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Weather in June on the Camino Frances

2020 Camino Guides

MaggieQYogini

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
End of May to June, 2020
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
MOST of the time it's very warm. However, I've been in Santo Domingo del Calzada in June and FROZE. I have a photo somewhere of me in long johns, jacket, hat and gloves. A buff is a good idea. I always carry my ALTUS poncho because it serves as a windbreaker and blanket as well as for rain. You don't need waterproof shoes - they hold water (sweat) IN as well as out and will give you blisters, imo. I'd take a lightweight sleeping bag if it were me. You might take one long sleeve shirt. If you want to PM me, I will give you the packing list I give my group members - we usually begin in May/June and I usually walk every year.

Lastly, remember, ANYTHING you end up needing that you didn't take, you can buy along the way.
Just plan on layering and you'll be fine.
 

ranthr

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances 2005, 2007
Le Puy en Velay -SdC 2009
Via de la Plata 2011
gr 653 from Oloron to Puente la Reina 2012
Gr65 from le Puy to Figeac 2013
Irun to Santander 2013
Porto to SdC 2014
Astorga to SdC 2015
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
The list of things to buy frustrates you. Why not only take the clothes you already have in your cupboard, and choose the most lightweighted + some raingear, 1 set to walk in during the day and 1 set for change.
A buff is good on cold mornings. One shorts and one pair of pants or leggings is enough. 2 t-shirts or 1 sleeveshirt and 1 T-shirt, choose wool if you already have one. Most important is a good pair of socks for walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
The list of things to buy frustrates you. Why not only take the clothes you already have in your cupboard, and choose the most lightweighted + some raingear, 1 set to walk in during the day and 1 set for change.
A buff is good on cold mornings. One shorts and one pair of pants or leggings is enough. 2 t-shirts or 1 sleeveshirt and 1 T-shirt, choose wool if you already have one. Most important is a good pair of socks for walking.
I agree. No need for special gear. Just take what you have, except perhaps for shoes.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
I agree. No need for special gear. Just take what you have, except perhaps for shoes.

Although a heavy jeans might not be the best idea ;) .

@MaggieQYogini : IMHO layering of clothes works the best.
Also a long john works well as a pj-trouser. Double use of items is always good to keep your pack light.
I always take a light weight fleece with me on every Camino. When I stop walking and arrive in an albergue I tend to cool down rapidly.

I think differently about shoes and use waterproof ones winter and summer. But that is just me.

Happy preparations.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de France: start on 5/14/2019
I walked the Camino Frances this year from mid-May to third week in June. I found the weather to be a little on the cool side, especially in the mornings when starting out. I typically wore long sleeved shirts and had a light windbreaker on most days. I'm also 73, so that may have had something to do with it. There were definitely days when it got warm, but never over the high 80's (F). I think the May to June time frame is almost perfect for this trip.
 

MaggieQYogini

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
End of May to June, 2020
I walked the Camino Frances this year from mid-May to third week in June. I found the weather to be a little on the cool side, especially in the mornings when starting out. I typically wore long sleeved shirts and had a light windbreaker on most days. I'm also 73, so that may have had something to do with it. There were definitely days when it got warm, but never over the high 80's (F). I think the May to June time frame is almost perfect for this trip.
Thank you for indicating it was never over 80's (F). That really helps me. Telling me it's cool or hot doesn't really help. But actual temperature of real experience give me a good gauge . Thank you!
 

sugargypsy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019
In progress: CP 2020 and/or CI
I walked this year end of May till beginning of July. Had almost no rain, but sometimes - especially in the mornings - it was windy and cold. I usually don't get cold easily, but I was quite happy that I did bring my warm sweater and a windbreaker to wear most mornings. I did buy a scarf, because my ears sometimes got quite cold because of the wind. Next time I will take a headband with me.


PS Could someone please explain to me what a buff is? I tried to translate it, but didn't find an explanation in my language that would fit in the mentioned context of the original posting. Thanks.
 
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Flig

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles (2020)
I walked this year end of May till beginning of July. Had almost no rain, but sometimes - especially in the mornings - it was windy and cold. I usually don't get cold easily, but I was quite happy that I did bring my warm sweater and a windbreaker to wear most mornings. I did buy a scarf, because my ears sometimes got quite cold because of the wind. Next time I will take a headband with me.


