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Luggage Transfer Correos

Water carried -- how much is enough?

2020 Camino Guides

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
I agree, never less than 1 litre IMO, I carry 2 x .75 L bottles, one in each side pocket of my pack and a Smartube so I can drink while walking.
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?

Never carry less than 100 ml for psychological reasons. Knowing you have a mouthful of water left will sustain you easier than if you know you have no water left.

Water requirements are variable. You will want more on a hot day. Some sections between sources of water are longer than others. You would do well to have 2 liter capacity but only carry that much water when you know there is no water source because of distance to the next town. Such as over route Napoleon or sections on the Meseta.

I'd even consider a thermos for 1 liter of that capacity. Hot tea on a cold day ...
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Take an extra liter. It's just a little over 2 pounds. If the weight is too much then pour it out and suck up the financial loss. ;)
:) Thanks! It's not really the weight that concerns me (or the cost... ;)). I bear more than a passing resemblance to a pack-mule anyway. o_O

Nope. My issue is planning the carrying arrangements. From the responses here, I am well on my way.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
A lot of places to replenish your water supply all up and down the Camino Frances. Fountains. Cafes. Bars. I always just carried two ordinary, standard 500 ml bottles (soda bottles work best because they are sturdier) and reused them all the way to Santiago. Kept them in the lower, side mesh pockets on my pack (one on each side).
The only two sections of the Camino Frances I encountered where I brought and needed a third 500 ml water bottle was the first day out of SJPdP and the long stretch between towns out of Carrion de los Condes (about 17 km).
Of course what time of year plays a big role on your staying hydrated. I would guess in the fall carrying one liter of water with you should be enough. If not? Then buy another bottle to carry with you.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
... Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?
What I did and still would do again: Buy 2 PET bottles of 0,5l each on arrival and use those. Buy another one for really long stretches like Carrion to Calzadilla. Alternatively use two 0.75l PET bottles. The weight of the bottles is minimum - it is the weight of the water within them that counts - and that you can adjust each day.

Buen Camino, SY
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
Water needs will vary from person to person, with varying body sizes, etc. For myself, I would start out with a reasonable minimum, which is one liter bottle. If I found I needed more, if weather is very hot, etc. it's quite easy to buy an extra bottle of water or soda and refill with water to carry more at the beginning of the day. Having walked CF and CP, with some quite hot and humid weather, one bottle has always been enough. I stop at small markets or cafes and buy water, soda, etc. to supplement the water bottle.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
On the CF in October-November I usually kept 500 mL in my pack for emergency (never needed) and carried 500 mL to drink while walking.
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
You folks are GREAT! I have my carrying arrangements worked out. "Standard" will be two .75 liter bottles carried in open-top pouches on my hip belt (see thread "Water Bottles on Shoulder Strap/Hipbelt?"). Any "expansion" bottles needed will be carried in the lower side pockets of my pack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Generally for backpacking we carry water in a reused 2 liter soda bottle (light-weight) and a Lexan 1 liter bottle (heavier.) This is so if we fall or if something attempts to puncture the bottles at least the Lexan one survives. From habit that is what we did for the camino although the chances for a fall or puncture on the camino was pretty slim. When walking in pairs it is easy to get to the bottles; I can grab and put back the one in Peg's pack pocket and she can do the same for mine.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019
I normally carry a two litre bladder and a 500ml bottle. I start the day with at least two litres between the two. But this does allow me walk on and I don't have to fill at every font. So it is possible to do it with much less should you want to. As @Mark Lee notes, there a times when planning to carry more is sensible because you won't find a font for a couple of hours.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Wishing not to be boring and repetitive. I walk with a 500 bottle in my pocket and replenish it wherever I can and as often as I can. I carry 1500 bottle at the top of my pack which I fill on the long treks where we all know the water sources are few and far between.
 

