• This section is a collection of FAQs on the Camino. No new questions can be posted here, but questions that are asked often will be move here by a moderator.
  • Missing the daily forum e-mail? Subscribe again.
A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Warnings about your (national) passport

Camino(s) past & future
23 May (2016)
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error.

WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.

My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! :eek:

I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(

I gasped and immediately fled to my Denver Passport office and got a new one just in time.

So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!

Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!
A nice reminder, but hardly a new requirement, and not limited to France or Spain. It applies to most countries. While it applies on entry, the airlines have a vested interest in enforcing it on departure. They don't want to be faced with returning you to your port of departure if you are refused entry.
 

Lachance

Me llamo Deb
Camino(s) past & future
Part Francese 2016
A nice reminder, but hardly a new requirement, and not limited to France or Spain. It applies to most countries. While it applies on entry, the airlines have a vested interest in enforcing it on departure. They don't want to be faced with returning you to your port of departure if you are refused entry.
Definitely not new. In fact, it was over 20 years ago that I first noticed it when checking travel documents 2 days before the flight with a passport having less than 6 months to go. A mad scramble got a new one just in time.

We travelled overseas quite frequently and thought we knew the ropes. My husband's office had done the bookings and there was a failure of communication.

But even these days I can imagine someone who hasn't travelled for a long time failing take in this now common requirement. So, as you say, a nice reminder.
 
Camino(s) past & future
23 May (2016)
A nice reminder, but hardly a new requirement, and not limited to France or Spain. It applies to most countries. While it applies on entry, the airlines have a vested interest in enforcing it on departure. They don't want to be faced with returning you to your port of departure if you are refused entry.
This is an increased requirement in France, which used to be four months.
However, most of my traveling has been in 3rd world countries which required....one day!
 
Camino(s) past & future
23 May (2016)
Yup, not new. Always has to be ok for 6 months after.
Anemone, not "always." Often, but definitely not "always."
Every country has their own requirements - France has just upped theirs from 4 to 6 months.
Central America, and most of South America - they only require it to be active the day you enter.
Cuba now requires 6 months, but Japan only requires length of stay.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Anemone, not "always." Often, but definitely not "always."
Every country has their own requirements - France has just upped theirs from 4 to 6 months.
Central America, and most of South America - they only require it to be active the day you enter.
Cuba now requires 6 months, but Japan only requires length of stay.
But we are not talking about the Zanzibar Way, are we?
 

zzotte

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Camino Frances, 2014 Lourdes to SDC, 2016 Camino del Norte
A good reminder, it has been like that forever ok just for a long time :)

zzotte
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
A question, does anyone know?
The empty 'full page': does that mean front and back sides both, or is only one side necessary?
 

MichaelSG

Retired member
Camino(s) past & future
Not enough
@Jennifer from Colorado, thanks for the reminder. I assume that you intended to inform people that did not know about this requirement or had forgotten it but I guess it is also a good thread to allow some of us to pat ourselves on the back about how clever we are. You have provided something to make everyone happy which can be a challenge some days! Buen Caminho!

A question, does anyone know?
The empty 'full page': does that mean front and back sides both, or is only one side necessary?
My experience is that it is one single page (one side) but remember that many immigration officials, in some countries particularly third world ones, seem to make up rules as they go along and, since they make the decisions about entry or non-entry, always try to err on the side of caution.
 
Last edited:

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
A question, does anyone know?
The empty 'full page': does that mean front and back sides both, or is only one side necessary?
Time for additional pages (if that service is still available) or a new passport. Don't put yourself in the position where one quibbling immigration official can ruin your trip.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
The moral of the story is that you should check entry and visa requirements before you buy your tickets.

Canada has Foreign Affairs Canada Travel website. US has something similar under its State Department. Information about documents and other useful travel information is readily available about every country. If there are questions you can contact the embassy of the country to which you are traveling.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo
Another thing travellers often overlook is the the page in your passport where you 'pencil' in your emergency contact information.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Another thing travellers often overlook is the the page in your passport where you 'pencil' in your emergency contact information.
If you are travelling with your 'next of kin' it is also good to add in a further name who is still in your home country. Also to put ICE (In case of Emergency) numbers into your phone.

Our passports will be going for renewal as soon as we get back from Spain this year, that will give the passport office plenty of time to process them before next year. If you are thinking about driving at all check your driving licence too and for some, depending on where you are coming from, you will also need and international permit.

Glad that, so far as we can see, all our paper work is in order for this year, especially the national passports.
 

Bonita

Member
Camino(s) past & future
September ( 2015)
I have a passport story, too. The day before I was to leave for my Camino, I thought I'd do my pre-checkin. As I was filling out the form on the computer, I needed my passport number. I went to get my passport, and guess what!, it wasn't there. I spent two hours looking all through the house. What a disappointment, after all these months getting ready for my Camino, I wasn't going to be able to go. I live in Panama, Central America. I had been to the States several months before and figured I lost it somewhere between the airport and my home. I called the American Embassy in Panama City, just in case somebody found it and turned it in. After talking to the young lady for a couple of minutes, she told me I could get an emergency passport. It would be good for several months. My flight left the following day at 5 pm. I asked her if I would have it in time. She told me what to do. I took an earlier flight the next morning, took a taxi from the airport to the Embassy. Within 4 hours I had my new passport and I was ready to go. It cost me more, but at that stage, who cared. From there, everything went as smooth as silk. That was the biggest obstacle of my trip. I figured that, with overcoming that obstacle, I could overcome anything.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2017-Sarria to Santiago and Lires to Finisterre
Another thought. If you keep your passport in a bank safe deposit box, don't wait until the last minute or even last day to retrieve it. A number of bank lobbies are no longer open on Saturdays and you would be in major trouble with a Saturday or Sunday flight. Also, as I was waiting to have box drilled a year or so ago because they could not match the key on their end for some reason, the person at the bank told me a horror story where a person came into the bank on the way to the airport to pick up his passport. Yep, several hours later when he had his box drilled, his flight had long since departed.
 

