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Luggage Transfer Correos

Water bottle adapter

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pjacobi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
I use Camelbak Eddy bottle with Camelbak Hand-free adapter. I also carry a spare Eddy bottle, then swap when the hands-free bottle is empty.

The bottle is easier to clean then the plastic bag.


-Paul
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I use Camelbak Eddy bottle with Camelbak Hand-free adapter. I also carry a spare Eddy bottle, then swap when the hands-free bottle is empty.

The bottle is easier to clean then the plastic bag.


-Paul
A lot of folks have been told the similar things. . . that bottles are more sanitary and easier to clean. The information gets handed down as a type of common knowledge, and is taken for granted.

The choice of what containers are used to carry water is a personal preference based on any number of criteria. For users to be able to consider all options, safety concerns or usability concerns based on myth and incorrect information need to be accurate. Below is some information for consideration that I had written and posted before.
---------------------------------------
Full disclosure. . . After using any number of water carrying systems and container, my personal preference Platypus Big Zip hydration reservoirs.

This post is written to dispel myths which are commonly used to try and claim that reservoirs are either less sanitary to use, or are less easy to use than bottles.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am doing this to preempt those who mistakenly claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go based on THEIR personal preferences.

In other words, a personal choice cannot be reasonably argued with, or disputed. But if incorrect facts are used to make such choices, then those things which are not correct can reasonably be discussed or addressed.

1. Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through use that keeps things fresh. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into either storage container.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and not properly washed out prior to long term storage..

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference, not an issue of something being 'better'. Access water bottles is not an issue of usability for bottle users.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 ounces. The equivalent in bottles is around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration, for me, with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is capacity and weight.

No, one does not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. So regardless of container used, water weight is related to the individual's decision about how much to carry, and NOT on a container's capacity.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory.

For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I leave off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.

For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So if I decide to, say, carry 1.5 liters on a longer stretch between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle and keeping the bottle partially collapsed. That also assures me that I do not need to visualize the amount in the reservoir to be assured of adequate water. :)

The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are other myths, but those are the major ones. :)


 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Just browsing the hiking section in our local Decathlon when I came across this drinking tube kit. It probably only fits their own bottles but they do come in different capacities.View attachment 65620
I would bet that the lid will match other wide mouth bottles, too. I bet it was a pretty inexpensive item to purchase.

Also, magnetic clip tube holders, like the one linked below (there are any number of models), work quite well in managing a flopping drinking tube :)

 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Just browsing the hiking section in our local Decathlon when I came across this drinking tube kit. It probably only fits their own bottles but they do come in different capacities.View attachment 65620
Oh excellent - I have the Quecha 100 Tritan bottle (very rugged) and none of my SmarTube caps fit it. Thanks for the tip!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I would bet that the lid will match other wide mouth bottles, too. I bet it was a pretty inexpensive item to purchase.

Also, magnetic clip tube holders, like the one linked below (there are any number of models), work quite well in managing a flopping drinking tube :)

It's an odd sized bottle neck - 35mm internal diameter 39mm external diameter and 44mm over the thickness of the threads. Doesn't match any of the SmarTube caps I've got. The bottles (made in Portugal) are very strong and incredibly cheap even for Decathlon. I've the 0.8l plastic one - about 27 fl.oz.
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Somport to Finisterre Jul-Aug 2018
I bought the bluedesert SmarTube (or the predecessor). I like the idea of using 'any' standard 0,5ltr-bottle with the drinking system and would buy it again.
But... at the beginning the water tasted like plastic when I used the drinking system. So I was happy that I bought it months before my camino.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
Just browsing the hiking section in our local Decathlon when I came across this drinking tube kit. It probably only fits their own bottles but they do come in different capacities.View attachment 65620
Drinking tubes are available for standard water bottles and come with two size adaptors, they are readily available online on ebay and other sites. These are what I use all the time.
0

 

steve 217

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances planning via del la plata
Have to say as. Someone who has used a bldder and bottles , i hate the badder whatever i do i cant get rid of the plastic taste lemon juice freezing sterilising ive tried it all . Any suggestions ? I always default to cycling bottles .
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Have to say as. Someone who has used a bldder and bottles , i hate the badder whatever i do i cant get rid of the plastic taste lemon juice freezing sterilising ive tried it all . Any suggestions ? I always default to cycling bottles .
I think that it depends on the manufacturer/quality of the bladder. I have one from Source, and I've never had a plastic taste from it.