Jo Jo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, July '14 & Sep-Oct '16
Via di Francesco, July '15,
CP Oct. '17, Salvador & Primitivo Sep '19
I walked the CF last Sept-Oct. I carried a .9L water bag (Evernew--very light, unlike most bladders), which was more than enough. Only carried extra water twice--the day after Roncevalles walking to Zubiri. No need this time, although in a July CF it would have been nice. And on the optional high route after Villafranca (it really was nice to have it that day).

Buen Camino,
Jo Jo
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Also, something to keep in mind is always carry a bit more water for a pilgrim that may need it. I saw that a few times on the CF. Pilgrims who underestimated water need and didn't carry enough and don't hydrate enough. I saw an older gentleman fall out right before Pamplona. His wife caught him before he hit the ground and he was out (unconscious) from the warmth of the day and I assume dehydration. It looked really bad at first then he came to. Initially it was just me and her getting his stuff off, dragging him to shade and elevating his feet, getting water in him, etc (he was a pretty big guy) but suddenly there was a dozen pilgrims all around us assisting. One young lady had some electrolytes. Another some banana and chocolate. It was so cool to see everyone helping.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
I have read the previous posts and had the impression that for some reason many pilgrims carry all the water they need for all the stage, without considering public sources and bars.
In the Frances, the only long stretch I remember without places to replenish your water bottle is between Carrión de los Condes and Calzadilla (17 km).
The tough SJPP-Roncesvalles stages has public sources besides an orientation panel (km 6.4), the Orisson albergue/bar (km 7.6), and Fuente de Roldán (km. 16.5). From there it is 8 km to Roncesvalles by the forest, and a bit more by the Ibañeta variant.
Sometimes there is a van offering snacks and drinks in the road, after Biakorri Virgin, I think by km 13.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I have read the previous posts and had the impression that for some reason many pilgrims carry all the water they need for all the stage, without considering public sources and bars.
In the Frances, the only long stretch I remember without places to replenish your water bottle is between Carrión de los Condes and Calzadilla (17 km).
The tough SJPP-Roncesvalles stages has public sources besides an orientation panel (km 6.4), the Orisson albergue/bar (km 7.6), and Fuente de Roldán (km. 16.5). From there it is 8 km to Roncesvalles by the forest, and a bit more by the Ibañeta variant.
Sometimes there is a van offering snacks and drinks in the road, after Biakorri Virgin, I think by km 13.
I don't know about you, but for me while walking the CF during the summer on an average day one liter of water just ain't enough "for all the stage" and I don't recommend only consuming that much on an average walking day of say 18-25 km.
Even if I cover only say 6-8 km when I hit the first fountain, I drink or finish both bottles and refill. I keep doing this and on average drink probably four or five liters of water in a 24 hour period while walking the Camino. Also, coffee is a diuretic. No way would I give up my beloved coffee, so I just compensate with more water. ;)
I would say to all prospective pilgrims, hydrate when you can, where you can. Don't let the prospect of peeing on the trail put you off.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy
I've tried all sorts of combos, from camelbaks, life saver bottle, bike bottles, you name it, on various routes. In the end I settled on two or three half litre perrier bottles, refilled along the way. Only Camino where that was a bit marginal was the levante before Toledo. Frances outside of July and August one probably would be fine. Anything originally sold with a fizzy liquid inside is strong enough to last at least a couple of weeks. If course, if the weather is hot the water will get warmish. If that bothers you and there is a freezer available (hotel or whatever) overnight, you could start with a bottled ice cube.
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
The water from the fountains along the Way is absolutely delicious. Fountains towards the beginning are frequent and because I try not to carry too much weight, I did get a bit complacent and usually only carried about 500 ml. As a result, twice I would have liked more water. Once was on the 17 km day out of Carrion de los Condes (that one snuck up on me - message to self: always read the guide the day before!). I can't work out where the other was but it was further on and one of those days with some pretty rough uphill along dusty roads passing some incredibly ancient tree stump. On that day there was an angel in a donativo van - phew! Towards the end I carried more water as fountains were less frequent. However by then there are plenty of towns in which to buy drinks. I just preferred water.
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
Walked in Summer with 2 x 0.5 lt bottles and had no issues at all filling up when needed. Most of the time I never bothered with the second bottle.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Lots of good advice already. I would only add that if relying on village shops or Fonts to refill along the way you will very occasionally find .........the village has no shop, the shop is closed, or the Font (in your guide, on your map) is dry/non potable.

