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Washing socks with Vaseline buildup

2020 Camino Guides

MacGlynn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk in April/May, 2016
I've been using Vaseline to prevent blisters in practice for our Camino in April/May and it seems to be working well. However, I'm finding it difficult to get our socks to dry due to Vaseline build up? Does anyone have any thoughts/advice? Thanks.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Welcome to the forum @MacGlynn. I slathered my feet with Vaseline while on Camino and while training beforehand, and didn't notice any problem with Vaseline buildup on my socks. I used socks bought from MEC, and never used any liners. I use the socks still. Perhaps you could tell us what type of socks you are using, and the content.
 

MacGlynn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk in April/May, 2016
We're using Smartwool socks, about 75% merino wool I think. We get a vaseline residue on the socks that seems to be resistent to washing off.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
My socks did the same thing, but I figured they were going to get greasy again the next day anyway, so I didn't give it much thought. Just washed them the best I could. By the end of all my Caminos my socks (synthetic running type) are so trashed from dirt, walking and hand washing that I threw them in a trash bin in Santiago. I had a fresh, unused set in my pack for the trip home.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
Welcome to the forum MacGlynn, use "Gloves in a bottle" instead of Vaseline, its non greasy, doesn't leave a residue, and works better IMO. It is available online or from any Boots Chemist. If you are coming from Australia then use SILIC 15, its a similar product but slightly better IMO. I would use liner socks as well.
Buen Camino
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Start the Camino with fresh new socks of your choice, anything with considerable use will break down sooner than you think.
 

marjude

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
4/2019 Madrid, Frances
Hi MacGlynn I had the same problem with vaseline on icebreaker merino socks and i found that if i turned the socks inside out and washed them by hand in fairly warm soapy water (warm enough to soften the vaseline) i was able to get the vaseline out of them. I took Wayfarers advice and started using Silic 15,which leaves no residue build up. For anyone interested you can by it in the Chemists here in Australia.

Wayfarer thanks for your advice about Silic 15 i have been using it for a few months now on my training walks and i prefer it to vaseline.

Buen Camino Judy.
 

Lachance

Me llamo Deb
Camino(s) past & future
Part Francese 2016
Another option is Engo blister prevention patches which go on your insole or orthotic. I have just started trying them and they have worked a treat for me. Wearing Icebreaker liner and regular socks wasn't enough although I didn't use lubricants.
 

KerrieG

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part CF (2016), Camino Frances (2019)
Another option is Engo blister prevention patches which go on your insole or orthotic. I have just started trying them and they have worked a treat for me. Wearing Icebreaker liner and regular socks wasn't enough although I didn't use lubricants.
Hi Deb, I heard about the Engo patches on a podcast just recently. Thought they sounded interesting. Are you using a lubricant on your feet now? I'd like to try and avoid using a lubricant if I can. Just wondering where you bought the Engo patches?
 

Lachance

Me llamo Deb
Camino(s) past & future
Part Francese 2016
Hi Deb, I heard about the Engo patches on a podcast just recently. Thought they sounded interesting. Are you using a lubricant on your feet now? I'd like to try and avoid using a lubricant if I can. Just wondering where you bought the Engo patches?
Hi Kerrie, no lubricant, I just don't like the thought of greasy feet! You can order the patches from blisterprevention.com.au which has a lot of interesting stuff about blisters and is quite often quoted in this forum.
 

purplesage

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francais, Finisterre and Muxia (2012) , Camino Portuguese 2014, Camino Inglese 2015, Camino Muxia 2015, Incomplete part of CF 2015 ... will hopefully finish later this year
I've been using Vaseline to prevent blisters in practice for our Camino in April/May and it seems to be working well. However, I'm finding it difficult to get our socks to dry due to Vaseline build up? Does anyone have any thoughts/advice? Thanks.
MacGlynn, my humble suggestion: KEEP IT SIMPLE. All will be well. I was walking with toes and feet that looked like someone with leprosy but I didn't mind. Blisters and bleeding toes but that WAS my first Camino experience. Be blessed. Buen Camino :) Caesar
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Although everyone's feet are different, I would suggest that you probably don't actually need Vaseline. There are arguably two basic purposes to the Vaseline. First, it serves as a lubricant to reduce frictional stress on the skin. Second, it protects against moisture.

