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Water bladder or no water bladder; that is my question?

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?
 
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xin loi

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walked May 14, 2014 from St Jean France

starting to walk again August 25, 2016 --SJPDP to Finisterre
I was in the Military in the days of "water discipline". I carried a one liter bottle of water from SJPDP to Santiago and never opened it. I also had an empty Coke bottle (500 ml?) that I filled with water each morning and put in my vest pocket and very rarely emptied it by the end of the day. Walked a lot with an old ex-mortar man who never drank anything during the day while walking from SJPDP to Santiago.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
I was in the Military in the days of "water discipline". I carried a one liter bottle of water from SJPDP to Santiago and never opened it. I also had an empty Coke bottle (500 ml?) that I filled with water each morning and put in my vest pocket and very rarely emptied it by the end of the day. Walked a lot with an old ex-mortar man who never drank anything during the day while walking from SJPDP to Santiago.

Thanks for the comment xin, but it wasn't of much assistance to me.
I wouldn't want to risk dehydration, I know that when I'm in a hot climate and/ or active I do need to drink fluids.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
I was in the Military in the days of "water discipline". I carried a one liter bottle of water from SJPDP to Santiago and never opened it. I also had an empty Coke bottle (500 ml?) that I filled with water each morning and put in my vest pocket and very rarely emptied it by the end of the day. Walked a lot with an old ex-mortar man who never drank anything during the day while walking from SJPDP to Santiago.

I participated in training that included water discipline too. One day we had to evacuate someone due to dehydration. Not a pretty sight. So drink water often.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?

There are a couple of long stretches where 1 liter is not enough. However, usually there are lots of places to fill up. A one liter bladder or canteen should be enough. You can carry a plastic bottle for the days where there are long stretches. Or not. As pointed out by Xin, you don't have to be topped up all the time.

Oh yeah, never drink the last mouth full of water. The psychological effect of having no water will make you focus on your thirst.
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
I carried a 750 ml bottle, that worked just fine, there are for the majority of time places to stop take & take your boots off & have a beverage at a cafe or bar. You will know from your guide book what villages are in route. So you learn to keep a minimum of 500 ml with you. Easily said as there will be times this will not always work. So I recommend with a bladder fill it 3/4 full. Until you get comfortable with what works for you. The big thing is the temp, & the time of year you walk.
In some ways a bladder may be good as it will force you to take your pack off to refill it.
Yep I can type as I think
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
My opinion - knowing everyone is different lest I start a firestorm:

I am a 62 year old female.
I walk the Frances every year and I never take more that an 8 ounce bottle with me.
I've walked 7 times so far.
In May and early June all the fountains are running in my experience.

I fill my bottle up at each fountain along the way.
If you are walking in summer months, you might need to take more, but my bottle and a couple of oranges seem fine for me.
I am not a big water drinker, however.

For me, the bladder is more than I want to deal with because you are getting water from fountains and will have to be sure the bladder stays clean.
On the VDLP, I would take bladder, but not on the Frances.

I would not buy water unless it's raining hard and the creeks are muddy, unless you have a fragile internal system.
The water from the fountains is very good, in my experience.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
I carried a 750 ml bottle, that worked just fine, there are for the majority of time places to stop take & take your boots off & have a beverage at a cafe or bar. You will know from your guide book what villages are in route. So you learn to keep a minimum of 500 ml with you. Easily said as there will be times this will not always work. So I recommend with a bladder fill it 3/4 full. Until you get comfortable with what works for you. The big thing is the temp, & the time of year you walk.
In some ways a bladder may be good as it will force you to take your pack off to refill it.
Yep I can type as I think
Lol, thanks MTtoCamino.
I'm starting the trek on 1st May 2016.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
I much prefer my water bladder to bottles. I use a 2L, but do not necessarily fill it. It weighs very little more than a 1L. I can sip continuously as I walk. I have seen many bottle users who have to stop to reach their water bottle, then strain to return it to a pack pocket.
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
My opinion - knowing everyone is different lest I start a firestorm:

I am a 62 year old female.
I walk the Frances every year and I never take more that an 8 ounce bottle with me.
I've walked 7 times so far.
In May and early June all the fountains are running in my experience.

I fill my bottle up at each fountain along the way.
If you are walking in summer months, you might need to take more, but my bottle and a couple of oranges seem fine for me.
I am not a big water drinker, however.