Pong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés - April - May 2016
Camino del Norte - April - May 2017
Frances - March-April 2018
If you are travelling with your 'next of kin' it is also good to add in a further name who is still in your home country. Also to put ICE (In case of Emergency) numbers into your phone.

Our passports will be going for renewal as soon as we get back from Spain this year, that will give the passport office plenty of time to process them before next year. If you are thinking about driving at all check your driving licence too and for some, depending on where you are coming from, you will also need and international permit.

Glad that, so far as we can see, all our paper work is in order for this year, especially the national passports.
A bit off topic but related to the above post: I will be walking the Madrid Camino, training to Santiago to spend a few days (during Fiesta de la Acunsión:)), then renting a car for a weeklong road trip. If you plan on driving in Spain, according to the US Dept. of State website, US citizens are required to have an international driver's permit to drive in Spain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés from Roncesvalles and from Astorga, Camino portugués, hospitalero numerous times
WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.
This won't apply to many on the Camino but there is also a limit to the length of one's stay there. There is this thing called the Schengen Area — more or less, but not quite the European Union countries — within which a U.S. passport holder does not need a visa but within which there is a limit of 3 months stay within any sliding 6 month period.

See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area
http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/go/schengen-fact-sheet.html#FAQ

(Jennifer, being from Colorado, you should look at:
http://www.americanpilgrims.org/colorado-front-range-chapter
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
Every time you check into an albergue or hotel, they ask to see your national passport (at least they're supposed to) and make a note of your passport number. Since most of us keep the passport in a secure place once we clear customs at the entry point into Spain or France or whatever, it can be a hassle to dig your passport out of its secure place every day. Consider making a color copy of the first page -- the page with your photo and vital statistics -- and laminate that single page copy. That's all that's need to check into a hotel or albergue, and you can keep it right in the fold of your credential/pilgrim's passport so it's there when you check in and get your sello. Our Colorado Front Range chapter of the APOC often has a color copier and laminating machine at chapter events, and makes the copy for a small donativo.

Edit (2018): Apparently things are changing. On our Portuguese Camino last year, many places required us to show our full national passport, not just a copy as I described in my original post. This was particularly true whenever we stayed in commercial hotels, and also in the Xunta (municipal) albergues in Galacia. Many of the private albergues still accepted the copy of the first page.
 
Last edited:
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Our Colorado Front Range chapter of the APOC often has a color copier and laminating machine at chapter events, and makes the copy for a small donativo.
What a great service for a club to offer.
 

Angie94

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - 2016 www.angie-carter.com/camino
https://youtu.be/PtE_hvREZc4
Since most of us keep the passport in a secure place once we clear customs at the entry point into Spain or France or whatever, it can be a hassle to dig your passport out of its secure place every day. Consider making a color copy of the first page -- the page with your photo and vital statistics -- and laminate that single page copy. That's all that's need to check into a hotel or albergue, and you can keep it right in the fold of your credential/pilgrim's passport so it's there when you check in and get your sello.
That is a good tip! I have a color copier and laminating machine so I just fixed me a copy and will keep it with my pilgrim's passport. What a great idea....thank you.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
A bit off topic but related to the above post: I will be walking the Madrid Camino, training to Santiago to spend a few days (during Fiesta de la Acunsión:)), then renting a car for a weeklong road trip. If you plan on driving in Spain, according to the US Dept. of State website, US citizens are required to have an international driver's permit to drive in Spain.
We use our Australian driver's license and there is no problem. Same in France. Even though theoretically you need an international license.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
A bit off topic but related to the above post: I will be walking the Madrid Camino, training to Santiago to spend a few days (during Fiesta de la Acunsión:)), then renting a car for a weeklong road trip. If you plan on driving in Spain, according to the US Dept. of State website, US citizens are required to have an international driver's permit to drive in Spain.
We use our Australian driver's license and there is no problem. Same in France. Even though theoretically you need an international license.
My experience is the same as Kanga's. I have both bought cars in Spain and Portugal and rented numerous cars in both countries and have never used anything other than my US drivers license. In fact, I was told a couple of years ago by an American friend who bought one of those "international licenses" issued by the American Automobile Association, that the Portuguese car rental place where she went to pick up her car at the Lisbon airport wanted to see her real US license before they would give her the car. So I wouldn't rely just on the AAA certificate alone.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
Our licenses have a secure photo ID, which the international license does not have.
 

Pong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés - April - May 2016
Camino del Norte - April - May 2017
Frances - March-April 2018
The International Driving Permit is not adequate in itself and the state issued photo ID driver's license is required. I wonder if having the IDP would only be an issue if you had to produce your license to some official or police in the case of an auto accident. Also, I was mistaken in stating that the information on the IDP requirement came from the US State Dept. I actually read the information (quite by chance), on the US Embassy web site. I have copied and pasted the relevant paragraph below:
"Driving in Spain
U.S. citizens visiting Spain who want to drive in Spain must obtain an international driving permit prior to their arrival in Spain. An international driving permit (IDP) translates your state-issued driver’s license into 10 languages so you can show it to officials in foreign countries to help them interpret your driver’s license. The IDP is not valid by itself and must be carried with your driver’s license. Click the following link for more information on driving overseas."