There are better and more effective ways to resolve frictional stress, the most important of which is proper fit and lacing techniques. Fit is all about finding the right shoe/boot for your foot, with the right mechanical aspects for your gate (neutral, pronation, supination), as well as other comfort considerations (slightly larger toe box, for instance). Fit may also be about getting a custom-fit (e.g. heat molded) insert that exactly matches and supports your foot. Coupled with a quality pair of socks, that is probably all most people really need. Engo patches are useful to compensate for those areas where you can't sufficiently dial in the right fit.

The second issue, moisture, is highly dependent on the person's tolerance. This is often a question about breathability. All leather boots are generally not breathable. Gore-tex arguably is (but it can only transport a certain amount of moisture under the right conditions; once wet on the outside, it's useless; and it can be overwhelmed by excess sweat accumulation interiorly as well). Non-waterproofed, well-vented shoes or boots provide no obstacle to ingress of water, but they very rapidly evacuate it as well, allowing your feet to actually stay drier for more of the time unless in perpetually wet conditions (which usually overwhelm GoreTex and even fully waterproofed shoes/boots anyways; it just takes slightly longer).

Thus, I walk in a pair of non-waterproofed trail shoes with a pair of merino wool socks and heat-molded inserts. I need no lubricant, or Engo patches (although I carry them just in case), or Compeed. I don't have to stop and change socks throughout the day. This approach appears to be the norm for most long-distance hikers (I see a lot of Continential Divide Trail walkers as I backpack, and probably 80% are using the same approach). In the last 1,000 miles of my own hiking and backpacking, I've only had one small blister, and that was because I got lazy about adjusting my lacing one day when I needed to. This may sound arrogant, but it's not meant to be; it's simply meant to highlight that blisters do not need to be a fact of life on the Camino.

If you want actual studies on the matter and not just anecdotal information, see http://www.blisterprevention.com.au/the-advanced-guide-to-blister-prevention#.Vt7SoZwrK9I. Pay attention in particular to their (non)recommendations around lubricants, especially petroleum jelly, as actually contributing to greater likelihood of blisters.
 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016)
Hi Deb, I heard about the Engo patches on a podcast just recently. Thought they sounded interesting. Are you using a lubricant on your feet now? I'd like to try and avoid using a lubricant if I can. Just wondering where you bought the Engo patches?
Amazon sells Engo patches.
 

IDBluebird77

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning: Camino Frances (Fall 2017)
I am a ways out from my Camino, but my plan is to try hexane free castor oil for my feet when I do start training. Being all natural (not petroleum) it *might wash out of wool better. And its known to be very good for skin, and reduces inflammation in the body by helping to stimulate the lymphatic system.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
We use Glide Foot Balm not greasy. Recommended to us by a professional mountain climber.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
There are a lot of good and interesting ideas in this thread. However, and IMHO the core question remains, how do I wash out a grease (petrolatum) residue that has accumulated in my wool socks? Have I understood that much correctly?

If yes, the basic solution to the 'problem' is to wash the socks using any soap that acts as a surfactant. This means the soap breaks down grease molecules, allowing them to be removed from fabric by agitation. This is how detergents work in your clothes washing machine at home.

The major "down side" to this result is that you would, in the process, remove the lanolin that occurs naturally in the wool fibers, especially if the soap you use has strong surfactant properties, while not replenishing the lanolin stripped from the wool fibers. It is this "good" oil that gives wool many of its positive properties.

So the "solution" (no pun intended) appears to be to carry a small bottle of a wool-friendly liquid soap like Dr. Bronner's, there are others out there I am sure. But Dr. Bronner's is inexpensive, environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and widely available, though not, perhaps, in Spain. I hesitate to advise carrying anything extra. But there you have it; a problem, and a solution.