For me, the bladder is more than I want to deal with because you are getting water from fountains and will have to be sure the bladder stays clean.
On the VDLP, I would take bladder, but not on the Frances.

I would not buy water unless it's raining hard and the creeks are muddy, unless you have a fragile internal system.
The water from the fountains is very good, in my experience.
Like the initial vets who replied, the only reason I went with a bottle was I carried on my web belt for 22 years. But like Anniesantiago, the bottle is very easy to clean & access. But I had to search hard for a bottle holder that would fit on my pack straps by my hip. Many folks get by just fine with bladders. I walked with a German woman who had the same pack I did only 38L using the bladder system. But she was concerned about clean water & purchased bottled water to fill it. I don't think it was due to potable water. I think it was her way of ensuring she kept the bladder clean.

Pete I am curious what pack you end up taking.
Keith
 

waveprof

Enthusiast
Year of past OR future Camino
May-June 2013, Camino Frances
No water bladder. Buy a small bottle and refill it. There will be plenty of chances. You don't need the weight of a bladder.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Like the initial vets who replied, the only reason I went with a bottle was I carried on my web belt for 22 years. But like Anniesantiago, the bottle is very easy to clean & access. But I had to search hard for a bottle holder that would fit on my pack straps by my hip. Many folks get by just fine with bladders. I walked with a German woman who had the same pack I did only 38L using the bladder system. But she was concerned about clean water & purchased bottled water to fill it. I don't think it was due to potable water. I think it was her way of ensuring she kept the bladder clean.

Pete I am curious what pack you end up taking.
Keith

Me to Keith.
As you know i'm possibly getting this tomorrow, however, I had a stark realisation last night that I seriously need to cut weight down.
My current equipment list (packed weight), and my walking weight combined is close to 10kg!!
I'm need to slice 2kg off of this if possible. Hence my thoughts of ditching a 2L bladder as the weight when full is over a kilo. Don't need to increase walking weight.
And the point raised about keeping the bladder clean is a very good point. I'm up for washing clothes each night, but don't want to be concerned whether i'm cleaning the bladder enough.
I think I might ditch the bladder and get well hydrated at breakfast, carry a 500ml bottle and buy as I need enroute, and top ups at fountains.
Any long stages i'll pack an extra bottle of water and check at what distance the next chance to refill is.

Keith i'll let you know what pack I buy.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I will tell you that Joe, my walking partner, does love and carry his water bladder.
So I think bladders vs bottles are much like shoes vs boots.
It's just a matter of personal preference.
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
Just finished hiking across England a few days ago and we all used 2 liter water bladders in our packs. The distances between available water sources along the Hadrian's Wall national trail can sometimes be long. On 1 day 2 of us ran our bladders dry. BUT, I seriously doubt that there is a need for a bladder on the Camino Frances due to the reported abundance of refill points so it would be a lot lighter to carry a commercial 1 liter bottle.

If you like the convenience of sipping through a tube while walking then buy a bottle tube. There are many styles/brands. Here is just one option to consider => http://sourceoutdoor.com/en/bottles/22-convertube-hydration-system.html
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Me to Keith.
As you know i'm possibly getting this tomorrow, however, I had a stark realisation last night that I seriously need to cut weight down.
My current equipment list (packed weight), and my walking weight combined is close to 10kg!!
I'm need to slice 2kg off of this if possible. Hence my thoughts of ditching a 2L bladder as the weight when full is over a kilo. Don't need to increase walking weight.
And the point raised about keeping the bladder clean is a very good point. I'm up for washing clothes each night, but don't want to be concerned whether i'm cleaning the bladder enough.
I think I might ditch the bladder and get well hydrated at breakfast, carry a 500ml bottle and buy as I need enroute, and top ups at fountains.
Any long stages i'll pack an extra bottle of water and check at what distance the next chance to refill is.

Keith i'll let you know what pack I buy.