Happened to me a couple of times on very hot days. I learnt to never go below 300-400 ml of water. Always have a bit spare, just in case. Dehydrated with an hour or more still to go is not fun.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
There is an old saying that you cannot fit a quart into a pint pot.
If you carry 2 one litre bottles you do not have to fill them right up. You can part fill both to approx the same level to keep your pack balanced. You may not need to totally fill them at all, but certainly cannot get extra water into a smaller bottle :)
The difference in weight between an empty 75cc and 1lt bottle is minimal, the weight is in the water carried and if it feels a bit heavy then you can drink it to lighten the load. Better that than risk dehydration.
 

wally

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
completed the camino frances in sept 2016 via bicycle (bicycletta)
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?
there are enough stops along the camino frances that you can either replenish or purchase more water bottles. Plan to consume about 80 oz./day. I began each day with two full water bottles and, usually by early afternoon, I was stopping to refill. I wouldn't plan it that close that you might come up short vs. the nominal incremental weight of one more bottle.
buen camino
 
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fenix

Nevertheless, she persists
Camino(s) past & future
Several, since 1999
Upcoming: Almeria to Muxia, Summer 2017
There is an old saying that you cannot fit a quart into a pint pot.
If you carry 2 one litre bottles you do not have to fill them right up. You can part fill both to approx the same level to keep your pack balanced. You may not need to totally fill them at all, but certainly cannot get extra water into a smaller bottle :)
The difference in weight between an empty 75cc and 1lt bottle is minimal, the weight is in the water carried and if it feels a bit heavy then you can drink it to lighten the load. Better that than risk dehydration.
I second that advice.

I carry 3 Platypus SoftBottles (1 liter capacity each, 1.2 oz each). One goes in each side pocket, and the third one stays in my pack (maybe full, maybe not). I use a SmarTube (2 oz?) to drink out of one side pocket or the other.

But I have tons of flexibility with this set-up to start the day with however much, or little, water is warranted based on what lies ahead (shops, bars, fuentes, etc).

(Uncertainty, and an abundance of caution, often warrants carrying more water.)
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?
I walked in October. I carried two 1-qt collapsible water bottles. Most days I only filled one. There were some days on the Meseta that I carried two, since the distances between water fountains was greater than average. I'd do the same again.
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
Most of the time there will be others walking with you and in a pinch they will have some water to spare. The extra weight of a couple of kilos of water causes the perspiration you will cause that makes you need that extra water. Reduce the amount of water you carry, reduce the strain, reduce the sweat, reduce water loss - don't need as much water.

October is cool and you shouldn't overheat. I cannot imagine needing more that 1 lt at that time of year.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019
Most of the time there will be others walking with you and in a pinch they will have some water to spare. The extra weight of a couple of kilos of water causes the perspiration you will cause that makes you need that extra water. Reduce the amount of water you carry, reduce the strain, reduce the sweat, reduce water loss - don't need as much water.

October is cool and you shouldn't overheat. I cannot imagine needing more that 1 lt at that time of year.
It really is not up to other people to let you borrow or consume things that you weren't prepared to carry for yourself, including water. Particularly where there are long stretches without fonts, it really is up to the individual to ensure they are carrying sufficient water to meet their own needs. Yes, people will be Good Samaritans, but should you rely on that? Probably not!
 
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Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
It really is not up to other people to let you borrow or consume things that you weren't prepared to carry for yourself, including water. Particularly where there are long stretches without fonts, it really is up to the individual to ensure they are carrying sufficient water to meet their own needs. Yes, people will be Good Samaritans, but should you rely on that? Probably not!
I was not insinuating that anyone do this as a regular mode of avoiding the need to carry water. I posted it if water was need in an emergency.
 
