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Wave of pilgrims when lock down is over?

2020 Camino Guides
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Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
Just from a gut feeling I would expect 2021 to be really too busy as it is a
holy year and many who were to do it this year will do it next year ... myself included probably. I fear for the worst ;-)
I have already decided I will not go in 2021. If I can't go this year it will have to wait.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
I have already decided I will not go in 2021. If I can't go this year it will have to wait.
I dislike large crowds ... so that could be a wise decision also for me. But on the other hand 2019 was the last camino and I am eager to go again :)
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
This thing isn’t likely to go away quickly and when it really gets going in India, Africa, South America and Central America etc “you ain’t seen nothing yet”...
I was due to walk the Invierno in early May with my wife & father but cancelled last month and putting it back by a year (exactly!) when hopefully some normality will have returned to our lives and the World in general.
We all just need to be sensible - and patient.
Don’t worry the Camino will always be there.
Yes I agree with most of what you wrote Guy, but for your last sentence. Yes, the Camino (whichever one you choose to walk) wii aways be there, but sadly for some of us, we won't be there for IT, given age, illness or family and work commitments.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte Sept 2013
Camino del Norte Sept 2014
Camino del Norte 2015,16,17,18
This is a difficult question. I still have plane tickets in May and I'm waiting for the airlines to cancel the flight because I've heard I have more options that way. But they only give you 6 months to reschedule although I'm hoping for a year. Two flights round trip from Seattle were expensive and I would just hate to lose the money. But of course I don't want to put myself or other people at risk. I'm from near Seattle which is one of the epicenters of the virus. So my risk of catching the virus is probably similar in both counties.
But on the other hand financially Spain needs the tourist industry so what to do? ( My friends in Pamplona and Leon are looking forward to my return)
Sounds like it's unlikely you can go as travel restrictions will still be in place. Everything is going to take ages to settle down and as someone said Albergues may never be the same again x
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
This is a difficult question. I still have plane tickets in May and I'm waiting for the airlines to cancel the flight because I've heard I have more options that way. But they only give you 6 months to reschedule although I'm hoping for a year. Two flights round trip from Seattle were expensive and I would just hate to lose the money. But of course I don't want to put myself or other people at risk. I'm from near Seattle which is one of the epicenters of the virus. So my risk of catching the virus is probably similar in both counties.
But on the other hand financially Spain needs the tourist industry so what to do? ( My friends in Pamplona and Leon are looking forward to my return)
Doing the same here ... waiting for my flights to be cancelled. Right now I can only rebook for a later date or cancel by myself and as a result get little to no refund.
 

Ian L

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances summer 2017 (SJPP to Fromista)
Camino Frances summer 2019 (Fromista to Santiago)
I canceled my plan to walk the Camino Madrid this summer. I will try to do it again next summer if conditions allow. This year I'm going to highpoint some local mountains I've had on my bucket list for a while (if local regulations permit it).
 

Mal Oso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
Vaccine first then Camino. Also, life along the Camino needs to settle down and get back to normal before I go again. I can wait. BTW, I recently cancelled my April 23, 2020 trip to SJPP.
Absolutely correct on the vaccine first. I have no doubt a vaccine or antibody certificate will be required before entry into Spain. Or anywhere for that matter. Highly doubt resumption of pilgrimages until sometime in 2022 at the earliest.
Old IDC and current RN here.
 

Antonius Vaessen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte (to Sobrado)
2019 Norte again
Think 'new normal.' Things will go back to some steady state, but it will likely look different than what we had before.

The plague hit harder with more recurrences in towns along the camino route. This is not the plague, but still - the same dynamic applies. It was people traveling along the camino who were the vectors for those recurrences.
That means us.

In the 1918 flu epidemic, the second wave - the resurgence and recurrence that happened after the initial spike of infections died down - was much more virulent than the first. And, no. This is not the flu, either. But this is definitely a possibility.

"It's my camino" is an attitude worth dropping right now, in favor of thinking of our host communities, and the elders who live there. Whether they be in our own country or not.
When you say that people should drop the "It's my Camino attitude" you seem to imply that you read this in reactions in this thread. If that is the case I disagree with you. Everybody is aware of the graveness of the stuation and accepts the restricting measures being taken. When governments change their policy regarding travel, each one has to consider, taking in account advises from experts, organisations and so on. Of course the effects on others is a main factor. To local people we are not only seen as possible threats but also welcomed as means for economic revival. It is up for them to decide
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Absolutely correct on the vaccine first. I have no doubt a vaccine or antibody certificate will be required before entry into Spain. Or anywhere for that matter. Highly doubt resumption of pilgrimages until sometime in 2022 at the earliest.
Old IDC and current RN here.
I doubt that as by end of this year Spain will be likely thoroughly infected. The virus is not going to be contained or stopped, just slowed down a bit. If 60 to 70% is reached, foreign travellers do not pose a problem anymore, no matter if they are contagious or not.
Just my educated guess.

I am actually hoping for vast numbers of undetected cases with mild symptoms as this would allow to open the lockdown again within weeks rather than within months.

But as said, this is just a hope, not a certainty.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Everybody is aware of the graveness of the stuation and accepts the restricting measures being taken
If that were the case then there would be no question about walking any time soon, and certainly not as soon as lockdowns end. Just because restrictions are lifted does not mean it's over, as we can see in in China right now.

And yes. I may be wrong but I do perceive that in some replies.
 

Felicia V

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portuguese 2017 Porto to SdC
Return to Camino Portuguese 2018 Tui To SdC
Is it naive of me to think that many will hit the road in thanksgiving if they and loved ones are spared?
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Just from a gut feeling I would expect 2021 to be really too busy as it is a
holy year and many who were to do it this year will do it next year ... myself included probably. I fear for the worst ;-)
Will be Plata next year, ending a good distance from SdC.😞
 

Robi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances May/June 2018
I have tickets for June, I know the chances are low but while there is hope ...
The situation should be improved by June throughout Europe, and especially in Spain, because it started earlier.
Vaccines will not be available for at least another 15 months, not counting on that.
But this wave should be over by June, by which time most of the measures will be lifted, if God chooses so, it may be quiet for the next two to three months, perhaps longer.
There will be cases, but in a much smaller proportion.

Of course, all these are mere speculations and hopes, but I have not yet canceled my tickets or accommodation in Barcelona.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
I have tickets for June, I know the chances are low but while there is hope ...
The situation should be improved by June throughout Europe, and especially in Spain, because it started earlier.
Vaccines will not be available for at least another 15 months, not counting on that.
But this wave should be over by June, by which time most of the measures will be lifted, if God chooses so, it may be quiet for the next two to three months, perhaps longer.
There will be cases, but in a much smaller proportion.