If you are interested in seeing the original, go to the US Embassy web site, choose US Citizen Services, Spain. Sorry, I'm not sure how I would add the link. Oh, and the links provided by the Embassy in the above paragraph don't go anywhere but "page not found".
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Pong,
I'm not denying that that's what the embassy web site says, I am only saying that in the last thirty years I have shown nothing but my US license to a multiplicity of Spanish and Portuguese police officers and car rental companies and no one has ever blinked an eye at that. Spain has a lot of early morning drunk driving checkpoints, and I have driven to airports in Spain for early morning flights on at least 5 occasions on a Sunday morning and gone through those checkpoints. My US drivers license has never raised any questions. If people want to get those AAA "permits", that's fine with me, but I don't think they are required by either Spain or Portugal despite what the embassy website says.
 

Pong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés - April - May 2016
Camino del Norte - April - May 2017
Frances - March-April 2018
I don't work for the American Automobile Association, but maybe the US Embassy employee who wrote up that blurb has a relative with a financial interest in that organization:). (AAA issues the IDP in the states.) Just thought I'd pass along the info I read (and actually believed). Peregrina2000, you are obviously experienced in the country and have the "real life" information. Thanks.
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
(Apr -Jun 2019: Roncesvalles-SdC)
Last year the passport needed to be good for three months for Germany. Six months is an increase. Good to know.
I think it is more that there has been a clarification in the way the requirement is described, rather than that the actual requirement has changed. For years the Schengen area states (including Spain & France) have required passports to be valid for 3 months after your departure from the Schengen area. This has not changed. Technically if you're only going for a month, that would mean your passport needs to be valid for 4 months after your arrival. It's certainly never been allowable to arrive there with a passport valid for only a few days longer than your intended stay, or not for many years anyway. But since the maximum length of stay allowed within the Schengen area is 3 months and the border authorities don't necessarily know how long you'll stay, some of them have tended to assume the maximum (hence 6 months total from your arrival). That's also not new (if applied erratically), but there seems to have been a tightening-up and consequently also a recommendation from (some) other countries to their citizens to ensure their passports are valid for 6 months from arrival. Travel agents also seem to recommend a blanket 6 months regardless of the specific requirements of each country. Definitely best to be on the safe side!
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error. WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.
My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure! Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
Hola Jen - glad you read your forum pages closely - but you would be surprised how many times this happens to ordinary tourist, especially with people booking on-line so much these days. (In the old days your travel agent usually had a record of the info page from your passport).
Still your warning hopefully will alert another pilgrim. So well done!!
 

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
Every time you check into an albergue or hotel, they ask to see your national passport (at least they're supposed to) and make a note of your passport number. Since most of us keep the passport in a secure place once we clear customs at the entry point into Spain or France or whatever, it can be a hassle to dig your passport out of its secure place every day. Consider making a color copy of the first page -- the page with your photo and vital statistics -- and laminate that single page copy. That's all that's need to check into a hotel or albergue, and you can keep it right in the fold of your credential/pilgrim's passport so it's there when you check in and get your sello. Our Colorado Front Range chapter of the APOC often has a color copier and laminating machine at chapter events, and makes the copy for a small donativo.
I love these smart tricks - thank you and will certainly be doing this
Buen camino
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I love these smart tricks - thank you and will certainly be doing this
Buen camino
Unfortunately many accommodations throughout western Europe now do NOT accept any copy of your national passport! Only the real passport is valid.
 
Last edited:

Wokabaut_Meri

merely labeled
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPdP - Santiago (April/May 2015)
On a slight tangent but learned from another's unfortunate experience in the Australian Embassy in Paris - if you hold a permanent residency visa check its validity (they can be recorded electronically on your passport) and any new rules that now apply for resident return to Australia. I spent an afternoon consoling a lady a year ago with an expired electronic visa (unbeknown by her) whose return to her home and business in Australia would become a bureaucratic nightmare.

If you are unfortunate enough to require an Emergency Passport overseas, check the travel restrictions thoroughly as there are limitations. Otherwise carry all the paperwork that you will need to obtain a full passport or leave this with a trusted and contactable relative or friend who would be willing to go to a passport office for you. Also useful would be someone who can vouch for your identity and is NOT your husband :rolleyes:

With regards to an international driving licence, check with your travel insurance company (if you decide to have cover). I also know from another's experience that some will not cover you if you have an accident without the right paperwork.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Unfortunately many accommodations throughout western Europe now do NOT accept any copy of your national passport! Only the real passport is valid.
I have a laminated color copy of the passport page that I have used for the past few years. Always accepted on the Camino and afterward at hotels. Saves wear and tear on passport. You can keep your passport dry and protected in heavy weather
I use the passport card also.

I think the reason it is accepted without question is that EU citizens use the National Identity Card which is laminated. The EU card is smaller than the copy of the passport page but it seems to be accepted as the U.S. version.

It works and you can always dig out the actual passport if you ever run into someone who doesn't accept it.
 
D

DavidsRetired

Guest
@grayland, that’s great advice! I have always carried a paper copy of my passport, plus a scanned copy on my cloud drive.

I once turned my real passport over to a hotel clerk in Spain and the office didn’t open until 08:30, so I had to wait. Then the new desk clerk in the morning couldn’t find where the night clerk left it. It was another several hours before I was able to leave.

I’ll now laminate a copy for both my wife and I; can’t hurt, and easily done.