For your situation after you decide on the pack & load it I would put your list on here. it might be kind of painfull to get all us arm chair opinions. Yet there are some folks who really go lean. May not be the most comfortable but it may help make your walk doable. ( yep that doesn't look like a word)
 

jsalt

Jill
Year of past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I carry 2 x 500ml plastic bottles, one full, the other empty except on long dry stretches. I don’t drink a lot of water, and I’ve learnt that if I’m thirsty it probably means I could do with a short rest as well, so I LIKE having to take my pack off to get at my water bottle, because at the same time I sit down and take a 5 minute rest. The empty 500ml bottle is also useful for decanting any leftover vino tinto from the evening before, and goes great with a picnic lunch :)
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
Doesn't the water weigh the same when put into bottles?
Yes, the WATER weighs the same, but the water bladder & hose weigh a lot more than the retail bottles that are sold filled with water.

Its the weight of the CONTAINER that is different.
 
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PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Doesn't the water weigh the same when put into bottles?

My point was whether to carry a 2L bladder and fill it, or only take a water bottle and stop off more etc.
Plenty of people in both camps it would seem.
No wrong or right way I guess.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
For your situation after you decide on the pack & load it I would put your list on here. it might be kind of painfull to get all us arm chair opinions. Yet there are some folks who really go lean. May not be the most comfortable but it may help make your walk doable. ( yep that doesn't look like a word)

I already have a list, and was thinking of starting a new thread and posting my equipment list lol
 

Griffin57

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
October 2013 StJPdP to Burgos
September 2014 Burgos to SdC
Setember 2015 StJPdP to Burgos
Hi Pete, I was a bladder sceptic but am now a firm convert! The first part/two weeks of my camino were hotter than I expected in September 2013 and I definitely got dehydrated, the masseur in Los Arcos told me he could tell by my muscles I was underhydrated and should aim for 3 litres a day. I didn't always manage but felt better when I did drink more, this is just water in addition to other fluids. Many people do not need this much but it seems that I do.
So the second part of my trip in 2014 I took a bladder and would now never go back, I love the ease of it and drink loads more, still carry a small bottle for juice etc. Don't forget you don't always have to carry 2 full litres just because that's your capacity. Will be using my Osprey bladder to its full advantage again this year.
I think as with many subjects you may find as many answers as there are pilgrims.

Buen Camino
Sarah
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Hi Pete, I was a bladder sceptic but am now a firm convert! The first part/two weeks of my camino were hotter than I expected in September 2013 and I definitely got dehydrated, the masseur in Los Arcos told me he could tell by my muscles I was underhydrated and should aim for 3 litres a day. I didn't always manage but felt better when I did drink more, this is just water in addition to other fluids. Many people do not need this much but it seems that I do.
So the second part of my trip in 2014 I took a bladder and would now never go back, I love the ease of it and drink loads more, still carry a small bottle for juice etc. Don't forget you don't always have to carry 2 full litres just because that's your capacity. Will be using my Osprey bladder to its full advantage again this year.
I think as with many subjects you may find as many answers as there are pilgrims.

Buen Camino
Sarah

Hi Sarah

You're right that different people need different amounts.
What I know about daily fluid intake is this;
For each kilo of body weight, 30ml of fluid is required each day.
I'm 80 kg x 30ml = 2.4 litres.
This fluid intake can be a combination of liquid and food, this can include tea and coffee (they aren't diuretics, they're stimulants).
However, this daily fluid intake is assuming your environment is at room temperature and you are at rest (not active).

So walking the Camino most people would need to increase their daily intake, and in summer; considerably more.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Hi Pete, I was a bladder sceptic but am now a firm convert! The first part/two weeks of my camino were hotter than I expected in September 2013 and I definitely got dehydrated, the masseur in Los Arcos told me he could tell by my muscles I was underhydrated and should aim for 3 litres a day. I didn't always manage but felt better when I did drink more, this is just water in addition to other fluids. Many people do not need this much but it seems that I do.
So the second part of my trip in 2014 I took a bladder and would now never go back, I love the ease of it and drink loads more, still carry a small bottle for juice etc. Don't forget you don't always have to carry 2 full litres just because that's your capacity. Will be using my Osprey bladder to its full advantage again this year.
I think as with many subjects you may find as many answers as there are pilgrims.

Buen Camino
Sarah
For May I think a bladder no larger than 1000ml would be the most you would need other wise you are packing more weight than needed. One other issue is if you store the bladder inside the pack it is hard to know unless you pull it out how much is left. On my pack to get it back in is not easy especially after refilling it. That is another reason I chose the bottle over the bladder. But if I had walked in late June thru Mid September I might have brought & filled both bladder & bottle. As the heavy bladder when stored as designed rides so the weight is distributed perfectly on the back.
 