Of course, all these are mere speculations and hopes, but I have not yet canceled my tickets or accommodation in Barcelona.
Actually, even in relaxed Sweden there is a travel warning until mid June for all countries ... including in Sweden itself ... So there is hope, but do not hope for too much ....
 

Deputy Dan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Logrono to Burgos in week of October (2017); SJPP - ?, three weeks in 2020!
I have a round-trip air ticket to Madrid for October, planning on SJPdP to Leon. Too soon to give up, though in my opinion not looking good. If everything falls into place and it's actually safe to travel I'll likely go, but may not attempt the CF; I'll stay flexible and choose a route that has albergues and services commensurate with the traffic. Need more data to make any informed decision!
 

Vendee52

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France's SJPdP to Finisterre (2019)
I was going to start in SJPdP 14 April but instead I’m in lock down - only allowed to go out an hour a day within a km of my home...but grateful and admiring of the french “solidarity“. I shall wait until Spain is ready for legal visitors and wonder if pilgrims could spread themselves more evenly across all routes In Holy Year in order to try and support communities across Spain who are suffering so much now? I’m now thinking of the VdLP - is it a good choice for a solo woman?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017-18)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
Think 'new normal.' Things will go back to some steady state, but it will likely look different than what we had before.

The plague hit harder with more recurrences in towns along the camino route. This is not the plague, but still - the same dynamic applies. It was people traveling along the camino who were the vectors for those recurrences.
That means us.

In the 1918 flu epidemic, the second wave - the resurgence and recurrence that happened after the initial spike of infections died down - was much more virulent than the first. And, no. This is not the flu, either. But this is definitely a possibility.

"It's my camino" is an attitude worth dropping right now, in favor of thinking of our host communities, and the elders who live there. Whether they be in our own country or not.
The towns along the camino (means highway, remember) route were the towns that had travelers all the time. That was why the pilgrims passed through there. They, the towns that is, were always subject to contagions and things. The pilgrims didn't do it, at least not any more than peddlers, vagabonds, merchants' pack trains, military patrols, and processing kings' courts did.

Even then the world was bigger than us. It still is.
 

Mal Oso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
I doubt that as by end of this year Spain will be likely thoroughly infected. The virus is not going to be contained or stopped, just slowed down a bit. If 60 to 70% is reached, foreign travellers do not pose a problem anymore, no matter if they are contagious or not.
Just my educated guess.

I am actually hoping for vast numbers of undetected cases with mild symptoms as this would allow to open the lockdown again within weeks rather than within months.

But as said, this is just a hope, not a certainty.
With respect, herd immunity does not come into play until about 90 to 95% of the populace is resistant, either thru having developed antibodies from the disease or thru a vaccine. This pandemic will leave a psychic scar on many inhabitants and I believe returning to "normal" is a long way off. I intend to do a pilgrimage for my fellow nurses, if I survive, who have fallen and for those who will fall caring for others. Be well.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
Camino Ingles planned for June, this year. Cancelled, obviously.
I am (tentatively) looking for same month, next year. But I am not making concrete plans, will decide around Easter if it is feasible and wise. If it is, I probably will choose a less trodden Camino in Spain or France, maybe from Carcassone to Lourdes.
 

Jay Es

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017 the del Norte, home via the Portuguse to Vigo, Planning a Via de la Plata for October 2018.
We came home from A Gudina at the begining of March. We will certaiy complete our Sanabres at another time.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
With respect, herd immunity does not come into play until about 90 to 95% of the populace is resistant, either thru having developed antibodies from the disease or thru a vaccine. This pandemic will leave a psychic scar on many inhabitants and I believe returning to "normal" is a long way off. I intend to do a pilgrimage for my fellow nurses, if I survive, who have fallen and for those who will fall caring for others. Be well.
Not talking of full herd immunity here, but citing Germany's immunology top-advisor who speaks of 60 to 70 % leading to a very considerable slow down of infection rates. The same numbers have been spoken of by experts from other countries. Of course the virus will prevail. But ICU and respirator capacities can easily deal with the percentage of people showing worst symptoms after that point has been reached. This is what is considered a stable fade out.

The only way to avoid that scenario is through a break through with medication that eases the symptoms and slows virus replication in the host's body, hence reducing lethality. Vaccines for the masses will most likely be too late as a lockdown cannot be upheld for such a long time.

About what the pandemic itself does to the minds and souls of people, we will have to wait and see. From my interviews with WW2 survivors from the German-Russian front it appears that people are eager to return to normality, even when the mental scars remain for a long time.
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
We can hope, speculate, discuss, and give our opinions regarding when « normal « will resume. The fact is, no one knows. Not the medical community and it’s epidemiologists and virologists, not the predictive applications working overtime, not public health organizations or governments. We are facing a pandemic and a virus never seen before in our lifetimes. There are no guarantees.

Time is the only thing that will dictate what normal will look like in the future. Our world is shook up and so are we! Our lives and routines and plans have been turned upside down and all around. What we do have in common is «we care » ...for our health care workers, for our elderly and loved ones, and for our world. Suffering is all around us. We are all affected and together we will pull through.

So when will I be able to do my first ever Camino? I realized today that I won’t be able to answer that for a long time.

In the meantime one thing is for sure, we are all in this together and we all have a role to play to keep each other safe. ❤🌏🌍🌎
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
I am wondering about possible changes in health code laws may change the camino. How many beds/room, etc? I remember being coughed on in one albergue in the middle of the night-- I could feel the droplets hit my face. The peregrino next to me was seriously ill. He should have been in a separate room-- but my guess is that he didn't have enough money, and/or was more ill than he realized. (I am often in self-denial when ill.) The people running the albergue told me that they rely on individuals to determine if they are ill enough to self-quarantine. So.. maybe that will change.

Even when the Camino opens, I will probably wait until I have immunity-- either through an inoculation or getting the covid-19 virus.
Happened to me Oct 2018. Woman developing flu coughed right in my face. Next day was cold & windy & following day was sick, for a couple of weeks.
 

Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
If you think about it, the CF will probably be a lot less crowded next year.
I don't think so. Many who postponed this year will go next year. Things will go back to normal. People will get used to the idea that the virus is everywhere.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Thank you all for your kind thoughts of support. I had not intended to “go public”:, but the situation in Spain and to a lesser case Portugal brought the matter to a head. Whilst my situation is has a timeframe, it’s the wonderful Spanish people who I am feeling for, this was not something you brought on yourselves. Thoughts are with you!
 

