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Water and footwear

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.
 
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PANO

Guest
1. Water. Buy half-litre mineral water and refill. On hot days in isolated areas such as the meseta, take two bottles.
2- Shoes: Flip flops for shower is fine, for the evenings out, use your walking shoes. Avoid unnecessary weight!
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
You do not have to completely fill a water bladder, and it is quite convenient for sipping without breaking stride. A 2L bladder weighs about the same as a 1L, but you can fill it for the long, hot stretches. The downside is that bladders require a bit of unpacking to extract from your pack for refilling, so there is a tendency to not refill when you should!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Thanks. I will be walking in my boots and was hoping to avoid wearing these in evening and relax my feet in something more airy.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
You do not have to completely fill a water bladder, and it is quite convenient for sipping without breaking stride. A 2L bladder weighs about the same as a 1L, but you can fill it for the long, hot stretches. The downside is that bladders require a bit of unpacking to extract from your pack for refilling, so there is a tendency to not refill when you should!
Good point. Thanks
 
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tyrrek

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
I do as Falcon suggests - a 2l bag rarely (but occasionally) filled close to capacity. I was very lucky that my current pack has a convenient outer pocket for the water bag. It wasn't something I was really thinking about when I bought it but I certainly will when I replace it. For shoes, one pair for downtime - sandals, crocs, espadrilles etc. Remember that flip flops with a toe bar may not be ideal for blistered feet!
 
P

PANO

Guest
Thanks. I will be walking in my boots and was hoping to avoid wearing these in evening and relax my feet in something more airy.
OK, alternatively buy a pair of light sandals to substitute the flip-flops, you'll find nice n cheap ones in those many Spanish stores.
PS: Water. Nothing is lighter (and more hygienic) than PET water bottles.
 

taozenqi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: Sept/Oct (2014)
OK, alternatively buy a pair of light sandals to substitute the flip-flops, you'll find nice n cheap ones in those many Spanish stores.
PS: Water. Nothing is lighter (and more hygienic) than PET water bottles.

I like using the item below with a normal water bottle (usually a 1 liter Smartwater bottle), placed in a side pocket. It' s the best of both worlds; light weight and can be sipped easily while walking even while using trekking poles. The big plus for me is the easy cleaning / replacement. Don't like cleaning bladders and have witnessed too many people drinking from a bladder filled with mold.

Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System
Available via amazon.com and elsewhere


Buen camino - tzq
 
Last edited:

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
OK, alternatively buy a pair of light sandals to substitute the flip-flops, you'll find nice n cheap ones in those many Spanish stores.
PS: Water. Nothing is lighter (and more hygienic) than PET water bottles.
Thanks for suggestions
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I like using the item below with a normal water bottle (usually a 1 liter Smartwater bottle), placed in a side pocket. It' s the best of both worlds; light weight and can be sipped easily while walking even while using trekking poles. The big plus for me is the easy cleaning / replacement. Don't like cleaning bladders and have witnessed too many people drinking from a bladder filled with mold.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GM6LWS/?tag=casaivar02-20

Buen camino - tzq
clever idea
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I do as Falcon suggests - a 2l bag rarely (but occasionally) filled close to capacity. I was very lucky that my current pack has a convenient outer pocket for the water bag. It wasn't something I was really thinking about when I bought it but I certainly will when I replace it. For shoes, one pair for downtime - sandals, crocs, espadrilles etc. Remember that flip flops with a toe bar may not be ideal for blistered feet!
Thanks for advice
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
My preference is for a larger Source bladder. This year I changed the hose fittings so that I can carry a filler that allows the bladder to be filled from a tap or bottle without removing it from my pack. I don't bother worrying about doing a partial fill - it gets filled each morning and any time during the day that I need to refill it.

It is worthwhile knowing something about how much water you need to consume to avoid dehydration, which will vary a bit between individuals. It is possible to build up a water deficit by carrying too little and then restricting your intake until you are next able to refill your bottles. I saw this on the CF a couple of times walking in spring 2010, where a pilgrim was only carrying a 500-600 ml bottle, which was empty when they arrived at a bar or font. In one case, the font didn't have any water, and it was another half hour or so until there was another opportunity to refill.

On the matter of evening footwear, for my last two pilgrimage walks, I have carried a pair of Salomon Techamphibian shoes. These are a mesh shoe that can be worn in the shower and for short walks around towns. They are lighter than the Merrell sandals that I carried on my first pilgrimage walks, and more suitable for around town wear than a pair of thongs/flip flops/jandals.
 
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MeganG22

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPdP-->SdC
(Oct3-Nov3 2012)
Pamplona-->SdC
(Oct1-Oct29 2014)
Upcoming!
Pamplona-->SdC
May 1-? 2017
Hi jostony! I walked in October 2012 and had a camelbak bladder in my pack and an additional water bottle in my side holder section of my backpack. As the weeks went on I ended up not filling my camelbak very much because it was just a pain to get it out so often. There are so many places to refill your bottles, except for a couple sections of 15 or 17 kms without stops, so you'll rarely be without.
As for footwear, I walked in trail running shoes which worked great for me, and then I carried a pair of Chacos sandals for after arrival each day. Chacos are a bit heavier, yes, but they are so comfortable for me and also came in handy to actually walk in some days when my feet got sore in my shoes. I have read a lot of positive things on this forum about Crocs, so that may be an option too, and they are definitely lighter & softer, but it's all just personal preference!
I hope you find what works best for you!
 

xin loi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked May 14, 2014 from St Jean France

starting to walk again August 25, 2016 --SJPDP to Finisterre
Just finished Camino and never, ever drank from my one liter bottle that I carried. Carried a spare empty 500 ml coke bottle with water in my vest pocket and very rarely drank more than 250 ml per day from it. I was in the old military where "water discipline" was stressed. Fellow walker was also in that old military carrying a mortar and he did the entire Camino without drinking anything during the daily hike. Of Course we drank a lot of beer in the evenings.