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MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
I carry 2 x 500ml plastic bottles, one full, the other empty except on long dry stretches. I don’t drink a lot of water, and I’ve learnt that if I’m thirsty it probably means I could do with a short rest as well, so I LIKE having to take my pack off to get at my water bottle, because at the same time I sit down and take a 5 minute rest. The empty 500ml bottle is also useful for decanting any leftover vino tinto from the evening before, and goes great with a picnic lunch :)
I am glad to hear someone else packed a bottle of wine for there lunch?
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
I am glad to hear someone else packed a bottle of wine for there lunch?

Hi Keith, I;ve just published my pack list on a new thread.
Be brutal and tell me what you think?
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Hi Keith, I;ve just published my pack list on a new thread.
Be brutal and tell me what you think?
I will respond I copied it, your metric weights I will make a spreadsheet & convert so I know what you have.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CFx2, CPx1
Hi Pete
My progression along the water trail is as follows.
Started Caminoing with a 2 litre bladder.
Intensely disliked what seemed like an extra 2 ks on my back each morning.
Intensely disliked the performance involved in removing, rinsing, refilling and replacing each morning - I'm grumpy in the morning.
Met a German lass who had walked from Munich with 2 standard 600ml bottles in the 'cargo pockets' of her trousers.
She converted me. It took about half an hour to get used to the feel of them.

I also drink half a little of water first thing every morning to set myself up for the day.
Never had a problem with quantity.
Love not having that 2 kilos on my back.
Regds
Gerard
 

jpn321

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (May - June 2015)
Currently on the Camino Frances and using the Smartube system and loving it . Search on this site as someone else has a link to it . It is really somewhere between bottles and bladders. It is really a long plastic drinking straw with adapters for standard bottles ( Nalgene, regular commercial bottles, etc). It weighs next to nothing.
My daily routine is to get a 1.5L bottle of water from a tienda in the morning, fill my 1 L Nalgene which I drink from using the Smartube and put the large bottle in my other pack pocket and use it to fill up the Nalgene during breaks. You can also just use the commercial bottle (have an adapter to fit) and fill it up at fuentes along the way.
I HATE having to take off my pack to get a drink and am walking alone so no one to fish a bottle out of my pack for me. Also somewhat turned off by descriptions of full-size bladders (cleaning procedures, ?fungus, etc)
Give it a look. I think I got mine on Amazon.
 
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So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.

If you are doing the VDLP be aware that on many days there is no water to be had en route. From mid-September last year I carried 3L per day, cutting down only when we got to Galicia. But I have severe migraine and cramps and the weather was gorgeous almost the entire way.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Currently on the Camino Frances and using the Smartube system and loving it . Search on this site as someone else has a link to it . It is really somewhere between bottles and bladders. It is really a long plastic drinking straw with adapters for standard bottles ( Nalgene, regular commercial bottles, etc). It weighs next to nothing.
My daily routine is to get a 1.5L bottle of water from a tienda in the morning, fill my 1 L Nalgene which I drink from using the Smartube and put the large bottle in my other pack pocket and use it to fill up the Nalgene during breaks. You can also just use the commercial bottle (have an adapter to fit) and fill it up at fuentes along the way.
I HATE having to take off my pack to get a drink and am walking alone so no one to fish a bottle out of my pack for me. Also somewhat turned off by descriptions of full-size bladders (cleaning procedures, ?fungus, etc)
Give it a look. I think I got mine on Amazon.

That's a smart idea lol. Just looked at it on Amazon. I think that's the way forward, thank you, and enjoy the rest of your walk.
 

PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Currently on the Camino Frances and using the Smartube system and loving it . Search on this site as someone else has a link to it . It is really somewhere between bottles and bladders. It is really a long plastic drinking straw with adapters for standard bottles ( Nalgene, regular commercial bottles, etc). It weighs next to nothing.
My daily routine is to get a 1.5L bottle of water from a tienda in the morning, fill my 1 L Nalgene which I drink from using the Smartube and put the large bottle in my other pack pocket and use it to fill up the Nalgene during breaks. You can also just use the commercial bottle (have an adapter to fit) and fill it up at fuentes along the way.
I HATE having to take off my pack to get a drink and am walking alone so no one to fish a bottle out of my pack for me. Also somewhat turned off by descriptions of full-size bladders (cleaning procedures, ?fungus, etc)
Give it a look. I think I got mine on Amazon.