 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Have to say as. Someone who has used a bldder and bottles , i hate the badder whatever i do i cant get rid of the plastic taste lemon juice freezing sterilising ive tried it all . Any suggestions ? I always default to cycling bottles .
I agree with trecile. There are a lot of water reservoir manufacturers and brands, and the materials that are used are NOT the same in either quality or durability. If you are really interested, send me a PM and I can provide some recommendations for you to consider.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
I bought the bluedesert SmarTube (or the predecessor). I like the idea of using 'any' standard 0,5ltr-bottle with the drinking system and would buy it again.
Like several others above...I have been using the Bluedesert SmarTube since about 2016..It comes with several caps to be used with various bottle sizes. I have used them all and never have a problem fitting a bottle on the Camino.
One distinct advantage is the ability to use it with a bottle in my small day pack when not on the camino.

 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.
I clean my water bladder when I come home from the Camino. I always use plain water in it, and have never had a problem, even after continuously using it for over 6 weeks. The key is that I was continuously using it and refilling with fresh water.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I use Camelbak Eddy bottle with Camelbak Hand-free adapter. I also carry a spare Eddy bottle, then swap when the hands-free bottle is empty.

The bottle is easier to clean then the plastic bag.


-Paul
I did the same thing. Camelbak bottles, removed sippers, attached Camelbak hose. Switched bottles when empty.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
A lot of folks have been told the similar things. . . that bottles are more sanitary and easier to clean. The information gets handed down as a type of common knowledge, and is taken for granted.

The choice of what containers are used to carry water is a personal preference based on any number of criteria. For users to be able to consider all options, safety concerns or usability concerns based on myth and incorrect information need to be accurate. Below is some information for consideration that I had written and posted before.
---------------------------------------
Full disclosure. . . After using any number of water carrying systems and container, my personal preference Platypus Big Zip hydration reservoirs.

This post is written to dispel myths which are commonly used to try and claim that reservoirs are either less sanitary to use, or are less easy to use than bottles.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am doing this to preempt those who mistakenly claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go based on THEIR personal preferences.

In other words, a personal choice cannot be reasonably argued with, or disputed. But if incorrect facts are used to make such choices, then those things which are not correct can reasonably be discussed or addressed.

1. Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through use that keeps things fresh. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into either storage container.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and not properly washed out prior to long term storage..

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference, not an issue of something being 'better'. Access water bottles is not an issue of usability for bottle users.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 ounces. The equivalent in bottles is around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration, for me, with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is capacity and weight.

No, one does not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. So regardless of container used, water weight is related to the individual's decision about how much to carry, and NOT on a container's capacity.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory.

For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I leave off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.

For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So if I decide to, say, carry 1.5 liters on a longer stretch between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle and keeping the bottle partially collapsed. That also assures me that I do not need to visualize the amount in the reservoir to be assured of adequate water. :)

The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are other myths, but those are the major ones. :)


I think you were the Information Superhighway that Al Gore once spoke of.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
A lot of folks have been told the similar things. . . that bottles are more sanitary and easier to clean. The information gets handed down as a type of common knowledge, and is taken for granted.

The choice of what containers are used to carry water is a personal preference based on any number of criteria. For users to be able to consider all options, safety concerns or usability concerns based on myth and incorrect information need to be accurate. Below is some information for consideration that I had written and posted before.
---------------------------------------
Full disclosure. . . After using any number of water carrying systems and container, my personal preference Platypus Big Zip hydration reservoirs.