The two young women carrying babies less than 6 months old that were nursing did not appear to be carrying much water on the hike. Would have thought they sould have required extra water.

I used Tevas as a spare but would bring flip flops if I ever do something so evil that I have to redeem myself by walking the camino twice.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Just finished Camino and never, ever drank from my one liter bottle that I carried. Carried a spare empty 500 ml coke bottle with water in my vest pocket and very rarely drank more than 250 ml per day from it. I was in the old military where "water discipline" was stressed. Fellow walker was also in that old military carrying a mortar and he did the entire Camino without drinking anything during the daily hike. Of Course we drank a lot of beer in the evenings.
I was also in the military in a past life, and while water discipline was stressed, water stupidity wasn't. As a young soldier, we carried 2li, were generally able to refill twice daily, and were issued a water filter and treatment tablets. The regime being proposed here is very likely to lead to quite substantial fluid deficit and severe dehydration.

Dehydrating oneself during the day and then doing a bulk replacement with an alcoholic beverage may sound good, but isn't actually a very sensible way of walking when it is relatively easy to carry potable water, drink regularly and refill at towns and fonts between towns when they are operating.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
As the saying goes "Don't sweat the small stuff". Neither of the decisions you are worrying about is going to make or break your Camino. When you start walking you can easily change your water carrying system and evening/shower shoe choices. So it really does not matter much what you decide; just think of it as preCamino fun rather than a problem.

FYI I carry two 400ml water flasks and find that adequate. My husband just buys a single 600ml bottle of water in a PET container and refills it. Evening and shower shoes for him is thongs (flip-flops) or cheap locally bought sandals. For me it depends on what is in the cupboard - last time it was Merrels with a light stretchy mesh upper, but I have worn crocs and Skechers and Zero G sandals.
 

november_moon

Veteran Member
I can see why one would train under dehydration conditions in the military since dehydration may be a factor during combat and other missions. Soldiers need to know how their bodies will react to dehydration so that they can continue to do their jobs. But for something like walking the Camino, there doesn't seem to be any reason not to be fully hydrated.

We carried bottles of water - I carried 2 500 ml bottles that I filled most of the way. My husband carried 2 1-liter bottles. I don't like the water reservoirs just because they are harder to keep clean. Bottles are easy. We made sure to drink plenty of water along the way.

For after walking shoes - we both took Adidas soccer sandals that we used for showers and for wandering around after walking. We chose these instead of flip flops since we could wear socks with them as well.

http://www.zappos.com/adidas-adissage-new-navy-white

Next time though, I think I will bring some hiking sandals and a very thin pair of flipflops. Being able to change at the end of the day is important - give the feet a break and some room to breathe.
 
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I do agree with Doug that rehydrating with alcohol is foolish - accompanied a 20 year old girl to the hospital in Santiago from Monte de Gozo when she became seriously ill from dehydration. Her friends said she had not been drinking much water during the day but during the last week of walking had got stuck into the alcohol at night. She had to be put on a drip for 24 hours and they kept her in hospital for a couple of days. Wonderful Spanish health care.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
My preference is for a larger Source bladder. This year I changed the hose fittings so that I can carry a filler that allows the bladder to be filled from a tap or bottle without removing it from my pack. I don't bother worrying about doing a partial fill - it gets filled each morning and any time during the day that I need to refill it.

It is worthwhile knowing something about how much water you need to consume to avoid dehydration, which will vary a bit between individuals. It is possible to build up a water deficit by carrying too little and then restricting your intake until you are next able to refill your bottles. I saw this on the CF a couple of times walking in spring 2010, where a pilgrim was only carrying a 500-600 ml bottle, which was empty when they arrived at a bar or font. In one case, the font didn't have any water, and it was another half hour or so until there was another opportunity to refill.

On the matter of evening footwear, for my last two pilgrimage walks, I have carried a pair of Salomon Techamphibian shoes. These are a mesh shoe that can be worn in the shower and for short walks around towns. They are lighter than the Merrell sandals that I carried on my first pilgrimage walks, and more suitable for around town wear than a pair of thongs/flip flops/jandals.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I really like the look of the Salomon Techamphibian shoe you have kindly recommended. Does everything I am looking for. Will definitely check this one out and try it on when I visit local store . Many thanks.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Jostony,

Have a look at the vivobarefoot ultra running shoe. Mine are comfortable to wear, dry quickly if you want to shower with them, and can be used to hike/ run in as well. Mine, size 10.5, weigh 7 oz without the internal boot and 13 oz with the internal boot.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004TUUZJS/?tag=casaivar02-20


-tzq
Can't run! Thanks for suggestion will check this shoe out too. My list is getting longer! But I have time.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I can see why one would train under dehydration conditions in the military since dehydration may be a factor during combat and other missions. Soldiers need to know how their bodies will react to dehydration so that they can continue to do their jobs. But for something like walking the Camino, there doesn't seem to be any reason not to be fully hydrated.