As an FYI, I hand wash my microfiber liner socks, and Smartwool outer socks nightly, using the bar of hand soap I carry. It is intended to be gentle to skin, acts as a mild surfactant, yet contains olive oil. My favorite hand and body soap in Spain is Heno de Previa. It is widely available is all supermercados and most tiendas.

At the end of a month-long Camino, I usually recycle the three pair of navy blue or black microfiber liner socks to use at home to buff shoes and bright work around the house or the car. The Smartwool socks will do their 4th Camino this year.

I hope this helps.
 
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Kiwi-d

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep/Oct 2014
I didn't use any lubricant as I couldn't understand the logic of making my feet moist and slippery. Instead I taped my toes and the balls of my feet with Micropore tape each night, in readiness for the morning, and only had one tiny blister where a toenail I'd forgotten to trim rubbed.

One other thing I didn't understand was the number of ladies I saw carefully creaming their feet each day, to soften them. On the contrary, I was happy for my soles to harden up, so they wouldn't blister. Knowledge probably the result of a New Zealand childhood, when we ran around barefoot over footpaths, grass (prickles!) sand and shells.
 

KerrieG

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part CF (2016), Camino Frances (2019)
Hi Kerrie, no lubricant, I just don't like the thought of greasy feet! You can order the patches from blisterprevention.com.au which has a lot of interesting stuff about blisters and is quite often quoted in this forum.
Thanks Deb, I'm not keen on using vaseline for that very reason - too greasy! Not only your feet, but your hands too, putting it on. Of interest, the podcast I was listening to - 'The Camino Podcast' Episode 8 'On blisters and snoring', didn't recommend vaseline for the reason the OP wrote that it does build up in your socks making them hard.
 

KerrieG

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part CF (2016), Camino Frances (2019)
Although everyone's feet are different, I would suggest that you probably don't actually need Vaseline.........
Thanks for your post @koilife - I've yet to walk my first Camino, so no experience of long distance walking - but you expressed/confirmed my developing thoughts on the matter exactly! :)
 

GettingThere

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
C. Frances sections Apr-Jun 2019
I considered but didn't use Vaseline for that very reason - I thought it would just gunk up my socks and everything would end up a mess. I used BodyGlide (comes in stick form) on my feet every day, all over every inch of them including ankles and between the toes - easy enough to do, just pull your toes around to ensure coverage between. There are many other factors in blister prevention of course (moisture and boot/shoe fit and lacing as @koilife explains above, not carrying too much weight, not walking to fast or far each day, good hydration, genetics....), but I didn't get a single one. And I have fairly namby-pamby wimpy feet which nearly always blister with new shoes!
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 - 2019
Oh, I forgot to add that everyone's feet are different. Some benefit using moisturizing. Others do not need it. To each his or her own. There can be no "one-size-fits-all" solution for this issue.

Personally, I cannot walk without first moisturizing my feet with an ointment product called Callex. It is petrolatum based, and contains two enzymes that work to break down hard, callus tissue before it becomes problematic. If I cannot find Callex, then plain Vaseline or any brand petrolatum jelly will work in the short term.

On my first Camino in 2013, I was waylaid by infections in both heels, with pockets of blood locked under nearly 3 mm of dead callus tissue on both heels. I was VERY lucky to have a hotel's help to find a very kindly, older podiatrist at Burgos who had been a pilgrim as a youth and understood my need. He came in on a Saturday, his day off, just to treat me, and perform minor surgery in his office. I remember him fondly.

I had to lay over in Burgos for three days while the surgical wounds healed well enough for me to continue. My feet are naturally dry, regardless of physical activity and degree of perspiration from walking, and quickly accumulate calluses, despite wearing orthotics, getting monthly pedicures at home, and moisturizing my feet regularly. I suppose it is just part of the wonder that is "me."

I hope this helps the dialog.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Vaseline has always done the job preventing blisters, as has Vick's and ProShield Plus. As nothing ever gets really clean on the Camino I really don't care if there is some residue in my otherwise never really clean socks. In the afternoon, after my shower I put St-John's Wart oil on my feet, a natural antisceptic. In the am Vaseline, Vick's, may even try Bag Balm this time, as it also serves as an antisceptic and helps heal skin. Harden your feet before you go, moisturise while walking. Hence the Tano-Nok combo by Akileine, something else I have tried with success.
 

