweg. Well studded with pilgrim friendly and cheap and quirky accommodation. You will see some pilgrims on the way. I would start in Goerlitz. It is a beautiful old town.
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Norte, Salvador, Aragones, Portuguese, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakibspaad.
I think (but others may correct me if I am wrong) that the Via Regia is the most "crowded" route in Germany. It's all relative, when I walked it in September I met app 10 pilgrims in 20 days. But I was told that in the holiday season it is more crowded. There are a lot of albergues (Herbergen) on this route, allowing for flexible planning of stages. Forum member SYates has made an excellent (English) website about the Via Regia, you may want to check it out: http://viaregia.guide/town-to-town/

I dont know if you speak German, but this is the German site about the Via Regia.
https://www.oekumenischer-pilgerweg.de/
A guidebook and credential can be ordered there as well.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hello @ShelleyS

The town of Damme is found along the Via Baltica, a pilgrim trail coming down from the north through Lübeck, Hamburg and Bremen to Vechta near Damme. I followed this trail in winter 2010, spending Christmas at Damme Kloster. There was a pilger herberge in the Vechta Museum im Zeughaus, one or so days walk from Damme (27 kms) .

Here's a link to the guide book I used (updated 2016):

Bernhard Weber: Pilgern auf der Via Baltica.
https://www.amazon.fr/Pilgern-auf-Via-Baltica-Baltisch-Westfälischen/dp/3000590153

and the author's website with extra information and a contact address:
http://www.via-baltica-verlag.de/index.html

Damme Kloster, Winter 2010
Damme Kloster Christmas 2010.jpg
 
Last edited:

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have heard talk about the “60 lakes walk”(?) near Berlin. No personal experience...
Apparently it is very deserted and complicated with accommodation, as there is not much available. Need to plan ahead...
Friend of mine walked it.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hello @ShelleyS

The town of Damme is found along the Via Baltica, a pilgrim trail coming down from the north through Lübeck, Hamburg and Bremen to Vechta near Damme. I followed this trail in winter 2010, spending Christmas at Damme Kloster. There was a pilger herberge in the Vechta Museum im Zeughaus, one or so days walk from Damme .

Here's a link to the guide book I used (updated 2016):

Bernhard Weber: Pilgern auf der Via Baltica.
https://www.amazon.fr/Pilgern-auf-Via-Baltica-Baltisch-Westfälischen/dp/3000590153

Damme Kloster, Winter 2010
View attachment 50780
The Via Baltica comes in from the East through Poland and connects with Germany at Swinemuende. It is a lovely walk towards Luebeck, but you hardly see a soul on the trail. I walked this about 3 years ago. Also on my blog.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
The Via Baltica comes in from the East through Poland and connects with Germany at Swinemuende. It is a lovely walk towards Luebeck, but you hardly see a soul on the trail. I walked this about 3 years ago. Also on my blog.
Hi there, @gittiharre
...I didn't see a soul out walking either but it was a glorious hike in the snow and every day there were Chrismas markets to explore, Glühwein to drink and concerts to attend...

ps from the east? I didn't carry a compass. It was as cold as the North Pole to walk and being from the Southern Hemisphere everywhere in Europe seems to me be North...i've edited the above :)
 
Last edited:

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Hi there, @gittiharre
...I didn't see a soul out walking either but it was a glorious hike in the snow and every day there were Chrismas markets to explore, Glühwein to drink and concerts to attend...

ps from the east? I didn't carry a compass. It was a cold as the North Pole to walk and being from the Southern Hemisphere everywhere in Europe seems to me be North...i've edited the above :)
It is a fab walk! I reckon the German walks are ready to be discovered!
 

ShelleyS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP 9/20/17
Hello @ShelleyS

The town of Damme is found along the Via Baltica, a pilgrim trail coming down from the north through Lübeck, Hamburg and Bremen to Vechta near Damme. I followed this trail in winter 2010, spending Christmas at Damme Kloster. There was a pilger herberge in the Vechta Museum im Zeughaus, one or so days walk from Damme (27 kms) .