Frill

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Chemin de St. Jacques
Like many others I had caminoplans in the near future (may from Le Puy en Velay to Irun) I am retired, am for a great deal "master of my own time" so I can start my camino real soon after lock down is over. I don't like crowds, races for beds and so on though. Now I don't know what to expect, will many people who could not go take up their plans as soon as possible? I know that no one can see in the future that is why I want to ask a specific question:
Did you have to cancel a camino, if so do you still want to go and plan to go in the near future or postpone it.
Answers could give me some insight in what I may expect. Next year is holy year, that would lead to much more pilgrims on their way. (I don't know if that will also be the case on the Le Puy route, as this is also walked by walkers who don't walk in the direction of Santiago)
Thanks for all answers
I am also retired, and had to cancel. I’m thinking about starting from Le Puy as soon as the world opens up again.
 

gypsy9

Active Member
I don't detect an "It's my Camino" vibe here. We are all adults and these are legitimate questions from people who express a heartfelt desire to walk the Camino. When can we go? Who knows?

We all have proverbial crosses to bear and it is impossible to peer into the life of any individual. For some, the Camino feels like a lifeline. Ultimately, we are walking the Earth and there is something really balancing, healing and powerful about that.

I am in wonder regarding those medieval Christians who stepped out from their front doorstep many hundreds of years ago. For sure the Camino was scruffy then! And the risk factor massive! These pilgrims were driven by an unwavering faith in God. That's a pretty different mindset in relation to today's world.

Now, I hope to walk in the Holy Year. That would be a privilege for me.
See what unfolds. I was given a travel voucher that allows me to book next year and valid for a year after that. I don't think anyone has a clear picture of how life will play out. It's always been this way but we don't really realize it...
Kindness goes a long way, however. I've noticed that living in Australia --a country that has gone through bush-fires, floods and now like many countries, economic recession. During these uncertain times, this simple act seems important.
 

Jim

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006- Camino Portuguese
2008- Camino Frances
2009- Sanabres extension of the VDLP
2010- Camino Frances
2011- Camino Potuguese
2014- Camino Frances
2017- Camino Finisterre
Chances are you will need a certificate of vaccination at immigration, at least in the short term.
I would hope so for Italy, Spain, France, everywhere that has been affected!
 

David61

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
Frances (2020)
I hope the Camino is quiet for some time until people are fully sure that everything is ok.

I have to admit astonishment at some of the responses. Seriously?

This thing is not just going to quietly go away in a few months, tracing a tidy parabolic curve as it goes down to zero. There will be waves, perhaps several. So I hate to say it, but it seems more realistic to give it up for this year - and maybe even next year.

There is also the consideration that everything won't just snap back to the way it all was. There are too many aspects life this will affect.
Am afraid to say the forecast is wave after wave of this. The attached is the model from scientists in Basel and Stockholm. That spike for next winter is 100 million cases and it is mainly northern hemisphere. I know they may be wrong and lets hope so but if it comes close to this Camino will fade into insignificance.
 

Attachments

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Nobody knows how and when the solution to the crisis occurs, but in my heart I know there will be one. There has to be one.
That being said when it happens and the smoke has cleared and the dust settled there will be hordes of pilgrims descending upon the Camino, and I for one will happily and joyfully deal with it as I will be one of them. 😉
 

Whispering Ted

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primitivo, Portuguese, Via de la Plata, Mozarabe, Aragones, San Salvador, Madrilen
Perhaps it is important now that we remember this: Very many Caminos in Spain have never been overcrowded. There is plenty of space! Most of these Caminos won't be overcrowded for many years either - I guess. I haven't been to a Camino with a lot of people for the last ten years. For those of us who know that we do not have so many years left to walk the Caminos, it is perhaps hopeful to remember that it is always possible to find a Camino with solitude - even in 2021. :)
Exactly! The Mozarabe, the Via de la Plata, the Ebro, the Portuguese will continue to be relatively quiet and allow reflection, contemplation and enjoyment of the Camino experience- but those of us who are not in the first flush of youth would be well advised to hold off until there is a vaccine and we have been treated.
 

Jude Rich

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese coastal from Porto
Did you have to cancel a camino, if so do you still want to go and plan to go in the near future or postpone it.
Answers could give me some insight in what I may expect. Next year is holy year, that would lead to much more pilgrims on their way. (I don't know if that will also be the case on the Le Puy route, as this is also walked by walkers who don't walk in the direction of Santiago)
Thanks for all answers
My first Camino was to be Porto to Santiago in July 2020. Still haven’t had refunds for my flights. But as soon as there is a vaccine I will be making new plans. I am very sure that things will be changed and I am a little disappointed that I won’t really ever experience what was but I am still keen to be on my way as soon as the Portugese and Spanish people are ready to welcome back pilgrims. At present there is no travel insurance that would give any real cover and that for me I think is also a big consideration along with the vaccine.
I'm wondering what travel insurance will actually cover after these events of Covid19???
 

Lady M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September - October (2019)
Like many others I had caminoplans in the near future (may from Le Puy en Velay to Irun) I am retired, am for a great deal "master of my own time" so I can start my camino real soon after lock down is over. I don't like crowds, races for beds and so on though. Now I don't know what to expect, will many people who could not go take up their plans as soon as possible? I know that no one can see in the future that is why I want to ask a specific question:
Did you have to cancel a camino, if so do you still want to go and plan to go in the near future or postpone it.
Answers could give me some insight in what I may expect. Next year is holy year, that would lead to much more pilgrims on their way. (I don't know if that will also be the case on the Le Puy route, as this is also walked by walkers who don't walk in the direction of Santiago)
Thanks for all answers
I have plans to walk the camino frances mid-August to October. All my accommodations are reserved but I have no flight booked yet. If these falls through I will be devastated.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
If one were to categorize the months of April to October as the peak/popular walking season for the Camino, for the 2020 season we have already begun and the end of said season is only about seven months away. Folks, the realism of the current world situation is that in seven months things will not be back to normalcy worldwide. For the year 2020 the Camino will not happen in the sense of pilgrims walking the route. It is something everyone needs to accept and deal with. I hope all that had plans for walking the Camino in 2020 realizes this and has accepted it.
 