PS Could please someone explain to me what a buff is? I tried to translate it, but didn't find an explanation in my language that would fit in the mentioned context of the original posting. Thanks.
It’s a neck gator. It can be worn on the head (bit of a tube sock for the head) for sun protection and warmth and to keep hair covered and out of the face. When worn on the neck it serves The same function as a scarf by keeping the wind out and the warm in. Most are very light weight.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances SJPP-Fisterra (2014_18). Burgos-Astorga (2019). Sarria-Santiago (Jan 2020). CF 2020
But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
Welcome to the forum Maggie. I have walked different sections of the Camino over the past six years, usually during first or second week of June. Only one year (2018) was persistently wet and under 20 degrees Celsius, hottest was 33C in 2016. I always wear full length running pants (to avoid ankle tan marks!) and short sleeved running tops, warm fleece for early mornings/evenings, silk scarf for multiple uses including emergency towel, lightweight rain jacket which doubles as windbreaker, walking shoes that are not waterproof and light sleeping bag. Oh and a dress for evenings! Total weight five kgs, including pack. Will be doing full CF in 2020, starting in SJPDP 23 May, with pretty much the same gear. Buen Camino.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Thank you for indicating it was never over 80's (F). That really helps me. Telling me it's cool or hot doesn't really help. But actual temperature of real experience give me a good gauge . Thank you!
It definitely can be hotter than 80°F in June. I would plan for temperatures between 40°F and 90°F.
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023)
Thank you for indicating it was never over 80's (F). That really helps me. Telling me it's cool or hot doesn't really help. But actual temperature of real experience give me a good gauge . Thank you!
Sorry, 2017 over 100 (40c) on many days. This year near freezing, ice fog at the Cruz de Ferro on June 11th. 2 weeks later, a blistering heatwave. So, be prepared for extremes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
Fellow first timer here - I’ll be starting my first Camino in May and like you, have more-than-occasionally felt overwhelmed by all the variables involved and by all the information that our fellow forum members have so generously made available here. But it’s definitely a happy excitement, and May 9 (the day I arrive in SJPdP via Paris) can’t come quickly enough, though I’m sure it will be here before I know it.

One thing that’s been very helpful for me as far as getting a handle on what kind of weather to expect - keeping in mind, as you said, that it changes from year to year so precise information is impossible - is searching for historical daily temperature info for places along the way on Accuweather.com. Here, for example, are the June 2019 temperatures for Pamplona:


You can simply search for other cities along your route for more information - maybe including ones at different altitudes and plugging different years into the calendar while you’re at it.

As far as other things to think/worry/obsess about - poncho or rain jacket? Sleeping bag or sleep sack?, etc. - you’re always going to get recommendations for every option, pro and con, and I found that often tends to confuse me further.

So simply pick the one you feel most comfortable with and go from there. Try closing your eyes and visualizing: Which one do you "see" yourself using? It sounds vague but can be very helpful. And keep in mind that you can always pick up things along the way if you make the “wrong” choice initially. (For what it’s worth, I’ve settled on poncho + sleep sack, at least for now.)

I definitely know how it feels to wonder if you’re overthinking things - a quick look at my post history is evidence of that - but weighing options and planning is also a big part of the experience for me, and I‘m rather enjoy the research instead of letting it stress me out too much. As others have mentioned, your Camino has already begun - relax, keep breathing, and enjoy the journey!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
PS Could someone please explain to me what a buff is? I tried to translate it, but didn't find an explanation in my language that would fit in the mentioned context of the original posting. Thanks.
See https://www.buff.com. They’re circular scarves that can be used in many different ways and are very lightweight. BUFF is a Spanish company that owns the trademark but you can find other suppliers out there. There are also ones available for sale in the Forum shop.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
June is hot for most parts of the Camino Francés (easily 30+C on a sunny day, sorry, I don't do F ;-) Rain is always an option, especially in Galicia. So a light poncho is a must. It still can get cold in the mountains at night, so I always carry a light sleeping bag, even in summer.

BC SY
 

MaggieQYogini

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
End of May to June, 2020
I walked this year end of May till beginning of July. Had almost no rain, but sometimes - especially in the mornings - it was windy and cold. I usually don't get cold easily, but I was quite happy that I did bring my warm sweater and a windbreaker to wear most mornings. I did buy a scarf, because my ears sometimes got quite cold because of the wind. Next time I will take a headband with me.