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
tangential to the original poster's question: last summer (2015) it was very hot on the Camino. I was using adhesive tape on my feet. The glue softened and came through the fabric of the tape and got onto the inside of my Injinji liner socks. Sadly, some of those socks still, after around 6 months and repeated washes, have the sticky goo on the insides. Resolve has not done it, Greased Lightning has not done it. Nor, of course, the regular clothes washing detergents. Has anyone any suggestions for removing the tape goo from the inside of the sock? Thanks!
ps--and last summer feet were in such a hot environment inside the botes that Compeeds just plain melted and came off in a day. Even with the goo getting on the socks, the gauze and tape business was better on my few blisters. I suspect the blisters were heat-caused, too.
 

auldies

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
Sadly, some of those socks still, after around 6 months and repeated washes, have the sticky goo on the insides. Resolve has not done it, Greased Lightning has not done it. Nor, of course, the regular clothes washing detergents. Has anyone any suggestions for removing the tape goo from the inside of the sock?
I'm not even sure what Resolve or Greased Lightning is, but further to @Kanga's suggestion, have you tried eucalyptus oil. It is wonderful for removing all things gooey and sticky, smells great and is environmentally friendly. It has sooo.......many uses and won't damage the item.
Try putting enough oil on the affected area of the sock, rub it in and leave to soak for a few minutes. Rub again.
Rinse in very warm water. See how it looks and repeat if necessary (depending on the level of build up). Then wash in warm soapy water to remove all the residue.
Hope this helps.
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
So many good opinions, and I am sure they work for each of you. But I have some stuff that works for me and will share.
Vaseline is petroleum product and not water-soluble. It should not be used if you are diabetic, or have Peripheral Vascular Disease. If you use, do not put in between toes. Think about it - you are creating a oil-soluble barrier against your skin, which does not breathe, can harbor micro-organism and cause infection, and will trap heat and perspiration.
Vasoline will require HOT water and detergent's to remove - possibly several washes to completely remove On camino I want to spend the least time possible washing my clothes. When was the time on the camino you had all the hot water you wanted? Few and far between.
A water soluble anti- friction stick such Gold Bond Friction Defense, cost $5 and is 1/3rd the cost of Glide. You have to remember to apply it every time boots are off and you are airing your feet and socks. I try to do this every 2 hours on the way.
It was 82 F today, and I forgot to use the panty-liner-in-the-boot trick I learned on this forum! :)

Buen Camino,

Janice
 

CathyJ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - April 2016
SJPP to SDC
tangential to the original poster's question: last summer (2015) it was very hot on the Camino. I was using adhesive tape on my feet. The glue softened and came through the fabric of the tape and got onto the inside of my Injinji liner socks. Sadly, some of those socks still, after around 6 months and repeated washes, have the sticky goo on the insides. Resolve has not done it, Greased Lightning has not done it. Nor, of course, the regular clothes washing detergents. Has anyone any suggestions for removing the tape goo from the inside of the sock? Thanks!
ps--and last summer feet were in such a hot environment inside the botes that Compeeds just plain melted and came off in a day. Even with the goo getting on the socks, the gauze and tape business was better on my few blisters. I suspect the blisters were heat-caused, too.
Hi Texas Walker, a great solution for removing sticky residue is eucalyptus oil. Use it liberally on the sticky areas and allow to sit for a while to soften before gently wiping the area and washing. If it's really bad it may take a couple of goes.... but your socks will smell wonderful! It is brilliant for removing sticky labels and most oily substances :)
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
No lubricant but layered socks is our solution. That means that we do not have a problem washing our socks. We wash the liners daily and the mohair ones only if they start to stretch a little (about every 7 -10 days depending on drying them easily). Mohair is not wool and so does not get smelly.
We have never had to ditch socks for being greasy, dirty or otherwise unuseable.
Like others have said, if the problem already exists then eucalyptus oil is wonderful. First met it over 50 years ago for removing tar from our feet and clothes after an oil spill affected the beaches where we went on holiday. I would be fairly liberal with it if the socks are already greased - rub it into the affected part and leave it for a time, then gently wash to remove the grease and oil.
 