RodlaRob

Oz Member
Camino(s) past & future
Torres (2016) Portuguese (2016)
It's been great......no mention of bed bugs for months 😎...... but they will be so hungry & just waiting for the first wave of Pilgrims!!😜
 

Tony Bobcat

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
Like many others I had caminoplans in the near future (may from Le Puy en Velay to Irun) I am retired, am for a great deal "master of my own time" so I can start my camino real soon after lock down is over. I don't like crowds, races for beds and so on though. Now I don't know what to expect, will many people who could not go take up their plans as soon as possible? I know that no one can see in the future that is why I want to ask a specific question:
Did you have to cancel a camino, if so do you still want to go and plan to go in the near future or postpone it.
Answers could give me some insight in what I may expect. Next year is holy year, that would lead to much more pilgrims on their way. (I don't know if that will also be the case on the Le Puy route, as this is also walked by walkers who don't walk in the direction of Santiago)
Thanks for all answers
Hi Guys We were planning to continue our Camino from Castrojeriz late Ma, all is cancelled and hopefully will start same time next year. We got a credit on our flights, some refunds from Albergues.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I have plans to walk the camino frances mid-August to October. All my accommodations are reserved but I have no flight booked yet. If these falls through I will be devastated.
My only advice is that you cancel all your reservations and try and recoup any money already put down and to forget about scheduling a flight at this time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012-2018 Frances, Via de la Plata, Portugues Central and Seaside, Norte
Perhaps it is important now that we remember this: Very many Caminos in Spain have never been overcrowded. There is plenty of space! Most of these Caminos won't be overcrowded for many years either - I guess. I haven't been to a Camino with a lot of people for the last ten years. For those of us who know that we do not have so many years left to walk the Caminos, it is perhaps hopeful to remember that it is always possible to find a Camino with solitude - even in 2021. :)
Which Caminos would you say are less traveled?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Which Caminos would you say are less traveled?
Gronze.com lists just about all the Camino routes. I'd say that any route other than the Francés, Portuguese, Primitivo, Inglés, and Norte would be the less traveled routes.

 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Which Caminos would you say are less traveled?
This chart should give you a good idea of which routes are the most traveled - taken from stats available from the Pilgrims Office website. However, many of the pilgrims on less traveled routes don't collect compostellas, or may be counted on the route that entered Santiago, so the actual numbers are likely higher than indicated. But you can definitely see which routes are "less traveled". This website shows many of the "otros caminos" which are not even listed here.
Capture.JPG
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2020"
I was supposed to be in Lisbon on the 14th of June for the Portuguese. That obviously wont happen. My airline was happy to defer my flights to September. Now after some negotiation they will defer until June next year. If by that time Portugal and Spain are back to "Normal" and there is a vaccine, then I will go. My only problem is that I will be pushing 80 and even though I am very fit now, and I don't know what condition I will be in the longer I have to wait. I just hope that I have not already walked my last Camino.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018, 2019
tl;dr = The 2021 boom will be tempered by the continued coronavirus risks and countermeasures.

By 2021, I expect that the Camino will be "open" to most people from European countries. Spain will have refined its approach to limit coronavirus - perhaps with some control of movement (e.g. "health passports" digital bio surveillance, periodic testing, requirements to share GPS data from personal devices) and continued possibility of temporary, localized lockdowns. This will be necessary until a vaccine is widely distributed.

In 2019, over 40% of pilgrims were Spanish. I believe the Spanish pilgrims will be the first to get back out on the camino in numbers. But ...

I think that some older pilgrims (or those with underlying health conditions) will still be anxious about the continued risk of infection, so many of them will stay away.

When it comes to pilgrims from Asia and America - I think it will all depend on the level of concern not only about infection but also about bureaucratic procedures (e.g. applying for "health passports" or going through enforced quarantine periods when flying to or from Europe). I expect that many Asian pilgrims will put off their Caminos in favor of staycations - perhaps leading to a growth of interest in thru hikes in places like Korea and Taiwan. Some American pilgrims might choose to explore the national parks while waiting for the situation with the Camino de Santiago to fully stabilize.
 

Fromista

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015, 2017)
Thank you for rising this question, I am sure we all had this question in our mind. I think life will go back slowly, step by step to the Camino routes. First government announcements... than some brave albergues will open... than some brave pilgrims will arrive... definitely less people than in a normal holy year... and gradually it will build up again, with new rules for hygiene, etc. I postponed my plan for walking in 2020 summer, like many others. Plans may change (as we learned)... Now I think I will go back when 1. it is officially announced that it is safe, 2. when there are enaugh albergues open, 3. definitely choosing a less popular route and 4. sleeping in my tent, whenever it possible. If they re-open in 2021, I will be there, if not, I guess the following year, or after. The Camino will be there, it is true. The interesting bit is that we need to make our inner journey now without the beautiful scenery and without the physical part of it. I find it so much harder. But no escape:)
Staying home saves lives, so we need to do what we need to do.
 

Dromengro

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Leon 1984
Frances (2021)
I'm not making any plans for this year or next, that way I won't be disappointed if this takes longer than we think. Coming out of lockdown will probably be harder than going into it. If it ends sooner and easier than expected then I'll be pleasantly surprised and ready to go.
 

anthikes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP > SdC
2018 Porto > SdC
2019 Sevilla > SdC
I am still planning the Norte this year and will be hiking it as soon as allowable. I see comments about giving Spain time to heal etc. but the businesses that depend on pilgrims will be desperate to see us again with their livelihoods are at stake.

Hoping we can all get back to normal as soon as possible.
 

bjorgts

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos in Spain, France, Portugal, Germany since 2003. Last: Malaga - Cordoba November 2019
Which Caminos would you say are less traveled?
It is much easier to make a list of the Caminos where there are many pilgrims, than to mention those where there are few pilgrims. The most commonly used are probably the ones mentioned earlier: Francés, Portuguese, (Via de la Plata? (in spring)), Primitivo, Inglés, Norte. If you look at Munidicamino, for example, you will see that there are Caminos all over Spain.

For example, in recent years we have walked: Levante from Valencia and Alicante, Camino Via de la Plata (or Zamorano) Portuguese from Zamora, Ruta de la Lana from Alicante, Camino Mozarabe from both Malaga and Almeria, Augusta from Cadiz, Camino Sur from Huelva. This spring we should have walked the Ruta del Ebro from the river Ebro's delta in Catalonia. All of these are examples of Caminos having few pilgrims.
 

anthikes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP > SdC
2018 Porto > SdC
2019 Sevilla > SdC
Could not agree more, the camino is not going anywhere so it is better to think of safety first. Overseas travellers are more likely to reintroduce the virus into a country they are visiting.
May not need a vaccine though. This virus might just become one of the many regular winter flus that occur and be less deadly.
They've never been able to make a vaccine for the common cold. Why put our lives on hold waiting for something that may never happen?
Can you imagine the economic devastation to these small towns and villages if we all stayed away until a vaccine was ready??
If the government says it is ok and safe then I don't see why people should continue to stay away.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Portuguese Camino, Coastal Route (2018); Via de la Plata (planned 2021)
This has probably already been said, many times, in many ways. The question shouldn't really be able what are MY plans, but more about the competing questions of what can the Spanish health system cope with into the foreseeable future and how best do we return so as to support the various businesses (private, public and religious) along the various caminos. The answer to the question should be about them, not us.
 