Cheers,
Dave
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
My experience is the same as Kanga's. I have both bought cars in Spain and Portugal and rented numerous cars in both countries and have never used anything other than my US drivers license. In fact, I was told a couple of years ago by an American friend who bought one of those "international licenses" issued by the American Automobile Association, that the Portuguese car rental place where she went to pick up her car at the Lisbon airport wanted to see her real US license before they would give her the car. So I wouldn't rely just on the AAA certificate alone.
Our licenses have a secure photo ID, which the international license does not have.
The licences both have to be shown if required, the national licence and the IDP. Also the latter is only valid if the national licence is still valid. We think that UK citizens now maybe need one as we no longer have paper counterparts to the photocard. Progress?
The advice is given on this Driving in Spain website
DRIVING LICENCES British citizens NOT in possession of a licence that conforms to the EU three part printed pink document will require an international driving licence when driving in Spain.
We have bought ours, it is not worth risking a fine or problems with our car.
 

Travelchick

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Registered for September 10, 2016 walk, Camino Frances
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error.

WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.

My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! :eek:

I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(

I gasped and immediately fled to my Denver Passport office and got a new one just in time.

So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!

Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
That is an enforcement which has been around for some years. Some countries such as China for sure. Other countries don't require it. I just don't get why there is an expiration date if it's not honored.
 

sunwanderer

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago
Sep/Oct 2015
Some of these posts seem to be confusing "what you can get away with" with "what is the law."

I don't know about France or Spain, but in Italy you can rent cars and drive through the frequent police checkpoints with only your U.S. driver's license. However, the law says you must have an IDP.

Things go pretty smooth when everything is OK. But if you are in a small accident, even if it's not your fault, the lack of an IDP will likely initiate a long bureaucratic nightmare, including impounding your car.

Please check what the law requires in France and Spain. That should be the only recommendation.
 
Last edited:

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
Unfortunately many accommodations throughout western Europe now do NOT accept any copy of your national passport! Only the real passport is valid.
Oh dear well I will still do it and if they ask for the real thing then I can dig it out from the pits if my bag - thanks to all for their interesting input
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
WOW - the things that come up on this Forum continue to amaze me. I think there are 4 or 5 great tips on this one area alone - some of which I will adopt. Cheers
 
Camino(s) past & future
23 May (2016)
This won't apply to many on the Camino but there is also a limit to the length of one's stay there. There is this thing called the Schengen Area — more or less, but not quite the European Union countries — within which a U.S. passport holder does not need a visa but within which there is a limit of 3 months stay within any sliding 6 month period.

See:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area
http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/go/schengen-fact-sheet.html#FAQ

(Jennifer, being from Colorado, you should look at:
http://www.americanpilgrims.org/colorado-front-range-chapter
Gene...I know the FRP is a really large group, but I attend ALL your functions!!! :)
You even hooked me up with Kris as a Camino Tutor!
Front Range Pilgrims rock!
Ultreia!!
 

offtrail1

Dave Black
Camino(s) past & future
May 9th - June 13rd (2015) St Jean to Santiago
June 1st - June 29th (2016) Leon to Santiago & Finisterra
That is a good tip! I have a color copier and laminating machine so I just fixed me a copy and will keep it with my pilgrim's passport. What a great idea....thank you.
I did this last year - the color copy, not laminated, carried in my Credencial. Worked every place except a couple of hostals with the new electronic strip reader; there I naturally had to produce the original.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I did this last year - the color copy, not laminated, carried in my Credencial. Worked every place except a couple of hostals with the new electronic strip reader; there I naturally had to produce the original.
Electronic strip readers in albergues! Wow, that is certainly giving the Camino a modern twist.
 

offtrail1

Dave Black
Camino(s) past & future
May 9th - June 13rd (2015) St Jean to Santiago
June 1st - June 29th (2016) Leon to Santiago & Finisterra
One was a private albergue, not sure where now. The other was a hostal in city center Burgos.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
A nice reminder, but hardly a new requirement, and not limited to France or Spain. It applies to most countries. While it applies on entry, the airlines have a vested interest in enforcing it on departure. They don't want to be faced with returning you to your port of departure if you are refused entry.
In addition, and as a former immigration officer (US) I can tell you that most countries also levy HUGE fines against the transportation carrier for EACH person presented for inspection and admission at the passport control point, who is found to not be admissible to that country. So, if the airline boards you and carries you to another country and that country rejects you, the airline pays a fine. They cannot come after you for the fine. Hence, they err on the side of caution and frequently refuse to board passengers who have national passports with less than six months running on the expiry date.

This fine is payable by the airline, not the person, to the country who rejects the person. The cost of returning you, as DougFitz correctly points out, is small compared to the cumulative fines that can accrue.

So CHECK YOUR PASSPORT EXPIRY DATE and reapply early. 'Nuff said?

I hope this helps.
 

BlackDog

Older Peregrino
Camino(s) past & future
Francés part 2012, Francés 2013, Inglés 2014, Muxía 2014, Fisterra 2012, 2014, Portugués 2016, 2018
EU citizens use the National Identity Card which is laminated.
Just for clarity, most do but not Denmark, Iceland, Norway and UK citizens. Norway is planning to do so from 2017.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
Just for clarity, most do but not Denmark, Iceland, Norway and UK citizens. Norway is planning to do so from 2017.
Comment on the UK - if BRITEX happens it will be a real sh*t fight as to what documents EU people will need to enter UK???
 

Juanajoanna

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to bike spring 2017

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
I thought about doing that but I didn't want a heavier passport. Sometimes while focusing on weight, common sense suffers. :(
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I have a laminated color copy of the passport page that I have used for the past few years. Always accepted on the Camino and afterward at hotels. Saves wear and tear on passport. You can keep your passport dry and protected in heavy weather
I use the passport card also.