TD Justus

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF May/ June 2016
Although everyone's feet are different, I would suggest that you probably don't actually need Vaseline. There are arguably two basic purposes to the Vaseline. First, it serves as a lubricant to reduce frictional stress on the skin. Second, it protects against moisture.

There are better and more effective ways to resolve frictional stress, the most important of which is proper fit and lacing techniques. Fit is all about finding the right shoe/boot for your foot, with the right mechanical aspects for your gate (neutral, pronation, supination), as well as other comfort considerations (slightly larger toe box, for instance). Fit may also be about getting a custom-fit (e.g. heat molded) insert that exactly matches and supports your foot. Coupled with a quality pair of socks, that is probably all most people really need. Engo patches are useful to compensate for those areas where you can't sufficiently dial in the right fit.

The second issue, moisture, is highly dependent on the person's tolerance. This is often a question about breathability. All leather boots are generally not breathable. Gore-tex arguably is (but it can only transport a certain amount of moisture under the right conditions; once wet on the outside, it's useless; and it can be overwhelmed by excess sweat accumulation interiorly as well). Non-waterproofed, well-vented shoes or boots provide no obstacle to ingress of water, but they very rapidly evacuate it as well, allowing your feet to actually stay drier for more of the time unless in perpetually wet conditions (which usually overwhelm GoreTex and even fully waterproofed shoes/boots anyways; it just takes slightly longer).

Thus, I walk in a pair of non-waterproofed trail shoes with a pair of merino wool socks and heat-molded inserts. I need no lubricant, or Engo patches (although I carry them just in case), or Compeed. I don't have to stop and change socks throughout the day. This approach appears to be the norm for most long-distance hikers (I see a lot of Continential Divide Trail walkers as I backpack, and probably 80% are using the same approach). In the last 1,000 miles of my own hiking and backpacking, I've only had one small blister, and that was because I got lazy about adjusting my lacing one day when I needed to. This may sound arrogant, but it's not meant to be; it's simply meant to highlight that blisters do not need to be a fact of life on the Camino.

If you want actual studies on the matter and not just anecdotal information, see http://www.blisterprevention.com.au/the-advanced-guide-to-blister-prevention#.Vt7SoZwrK9I. Pay attention in particular to their (non)recommendations around lubricants, especially petroleum jelly, as actually contributing to greater likelihood of blisters.
Great resource. Thanks!
 

rolo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015
I'm very prone to blisters. After reading recommdations from this forum before my Camino in September, I bought Body Glide a a local sports store. Used it for training & the Camino. Not one blister!! Happy feet!
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
I'm very prone to blisters. After reading recommdations from this forum before my Camino in September, I bought Body Glide a a local sports store. Used it for training & the Camino. Not one blister!! Happy feet!
Hi, rolo did you apply all over and in between toes, and how often did you apply?
Thanks,
Janice
 

rolo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015
Hi, rolo did you apply all over and in between toes, and how often did you apply?
Thanks,
Janice
Hi Janice, applied every morning between toes, bottom & top of feet. If need be, one could reapply during a break. Body Glide was my savior. I have mentioned this to other friends who walked after me. They & their feet thanked me.
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
@rolo , hope we are not hijacking this thread! I did use Glide - but will apply more frequently on upcoming CP. Did you wear boots or trail runners? Just an FYI, if you live in USA check out Gold Bond Friction Defense, also water soluble, and a whole lot cheaper than Glide - happy feet, happy wallet!
Regard's