Antonius Vaessen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte (to Sobrado)
2019 Norte again
This has probably already been said, many times, in many ways. The question shouldn't really be able what are MY plans, but more about the competing questions of what can the Spanish health system cope with into the foreseeable future and how best do we return so as to support the various businesses (private, public and religious) along the various caminos. The answer to the question should be about them, not us.
Few people who reacted in this thread would disagree with your last sentence I think.
 

Rj7797

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017
Way to many moving parts to do much more than speculate on the future. I would not be surprised to see travel restrictions last quite a bit longer with stricter regulations following. :(
 

VeganCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future Frances from Saint Jean Pied du Port to Burgos, starting in June.
This is interesting! JanskeMarie says September, but maybe not until next year. I think next year. What is "when it's safe"? What is the time perspective of you who are writing here now? Do you think you will walk in 2020? Spring? Summer? Autumn? Are you willing to travel as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted? The virus will be suppressed at one time or another, but it probably won't go away. Therefore, it is interesting to read the answers here.

Are you willing to walk a Camino before we get a vaccine? I am a pensioner as many of you are. Most of us then are part of the risk group - just by our age. I was supposed to start my Camino del Ebro in a week now, but now I imagine there may not be a new Camino in a year. The best I can hope for is late fall this year, but I don't think it will be. I will not dare to go for a Camino as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted.
I'm hoping to walk next April and beat the summer crowds on the CF. Not sure how realistic that idea is given it's a jubilee year.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
May not need a vaccine though. This virus might just become one of the many regular winter flus that occur and be less deadly.
They've never been able to make a vaccine for the common cold. Why put our lives on hold waiting for something that may never happen?
Can you imagine the economic devastation to these small towns and villages if we all stayed away until a vaccine was ready??
If the government says it is ok and safe then I don't see why people should continue to stay away.
Cheers and good luck to you, dude. If you are exposed to it, please do the rest of us who do not want to be a favor and keep your distance, long distance.
As been said before, walking the Camino is at the end of the day a pastime. A hobby. A recreation. A holiday, etc. Not life and death. Nothing worth doing if the result of doing it is a ride in the ventilator express, or worse.
Besides, I have the feeling the local governments on the Camino will not give the all is normal again, come on over green light until a vaccine is developed. Why would they do otherwise?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Francais: 2002, 2012, 2019. (Future Ingles, Primitivo, Portuguese in 2020)
This is interesting! JanskeMarie says September, but maybe not until next year. I think next year. What is "when it's safe"? What is the time perspective of you who are writing here now? Do you think you will walk in 2020? Spring? Summer? Autumn? Are you willing to travel as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted? The virus will be suppressed at one time or another, but it probably won't go away. Therefore, it is interesting to read the answers here.

Are you willing to walk a Camino before we get a vaccine? I am a pensioner as many of you are. Most of us then are part of the risk group - just by our age. I was supposed to start my Camino del Ebro in a week now, but now I imagine there may not be a new Camino in a year. The best I can hope for is late fall this year, but I don't think it will be. I will not dare to go for a Camino as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted.
As much as I have stated on this Forum "September 2020", I keep receiving from sources I trust that Autumn 2020 may find the planet experiencing another wave of the virus. Cross out September. I strap on my new NAOH Harbor sandals and go for another walk on a High Point NC trail. I expect/hope/anticipate April 2021 for a new Camino. That's about 365 days from now, but I shall not the count days until then. Retired, divorced, my son and family well provised, I realized I was burdening the Camino with the heavy baggage that I am only living until the next Camino, all those annoying days I had tick off until could to fully live until I am on the plane, on the train, on the bus to Roncesvalles, and then, then! I can "live", being, living, breathing, on the Camino again!

Well, you know, that was a big, ol' wakeup call! This day I live for itself, today. And maybe April, some date or other in a year too far away to give my energy to, yeah. A Camino. Thqt would be mighty fine, Until then, I am here, now (Thanks, Ram Daas). And still walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino June 2018 from Leon to SdC. Plan Porto central 2021, Le Puy-SJPdP 2022, SJPdP- SdC 2023
May not need a vaccine though. This virus might just become one of the many regular winter flus that occur and be less deadly.
They've never been able to make a vaccine for the common cold. Why put our lives on hold waiting for something that may never happen?
Can you imagine the economic devastation to these small towns and villages if we all stayed away until a vaccine was ready??
If the government says it is ok and safe then I don't see why people should continue to stay away.
When the WHO and all leading health experts in the field declare we do not need a vaccine your sentiments are of value. Presently the race is on to develop a vaccine and for good reason. Our actions should be guided by the reality.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Here's a well-considered opinion from the writers at Gronze:
(and I promise, I hadn't read this when I posted my thoughts above)

Thank you so much for this link!

As I read it, we can forget any Camino this year. What more I may deduct from this excellent article, the Camino may take a turn, regarding walking and pilgrims: It predicts that less "tourists" will arrive, due to health issues, some truly business/profit-orientated enterprises will go down, but the basic Camino structure will prevail, not without difficulties, though. That is where dedicated pilgrims, like on this forum, have a role to play.

The article also points out that there maybe will be a shift in who will walk the Camino, and at what pace. More calm-down, reflective Caminos perhaps, in the wake of all the death and pain?

After this, many people will need the Camino to mourn their losses. I am sure of that. There will be much suffering, but also much healing on the Caminos, when this ordeal is over and pilgrims return, for good reasons, to the Caminos.

All in all, this article was very uplifting for me: Maybe the Camino will come closer to its roots, and there will be a change from the bed race, attitudes amongst pilgrims leaning more towards their inner journey than competition about kms/day and other out-of-camino-focus stuff?

For one thing is certain: The present is temporarily, but the Camino is and will always be there. It is waiting for us and it continues to call us back. We'll meet again, when the time is right and this temporarily crisis is over. But it might take some time, I am afraid.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (2020)
May not need a vaccine though. This virus might just become one of the many regular winter flus that occur and be less deadly.
@anthikes, I agree with you. In the context in which this was written, this appears as reasonable a view as the speculation to which you were responding. It is unfortunate that someone appears to have taken this completely out of its original context in their response.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (2020)
Old IDC and current RN here.
What is an IDC? The two meanings that immediately came to mind are 'in due course' and 'I don't care', and I suspect neither apply.
 