By the way, im walking the Camino next May/ June, so whilst there are variables, I would like to read any posts from you. It may help with tips and hints for when I do my walk same time next year.
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
... On my pack to get it back in is not easy especially after refilling it. That is another reason I chose the bottle over the bladder. But if I had walked in late June thru Mid September I might have brought & filled both bladder & bottle. As the heavy bladder when stored as designed rides so the weight is distributed perfectly on the back.
Apparently it is a secret among Camino walkers while it is pretty much common knowledge among American backpackers, but you can refill your bladder while it is still INSIDE your pack.

Just use a simple piece of 1/4" I.D. hose, a nozzle adapter, and install a "CamelBak Filter Adapter" onto your drinking hose. The Filter Adapter allows you to 'pop' off the bite valve, you then snap in the fitting from the filter adapter (which is attached to your hose) and stick the other end up to a faucet, turn on the faucet and the water will flow into your bladder. The whole assembly only weighs a couple ounces and you can make the hose length as long as you want or need. I use about 32" of hose.

No need to remove the bladder from your pack!

Just don't over-fill your bladder and pop it while its inside the loaded backpack :eek:




Currently on the Camino Frances and using the Smartube system and loving it . . .
That is pretty much the same thing that I provided a link for earlier in this thread. There are several different brands of these things, they basically turn just about any bottle into a bladder.

Here is a link to the SMART TUBE from Amazon.Com => http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GM6LWS/?tag=


Here is a YouTube of Convertube system >>>
 
Last edited:

Ian Afloat

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF July 25th 2017 from SJPDP
Me to Keith.
As you know i'm possibly getting this tomorrow, however, I had a stark realisation last night that I seriously need to cut weight down.
My current equipment list (packed weight), and my walking weight combined is close to 10kg!!
I'm need to slice 2kg off of this if possible. Hence my thoughts of ditching a 2L bladder as the weight when full is over a kilo. Don't need to increase walking weight.
And the point raised about keeping the bladder clean is a very good point. I'm up for washing clothes each night, but don't want to be concerned whether i'm cleaning the bladder enough.
I think I might ditch the bladder and get well hydrated at breakfast, carry a 500ml bottle and buy as I need enroute, and top ups at fountains.
Any long stages i'll pack an extra bottle of water and check at what distance the next chance to refill is.

Keith i'll let you know what pack I buy.
Where are you getting this magic water from that only weighs 500g/litre?
A full up 2 litre bladder would weigh over 2 litres, seeing as water weighs 1kg per litre.
 
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PeteT70

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk the Camino from St.-Jean-Pied-de-Port to Santiago de Compostela May - June 2016.
Where are you getting this magic water from that only weighs 500g/litre?
A full up 2 litre bladder would weigh over 2 litres, seeing as water weighs 1kg per litre.
Either I wrote it wrong, or you read it wrong lol.
500ml of water = 490g
 

Canucks

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino frances, SJPDP to Santiago (2013), Le Puy to SJPDP (2014), Porto to Santiago (2019)
You said on two separate occasions that your two liter pack would weigh over 1 kg when full.....it will weigh over 2 kg incl the weight of the container. Water is exactly 1kg per liter.....I was wondering how long before someone noticed!

We took a 2l camelback and usually filled it about half full except on really hot days. If you are starting in may you may want to have the ability to carry more than a liter.
However, the advice about lots of places to refill or buy something is accurate on the Frances. On Le Puy, there were much less options along the way.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Apparently it is a secret among Camino walkers while it is pretty much common knowledge among American backpackers, but you can refill your bladder while it is still INSIDE your pack.

Just use a simple piece of 1/4" I.D. hose, a nozzle adapter, and install a "CamelBak Filter Adapter" onto your drinking hose. The Filter Adapter allows you to 'pop' off the bite valve, you then snap in the fitting from the filter adapter (which is attached to your hose) and stick the other end up to a faucet, turn on the faucet and the water will flow into your bladder. The whole assembly only weighs a couple ounces and you can make the hose length as long as you want or need. I use about 32" of hose.

No need to remove the bladder from your pack!