We carried bottles of water - I carried 2 500 ml bottles that I filled most of the way. My husband carried 2 1-liter bottles. I don't like the water reservoirs just because they are harder to keep clean. Bottles are easy. We made sure to drink plenty of water along the way.

For after walking shoes - we both took Adidas soccer sandals that we used for showers and for wandering around after walking. We chose these instead of flip flops since we could wear socks with them as well.

http://www.zappos.com/adidas-adissage-new-navy-white

Next time though, I think I will bring some hiking sandals and a very thin pair of flipflops. Being able to change at the end of the day is important - give the feet a break and some room to breathe.
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Thank you for your suggestions.
As the saying goes "Don't sweat the small stuff". Neither of the decisions you are worrying about is going to make or break your Camino. When you start walking you can easily change your water carrying system and evening/shower shoe choices. So it really does not matter much what you decide; just think of it as preCamino fun rather than a problem.

FYI I carry two 400ml water flasks and find that adequate. My husband just buys a single 600ml bottle of water in a PET container and refills it. Evening and shower shoes for him is thongs (flip-flops) or cheap locally bought sandals. For me it depends on what is in the cupboard - last time it was Merrels with a light stretchy mesh upper, but I have worn crocs and Skechers and Zero G sandals.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
which was your favourite and most comfortable shoe?
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
As the saying goes "Don't sweat the small stuff". Neither of the decisions you are worrying about is going to make or break your Camino. When you start walking you can easily change your water carrying system and evening/shower shoe choices. So it really does not matter much what you decide; just think of it as preCamino fun rather than a problem.

FYI I carry two 400ml water flasks and find that adequate. My husband just buys a single 600ml bottle of water in a PET container and refills it. Evening and shower shoes for him is thongs (flip-flops) or cheap locally bought sandals. For me it depends on what is in the cupboard - last time it was Merrels with a light stretchy mesh upper, but I have worn crocs and Skechers and Zero G sandals.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Thanks for replying. As it's my first Camino and have literally done little or no walking in my life I needed so much gear and have had so many decisions to make. Reading the Forum has been invaluable and reviewing member's shared kit lists has definitely helped me with my research in choosing so many things. So many thanks to all that have contributed. Now all I have to do is start walking and get fit!!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Hi jostony! I walked in October 2012 and had a camelbak bladder in my pack and an additional water bottle in my side holder section of my backpack. As the weeks went on I ended up not filling my camelbak very much because it was just a pain to get it out so often. There are so many places to refill your bottles, except for a couple sections of 15 or 17 kms without stops, so you'll rarely be without.
As for footwear, I walked in trail running shoes which worked great for me, and then I carried a pair of Chacos sandals for after arrival each day. Chacos are a bit heavier, yes, but they are so comfortable for me and also came in handy to actually walk in some days when my feet got sore in my shoes. I have read a lot of positive things on this forum about Crocs, so that may be an option too, and they are definitely lighter & softer, but it's all just personal preference!
I hope you find what works best for you!
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Thanks for your helpful thoughts. Sure I will find what I am looking for soon.
 

xin loi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked May 14, 2014 from St Jean France

starting to walk again August 25, 2016 --SJPDP to Finisterre
Water--carry what you want. But I still think people over estimate how much they need. I don't carry at water at all when out hunting all day in early fall. Worked on a Gas/oil seismic crew from Carlsbad , New Mexico to Del Rio , Texas, one summer and we never carried water even thought we were humping heavy electrical lines all day. We got water at lunch and in the evening. We still had guys with enough stamina to run down cottontails in the evening---try that some day when you have nothing to do.
 

Sani

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Last 113 km (July 2013)
From Roncesvalles to Logroño (July 2014)
Hello! One half liter is enought and you can refill often.
I carried Crocs for shower and also for walking after the stage, for me it's the best option because they are not heavy and you don't need extra shoes.

Buen Camino!
 

Franpio

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked Camino Frances May/June 2014
Good point. Thanks
Jostony
I am on the Camino right now in fact just came into Santiago. Definitely don't wear your boots in the evening. Your feet need the break until the next morning. Last minute I bought croc sandles and they were amazing. Not the big crocs but sandals great also for the shower. Very light and flex able. With the water I got advice here to buy half liter bottle and fill it as I went and it worked perfectly. Again less weight. You will be glad of less weight.

Enjoy your planning.
 
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cecelia

Wandering for the love and growth of it
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances from SJPP - 2003, 2005, 2009, 2013. 500 km on Le Puy 2013. Future - Vezelay-Santiago
[QUOTE="Blue Desert SmarTube Hydration System[/QUOTE]
This looks like a great idea although it would still have the problem of gathering mold of course. Mouthwash (listerine) & false teeth cleaning tablets (the fizzy kind) claim to kill 99.9% of all germs and some have said they work. I prefer my water in my pack to keep it cooler and use a bladder but always do need something (alcohol - the drugstore kind not the drinking kind) to clean it - but the tube is the big cleaning issue. Many outdoor suppliers have a long, skinny brush for the tube. Other than the need to clean, the other water thing you may want to think about is balancing the weight on your body - especially with larger containers.
Cecelia
 

Chacharm

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Via Frances (2012) Vie Del Norte (2015) Via Frances (2016) Le Puy (2017)
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.
I made thew mistake of taking sandals I could not wear socks with - not smart for cold evenings. I stopped in Pamplona and bought something else. My preference is for something a bit more substantial than Crocs - Tevas or Chacos. And I used a bladder too. Emptied it most days.
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.