Damico Walking

Ready, and waiting, to walk
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese coastal route May 2020 (not to be)
Portuguese coastal route TBD post COVID-19
Like many others I had caminoplans in the near future (may from Le Puy en Velay to Irun) I am retired, am for a great deal "master of my own time" so I can start my camino real soon after lock down is over. I don't like crowds, races for beds and so on though. Now I don't know what to expect, will many people who could not go take up their plans as soon as possible? I know that no one can see in the future that is why I want to ask a specific question:
Did you have to cancel a camino, if so do you still want to go and plan to go in the near future or postpone it.
Answers could give me some insight in what I may expect. Next year is holy year, that would lead to much more pilgrims on their way. (I don't know if that will also be the case on the Le Puy route, as this is also walked by walkers who don't walk in the direction of Santiago)
Thanks for all answers
My wife and I were planning to walk the CP, and like others here, have flights scheduled for mid May. We are waiting for the flights to be cancelled by the air carrier so we have more options available without loosing money. And like you are not fans of crowds. So if September things have settled down then maybe. Other options are 2021, or delay to 2022 to avoid crowds. Don't really have much hope for September but still have some. This is a very difficult decision since we don't have a crystal ball that works consistently, and we are fighting our own desires to go. Like so many things today we are taking a wait and see attitude/approach so we can make the best and safest choice for us once things settle down. There is always the possibility that countries may add a vaccination requirement to the list prior to allowing travel.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago de Compostela
This is interesting! JanskeMarie says September, but maybe not until next year. I think next year. What is "when it's safe"? What is the time perspective of you who are writing here now? Do you think you will walk in 2020? Spring? Summer? Autumn? Are you willing to travel as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted? The virus will be suppressed at one time or another, but it probably won't go away. Therefore, it is interesting to read the answers here.

Are you willing to walk a Camino before we get a vaccine? I am a pensioner as many of you are. Most of us then are part of the risk group - just by our age. I was supposed to start my Camino del Ebro in a week now, but now I imagine there may not be a new Camino in a year. The best I can hope for is late fall this year, but I don't think it will be. I will not dare to go for a Camino as soon as the travel restrictions are lifted.
Correct. It will be 9 - 12 months before things return to any sort of normality
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018, 2019
They've never been able to make a vaccine for the common cold. Why put our lives on hold waiting for something that may never happen?
There are at least 160 strains of "common cold" virus. Creating vaccines for individual strains would have been technically possible long ago, but there is little incentive to do that. The development of a "master key" vaccine that covers many strains of the common cold is progressing slowly.
With this coronavirus, there are significant incentives to create a vaccine. It has a far greater impact than the common cold. There are not so many strains. Many candidate vaccines have been proposed and funded.
 
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Mal Oso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2018)
What is an IDC? The two meanings that immediately came to mind are 'in due course' and 'I don't care', and I suspect neither apply.
Sorry, should have spelled it out. IDC is milspeak for Independent Duty Corpsman. Basically the medical provider for a ship or command that does not have an MD aboard. One of the major concerns aboard a ship is
a communicable disease for the obvious reasons. (see USS Theodore Roosevelt). Like in an albergue.
Thanks for the "I don't care" laugh, I really needed that just now. Be well.
 

Rako

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
In my view, when it re-opens, the camino will be quiet because:
1. No-one knows when it will re-open / when they can travel to their starting point. The re-opening will probably not be announced long in advance, it will likely be "OK, the camino is open starting next week".
2. Travelers from some countries will likely be blocked from travel by either their own governments (you want to go to SPAIN???), or by the Europeans (EU may not trust other governments' mitigation measures or reporting). Travel restrictions, once in place, can take many years to be reversed by our world's political systems.
3. After the camino re-opens, many potential visitors will choose to wait for a vaccine. However, vaccine supply constraints may mean that it could take quite a while (years?), for an effective vaccine to be available to everyone.
4. Personal finances of many potential visitors will be strained and some will not be able to afford a trip that they may have taken without the economic impact of the pandemic.
5. The camino will be more expensive. Air travel will be more expensive (some airlines will go bankrupt and there will be less price competition). Albergues may be more expensive (e.g. if they have restrictions on how many pilgrims they can put in one room, or if some go out of business and there's less competition). This will discourage some.
6. General uncertainty and risk aversion (e.g. fear of a new wave or mutation), will discourage some who would otherwise have walked the camino.

There are a few reasons that some may accelerate their plans:
1. The Spanish economy will need pilgrims. Some visitors (like myself), will want to support the economy by being there.
2. "Herd immunity" will reduce risk. Some pilgrims will recognize this and not necessarily wait for a vaccine.
3. Pent up demand. Pilgrims who have experienced "camino magic" will be eager to return. Some first-timers will be eager to fulfill their goals.
4. Holy year (or whatever 2021 is called).

IMO: It will be quiet initially. It will take 2 years to get back to 2019 traffic levels.

People who feel called to walk the camino should follow the call.
 

jeanineonthecamino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2020
This is so hard. I have been wanting to do the Camino for a long time. In October or November, I FINALLY got the OK to do it from my husband. Finally bought normally non-refundable inexpensive tickets. I am scheduled to depart May 23rd. I can cancel my outbound flights (3 of them). But I canNOT cancel my return ticket (only have 1 so far). Why? I am flying in to one city and home from another... so they were purchased separately. Also, my return ticket is for July 14th, and COVID-19 refunds/vouchers are not being offered that far out yet. Like everyone else, I am heartbroken because I have accepted the fact that my camino is not going to happen (and of course, even more heartbroken because of the reality of what is going on around the world... but that is another topic). I have NOT cancelled my plans on paper yet. I am waiting for the airlines to start cancelling my May flights. I am hoping that will give me enough leverage to petition for the same refund/voucher to be given for my return flight.

On to the original question: I STILL want to go. I want to go as soon as I can. I want to go when Spain welcomes visitors again. But my reality is that I only have summer in which I might be able to go again. And I need to be able to afford to go. Next year is Holy Year, and I would be happy to go then, but am nervous about the crowds. Also... I am nervous about the potentially inflated airfare prices due to the economic impact on the airlines. I can't afford to pay more than I did to buy these tickets. I am also nervous that I will purchase NEW tickets, only for the airline to go bankrupts after a failed attempt to restart their business. I am also nervous that lodging will be more limited and/or more expensive. And then there is the health of myself and others. Will I get COVID-19 before I go? Will a vaccine be ready? If a vaccine is ready, will I be able to actually get it? Too many questions.