This post is written to dispel myths which are commonly used to try and claim that reservoirs are either less sanitary to use, or are less easy to use than bottles.

I'm NOT writing this post to suggest that I and others who prefer reservoirs are making the best and most superior choice; I am doing this to preempt those who mistakenly claim that using hydration reservoirs is the WRONG way to go based on THEIR personal preferences.

In other words, a personal choice cannot be reasonably argued with, or disputed. But if incorrect facts are used to make such choices, then those things which are not correct can reasonably be discussed or addressed.

1. Sanitation. Bottles have no advantage. Reservoirs stay as sanitary. They do not require cleaning every day, nor do they need to be dried.

As with plumbing, it is the change of water and water flow through use that keeps things fresh. With normal use, both bladders and bottles are constantly refilled and emptied That keeps them sanitary UNLESS contaminated water is introduced, or other fluids with sugars (juices, energy drinks, soda pop, etc) are put into either storage container.

While working for the local public health district, I did a review of the literature, which I again did in 2016. Comparisons of bacterial contamination levels between bottles and hydration bladders were indistinguishable -- both had equally low rates of bacterial contamination. And both were at about equal risk for developing significant levels of bacteria and mold if not cleaned and dried properly prior to storage. In the last few years, the hydration reservoirs have become more modular in nature and have wider openings to access the water compartments, making it much easier to clean and prepare for storage than previous generations of the product.

One study, from 2009:
https://www.wemjournal.org/article/S1080-6032(09)70419-3/fulltext

When it is time to store bottles or bladders away for the season, they can be sanitized if desired with a bit of bleach added to the final rinse water during cleaning. It is not necessary, but there is no harm in doing so. Then they can be rinsed out and be allowed to dry.

Molds and other nasty things occur if either container is stored with water over a period of time, or have contained other fluids which might have sugars and not properly washed out prior to long term storage..

2. Ease of Use. I find it personally easier to raise the mouth tube on my shoulder strap to drink from. I do not like to reach around to a side pocket, or even need to take off my pack to do so. I definitely do NOT like stuff hanging on my shoulder straps like bottles of water.

Again, this is personal preference, not an issue of something being 'better'. Access water bottles is not an issue of usability for bottle users.

3. Weight. Here is where two major claims are made, one is correct and the other is not.

A typical empty 2 liter reservoir weighs around 4 ounces. The equivalent in bottles is around 1.5 to 3 ounces. Depending on bottle material used, though, bottles can weigh up to 8 ounces.

So while it is correct that bottles can weigh less, it is not a significant issue of consideration, for me, with overall backpack weight.

The other issue is capacity and weight.

No, one does not have to fill a reservoir to the tippy top. I will carry as much water as I need to carry from water source to water source. So regardless of container used, water weight is related to the individual's decision about how much to carry, and NOT on a container's capacity.

4. Refills. This is actually a subheading under 'ease of use', but it is frequently pointed to as why bottles are better than reservoirs.

I can refill my reservoir without even removing my backpack. One does not need to pull a reservoir out of the pack. It is a matter of using a quick disconnect system which is a simple and cheap add on accessory.

For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I leave off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.

For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket.

Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. So if I decide to, say, carry 1.5 liters on a longer stretch between water resupply points, I will fill the reservoir with 1 liter, and then carry 1/2 liter in the bottle and keeping the bottle partially collapsed. That also assures me that I do not need to visualize the amount in the reservoir to be assured of adequate water. :)

The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

So those are the major issues that always seem to come up. There are other myths, but those are the major ones. :)


As ever DaveBugg the voice of reason and factual information. Brilliant report, I find your information to be extremely useful, thank you.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
I think that it depends on the manufacturer/quality of the bladder. I have one from Source, and I've never had a plastic taste from it.

Nice, but fifty squid is a bit steep (for me)
 

Arlene Laskey

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April-May 2018
Camino Portuguese ?2021? maybe
Thank you everyone, very informative. I was wondering where I could find something like that, so this is most helpful.
 

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