Despite my sister having a picture of crocs 0n her facebook page saying 'Wear these and watch your dignity flow out the holes' - I would say - just take crocs - great in the shower or swimming, or crossing stony streams, but fine for evenings and sight-seeing too. And they are so airy and comfy after tight boots or cycling shoes all day... Also they are lighter than anything else and can be fastened to your pack with a carabiner - get colourful ones and you'll become 'purple croc guy' !!!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Jostony
I am on the Camino right now in fact just came into Santiago. Definitely don't wear your boots in the evening. Your feet need the break until the next morning. Last minute I bought croc sandles and they were amazing. Not the big crocs but sandals great also for the shower. Very light and flex able. With the water I got advice here to buy half liter bottle and fill it as I went and it worked perfectly. Again less weight. You will be glad of less weight.

Enjoy your planning.
Thanks for taking time out to respond with your suggestions particularly whilst you are on your Camino. Hope it is going well
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I made thew mistake of taking sandals I could not wear socks with - not smart for cold evenings. I stopped in Pamplona and bought something else. My preference is for something a bit more substantial than Crocs - Tevas or Chacos. And I used a bladder too. Emptied it most days.
Thanks for your response will look into Tevas.
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Despite my sister having a picture of crocs 0n her facebook page saying 'Wear these and watch your dignity flow out the holes' - I would say - just take crocs - great in the shower or swimming, or crossing stony streams, but fine for evenings and sight-seeing too. And they are so airy and comfy after tight boots or cycling shoes all day... Also they are lighter than anything else and can be fastened to your pack with a carabiner - get colourful ones and you'll become 'purple croc guy' !!!
Thanks for your contribution will add Crocs to list and even consider your colour suggestion!
 

Kimmzie

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino de Santiago .. St Jean planning to do June 2015
Hi... I am also getting ready for my camino in June 2015. I have purchased a pair of closed toe Keen sandals which I plan to wear in the evenings and can also wear hiking during the day to get a break from my hiking boots. Then for shower footwear I am planing on wearing the "spa" type very thin flip flop you get after having a pedicure. You can get these from your local hair salon that also does manicures and pedicures.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Hi... I am also getting ready for my camino in June 2015. I have purchased a pair of closed toe Keen sandals which I plan to wear in the evenings and can also wear hiking during the day to get a break from my hiking boots. Then for shower footwear I am planing on wearing the "spa" type very thin flip flop you get after having a pedicure. You can get these from your local hair salon that also does manicures and pedicures.
Thanks for your suggestions. Pedicure - that wasn't even on my list! but now is - thanks
 

jeffnd

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
March/April 2014
I had a 2 liter bladder that I filled all the way up for the first 5 days or so. Then I got smart and saved a half liter Aquarius bottle that fit nicely into my side bag.

I became VERY dehydrated my first day. We're talking orange urine, probably should have seen a doctor dehydrated. After that, I made water my top priority each day and never had a problem again.

My water routine went like this:

1. In the morning, check the guidebook to see what the water situation would be like. Lots of fountains and towns? I'd fill the water bladder halfway. If it was a desolate stretch, I'd go 3/4 or all the way full.

2. Fill up my half liter bottle and drink it. And repeat. I started each day with at least a liter of water in my system, whether I was thirsty or not. Some mornings I had to force it all down, but it was worth it.

3. Refill the half liter bottle and head out. I drank out of the bottle, keeping the water in the bladder as a reserve.

4. Refill the bottle at almost every fountain. If I came to a fountain, the first thing I'd do is look for an agua non-potable sign. If I found one, it meant no refills there. If there was no sign or an agua potable sign, I figured it was safe to drink. A few fountains seemed a bit suspect, and I skipped them. You'll have to use your own judgment. The next thing I would do is make sure the damn thing actually works! If the water flowed, it was clear, and had no funky smells, I'd refill my bottle, drink it, and refill again. Obviously you don't need to do this at EVERY single fountain along the way. But I liked to change out the water in my bottle whenever possible, just because cool water is a little easier to drink than lukewarm or hot water.

Following this system, I only found myself without water 1 more time along the way. But that was near the end of the day I walked for 24 hours straight and I don't think my brain was working quite right!

For my second pair of shoes, I picked up a pair of these:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/AVIA-MENS-QUICKSTER-SNEAKER/33878278

They were cheap, lighter than Crocs or sandals, and they spaired me the indignity of having to wear flip flops.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
@jeffnd, I use a similar approach, but consume from the bladder first. When it is empty, I decant the water bottle into the bladder, and then look for the next potable water. I normally refill the bladder around lunch time anyway. After this years pilgrimage walks, I bought a filler attachment (Source) that allows me to fill the bag without removing it from my pack, which is one of the drawbacks of bladder systems.
When I have been walking in more remote areas, I refill the empty water bottle from a local stream or the like, and use a purification tablet to treat the water. This takes about half an hour, more if it is colder, so I am contemplating carrying one of the UV purifiers. That is not an option that I necessarily see as useful on the camino.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
I had a 2 liter bladder that I filled all the way up for the first 5 days or so. Then I got smart and saved a half liter Aquarius bottle that fit nicely into my side bag.

I became VERY dehydrated my first day. We're talking orange urine, probably should have seen a doctor dehydrated. After that, I made water my top priority each day and never had a problem again.

My water routine went like this:

1. In the morning, check the guidebook to see what the water situation would be like. Lots of fountains and towns? I'd fill the water bladder halfway. If it was a desolate stretch, I'd go 3/4 or all the way full.