Here's a link to the guide book I used (updated 2016):

Bernhard Weber: Pilgern auf der Via Baltica.
https://www.amazon.fr/Pilgern-auf-Via-Baltica-Baltisch-Westfälischen/dp/3000590153

and the author's website with extra information and a contact address:
http://www.via-baltica-verlag.de/index.html

Damme Kloster, Winter 2010
View attachment 50780
Thank you so much for this!
 

ShelleyS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP 9/20/17
I think (but others may correct me if I am wrong) that the Via Regia is the most "crowded" route in Germany. It's all relative, when I walked it in September I met app 10 pilgrims in 20 days. But I was told that in the holiday season it is more crowded. There are a lot of albergues (Herbergen) on this route, allowing for flexible planning of stages. Forum member SYates has made an excellent (English) website about the Via Regia, you may want to check it out: http://viaregia.guide/town-to-town/

I dont know if you speak German, but this is the German site about the Via Regia.
https://www.oekumenischer-pilgerweg.de/
A guidebook and credential can be ordered there as well.
Thank you. I don't speak German, so I will check out SYates website. I've seen some of her posts.
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
Another Option in Germany is the "Eifel-Steig". It is 314 km from Aachen to Trier.

It is not a pilgrims trail, but it passes through lovely landscapes and almost touches my house on stage 10.

Here is further information on this - but only in German: Eifelsteig

Perhaps you could use Google to translate it?

BC
Alexandra
 
Last edited:

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Another Option in Germany is the "Eifel-Steig". It is 314 km from Aachen to Trier.

It is not a pilgrims trail, but it passes through lovely landscapes and almost touches my house on stage 10.

Here is further information on this - but only in German: Eifelsteig

Perhaps you could use Google to translate it?

BC
Alexandra

There is a small button with EN on the bottom of the page. And it works!

 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Adding to the fun of the Eifelsteig which looks very interesting anyway:

Eifel Tourismus GmbH and several other hiking tour operators offer a “Hiking without baggage on the Eifelsteig” package. This means that hikers only need to take their day rucksack with them, while their baggage is transported to the next hotel. This allows you to enjoy the hikes baggage-free.
hehehe. count me in.
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. Last: Levante + Ruta de la Lana October 2018
Mosel Camino from Koblenz to Trier. I have walked it.
 

nickymd1

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdN 2017
CFisterra 2017
Via Imperii + Via Regia | Berlin-Leipzig-Erfurt '18
Planning: CF 2019
I've done a fair bit (70% or so) of the 60 Lakes Trail - it's great, well maintained and beautiful but not really on the pilgrim radar. If you're looking of beauty, this is the one. If you're looking for pilgrim spirit, not so much.

I did two shorter sections of the 'Camino' in Germany last year (May + October), walking the Berlin - Leipzig - Naumburg 'elbow'. In the 8 days I spent walking it, I met only one couple who will "pilgrims" but out on a day hike rather than continuing on the trail. Be warned, it is lonely and expensive compared to what you've done before and you'll be forced to plan ahead. That being said, it was very pretty and the architecture when you get to town is often both quaint and stunning.
 

Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
In Globetrotters, there was a whole shelf of books with various sections of the Jakobsweg. I have one of them, Fulda to Frankfurt. I find markings in many cities and churches here, as many of them were/are part of this route. Occasionally, I run into pilgrims here in Frankfurt that have stopped by one of the churches to get a stamp.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.
(Sorry, just spotted this post, or I would have replied sooner.) I walked the Jakobsweg across Bavaria (coming from Prague) from the Czech border through Nuremberg and Ulm to Konstanz (and on into Switzerland) over several years. Daily details are in my blog.
This was lovely, rolling, forested/pasture countryside and very enjoyable walking. Small towns in every valley had all services. The routes were well marked (in the German fashion- turn here but not until we tell you) and well maintained. Guidebooks in German were widely available (maps and elevation profiles and lodging listings are useful even if you don't speak much German yet). I walked in late May/early June and did not encounter many other walkers; but there will definitely be more traffic in July.
Take advantage of the camping-grounds and the monasteries!