I think the reason it is accepted without question is that EU citizens use the National Identity Card which is laminated. The EU card is smaller than the copy of the passport page but it seems to be accepted as the U.S. version.

It works and you can always dig out the actual passport if you ever run into someone who doesn't accept it.
I just checked and it's $30 to get a US passport card, if you already have a passport book. Seems like it might come in handy on the Camino.
 

KristinK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 14, 2016 SJ-Santiago-Finisterre
I don't work for the American Automobile Association, but maybe the US Embassy employee who wrote up that blurb has a relative with a financial interest in that organization:). (AAA issues the IDP in the states.) Just thought I'd pass along the info I read (and actually believed). Peregrina2000, you are obviously experienced in the country and have the "real life" information. Thanks.
The IDP is a technical requirement. What it does is translate your DL into many languages, including restrictions, etc. It's meant to accompany your state issued DL. AAA is a vendor for this and a very convenient/inexpensive option vs. having an "official" or "certified" translation done for every country that has a translation requirement. I've never been asked for mine when renting a car overseas (probably because so many people speak English) but it is TECHNICALLY required in many countries;).

Buen Camino,

Kristin
 

aussie62

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planning to walk 2017
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error.

WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.

My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! :eek:

I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(

I gasped and immediately fled to my Denver Passport office and got a new one just in time.

So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!

Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
that's pretty standard worldwide
 

JuanitaOnTheRoad

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk September & October (2017)
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error.

WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.

My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! :eek:

I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(

I gasped and immediately fled to my Denver Passport office and got a new one just in time.

So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!

Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
Dear All, Must one carry a national (in my case, USA) passport on the Camino? I luckily have friends in Spain where I could leave it, use in to enter & leave the country only. That way I do not have to keep track of it. Hopefully all I need is the credential. Any opinions?
Gracias y Buen Camino, J
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
Yes, there are quite a few places, for example the Xunta albergues in Galicia, that want to see a valid photo id before checking you in. I simply carry my passport in my money belt under my clothing, shortly before reaching the albergue I take it out and store it ready to be shown. Then it goes back again in my money belt which I wear all day and night (ziplog bags help to keep passport etc dry from sweating). Buen Camino, SY
 

Gerhard58

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances : April /May 2017
Just for clarity, most do but not Denmark, Iceland, Norway and UK citizens. Norway is planning to do so from 2017.
I've been reading this threat about passports and visas with interest.


Below I offer some advice about visas and passports. I know that many countries have no problems with visas, but in ALL cases the validity of National passports/ I D cards is important.


As a person who have worked with consular matters ( Visas , passports ) all my working life , I generally agree with what is mentioned as advice in this thread.

Security concerns are paramount for all countries , especially recently in France. Please don't be complacent about your travelling arrangements/documents. If you falter here you can wave your Camino plans goodbye. immigration authorities now take their countries' security concern much more serious than worrying about a few tourists who cannot enter because there travel documentation is wrong !! Expect little sympathy from immigration officers or airlines !

I just want to add the pillowing points .

1. All countries are now more security concerned then ever before.
2. See that you have the correct visa ( applied for in your country of domicile ), (Schengen visa ) that is if you need a visa. Please make very sure !
3. Its your duty to see that your passport 's expiry date in more that 6 months away from the day of entry into France/Spain.
4. See that you have open pages in your passport for the entry and exit stamps when entering of leaving a country.
6. If you come from certain countries ( check yourself ) , then yellow fever certificates are required
7. Please see that your COMREHENSIVE TRAVEL INSURANCE is in place and valid. ( for obvious reasons )
8. Last, to UK passport holders, please keep your self abreast with the BREXIT arrangements from the EU.
8. If you are one of those counties who need visas to enter Spain/Portugal etc., don't overstay the time which is granted per the visa please

I would appreciate any comments or additions please
 
Last edited:

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(
This is actually contrary to International Law as I understand it.

While it is true that Nations can refuse exit permission to foreign nationals presenting out of date passports, no Nation can legally impose travel restrictions on the holders of valid travel documents on such a spurious basis. A Nation *can* refuse entry to someone presenting no evidence of return travel plans within the validity of a passport, and a Nation can of course always demand particular Visa requirements, and declare particular individuals as non grata, etc.

But of course, Nations routinely break International Law on a daily basis ...

Nevertheless, to refuse passage to someone simply because of some possible future events and on the basis of some putative scenario of illegal immigration simply violates the very nature of what a passport is for in the first place -- as a reminder, in International Law that all Nations must abide with, Passports are valid as travel documents towards one's Home Nation for a year after their date of expiration (but not necessarily as exit documents from a foreign Nation), and they are valid as identity papers for five years after that date. That multiple Nations violate these principles is scandalous, but that United unilaterally enforces these illegal principles upon innocent travellers is most likely also a violation of both Colorado State and Federal US Law.

But then of course, so are sundry provisions of the so-called "Patriot Act", and the illegal reactions of sundry foreign Governments to those illegal provisions.

Nevertheless, United employees are not Agents of the French nor Spanish States, and are therefore required in such matters to obey International, Colorado, and US Federal Law concerning the ability to exit an international port using a valid travel document. The very principles of what a valid passport actually is in its nature forbid such violations thereof.

Employees of US travel firms, or the US travel firms themselves, or any employees or firms operating on US soil under US State and Federal Law, cannot legally refuse permission to US nationals holding valid US passports to exit US territory except for grave reasons not constituted by "my passport expires in 6 months time".