So... while wishing for a miracle that I know will not happen allowing me to depart as planned in May... realistically I am looking at rescheduling for next summer and HOPING I can make it happen. But, if everything does not fall into place, I am also looking at possibly never getting to go. At least not in the not so distant future.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Francais: 2002, 2012, 2019. (Future Ingles, Primitivo, Portuguese in 2020)
How do your like your sandals? Is the sole very stiff, or does it have some flexibility?
You got it! Mind you, this is out of the box, onto the feet, onto the trail. I found the ankle strap confining (imagine a too tight collar around your neck) so stopped, adjusted Velcro in both straps below the toes. And slightly loosened a smidge around the ankle. It worked! I mean, it really worked! I could feel the support shift and the perfection of this design astonishes me! I ordered an 8 and I might, maybe, go for a 7; if I order from Zappos, they will return the 7's if they don't fit. NAOH is "the bomb". This may sound strange, only I feel like I am walking on my feet. My real feet!
How do your like your sandals? Is the sole very stiff, or does it have some flexibility?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Francais: 2002, 2012, 2019. (Future Ingles, Primitivo, Portuguese in 2020)
I was supposed to be in Lisbon on the 14th of June for the Portuguese. That obviously wont happen. My airline was happy to defer my flights to September. Now after some negotiation they will defer until June next year. If by that time Portugal and Spain are back to "Normal" and there is a vaccine, then I will go. My only problem is that I will be pushing 80 and even though I am very fit now, and I don't know what condition I will be in the longer I have to wait. I just hope that I have not already walked my last Camino.
I shall be 76 when I hope for the opportunity for a Spring 2021 Camino. I share your age-related concerns. I am grateful for a year to get fit walking local trails and putting footwear -- my prference leans increasingly towrards sandals and NAOH Harbors are amazing -- to the test. As the body wears down and resilience wanes, it's vital that we are not wearing ourselves out "fighting" our equipment! Old Kiwi, I do, i truly do, know that fidgety feeling, that itchy onging. the thousand yard Camino stare as you look at a map of Spain. I have recently come to the knowing that I was spending an incredible amount of energy in the "future" of a Camino and not on today's gifts. This day, no coronavirus. This day, I can drive in gorgeous Spring weather to an unfrequented trail for an hour's walk. This day, I can prepare a meal from a larder which suits my needs. This evening, I will Facebook with friends online. This night, I shall express gratitude to Source and sleep snug with my windows open to fresh night airr. The difference between a day in North Carolina and a day on the Camino is really only one of degree.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Another anecdote regarding "No vaccine - no Camino" ... In the region I live in the official estimate of infections is around 3-5% of the population.
We are assumed to be far ahead in the curve compared to many other regions and countries with one potential reason being the extreme numbers of Chinese Aurora tourists in January and February. Of course there is no proof yet that the estimates are correct.
We appear lucky as we are sparsely populated and hence many of our elderly and other risk groups are not heavily affected (yet?) ... self isolation is easy.
With the current estimated rate, 80% should be infected within the next 2 months.

The official strategy of our region/county is to slowly get the majority of the population infected by summer, while giving special protection to our risk groups. I would guess we are one of very few regions in Europe officially on this path. As we are not many, it could be seen as a contained experiment.

So unless there comes a change in official strategy, my chances that before summer I will have had the virus are quite high.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Travel restrictions, once in place, can take many years to be reversed by our world's political systems.
While I can follow most of your arguments, this one I would see differently. I would guess that most countries will open up faster than we expect. Actually several European countries are already discussing exit strategies out of the lockdown, with the re-opening of borders being earlier measures.
Once the virus is truely pandemic, differences between countries will quickly be negligible. Hence cross border travel restrictions will not help much in slowing the spreading. The only reasons for delays in opening the borders will be political and will be restricted to a limited number of countries only.

Just my guess. But hey, guessing is all we can do these days ;-)
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Another anecdote regarding "No vaccine - no Camino" ... In the region I live in the official estimate of infections is around 3-5% of the population.
We are assumed to be far ahead in the curve compared to many other regions and countries with one potential reason being the extreme numbers of Chinese Aurora tourists in January and February. Of course there is no proof yet that the estimates are correct.
We appear lucky as we are sparsely populated and hence many of our elderly and other risk groups are not heavily affected (yet?) ... self isolation is easy.
With the current estimated rate, 80% should be infected within the next 2 months.

The official strategy of our region/county is to slowly get the majority of the population infected by summer, while giving special protection to our risk groups. I would guess we are one of very few regions in Europe officially on this path. As we are not many, it could be seen as a contained experiment.

So unless there comes a change in official strategy, my chances that before summer I will have had the virus are quite high.
Do they proactively infect new people? Tell certain neighbourhoods, ‘okay it’s your turn to get coughed on?’ Or just assume that it will happen?
 

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
As soon I can I will continue my Camino at home.
Praying for those that left and their families, for the ones that lost their livelihood and for all those who lost a little bit of there innocence.
I will give thanks if I survive that I life, that so many good actions were born out of this crisis
before I go I will make sure that I am not a carrier or a burden here or in France or in Spain.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Do they proactively infect new people? Tell certain neighbourhoods, ‘okay it’s your turn to get coughed on?’ Or just assume that it will happen?
No, we do not line up to be infected.

But restrictions are very mild. Mostly based on recommendations. Although tourist hot spots have been closed and people are advised not to visit their elderly relatives over easter.

So we still are free to move around, dine out. Meet in groups under 50 people. Schools are mostly open. Restrictions are as elsewhere in Sweden, but my county is the only where herd immunity has been declared official strategy.
 

Bristle boy

If not now...when? If not you...who?...........
Camino(s) past & future
2019
I fear that this has a while to go. The world will need to be vigilant that there is not a second or third wave. There may not be a perfect “magic” moment when all this is over.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
No, we do not line up to be infected.

But restrictions are very mild. Mostly based on recommendations. Although tourist hot spots have been closed and people are advised not to visit their elderly relatives over easter.

So we still are free to move around, dine out. Meet in groups under 50 people. Schools are mostly open. Restrictions are as elsewhere in Sweden, but my county is the only where herd immunity has been declared official strategy.
Interesting. They must be confident that the health care system can cope with active & acute cases.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
No, we do not line up to be infected.

But restrictions are very mild. Mostly based on recommendations. Although tourist hot spots have been closed and people are advised not to visit their elderly relatives over easter.