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cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
My CF water system is conveniently carrying two half liter water bottles that are regularly refilled and occasionally replaced. In addition I have one half liter in my pack for emergencies. I can only remember digging it out once but that's all it took to make me glad I had it. That reserve water bottle and a few snacks are the only "might need" items that I allow myself.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019
I was not insinuating that anyone do this as a regular mode of avoiding the need to carry water. I posted it if water was need in an emergency.
I see. Unfortunately, I took the remainder of your post to indicate that your were advocating reducing the water being carried, with the clear possibility that one would run out. I am confused, but glad you are not suggesting one should rely on other pilgrims to carry stuff one needs.
 
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Lukey

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
2 x 500 ml bottles on the side of your bag :) Fountains (Fuente) are everywhere along the trek, look out for agua portable. Some of the nicest water you'll ever taste!
Agua no portable- Is none drinking water.
 

Craig Towers

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?

Don't forget. So many places are open that sell water or other water sources your never that far from hydration. Unless it's the meseta Two liters of water is a lot of extra weight. The latest research on hydration is showing that our current fixation is over rated. Don't panic I'd suggest.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Consider, too, some words of wisdom that an old hermit revealed to me, after many weeks of shared praying and abstinence:
"Any water that comes in, sooner or later has to come out".
And that can be a problem in some very crowded stages.
"many weeks of shared praying and abstinence"? poor guy....:D
I wouldn't let bashfulness of going to the outdoor loo prevent oneself from hydrating properly. This past July-August on the CF was extremely warm, especially the stretch between Roncesvalles to Pamplona. Daily highs of 32 C and above. To risk heat exhaustion or stroke because you don't want to do your business outside is stupid. Believe me, nobody cares what you are doing.
 

Left Coaster

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Primitivo (2017)
Water, one of my favourite topics! I fell into a routine that worked for me while walking the CF in May. The fundamental rule is that hydration shouldn't happen just when we are walking; consider your whole day and try to consume water regularly. As my marathon coach said, if you wait until you are thirsty to drink, it's too late. I carried 1 litre in a bladder plus an empty 500ml bottle. The advantage of any type of hose system is that the water is easily accessible without breaking stride. I would drink 500ml in the morning while getting ready, sip on the litre through the day and have another 500ml at the end of the days walk and another 500ml after dinner and through the night. That provided 2 1/2 litres of water plus juice, coffee, tea etc.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
if you wait until you are thirsty to drink, it's too late
I think that is just a stock phrase said enough times that everyone believes it. Of course people should be sure to carry enough water to avoid dehydration, or to quench any thirst. Dehydration can definitely become a serious matter and I don't want to get to that stage! However, there is no evidence that a touch of thirst causes harm.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I think that is just a stock phrase said enough times that everyone believes it. Of course people should be sure to carry enough water to avoid dehydration, or to quench any thirst. Dehydration can definitely become a serious matter and I don't want to get to that stage! However, there is no evidence that a touch of thirst causes harm.
Well, that was one of the sayings stressed to us by our medics when I was working overseas in SW Asia, where it would often hit 48 C highs during the day, and we operated around outside wearing 20 kilos or so of kit on. We were told not to wait until thirsty before hydrating. Of course not everyone heeded the advice, and I saw a few guys have to get saline IV's from the doc's.
Same goes with extreme athletics such as marathons, and walking 25 k in 30+ C degree weather with a backpack on.
No way to find out I'm sure, but I wonder how many pilgrims take a short dirt nap every year from heat exhaustion or stroke?
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019
Well, that was one of the sayings stressed to us by our medics
I think it's always valuable to caution against leaving it too long after the onset of thirst to drink something, and if no other meaning is drawn from it, that would be enough. I agree with @C clearly, taken literally, this is just more one of those useless directions, a bit like 'coming that way, I live five houses from the far end of the street'. It doesn't actually say anything useful.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I think it's always valuable to caution against leaving it too long after the onset of thirst to drink something, and if no other meaning is drawn from it, that would be enough. I agree with @C clearly, taken literally, this is just more one of those useless directions, a bit like 'coming that way, I live five houses from the far end of the street'. It doesn't actually say anything useful.
Who wants to live in a world where everything is taken literally and all advice was given out in technical terms? How dull would that be. I like the world of "pert near", "there about's", "fixin to in about a minute or so", "give or take" etc etc etc
:D
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Who wants to live in a world where everything is taken literally and all advice was given out in technical terms?
I agree with this to a certain extent, and enjoy poetic license in writing.