2. Fill up my half liter bottle and drink it. And repeat. I started each day with at least a liter of water in my system, whether I was thirsty or not. Some mornings I had to force it all down, but it was worth it.

3. Refill the half liter bottle and head out. I drank out of the bottle, keeping the water in the bladder as a reserve.

4. Refill the bottle at almost every fountain. If I came to a fountain, the first thing I'd do is look for an agua non-potable sign. If I found one, it meant no refills there. If there was no sign or an agua potable sign, I figured it was safe to drink. A few fountains seemed a bit suspect, and I skipped them. You'll have to use your own judgment. The next thing I would do is make sure the @#!*% thing actually works! If the water flowed, it was clear, and had no funky smells, I'd refill my bottle, drink it, and refill again. Obviously you don't need to do this at EVERY single fountain along the way. But I liked to change out the water in my bottle whenever possible, just because cool water is a little easier to drink than lukewarm or hot water.

Following this system, I only found myself without water 1 more time along the way. But that was near the end of the day I walked for 24 hours straight and I don't think my brain was working quite right!

For my second pair of shoes, I picked up a pair of these:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/AVIA-MENS-QUICKSTER-SNEAKER/33878278

They were cheap, lighter than Crocs or sandals, and they spaired me the indignity of having to wear flip flops.
Thanks for helpful feedback on your experience whilst I will take into account when doing my camino.
 

Perejil

New Member
Hi Jostony,
I'm training for Camino and found that I have the same questions you're asking.
I've taken the training approach of increasing my walking distance slowly over time and now reached 20 km with a full pack weight of 10-12kg on the weekends. My pack isn't complete so I add 5kg weight with water bottles to make up the difference. In doing this I hope to find out how much water I need to carry to sustain a heathy balance.
Buen Camino


Buen Camino
 

titasanz

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
August-September (2013)
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.
Hi there! I walked last year from SJPP to Finisterre, about water I agree with carrying a half a litre bottle and refill it. About foot wear, and this is really , the most valuable item I took to the camino were were the trekking sandals and included them at the last minute, I wore flip flops for the shower and in the albergues and I took a pair of The North Face Shoes, no boots. I changed them to the sandals every time I felt my feet were boiling in order to avoid overheating and blisters and also whenever there was a downhill to avoid the toes to continuously hit the front of the shoes and thus lose a toenail. The sandaare not heavy at all and can be carried outside the backpack and thus you can change footwear any time you feel like it. Buen Camino!
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Hi there! I walked last year from SJPP to Finisterre, about water I agree with carrying a half a litre bottle and refill it. About foot wear, and this is really , the most valuable item I took to the camino were were the trekking sandals and included them at the last minute, I wore flip flops for the shower and in the albergues and I took a pair of The North Face Shoes, no boots. I changed them to the sandals every time I felt my feet were boiling in order to avoid overheating and blisters and also whenever there was a downhill to avoid the toes to continuously hit the front of the shoes and thus lose a toenail. The sandaare not heavy at all and can be carried outside the backpack and thus you can change footwear any time you feel like it. Buen Camino!
Thank you for your helping suggestions.
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
Hi Jostony,
I'm training for Camino and found that I have the same questions you're asking.
I've taken the training approach of increasing my walking distance slowly over time and now reached 20 km with a full pack weight of 10-12kg on the weekends. My pack isn't complete so I add 5kg weight with water bottles to make up the difference. In doing this I hope to find out how much water I need to carry to sustain a heathy balance.
Buen Camino


Buen Camino
Hello. I have enjoyed researching and making gear purchases. Typical me putting off the actual walking - but method in procrastination as I want to start my walking training with a backpack so I get used to carrying it on my back. You say you built up walking over time. I am now a free agent so I could make time to walk most days. Would like to draw up sensible incremental walking distance plan rather than my all or nothing tendency!
 

Perejil

New Member
@Yostony
Drawing up a plan before walking sounds like a good idea, unfortunately I went the other way and began walking first probably because I was a novice.
My journey began with no pack and regular footwear walking about 4km or so. After a while I started purchasing gear from hiking stores and advice from this forum on what's recommended and found I could walk further. I tried boots, sanders but settled on a good pair of running shoes only because they suited me best and found I could walk further. I increased my pack weight and added sock liners to avoid hotspots and blisters and so on and so on.
It would be interesting to hear from others in the forum if they had similar lead up to Camino. Oh and don't worry about procrastination, just let it happen, some days I plan to walk more but end up walking slower or stopping longer.


Buen Camino
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
@Yostony
Drawing up a plan before walking sounds like a good idea, unfortunately I went the other way and began walking first probably because I was a novice.
My journey began with no pack and regular footwear walking about 4km or so. After a while I started purchasing gear from hiking stores and advice from this forum on what's recommended and found I could walk further. I tried boots, sanders but settled on a good pair of running shoes only because they suited me best and found I could walk further. I increased my pack weight and added sock liners to avoid hotspots and blisters and so on and so on.
It would be interesting to hear from others in the forum if they had similar lead up to Camino. Oh and don't worry about procrastination, just let it happen, some days I plan to walk more but end up walking slower or stopping longer.


Buen Camino
Thanks. Will have to avoid temptation to plan walks that inevitably end up in a pub for a glass of tinto!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Would like to draw up sensible incremental walking distance plan rather than my all or nothing tendency!
There is an eight week program here to get you from 12km to 30km. If you struggle doing 12km now, you might want to do the 10km program first. The walks this is focussed on preparing you for do not require a pack, so you might want to vary the program to bring your pack weight up earlier and increase the weight to your camino load. I also vary it by doing the longer walks with a pack, generally starting at about 5-8kg and building up from there.