Just don't over-fill your bladder and pop it while its inside the loaded backpack :eek:





That is pretty much the same thing that I provided a link for earlier in this thread. There are several different brands of these things, they basically turn just about any bottle into a bladder.

Here is a link to the SMART TUBE from Amazon.Com => http://www.amazon.com/dp/B000GM6LWS/?tag=


Here is a YouTube of Convertube system >>>

Melensdad I have a filter adapter I had no idea you could put it under a faucet to fill as in the backcountry there arn't any faucets... But good to know.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I was in the Military in the days of "water discipline". I carried a one liter bottle of water from SJPDP to Santiago and never opened it. I also had an empty Coke bottle (500 ml?) that I filled with water each morning and put in my vest pocket and very rarely emptied it by the end of the day. Walked a lot with an old ex-mortar man who never drank anything during the day while walking from SJPDP to Santiago.
Well, my days in the military we were told to drink a lot of water and we did.
Drinking less than 1/2 liter of water a day while walking the Camino Frances, especially during the summer is not recommended and honestly there is no logical reason not to drink lots of water. There are potable water fountains all along the way as well as the ability to refill your water bottles at cafes, etc. I averaged about 20-25 kilometers a day on both my Caminos and on an average day probably drank 4-5 liters of water. I drink probably 1/2 gallon a day when not walking the Camino. Besides hydration, water keeps your joints healthy, flushes toxins, and aids in digestion. If your not peeing often and if your urine is not clear, you are dehydrated.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?
I don't like hydration/water bladders and didn't use them on either Camino. I carried two 1/2 liter water bottles with me. The only days I carried a third was the first day over the Pyrenees out of St. Jean and the day out of Burgos across that section of the meseta. Otherwise the two bottles worked perfectly. I used the same two bottles the entire way. Just kept refilling them (I try to contribute as little as possible to the zillions of them discarded in the world).
I drank two bottles (1 liter) of water in the morning before I even started walking. Then I drank at least one bottle at every fountain and refilled it.
The bladder takes up room and weight. The plastic bottles were light. Rode in the pack's side pockets and were put in a recycle bin in Santiago.
cheers
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I'm not sure how much value there is in me engaging in this discussion again, given that so far nothing new has emerged that hasn't been discussed recently for those with the inclination to search for it.

What I would observe is that if @PeteT70's target bare pack weight is 8kg based on that being 10% of his body mass, then this target would not normally include consumables such as water and food. It should include the weight of any container(s) but the choice of how much they contain at the start of each day is a decision that can be made at the time.

I use a 2 li bladder, and fill it each morning and refill it around lunchtime. I am not sure that is always enough to avoid the early signs of dehydration, particularly when I raise a sweat walking on a hot day.
 

gidivet

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPP to SdC - April - June 2014
Le Puy to Conques May 2016
Multiple CF sections since 2014
Lots of good advice already in this discussion. Choice of water container is definitely very personal.

I like using a water bladder for various reasons:
- With my pack I can't reach water bottles in the side pockets.
- I don't like bottles dangling from the belt or weighing down pockets.
- I like taking frequent small sips of water.

If you decide to go with a water bladder consider the following:
- A wide mouth is easier to fill then a small screw cap, and the bag is easier to clean.
- Technology has made some bags more mould resistant.
- If your water bladder is mounted on the outside of the pack it is easier to fill during the day.
- Mine is fitted between the harness and the pack, so almost impossible to fill when pack is loaded.

I have been using a "Source Widepac", so I can report that it has never leaked, either through the top or through the bite valve. It has been extremely easy to clean and has never grown any mould, despite my less than optimal storing technique on more than one occasion.

I fill up my water bag in the evenings, then pack my bag ready for the next morning.
You can half lift the bag out of its compartment and fill it up from the tap or a bottle.
I carry about 1.5 litre water with me on the average 25 km section and try to drink plenty from other sources e.g. when walking past water fountains and cafés.

http://www.source-hydration.co.uk
 
Last edited:

Rambler

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
I have used this system for both Caminos and been very happy:
1. water bottle holder-
32oz-carrier.jpg

I use a bottle holder similar to the picture above that I have on my pack belt. It sits to the side of my hip and is VERY easy to access and leads to me drinking plenty.
th