There are routes all over Germany. Check out the catalog listing at Conrad-Stein, publisher of the famous little yellow books. https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/ In particular there are routes along both banks of the Rhine.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
Somebody in the forum (I don't remember exactly who, but you are reading this, thanks!) recommended me the routes around Cologne/Köln. There is a "jakobsweg" along the Rhine (beautiful landscapes, although it is basically from one touristic town to another) and from Cologne to Trier. As I was just looking for some nice days of trekking, I finally chose the Bergisches Way, the "panorama" option. Rolling hills, forests, very well signposted, little villages, picturesque hostals, kind people, and great food.:):)
I discovered that there is actually a jakobsweg that crosses the Bergisches...it is just an option between many ways, you are just another trekker (a real passion in this country, as you probably know). Only inconvenient (in June): in some low and marshy parts, there are many horseflies, they could bite even through the clothes; avoid taking a pause to admire the landscape in these sections (as I did...):confused: And the lodging aspect needs some previous planning. But, certainly, these are minor problems, and I am looking forward to come back and finish the stages.
There are published guides and a webpage.
 

Attachments

inmari

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2013)
El Camino de San Olav, Burgos - Covarrubias (2014)
Pamplona - SdC (2015)
My suggestion: Der Ochsenweg from the Danish border to Hamburg, the continue to Aachen, passing Bremen and Osnabrück.
 

ShelleyS

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP 9/20/17
(Sorry, just spotted this post, or I would have replied sooner.) I walked the Jakobsweg across Bavaria (coming from Prague) from the Czech border through Nuremberg and Ulm to Konstanz (and on into Switzerland) over several years. Daily details are in my blog.
This was lovely, rolling, forested/pasture countryside and very enjoyable walking. Small towns in every valley had all services. The routes were well marked (in the German fashion- turn here but not until we tell you) and well maintained. Guidebooks in German were widely available (maps and elevation profiles and lodging listings are useful even if you don't speak much German yet). I walked in late May/early June and did not encounter many other walkers; but there will definitely be more traffic in July.
Take advantage of the camping-grounds and the monasteries!

There are routes all over Germany. Check out the catalog listing at Conrad-Stein, publisher of the famous little yellow books. https://www.conrad-stein-verlag.de/ In particular there are routes along both banks of the Rhine.
Thank you! Very helpful information. I will look into the "little yellow books".
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
TdMB/KLW(2014)
Portugues(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
Hello fellow pilgrims!
I am looking for a walk in Germany that I can do this summer. It doesn't need to be part of the Camino. I would prefer a route in the north or western part of the country, but doesn't have to be. I will be going solo.

I'm wondering if any of you have hiked/walked a route in Germany that would be safe, fun and enjoyable.

All information is appreciated!
My response to a previous thread;
King Ludwig's Way in Bavaria, Germany is a beautiful walk without too many challenges...in other words, you can just wander & enjoy it. I did it in spring 2014 & loved it. Its approx 120km starting in Starnberg (near Munich) & finishing at Neuschwanstein Castle near Fußen. The 10 days could easily be filled with time spent at beginning & end. While not a Camino in itself, the path coincides with JakobsWeg so you will be accompanied by our familiar yellow arrows & scallop shell way marking along with the distinctive 'K with a crown' of the KLW.
Happy planning! 👣 🌏
 
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino Vasco interior
Hallo ShelleyS,

I saw your post and want to reply, as a German, to give you some ideas. Maybe we are related, my mother comes from a small peasentry (near Neuenkirchen) in the immediate vicinity of Damme. About hundred years ago there were only strictly Catholic farmers who always got married nearby or emigrated to the USA or Canada by the thousends😜.

Unfortunately, Damme is not the "hotspot" of hiking in Germany. Most of the Germans prefer hiking through the low mountain range and everything is flat in Damme. The "Dammer Mountains" are called mountains, but are only 150 meters high.