---

Given that it's the United States we're talking about, people affected by this lawbreaking should just sue for damages and reparations.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
If an airline flies a passenger without proper documents (visa, remaining time on passport, etc.) and is refused entry to a country the airline responsible for transporting the passenger back to their point of origin, and can face fines.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
If an airline flies a passenger without proper documents (visa, remaining time on passport, etc.) and is refused entry to a country the airline responsible for transporting the passenger back to their point of origin, and can face fines.
This does not change the fact that refusing departure to a passenger from an international port if that passenger has valid travel documents and without grave cause is a violation of International Law. Having a valid passport with only X months remaining in its validity is not a criminal offence.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
This does not change the fact that refusing departure to a passenger from an international port if that passenger has valid travel documents and without grave cause is a violation of International Law. Having a valid passport with only X months remaining in its validity is not a criminal offence.
I don't agree with this line of thinking. Another way of thinking of this is that the airline is not refusing entry to another country, it is refusing to offer a carriage service to an individual. I am sure that, in different legal systems, there a different interpretations of whether an airline is a common carrier and what rights it might have to refuse to offer its services to individuals, but it seems clear that they can both refuse to carry individuals and certain items of luggage and cargo.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I don't agree with this line of thinking. Another way of thinking of this is that the airline is not refusing entry to another country, it is refusing to offer a carriage service to an individual. I am sure that, in different legal systems, there a different interpretations of whether an airline is a common carrier and what rights it might have to refuse to offer its services to individuals, but it seems clear that they can both refuse to carry individuals and certain items of luggage and cargo.
Exactly
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I don't agree with this line of thinking. Another way of thinking of this is that the airline is not refusing entry to another country, it is refusing to offer a carriage service to an individual. I am sure that, in different legal systems, there a different interpretations of whether an airline is a common carrier and what rights it might have to refuse to offer its services to individuals, but it seems clear that they can both refuse to carry individuals and certain items of luggage and cargo.
That aspect of things has certainly occurred to me -- nevertheless, whilst I'm unsure about Spanish Law in this detail, refusing entry to France (or purportedly on the "behalf" of France) on such a spurious basis to those with valid travel documents sounds completely illegal, state of emergency notwithstanding. I am vaguely aware that Spain has some stricter entry requirements that can affect those having booked flights either into or out of that country.

Of course, all else being equal, enquiring in advance about administrative requirements is clearly a better option than getting all legal with airport & airline employees following whatever bad rules imposed upon them by their employers ...

hmmmm, and even in the US, it is doubtful that an airline that has sold a carriage service to an individual can then legitimately refuse to provide that service to that individual without grave cause. Just writing down some gratuitous contractual escape clause in small print in every ticket booklet doesn't make it legal.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
That aspect of things has certainly occurred to me -- nevertheless, whilst I'm unsure about Spanish Law in this detail, refusing entry to France (or purportedly on the "behalf" of France) on such a spurious basis to those with valid travel documents sounds completely illegal, state of emergency notwithstanding. I am vaguely aware that Spain has some stricter entry requirements that can affect those having booked flights either into or out of that country.
My view is that the airline has not refused entry. An individual can make whatever other carriage arrangements they wish and front up at an immigration check point another way.

hmmmm, and even in the US, it is doubtful that an airline that has sold a carriage service to an individual can then legitimately refuse to provide that service to that individual without grave cause. Just writing down some gratuitous contractual escape clause in small print in every ticket booklet doesn't make it legal.
I suspect that the 'small print', which you have probably acknowledged that you have read even if that wasn't the case, is part of the carriage contract and establishes a perfectly legal set of clauses about when the service might be refused, changed, withdrawn, etc.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
I'm a lawyer but there is no way I would want to argue international law at an immigrations counter - especially if it it is not my own country.

This from the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade website:

"Passport validity
Many countries require travellers to have at least six months validity remaining on their passports. Immigration authorities may refuse entry if you arrive with less than this. Renew your passport before travel or check with the diplomatic mission of the country concerned in Australia, or your local travel agent, whether this rule applies to them."

I always ensure my passport has at least 6 months to run before leaving home.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/?/Invierno ('19)
I'm a lawyer but there is no way I would want to argue international law at an immigrations counter - especially if it it is not my own country.
Yes, exactly. Theory is one thing. But pragmatically? If you want to walk, be prepared to jump through the hoops as the relevant immigration policies require. If you want to challenge the legality of the policies, and want to get turned away on purpose so you can pursue the case in a court of international law, then by all means go ahead. But that's another story altogether.:D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
I had a near catastrophe just weeks before launching for my 2016 Camino, so I hope someone else can learn from my near-error.

WATCH THE EXPIRATION DATE ON YOUR PASSPORT.

My passport was set to expire on 26 July 2016, but since I was launching my Camino on the 16th of May 2016, I expected to be back on American terra firma NLT than 6 July - lots of wiggle room, eh? NOT!! :eek:

I read on another blog about a pilgrim-to-be who was denied a boarding pass from United to begin her pilgrimage because Spain and France BOTH now require a minimum of six months on her passport from date of her entry into France. Her trip was completely ruined. :(

I gasped and immediately fled to my Denver Passport office and got a new one just in time.

So, double check your passport and make sure you have that sacrosanct six months before you head off to your airport to begin your adventure!

Buen Camino (con seis meses más)!!!
Thank you for posting. I knew this but I am sure there are many new traveler's who are not aware of this. Very useful as a reminder to everyone who just forgot about this requirement.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I'm a lawyer but there is no way I would want to argue international law at an immigrations counter
agreed -- especially given the possibility that if you "win", the employees might simply lose their jobs.
 