So we still are free to move around, dine out. Meet in groups under 50 people. Schools are mostly open. Restrictions are as elsewhere in Sweden, but my county is the only where herd immunity has been declared official strategy.
I think that this is the strategy that the UK started out with.
 

Bristle boy

If not now...when? If not you...who?...........
Camino(s) past & future
2019
I think that this is the strategy that the UK started out with.
Our strategy was a little confusing to start with .The initial policy was one of developing a “herd immunity”. The policy since has been based on protecting the National Health Service from being overwhelmed and closure of places of congregation (Pubs,clubs, gyms etc) and trying to encourage a “stay at home” policy.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Interesting. They must be confident that the health care system can cope with active & acute cases.
The strategy is based on several assumptions:
1. The spread is slower as we have the lowest population density of the country. Many people live rather isolated.
2. They only want to implement measures that can be upheld for a long time. A lockdown longer than 6 weeks is very hard to maintain. And here I fully agree.
3. Swedes are considered to be rather obedient to governmental advice – assuming strict rules would be not needed to slow rates down a bit – and that actually has been shown.
4. One reason to keep the schools open is to actually keep health care staff working – without them having to send their children to their grandparents. If the schools close, health care would almost collapse.

We will see if the strategy works.
 

Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
The strategy is based on several assumptions:
1. The spread is slower as we have the lowest population density of the country. Many people live rather isolated.
2. They only want to implement measures that can be upheld for a long time. A lockdown longer than 6 weeks is very hard to maintain. And here I fully agree.
3. Swedes are considered to be rather obedient to governmental advice – assuming strict rules would be not needed to slow rates down a bit – and that actually has been shown.
4. One reason to keep the schools open is to actually keep health care staff working – without them having to send their children to their grandparents. If the schools close, health care would almost collapse.

We will see if the strategy works.
In the UK schools are open for the children of essential workers only.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
but my county is the only where herd immunity has been declared official strategy.
Every country likely wants herd immunity to be developed, but at a speed that doesn’t overwhelm the hospitals. If too many get sick at the same time, too many will die.

As you say, population density and conformity to rules does factor in.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
I think that this is the strategy that the UK started out with.
Yes, the UK and Sweden were two countries on a similar path early on ... but now only Sweden is still on this path.
But as I said, especially in our county up North the communication from the health administration was rather clear. In its tone unusually clear and slightly different from the national chief-epidemiologist.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
Every country likely wants herd immunity to be developed, but at a speed that doesn’t overwhelm the hospitals. If too many get sick at the same time, too many will die.

As you say, population density and conformity to rules does factor in.
I agree, I should have said a fast(er) lane to herd immunity ... as containment is not an option with this virus.
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Finished: Camino Frances April/May 2019
Canceled: Primitivo May 2020
In the UK schools are open for the children of essential workers only.
As over here most people are still working, the sent-your-children-to-your-grandparents effect would kick in with all professions I suppose.

However, once you show symptoms, you are expected to stay home. You do not need to see a doctor to confirm that.
 

Bristle boy

If not now...when? If not you...who?...........
Camino(s) past & future
2019
As over here most people are still working, the sent-your-children-to-your-grandparents effect would kick in with all professions I suppose.

However, once you show symptoms, you are expected to stay home. You do not need to see a doctor to confirm that.
The send your children to the grandparents does not apply here.
 

Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
As over here most people are still working, the sent-your-children-to-your-grandparents effect would kick in with all professions I suppose.

However, once you show symptoms, you are expected to stay home. You do not need to see a doctor to confirm that.
The Irish government is talking about putting some kind of childcare scheme in place for the children of healthcare workers, to avoid the need for grandparents to take care of children.
 

Rako

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2018
This is so hard. . . .

So... while wishing for a miracle that I know will not happen allowing me to depart as planned in May... realistically I am looking at rescheduling for next summer and HOPING I can make it happen. But, if everything does not fall into place, I am also looking at possibly never getting to go. At least not in the not so distant future.
You have a difficult decision. No-one should criticize you for whatever route you decide on - there is no way that is clearly right or clearly wrong. I would like to encourage you. There will always be reasons to be afraid. Do not be afraid of things you cannot control. Decide, then do.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I fear that this has a while to go. The world will need to be vigilant that there is not a second or third wave. There may not be a perfect “magic” moment when all this is over.
I don't believe there will ever be a perfect magic moment...it will not be all over most likely unless a vaccine is developed and proven to work, otherwise it will raise its ugly head again and again if not fully eradicated by our self isolation this time around.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
I don't believe there will ever be a perfect magic moment..
Magic moments, Peregrinos carin'
Magic moments, memories we've been sharing
I'll never forget the moment we met
The night in ‘ Cebrerio
The way that we hugged to try to keep warm
Despite of the snow oh
Magic moments, memories we've been sharin'
Magic moments, when pilgrims are all carin'
Time can't erase the memory of
These magic moments filled with love
The Forums on line to soak up my time
For hours and hours
The way we can post about things that mean most
And feel that its all ours
Magic moments, memories we've been sharin'
Magic moments, Peregrinos carin'
Time can't erase the memory of
These magic moments filled with love
The way that we shared whenever a friend
Was feeling a bit down
The time that we knew, whatever we’d hoped
It was time for a shut-down
The Albergues and bars, the tiendas
That everyone prizes
The desperate hope, will there be bed,
And how there always is
This time will pass, as time always does

Magic moments filled with love


With profound and sincere apologies to Perry Como
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Magic moments, Peregrinos carin'
Magic moments, memories we've been sharing
I'll never forget the moment we met
The night in ‘ Cebrerio
The way that we hugged to try to keep warm
Despite of the snow oh
Magic moments, memories we've been sharin'
Magic moments, when pilgrims are all carin'
Time can't erase the memory of
These magic moments filled with love
The Forums on line to soak up my time
For hours and hours
The way we can post about things that mean most
And feel that its all ours
Magic moments, memories we've been sharin'
Magic moments, Peregrinos carin'
Time can't erase the memory of
These magic moments filled with love
The way that we shared whenever a friend
Was feeling a bit down
The time that we knew, whatever we’d hoped
It was time for a shut-down
The Albergues and bars, the tiendas
That everyone prizes
The desperate hope, will there be bed,
And how there always is
This time will pass, as time always does

Magic moments filled with love


With profound and sincere apologies to Perry Como
Awww, lovely, Tinky! Yes, let's forget what's going on today for a "moment" and reflect on all the perfect ones we have had in our memory!..."Memories, light the corners of my mind..." Barbra Streisand
 
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