Of course the advice to stay hydrated in those extreme conditions was very good advice. In fact it is good advice to pilgrims to be very aware of those dangers. However, I don't like the overstatements and propagation of wrong information (i.e. it is "too late" if you get thirsty). Too late for what? Maybe too late to find another water source quickly - that's a valid point. But this popular phrase is used to suggest that simple thirst shows that you've reached some danger point.

It is like saying "if you get chilly, it is too late." Yes, if you are out in frigid weather without proper clothes, you need to be concerned about the risk of hypothermia. That doesn't mean we need to carry our down jackets on the camino all year!
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
I agree with this to a certain extent, and enjoy poetic license in writing.

Of course the advice to stay hydrated in those extreme conditions was very good advice. In fact it is good advice to pilgrims to be very aware of those dangers. However, I don't like the overstatements and propagation of wrong information (i.e. it is "too late" if you get thirsty). Too late for what? Maybe too late to find another water source quickly - that's a valid point. But this popular phrase is used to suggest that simple thirst shows that you've reached some danger point.

It is like saying "if you get chilly, it is too late." Yes, if you are out in frigid weather without proper clothes, you need to be concerned about the risk of hypothermia. That doesn't mean we need to carry our down jackets on the camino all year!
You didn't happen to be a hall monitor in high school, were you? :D
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
Folks,

I read in several places that, on the CF, one small water bottle (approx. 500 ml) is generally enough to get from one water source to the next. I always thought that was cutting it a little close, especially for me -- if you even mention the idea of exercise, I break out in a sweat! :)o_O Therefore my initial plan was to carry two 750-800 ml water bottles for a total of about 1.5 liters.

Now, here on these boards, I am seeing posts where people talk of carrying two 1-liter water bottles, or more.

So, let me pose a question: Assuming that I'm on the CF in October, how much water should I reasonably carry?
Good for you for recognizing that there's not a one size fits all answer to your question. I drink a lot more than a lot of people, so was filling up whenever I had the chance. Once I got in a jam, but normally one bottle was enough for me.
 

Old Gringo

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2004 and Via de la Plata 2015
The amount of water you are going to carry is dependent on the time of year and the terrain you are going to cover. We did the VdlP in early September. There were 20km+ stages that had no intermediate watering opportunities. I drank the 2 liters I started with and would've drank a third had I had it.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but will I be fit enough for 2020?
Two gulps more than you thought would be enough . . .

My vote goes for two 500ml bottles in side pockets and a SmarTube.

I think I've said before drink from the one on your left first as this gets the most sun and tepid water isn't as refreshing.

Also check the fuente is working before emptying your part full bottle to refill with fresh (lessons learned on the Camino: 2003 Villafranca)
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Last year I carried two collapsible bottles. One - 1 liter, and one half liter. I also had a Smart Tube. Since it was very hot in late August/early September I ended up putting my one liter bottle inside my backpack to keep it cool and using it like a water bladder. This system worked fairly well for me, and I carried an emergency bottle in one of my side pockets.
But...seeing as how I was using it as a bladder and not as a bottle, and the fact that I'll be walking in the July heat this year, I'm thinking of buying this Source Naturals water bladder. It has an attachment that is supposed to make it possible to fill the bladder through the tube, so that you can leave it in your backpack. The smallest one is 2 liters, but I'd probably only carry a liter or so.
 

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When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 9 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 50 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 179 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 294 24.7%
  • June

    Votes: 85 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 23 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.3%
  • September

    Votes: 340 28.5%
  • October

    Votes: 146 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
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