It's worth avoiding boredom if you can, and finding a few different circuits rather than doing an out and back or laps of shorter circuits as you get your distance up.

I'm not a great believer in doing longer distances several days in a row, although I will try and get at least one longer distance in every weekend, and closer to departure do longer distances on both weekend days.
 

jostony

Camino del Vino
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues/F'tre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Norte 2020
There is an eight week program here to get you from 12km to 30km. If you struggle doing 12km now, you might want to do the 10km program first. The walks this is focussed on preparing you for do not require a pack, so you might want to vary the program to bring your pack weight up earlier and increase the weight to your camino load. I also vary it by doing the longer walks with a pack, generally starting at about 5-8kg and building up from there.

It's worth avoiding boredom if you can, and finding a few different circuits rather than doing an out and back or laps of shorter circuits as you get your distance up.

I'm not a great believer in doing longer distances several days in a row, although I will try and get at least one longer distance in every weekend, and closer to departure do longer distances on both weekend days.
Brilliant. Very helpful - thank you.
 
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henrymorgan

New Member
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.
Hi,
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.
Hi,
Like most topics, different people have different needs, the amount of water to carry is no exception. The best way of judging this, in my opinion, is to walk 25 kM on two successive days. At present, the weather in the UK is similar to that you will experience in Spain during May/June next year, especially during the first couple of weeks. Water is heavy, there are plenty of villages and water fountains on the route. With regard to footwear, take what is comfortable to you, by walking at least two days in succession in the UK on numerous occasions, so you become confident with your decision - take what suits you. Also take a pair of lightweight sandals/flip flops to wear in the shower and around the village in the evening.
The most important point to concentrate on is getting your feet toughen up and to become as fit as possible. This together with a light pack should make the walk more enjoyable.
The number of people that suffer with foot problems is amazing.
Best of luck
John
 

henrymorgan

New Member
Hi,

Hi,
Like most topics, different people have different needs, the amount of water to carry is no exception. The best way of judging this, in my opinion, is to walk 25 kM on two successive days. At present, the weather in the UK is similar to that you will experience in Spain during May/June next year, especially during the first couple of weeks. Water is heavy, there are plenty of villages and water fountains on the route. With regard to footwear, take what is comfortable to you, by walking at least two days in succession in the UK on numerous occasions, so you become confident with your decision - take what suits you. Also take a pair of lightweight sandals/flip flops to wear in the shower and around the village in the evening.
The most important point to concentrate on is getting your feet toughen up and to become as fit as possible. This together with a light pack should make the walk more enjoyable.
The number of people that suffer with foot problems is amazing.
Best of luck
John
P.S. Forgot to mention two items you should consider taking.
1. A large packet of dried apricots or similar - plenty of sugar.
2. Consider taking half a dozen GO sachets. They work, help replace the fluids and salts you loose. Use one when you feel tired, on some of the more strenuous days.
 

Texaloha

New Member
I had a backpack bladde which I usually filed to 2L. But I also carried a plastic cup that I attached through the waist straps in front. At fountains, I just used this cup but had the bladder for the ascents and descents between fountains
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2012
If bladders are not washed thoroughly and often, they can make you ill. I used two 1/2 lt bottles with a smartube, when one was empty I just switched the tube over. These bottles can be washed and reused easily or just buy new ones. With the smartube you can sip regularly and avoid dehydration. Remember to wash the tube thoroughly every day/evening.
 
P

PANO

Guest
If bladders are not washed thoroughly and often, they can make you ill. I used two 1/2 lt bottles with a smartube, when one was empty I just switched the tube over. These bottles can be washed and reused easily or just buy new ones. With the smartube you can sip regularly and avoid dehydration. Remember to wash the tube thoroughly every day/evening.
For sure, SmartTube is more hygienic than bladders, but best still is to drink straight from the bottle; this simple, yet ingenious device keeps it in immediate reach: www.niteize.com/product/Drink-N-Clip.asp. Keep one or two spare half-litre bottles in your pack and you have the most weight-efficient and hygienic solution.
If I learned one thing on my Camino, it is to keep everything as simple and straightforward as possible.
 
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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2012
For sure, SmartTube is more hygienic than bladders, but best still is to drink straight from the bottle; this simple, yet ingenious device keeps it in immediate reach: www.niteize.com/product/Drink-N-Clip.asp. Keep one or two spare half-litre bottles in your pack and you have the most weight-efficient and hygienic solution.
If I learned one thing on my Camino, it is to keep everything as simple and straightforward as possible.
Thanks PANO, are these available anywhere in Europe?
 
P

PANO

Guest
Thanks PANO, are these available anywhere in Europe?
When you search for "Drink'n clip", you'll find some vendors other than Nite Ize. But since this clip is so simple and cheap, it does not seem to be interesting enough for re-sellers in general.
I regret not having taken a few dozen spare-clips with me on my Camino, I could have made a solid business selling them to my co-peregrinos! If I were a hospitalero, I would stock them in my albergue; this would be a very nice side-business, I'm sure. :)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
If bladders are not washed thoroughly and often, they can make you ill. I used two 1/2 lt bottles with a smartube, when one was empty I just switched the tube over. These bottles can be washed and reused easily or just buy new ones. With the smartube you can sip regularly and avoid dehydration. Remember to wash the tube thoroughly every day/evening.
I am always amazed when I see these predictions of impending doom if bladders are not cleaned regularly. It is not my experience that there is an issue if they are in regular use. The few times mine have been a problem has been associated with not drying them out properly before storing them for a longer period. The extent of my regular care is to give mine a rinse with hot water into which I have dissolved a denture tablet about once every six months or so. Other than that, they get a rinse before being refilled from time to time, certainly not daily.
 