Janice
 

rolo

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 2015
So many good opinions, and I am sure they work for each of you. But I have some stuff that works for me and will share.
Vaseline is petroleum product and not water-soluble. It should not be used if you are diabetic, or have Peripheral Vascular Disease. If you use, do not put in between toes. Think about it - you are creating a oil-soluble barrier against your skin, which does not breathe, can harbor micro-organism and cause infection, and will trap heat and perspiration.
Vasoline will require HOT water and detergent's to remove - possibly several washes to completely remove On camino I want to spend the least time possible washing my clothes. When was the time on the camino you had all the hot water you wanted? Few and far between.
A water soluble anti- friction stick such Gold Bond Friction Defense, cost $5 and is 1/3rd the cost of Glide. You have to remember to apply it every time boots are off and you are airing your feet and socks. I try to do this every 2 hours on the way.
It was 82 F today, and I forgot to use the panty-liner-in-the-boot trick I learned on this forum! :)

Buen Camino,

Janice
I actually thought about vasoline when I first noticed it on this forum. Had the same concerns you have mentioned. Then I found Glide!
Buen Camino!
@rolo , hope we are not hijacking this thread! I did use Glide - but will apply more frequently on upcoming CP. Did you wear boots or trail runners? Just an FYI, if you live in USA check out Gold Bond Friction Defense, also water soluble, and a whole lot cheaper than Glide - happy feet, happy wallet!
Regard's

Janice
@rolo , hope we are not hijacking this thread! I did use Glide - but will apply more frequently on upcoming CP. Did you wear boots or trail runners? Just an FYI, if you live in USA check out Gold Bond Friction Defense, also water soluble, and a whole lot cheaper than Glide - happy feet, happy wallet!
Regard's

Janice
Not a hijack at all. Just trying to help others as they helped me. I had the same concerns as the OP is now experiencing w/ vasoline.
I am from the US & paid $9.99 for Glide. Would NEVER use boots. Walked in Merrill Moab low hikers.
Buen Camino!
 

MaidinBham

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP to Muxia, April (2014)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon>Santiago, April/May (2016)
@MacGlynn I have read on this forum about "Hikers Wool", so that maybe another solution. Some seem to reapply daily, or just leave in the sock when washing. Seems this may wash out natural lanolin in the wool?

Janice
 

CathyJ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - April 2016
SJPP to SDC
@rolo , hope we are not hijacking this thread! I did use Glide - but will apply more frequently on upcoming CP. Did you wear boots or trail runners? Just an FYI, if you live in USA check out Gold Bond Friction Defense, also water soluble, and a whole lot cheaper than Glide - happy feet, happy wallet!
Regard's

Janice
I have also used Glide but like Trail Toes as much and that also is cheaper
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
So many good opinions, and I am sure they work for each of you. But I have some stuff that works for me and will share.
Vaseline is petroleum product and not water-soluble. It should not be used if you are diabetic, or have Peripheral Vascular Disease. If you use, do not put in between toes. Think about it - you are creating a oil-soluble barrier against your skin, which does not breathe, can harbor micro-organism and cause infection, and will trap heat and perspiration.
Vasoline will require HOT water and detergent's to remove - possibly several washes to completely remove On camino I want to spend the least time possible washing my clothes. When was the time on the camino you had all the hot water you wanted? Few and far between.
A water soluble anti- friction stick such Gold Bond Friction Defense, cost $5 and is 1/3rd the cost of Glide. You have to remember to apply it every time boots are off and you are airing your feet and socks. I try to do this every 2 hours on the way.
It was 82 F today, and I forgot to use the panty-liner-in-the-boot trick I learned on this forum! :)

Buen Camino,

Janice
Did one stick of the Gold Bond Friction Defense last for your entire Camino Frances?
 

Walkerooni

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
Seems like most blisters are caused by ill-fitting footwear and socks, with moisture being a complicating factor. The BEST prevention for blisters is lots of training before you go, thereby ensuring the sock/footwear combo works for you. I swear by my Wright socks (double layered, and come in various weights). Used Body Glide on my feet preventatively, which goes on dry. Not a single blister. I agree with previous poster that blisters are largely preventable and should not be an assumed issue on the Camino.
 

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When is the best time to walk?

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    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 9 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 48 4.1%
  • April

    Votes: 174 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 282 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 85 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 23 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 26 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 331 28.5%
  • October

    Votes: 145 12.5%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.5%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
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