2. 1 liter Sport drink bottle: I purchase a 1L Powerade or Gatorade bottle the week before leaving for the camino. drink it during a practice hike, wash and clean, remove the label, stick empty in my pack, and use it for the entire trip. This is substantially lighter than a bladder or Nalgene bottle and can easily be replaced along the Camino. I do wash it everyday at the alberge, but would suggest buying another every few days if you are concerned about germs.
For me, 1L refilled along the way worked fine and I was never without water. But you could easily add another bottle in areas where you are concerned and then throw it away when not needed.
PROS:
  • Lightest weight water carry I could devise
  • Easily accessible
  • Easily replaceable if leaking or dirty
  • Easily cleaned
  • Inexpensive
  • Bottle will not leak in your pack
CONS:
  • Bottle holder can get dirty if you set your pack in dirt when you stop
  • Bottle holder works best if it is close to the same size as the bottle (a .5L bottle will move around more as you walk
Rambler
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
Melensdad I have a filter adapter I had no idea you could put it under a faucet to fill as in the backcountry there arn't any faucets... But good to know.
You don't put the filter adapter under the faucet, you attach a hose to the filter adapter and then put the other end of the hose up to a faucet.

I can't begin to count the number of times I've used this thing, and I've used it with at least 3 different backpacks.

It only cost a couple dollars to make (I've seen them for sale on Ebay too) and makes refilling fast and convenient. Took all of 5 minutes to make it. image.jpg
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
It's prob. too late for me to change anything for this coming camino but could you tell me: does the bladder keep the water cooler than in a bottle? Thanks. That would be a big plus for me.
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
It's prob. too late for me to change anything for this coming camino but could you tell me: does the bladder keep the water cooler than in a bottle? Thanks. That would be a big plus for me.
The water in the bladder may be very slightly insulated by the clothing that is in your pack, but in real terms, after an hour or 2 on the trail the water in the bladder is going to be pretty much the same temperature as the ambient air temperature.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Thanks for that quick response Melensdad.
I was rather hoping but I guess it makes sense...
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
The water in the bladder may be very slightly insulated by the clothing that is in your pack, but in real terms, after an hour or 2 on the trail the water in the bladder is going to be pretty much the same temperature as the ambient air temperature.
I have found the insulating effect of the pack, clothing etc more significant that that, particularly in very hot or very cold conditions. It might also depend upon whether a bottle is kept in an insulating sleeve. It might be that a bottle carried on the outside of a pack or on a belt is exposed to the radiant heat of the sun as well as the convective effects of air circulation, and heats up more because of this.
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
I have found the insulating effect of the pack, clothing etc more significant that that, particularly in very hot or very cold conditions. It might also depend upon whether a bottle is kept in an insulating sleeve. It might be that a bottle carried on the outside of a pack or on a belt is exposed to the radiant heat of the sun as well as the convective effects of air circulation, and heats up more because of this.
I'd say we are in rough agreement.

Probably will also depend upon the construction of the backpack. My last 2 packs have/had the bladder against a thin/rigid frame-sheet; that only allowed insulation from the clothing side of the pack because the frame-sheet offer essentially no insulation.

A bottle in a pocket, on the "shade side" of the pack, doesn't seem to get to ambient temperature much faster than a bladder.

A bottle on the "sun side" of the pack will heat up quickly.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
A bottle on the "sun side" of the pack will heat up quickly.
Yes. The same thing happens to the tube. If, after drinking, the water in the tube is no blown back, it will heat up. I know that there are insulating sleeves available that address this or the water in the tube freezing in very cold conditions.
 

jeffnd

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
March/April 2014
It's prob. too late for me to change anything for this coming camino but could you tell me: does the bladder keep the water cooler than in a bottle? Thanks. That would be a big plus for me.

I found that on warmer days, the water that was in the tube would feel hot in my mouth. I'd usually spit that first mouthful out. The water that then came from the bladder would feel much cooler.

The effect was the opposite on cold and cloudy days. They do make insulated tubes though.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
It is amazing how detailed this forum is, but it is really a good idea with some time to simply do some walking & test all of these ideas for yourself. It is like packing your backpack none of us will do it the same way, it just has to work for you.
What I want to know is has anyone figured out how to get 1906 Cervaca in the U.S. ? That is a liquid...
 

Melensdad

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 SJPdP to Santiago, Finisterre. Hadrian's Way, 2015. Sections of the AT + National & State Park trails.
What I want to know is has anyone figured out how to get 1906 Cervaca in the U.S. ? That is a liquid...
Easy enough but you need to pack it into your "check through" luggage.