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wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2012
I bought a camel pack bladder a few years ago but only used it a few times for the following reasons
1. The water did not taste good from it.
2. I saw some pretty grotty ones on the Camino and in some cases where the pilgrim menu was blamed for the upset stomach, it was my opinion that it was the dirty bladder that caused the problem.
3. I encountered one pilgrim whose bladder opened/burst in the rucksack and soaked everything.
I am probably just a bit paranoid because I got a bad tummy bug once while travelling and it is not an experience I want to repeat.
Having said all that, it is still each to his own, and I would not presume to tell someone who has used them for years to stop.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
For sure, SmartTube is more hygienic than bladders, but best still is to drink straight from the bottle; this simple, yet ingenious device keeps it in immediate reach: www.niteize.com/product/Drink-N-Clip.asp. Keep one or two spare half-litre bottles in your pack and you have the most weight-efficient and hygienic solution.
If I learned one thing on my Camino, it is to keep everything as simple and straightforward as possible.
I am not sure how you reach the conclusion that any of the SmartTube and similar solutions are more hygienic than bladders, particularly when the company itself isn't making any such claims. Certainly replacing a plastic water bottle every day would reduce the risk of contamination, but I don't sense you are being that environmentally unfriendly. Are you aware of any research on this matter that might shed light on the hygiene issues with each of the options?
 
C

Con Palos

Guest
K.I.S.S. system never fails, keep it simple stupid. Not that anyone's stupid, it's just a saying.

Buen Camino
 
P

PANO

Guest
........1. The water did not taste good from it.
Exactly why I prefer fresh mineral water*, wayfarer.:) The newbies seeking advise here should know that the Camino is far from wilderness, where a bladder would be justified. Except in the Pyrenees and a stretch on the Meseta, you're never further than an hour's walk away from a fountain, shop or a bar. Beyond that, each to his own, so what's the argument?

*) or a cool beer;)
 

hecate105

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
I do clean - as in sterilise - water bottles of any kind every week to 10 days of travelling. Most cyclists do - and I remember reading in Tim Moores 'French Revolutions' (another classic, funny book)that he just kept refilling his bottles and turned down offers from hosts to 'boil' his 'bidons'. He had many weeks of dodgy tummy, blaming too much red wine, too much French cheese etc - then it clicked - his bottles were infecting him - boiled them and was ok for rest of trip!! So when I started doing long cycles/walks/paddles - I took a few sterilising tablets and use them fairly regularly. I think it is more important in hot weather when any bacteria multiplies quickly.
But I had a horrible day when I had failed to replace one bottles contents with clean water - and halfway up a steep cliff took a huge swig of sterilising fluid! Oh man it tasted foul! But on the plus side I've never had a tummy upset when travelling...
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Exactly why I prefer fresh mineral water*, wayfarer.:) The newbies seeking advise here should know that the Camino is far from wilderness, where a bladder would be justified. Except in the Pyrenees and a stretch on the Meseta, you're never further than an hour's walk away from a fountain, shop or a bar. Beyond that, each to his own, so what's the argument?
@PANO, the argument is that you have to be setting a cracking pace for your suggestion that one is never further than an hour away to be true. Using the distances between localities from Camino Planner on the Godesalco site (http://www.godesalco.com/plan/frances) and assuming that a speedy pilgrim can achieve an effective average speed of 5kph (I averaged about 4.5kph on the CF, but I am prepared to give you some leeway on this) then:
  • Roncesvalles to Burgos: 51 locations, 31 < 1 hour from the previous location, 14 between one and two hours, six over two hours.
  • Burgos to Leon: 31 locations 13 < 1 hour from the previous location, 16 between one and two hours, one over two hours and one over three hours.
  • Leon to Santiago:74 locations 52 < 1 hour from the previous location, 19 between one and two hours, three over two hours.
  • Total: 156 locations, 96 < 1 hour from the previous location, 49 between one and two hours, 11 over three hours.
So on this basis, nearly 40% of the next locations are over an hour away. Even after Leon, about 30% of the next locations are over an hour away.

Newbies might need to know that the most effective way of staying hydrated is to drink freely, preferably before they get thirsty, and that one of the most effective ways of achieving that is a bladder or other arrangement where they don't have to stretch to get to their water. This is just as true on the Camino as it is in remote places. Further, they should know that they will generally be less than two hours from the next location, but over 5% of the time it will be more than that when they set out from the previous location.
 

rucsack

New Member
I walked the Camino in May and June this year. I found a 750 ml stainless steel bottle the perfect option and would use the same again . I had considered a bladder but the bottle in the side pocket of the rucksack that could be removed while walking was best.I started with this bottle and also a 1 litre reserve platypus bladder , I never needed the reserve litre so stopped carrying it. Good quality flip flops were adequate for evening wear.
 

theresairby

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2012) Camino Frances (2014)
Hello All. I intend to walk Camino Frances in May/June 2015 and I am compiling my kit. I have found Forum conversations very helpful and my initial queries are (1) how much water do you recommend to carry each day as 2 litres presumaby equates to 2 kilos - should I plan on this as I will have water reservoir within rucksack or is one litre enough. My main headache however is (2) what footwear to wear at the end of each day? Do I need flip flops for shower plus some sort of sandal, croc or shoe to go out in evening and relax in. So many options I am dithering! FYI I am male aged 54. Thanks for your help.