MissyG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 10-June 30
I hope this question was not already answered. I have an Italian and an American Passport. I don't know which one would be preferred as far as ease of travel goes... or perhaps I shall take both?
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I hope this question was not already answered. I have an Italian and an American Passport. I don't know which one would be preferred as far as ease of travel goes... or perhaps I shall take both?
I take both. I land with the EU one, and come back to Canada wit the Canadian.
 

Paddington Bear

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
Our licenses have a secure photo ID, which the international license does not have.
Not sure about Spain but in come countries in Europe you will need your international licence and your Australian licence at some car rental agencies and if you have an accident.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
I hope this question was not already answered. I have an Italian and an American Passport. I don't know which one would be preferred as far as ease of travel goes... or perhaps I shall take both?
What country do you want to help you if there is any trouble during your travel? Travel on that one.
 
Last edited:

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
I take both. I land with the EU one, and come back to Canada wit the Canadian.
Please would holders of dual nationality or a second passport make their own detailed enquiries on this subject, and get professional / embassy advice as necessary. I was under the impression that you had to make a round trip on one passport, especially when visiting multiple countries, where a paper trail of stamps will build up. I have even heard of people coming home for a night when it was inconvenient to do so, just to do this. Example would be people who regularly travel to Israel and the middle east, often keep duplicate passports and have to make separate trips on them, to keep the stamps separate.

Another example of the risks of travel on the 'wrong' passport is Iranians who have gained British nationality, since Iran does not recognise dual nationality and you are therefore breaking local law to land there and try to enter on the British passport. Even entering on the Iranian one and having the British one on you could put you at risk.
What country do you want to help you if there is any trouble during you travel?
And yes, you would like Britain to help you on that occasion but it absolutely can't, so this is not a valid rule for selecting which passport to use.

Another scenario to bear in mind is your tax status - if you spend longer periods out of your domiciled country you may need to be able to prove entry and exit dates to the tax authorities. Flitting around on various passports could make this harder: you need a properly structured approach.

It is a very complicated field so please seek professional advice in any non straightforward situation like that. People contribute snippets of their own experience on a forum and these cannot be extrapolated to blanket rules, and the forum as a whole is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice.

Other notes:
Given how easy and cheap it is to get an IDP I don't even know why people are debating it.
Britain and Ireland are not in Schengen and never have been, this has nothing to do with Brexit.
 
Last edited:
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
You are always supposed to enter the country you have a passport from with that passport. Plus Spain does not recocgnise my Canadian citizenship as it does not allow dual citizenship.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
And yes, you would like Britain to help you on that occasion but it absolutely can't, so this is not a valid rule for selecting which passport to use.
I think you have chosen to use some pretty extreme examples to rebut what was simple advice to someone who was puzzling over whether to use their US or Italian passport.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
We have international driving permits as well as our UK photocard licences. Apparently they are a legal requirement as we do not have EU recognised paper counterparts. In fact UK now has no paper counterpart at all so we believe it is a case of 'better safe than sorry'. Thanks to @mspath for raising this issue last year.
On dual nationality passports - we have a dual nationality child who had to travel on a non-UK passport and receive the required entry and exit stamps, but had a UK passport so as not to have to go through the non-UK border control as a 3 year old. The UK control, in the late 1970s) was sympathetic and stamped both passports, but the other end would not have been. I am not sure it would be so easy now. Taking expert advice sounds a good idea
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
You are always supposed to enter the country you have a passport from with that passport.
This is a good point. The Australian government advice on this is
All Australians, including dual nationals, should leave and enter Australia on their Australian passport. If you have a passport from another country you can use that for travel once you have left Australia.
There is other advice for Australian dual nationals at http://smartraveller.gov.au/guide/Pages/dual-nationals.aspx
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
Thanks for the links for Austrialians.
No specific case of dual nationality can be used as a general rule of thumb.
It's also sadly the case that if your face does not fit, you can be treated with greater stringency or even outright unfairness.

Please get advice from the relevant embassies, and from immigration professionals for more complex cases.
 
Last edited:

rgutena

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Podiensis (2016); Camino Portugues (2017); Via Regia (2018)
This does not change the fact that refusing departure to a passenger from an international port if that passenger has valid travel documents and without grave cause is a violation of International Law.
I must say I am quite confused as to why international law is brought in here. As a fundamental principle, public international law (which presumably is what is being discussed here) only binds States (ie national governments), not individuals or private entities except in very limited circumstances (eg war crimes). In refusing carriage of particular passengers, United is not acting on behalf of any State but is presumably exercising its own rights under its contract of service, which is a matter governed by domestic law.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Well, i managed to show up at the airport last night with a Canadian passport about to expire. It never occured to me to look at it, but did check the Spanish one. Lovely lady at the counter redid my registration and baggage check with my EU passport and I am now on the bus from Malaga to Sevilla to start VDLP tomorrow.

2 years ago I missed my flight to Spain because I couldn't remember if I was flying on sunday or Monday, and only checked my reservation at the precise time the flight was leaving. I am getting way to casual about international flights...
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
I must say I am quite confused as to why international law is brought in here. As a fundamental principle, public international law (which presumably is what is being discussed here) only binds States (ie national governments), not individuals or private entities except in very limited circumstances (eg war crimes). In refusing carriage of particular passengers, United is not acting on behalf of any State but is presumably exercising its own rights under its contract of service, which is a matter governed by domestic law.
There are a few small areas where international law does concern individuals. Passports and their validity are governed under that Law.