What about to visite Damme and than go by public transport to the next "official" hikingtrail, the Hermannshöhen (ca 70 km away). This trails starts in the "lowlands" and getting up to about 450 meters and ends in the low mountain range of "Sauerland". You could enter this trail for example to the fifth etappe.


It is very nice and very good signed, I did the way a few years ago with friends. It will be not full, but I think you will meet a few persons. The way goes through lovely nature, meets the remarkable monument "Hermannsdenkmal" and you would see very nice little villages with lots of half-timbered houses.

For me, the most beautiful way outside the Alps in Germany is the "Saar-Hunsrück-Steig"
The start is very close to the french border near Saarbrücken, and it goes over light mountains at the end to the river Rhein.


The next airport to the startpoint is Saarbrücken or Luxembourg, or the little "cheap-airport" Frankfurt-Hahn (it´s not Frankfurt international). But that´s much to far away from Damme

I´m sure, you will find a good path to walk. In these things, I'm really a bit proud of my homeland:)

Wherever you go hiking in Germany, please note:
  • You need cash, it´s not possible everywhere to pay with card
  • In the little villages, the shops close early - mybe at 18:30
  • Sunday all shops are closed, except at the airport, at the station in the cities etc, in little villages it´s only peace and silence😇.
If you need more information or help - no problem, ask me

All the best to you

Michael
 
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino Vasco interior
I totaly agree with Delphinoula. This area in the north of Bavaria, called Frankonia, is really wonderful.

Coburg with his great fortress is a nice place and Bamberg is a beautiful city with a great history and a fantastic old town.

And the whole area is known for its many family owned breweries🍺😜
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
A few general remarks about walking in Germany: The Germans like walking for exercise, so there are a great many marked routes, both long Jakobsweg routes that connect to the major routes through France to SDC and regional routes or loops. Often these routes will superimpose on each other; it's quite normal to see three or four route markers for a given stretch of trail. The routes are more often footpaths than the farm roads found in France; well maintained and usually well-marked (but not as frequently as Le Puy or C. Frances). Although there are occasional inexpensive pilgrim or parish lodgings, the most frequent lodging is the small country inn, the Gasthaus. These will have a restaurant/pub on the ground floor, owner/family quarters next up, then one or more floors with guest rooms. Real beds, clean sheets, private bath. Enormous, robust breakfast with assorted breads, butter, jams, pastries, cheeses, cold cuts, soft-boiled eggs almost always included in the room rate. There is usually enough breakfast on offer to make a sandwich for lunch as well. Cash is king, but every small town has a bank or ATM so getting cash is not a problem. Bus stops have lovely little shelters which make great rain or lunch shelters; this might actually be more useful than the bus service, which tends to focus on school-children's schedules. Trains connect the larger towns, and cities have trams or light rail which is useful for skipping over industrial sections. In general, Germany is more heavily populated than France, so the small towns are a bit larger and occur more frequently. It's really very good walking, and definitely worthy of your consideration!
 
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino Vasco interior
Nobody could have described "the states" on German trails better.

Especially the breakfast -The dark and crispy German bread, something we crave more on journey than after our Mama 😜

I admire the eating culture in France - they take so much time for a good meal. I love the partly elegant, partly hearty food in Spain👍

But breakfast is a disaster in both countries🥵

So even on the most beautiful Camino there is something to look forward to home🍺🍖🍞
 

Delphinoula

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese da Costa 2018
Finisterre Muxía 2018
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia 2019
It’s generally frowned upon to make a sandwich for lunch from your breakfast table. You can ask if it is ok, but like in the states in Europe breakfast is what it says for breakfast. But you can get a Sandwich for 1 Euro or 2 from any butchery or bakery. There you will find an inexpensive lunch and coffee.
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com


Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 37 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 133 15.6%
  • May

    Votes: 205 24.0%
  • June

    Votes: 60 7.0%
  • July

    Votes: 17 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 13 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 254 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 100 11.7%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.6%
Top