I carry Teva sandals for showering and town shoes...crocs are great too! give my feet a rest and some air at night
 

Lynda t

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPP to Santiago May 2010
Lisbon to Santiago May 2012
I use BPA free water bottles only because if the weather is hot and the water gets hot in a disposable bottle the plastic taste leaches into the water. Not healthy.
I walk in Keen sandals with an enclosed toe without socks BUT I use them all the time at home so my feet are very used to them. I do carry a thin pair of socks for a foot treat/cold weather. Bedroom slipper/socks for evenings in albergues. Never caught any gems from shower floors so don't carry crocks/flip flops.
Shorts. I have seen men on the camino wearing swim shorts (they have pants attached). They wash and dry very quickly. Less weight than cotton type shorts and pants, just a thought. I carry a 2 piece bathing costume that can double as underwear.
 
I just use a half little plastic bottle..
I don't see the advantage to use a bladder.

I like to rest and drink water, just take my time to enjoy my drink. While I see others struggling with the bladder either while walking "what I think is dangerous because they are not focussing on walking" or when they put their backpacks off and then have to bend over to reach the hose.

It's everybody responsibility to know how far the next town is and how much water they need everyday , there is no right or wrong here.

What about if they don't have enough water? Well I'm sure next day they will bring some extra


And shoes wise :) I use sandals without socks for walking and flip flops for the shower
 
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hecate105

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
'09 Portuguese Estellas '14 Aurelia '16 St Davids '17 Via Augusta/V dl P. '18/'19 Michael Mary Way
like Linda T - I have never caught anything in a shower - why do so many people take flip-flops etc just for showers?! I can understand wanting a shoe in a river or sea - sharp stones etc/ Is it just for not slipping maybe...?
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
like Linda T - I have never caught anything in a shower - why do so many people take flip-flops etc just for showers?! I can understand wanting a shoe in a river or sea - sharp stones etc/ Is it just for not slipping maybe...?

Athletes foot and people who pee in the shower. I was aware of the first; never thought of the second until someone on this forum suggested it. I still have trouble believing it.
 

aname4me

aname4me
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, (2021)
Water is heavy!
I walked in the Fall. A one Liter bottle is plenty.
I would check my Guide book for water fountains and often leave with it half full.
The best place for a Pilgrim (especially a guy) to store water, is inside you.
Take a big drink before you leave (peeing is easy).

As for shoes...
Keen Men's Targhee II Mid Waterproof Hiking Boot
and
Teva Men's Toachi 2 Outdoor Performance Sandal.
I hike 40% of the Camino in these Sandals!!!
They are great if you get a Toe Blister.

no Crocs or flip-flops
 

William Garza

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, The Jakobsweg
I am always amazed when I see these predictions of impending doom if bladders are not cleaned regularly. It is not my experience that there is an issue if they are in regular use. The few times mine have been a problem has been associated with not drying them out properly before storing them for a longer period. The extent of my regular care is to give mine a rinse with hot water into which I have dissolved a denture tablet about once every six months or so. Other than that, they get a rinse before being refilled from time to time, certainly not daily.
The only maintenance i ever used for my Camel Back 1 litre, was once a week to drop some chlorine bleach into the bag, fill half way and swish thoroughly, then empty through the tube. then leave to air dry upsi.de down. never greened up YUCK! never tasted bad and still reliable after at least 2006, though a new one is in order.
That Said...
My water requirements are extremely high..under load i will finish off 3 gallons, 11.3 Litres of water in around 5 hours, less if under typical S.Texas Sun.
thats approximately 24?lbs of water in half the day, In my past life i was into endurance and strength sports, and my hydration habits never changed. my body req mass quantities to function at peak, and to avoid cramps/
enough of the bellyaching..
everyone is different and i'm glad the forum listed the approx distance between potable water.
at the end of journeys, i would take a carb load drink and then a protein drink to keep me anabolic, and it helped me reduce soreness and rebuilt the ravaged and lactic acid flooded muscles .
water discipline is easy once in the flow and I hope my req drop as i go
Thanks for all the valuable information!
Peace
 
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sriyantra

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances September "2014"
Athletes foot and people who pee in the shower. I was aware of the first; never thought of the second until someone on this forum suggested it. I still have trouble believing it.
like Linda T - I have never caught anything in a shower - why do so many people take flip-flops etc just for showers?! I can understand wanting a shoe in a river or sea - sharp stones etc/ Is it just for not slipping maybe...?

Plantar warts are a real possibility from not wearing shoes in a shower. The following is taken from Wikipedia

A plantar wart, verruca or myrmecia (formally, a verruca plantaris[1]:405) is a wart caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV) occurring on the sole (Latin planta) or toes of the foot.

HPV is spread by direct and indirect contact from an infected host. Avoiding direct contact with infected surfaces such as communal changing rooms and shower floors and benches, avoiding sharing of shoes and socks and avoiding contact with warts on other parts of the body and on the bodies of others may help reduce the spread of infection. Infection is less common among adults than children.[10]

As all warts are contagious, precautions should be taken to avoid spreading them.

For more info have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantar_wart

Plantar warts are painful and very difficult to get rid of. Whenever I went on a school camp we insisted on students wearing some kind of foot covering in the showers.
 

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