Of course -- one's chances of redress would involve a complicated Court case, and UA is not just "automatically" wrong on the basis of these principles ; simply wrong in principle.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
It is really as simple as @rgutena said: When you buy a ticket, you agree to the airline's Contract of Carriage which is subject to domestic (civil/consumer/contract/etc) law, nothing to do with international law (public or private). Nobody ever reads it but you can easily find it online for major airlines.
Well sure, but I wouldn't call it "simple" -- as I pointed out, to enforce one's travel rights under International Law against that contract would involve a complex court case, and to clarify this would be both against the airline and against the Government(s )of the Nation State(s) in question, perhaps even against such supranational entities as the EU.

Just to say that something is in violation of international law doesn't make it vanish away -- I doubt that there's a single Nation State in this world that's not guilty of any such violations.

To simply ensure that one's travel documents are in order, particularly during these times of security clampdowns and passenger protection measures, regardless of the ultimate legality of these provisions, is obviously far more sensible use of one's time than to open some lengthy and consuming legal procedures against a major airline and at least one Nation State.
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
You are always supposed to enter the country you have a passport from with that passport. Plus Spain does not recocgnise my Canadian citizenship as it does not allow dual citizenship.
No that's not general - it's an odd Australian requirement - my brother who is a dual citizen had a slight issue with it a few years back. They've never picked me up though I have Aussie citizenship I go back and forth (several times a year) on my New Zealand passport.

Basically you leave a country on the passport you entered it with - but you can swap. So with UK passport - I'd depart NZ customs with my NZ passport (as I have no visa or stamps in my UK one) - check in with he airline with my UK passport (proof of right to arrive in the UK) - enter/exit the UK with my UK one - and then re-enter NZ with my NZ passport. IN other countries I use the passport which costs me the least in Visa fees.
 

tobaccoandvapemart

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
No that's not general - it's an odd Australian requirement - my brother who is a dual citizen had a slight issue with it a few years back. They've never picked me up though I have Aussie citizenship I go back and forth (several times a year) on my New Zealand passport.

Basically you leave a country on the passport you entered it with - but you can swap. So with UK passport - I'd depart NZ customs with my NZ passport (as I have no visa or stamps in my UK one) - check in with he airline with my UK passport (proof of right to arrive in the UK) - enter/exit the UK with my UK one - and then re-enter NZ with my NZ passport. IN other countries I use the passport which costs me the least in Visa fees.
nice
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
But we are not talking about the Zanzibar Way, are we?
I wont laugh but Zanzibar which is part of the United Republic of Tanzania. I have been going there since 2005 and you better believe that they have a 6 month requirement (usually applying to the date you leave their country) also you need at least one clear/clean page for your visa.
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
"Check your passport's validity" is reasonable advice. But I'll go further and suggest that you check the data that airlines themselves use when they decide whether to allow you to board:

If the IATA information says that you need a visa (numerous countries), two side-by-side blank pages in your passport (China or Russia, I think?), a passport that's at least six months old (Nigeria, ditto), a passport with at least six months validity (numerous), or proof of onward travel (numerous countries) then you can expect the check-in agent to deny you a boarding pass if you don't comply. Pointless to argue that you know that the Nigerian border control agent won't care.

Now, perhaps you think it's overkill and you've been to [Enter country name here] many times before. But rules change, and the "things we know for sure that just ain't so," are the things that really get us into trouble.
 
Last edited:

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
It would seem, on a related tangent, that one consequence of Brexit according to EU advice today might be that British pilgrims entering the EU may need, once again, to get their passports stamped -- might I suggest that this sounds like a good opportunity for an extra stamp on one's Credencial ?
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
"Check your passport's validity" is reasonable advice. But I'll go further and suggest that you check the data that airlines themselves use when they decide whether to allow you to board:

If the IATA information says that you need a visa (numerous countries), two side-by-side blank pages in your passport (China last time I was there on a multi-visit business visa), a passport that's at least six months old (Nigeria, ditto), a passport with at least six months validity (numerous), or proof of onward travel (numerous countries) then you can expect the check-in agent to deny you a boarding pass if you don't comply. Pointless to argue that you know that the Nigerian border control agent won't care.

Now, perhaps you think it's overkill and you've been to [Enter country name here] many times before. But rules change, and the "things we know for sure that just ain't so," are the things that really get us into trouble.

Couple of years ago I signed up for a sailing trip from Bermuda to Boston. I ignored the information about visa requirements because, why would I need to read them since this would be my umpteenth trip to the USA. Fortunately, someone pointed out to me that arriving at Salem MA on a private yacht was not processed in the same way as entering on a commercial flight to Logan airport ... so I looked into it ... and booked myself an appointment at the US embassy to apply for a visa. (FWIW, the IATA data won't help you with this particular issue because it's for travel with commercial airlines only).

Good news for pilgrims on the Kumano Kodo, though ... Japan will let you in with 1 day validity. (But you'd better run to your embassy to get a new passport same day).
Excellent advice
 

brian560

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, VdlP 2016, Fishermans Walk, Sultan's Trail (2017), Portugese and el Norte (2018)
A nice reminder, but hardly a new requirement, and not limited to France or Spain. It applies to most countries. While it applies on entry, the airlines have a vested interest in enforcing it on departure. They don't want to be faced with returning you to your port of departure if you are refused entry.
The Airline could also be fined in the process.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
It wasn't always like that, at least in SE Asia. I was in Singapore and was gonna drop down to Indonesia many years ago when I found out my passport was expiring in a few days. Well before even my flight back to the US. I was surprised the airlines didn't notice and warn me. Anyway, the US Embassy in Singapore got a new one for me by the next day. They don't want any illegal Americans there
 

Book your lodging here

Booking.com



Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 141 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 235 25.0%
  • June

    Votes: 69 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 20 2.1%
  • August

    Votes: 14 1.5%
  • September

    Votes: 275 29.3%
  • October

    Votes: 111 11.8%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top