I've brought liquid refreshments back from foreign lands many times ... checked through my luggage.

If you don't have check through bags then you may want to consider buying a cheap/used suitcase at a secondhand store (Oxfam or similar) and load it with your bounty, then check it through.
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
:) True the 1906 will just have to wait until 2025 when I can return with my wife.
 
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Costas

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Plan to walk in 2015
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?
My water bladder was useless. The water tasted of plastic, and the bulk was a hindrance. My recommendation, don't take a water bladder, better to carry small bottle of water on the side of your pack.
 

filly

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?
 

filly

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
The polite terminology is a generic term.... Camelback!

The answer is go for the bigger one. They are lifesavers. When it is really hot and there is a fridge and even better freezer, I fill it the night before and cool it or freeze it. I then get a cool back and cold water in sips through most of the day. It regulates your drinking and means you do not need to stop and pull bottles out etc. Invaluable!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
The polite terminology is a generic term.... Camelback!
I am not sure I understand what point you are trying to make here. Polite terminology for what? Camelback is a trade name for a water bladder, and there is no particular reason that I can see not to call it a water bladder if one wants to avoid using a trade name. It's not like the various names used for waist bags, one of which is offensive to about half the forum members, and the other offends the other halfo_O
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
CamelBak Products, LLC is an outdoors equipment company based in Petaluma, California, best known for its hydration products, such as hydration packs and water bottles.

No "c"!!! They seem to prefer "hydration pack" to bladder. :)

They are not squeamish here: http://www.outdoorgearlab.com/Hydration-Bladder-Reviews
I admit that I had always thought of the hydration pack as the small, specialist pack in which one carried one's water bladder. I must remember to omit the 'c' next time. Thank you for pointing that out.
 

Ikenuma

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Oct (2015) by bike
Thanks for the comment xin, but it wasn't of much assistance to me.
I wouldn't want to risk dehydration, I know that when I'm in a hot climate and/ or active I do need to drink fluids.
1 litre of water weighs 1 kilo. That is a given. So carry 2 kilos of water. You can easily get used to that extra weight if you are relatively fit; if not that fit, should you even consider doing the Camino? Rhetorical question perhaps. However, bladder wins over bottles every time. On many long distance walks done throughout UK and France, of which I was part, those that used bottles ended up getting ill, those using bladders didn't. Odd maybe but other long distance hikers & cyclists of my acquaintance over many years agree. I can only draw the conclusion that one tends to wash bladders and tubes really well, and they are often in packs out of sun, bottles often in sun, less well washed and open to dust, germs etc., hope that helps and good luck.
 

Gerard Hazelebach

Gerard Hazelebach
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (SJPdP - Santiago) September 2014
"The Peace Walk” (Vienna - Venice) August 2015
Currently putting the equipment list together for my Camino.
I've even found the actual weights to all of the products that I want to pack, however, the pack weight came out as 8.9kg including the pack.
So im looking at which areas to scale back on, or to forget about completely.
For now, forget all other equipment, im just focussing on water in this thread.

So I get to the water bladder on my list, and im wonder whether it's worth taking one.
The 2L water bladder weighs 150g + 980g of water at capacity, this is more than a kilo in addition to the rest of my pack.
So im thinking, do I really need one?
Should I take a 1L version instead?
Or, fill up on fluids at breakfast, and just take a 500ml water bottle instead, and buy bottles of 500ml water along the way?
I reckon over the course of an average day walking one stage to another I'd want to drink about 2 litres.

Any thoughts or ideas would be welcomed on the water issue?
Hi there, in my opinion you defenitly don't need a bladder of any kind. If you have a 500 ml bottle somewhere, there are more then enough places where you can fill it up ( do it every time there is an opportunity)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Hi there, in my opinion you defenitly don't need a bladder of any kind. If you have a 500 ml bottle somewhere, there are more then enough places where you can fill it up ( do it every time there is an opportunity)
I would be very cautious about taking so little water, particularly where there are longer distances between towns. I won't repeat the analysis here, but over 40% of places are over an hour away from the previous location. It might be that 500 ml is enough in many cases, but it is unlikely to be enough for the longer legs. You can read the analysis here.
 
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