PS Could someone please explain to me what a buff is? I tried to translate it, but didn't find an explanation in my language that would fit in the mentioned context of the original posting. Thanks.
It's a tube shape scarf, go around your neck, face, head ... multiple uses. Very handy.
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023)
Fellow first timer here - I’ll be starting my first Camino in May and like you, have more-than-occasionally felt overwhelmed by all the variables involved and by all the information that our fellow forum members have so generously made available here. But it’s definitely a happy excitement, and May 9 (the day I arrive in SJPdP via Paris) can’t come quickly enough, though I’m sure it will be here before I know it.

One thing that’s been very helpful for me as far as getting a handle on what kind of weather to expect - keeping in mind, as you said, that it changes from year to year so precise information is impossible - is searching for historical daily temperature info for places along the way on Accuweather.com. Here, for example, are the June 2019 temperatures for Pamplona:


You can simply search for other cities along your route for more information - maybe including ones at different altitudes and plugging different years into the calendar while you’re at it.

As far as other things to think/worry/obsess about - poncho or rain jacket? Sleeping bag or sleep sack?, etc. - you’re always going to get recommendations for every option, pro and con, and I found that often tends to confuse me further. So simply pick the one you feel most comfortable with and go from there, keeping in mind you can always pick up things along the way if you make the “wrong” choice initially. (For what it’s worth, I’ve settled on poncho + sleep sack, at least for now.)

I definitely know how it feels to wonder if you’re overthinking things - a quick look at my post history is evidence of that - but weighing options and planning is also a big part of the experience for me, and I‘m rather enjoy the research instead of letting it stress me out too much. As others have mentioned, your Camino has already begun - relax, keep breathing, and enjoy the journey!
SenorJacques,
I started my CF on May 18 in 2017. It was cold and damp in SJPP and snow/sleet at higher elevations. I took a light sleeping bag and a liner. I needed the sleeping bag in SJPP, Roncesvalles and Zubiri and never again. I shipped it to Santiago from Burgos shedding 2 lbs/1kg. From Pamplona on, it got hot and for the most part stayed hot. The day I walked into Villa Franca, it was 104f/40c. Regarding rain jacket vs Poncho, I’ve done both. Coming over the Pyrenees in 2017, it was blowing, raining and sleeting. I liked the extra layer of wind protection that my jacket provided. This year (June), I went with a poncho. On the CI, it blew and poured, the poncho was flapping in the wind and were it not for my rain pants, I would have been soaked. I bought a light rain jacket in Ponferrada. So, I’m a rain jacket/pants fan. Layers are what it’s all about. Be prepared for both extremes and rain is always possible. Good luck, Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
SenorJacques,
I started my CF on May 18 in 2017. It was cold and damp in SJPP and snow/sleet at higher elevations. I took a light sleeping bag and a liner.
Thank you for sharing your story! Sounds like a sleeping bag and rain jacket definitely came in handy for parts of your trip and I'm glad they worked out for you.

That said, I'd rather err on the side of packing less weight from the outset: even the lightest of sleeping bags is heavier and takes up more room than I want to carry, and I don't want to have to pack something I'm only going to be using for a scant handful of nights or in a "just in case" scenario. (I know that things can be sent ahead and/or left behind if not needed, but I'd rather not have to worry about that to begin with.)

So it's going to be a sleep sack for me, with the option of wearing some lightweight but warm layers to sleep in should temperatures require towards the beginning of my trip. And I'll probably end up taking both a poncho and a light travel rain jacket, since the latter doesn't add much weight to my pack and will come in handy on those occasions when wearing a poncho might be less desirable (like when walking around a town or city without my backpack on a drizzly evening or rest day.)

Appreciate the insight and good wishes - and hope this discussion will be helpful to @MaggieQYogini too! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF last 150 to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
Don't let the potential weather frustrate and overwhelm you when planning packing.
It's not a factor that you can control or easily predict.

Often you will read advice that suggests 'pack for the climate' and 'dress for the weather'.
For good reason.

The best advice you will read regarding clothing is to take lightweight layers.
This gives you the greatest flexibility and options to cope with weather changes day to day.

To give you an example, on 3 caminos, my wife and I have taken this approach.
Thin merino shirt. (hers are a bit thicker than mine)
Lightweight fleece
Outer rain/wind jacket.

If really cold, my wife would put on an extra thin merino shirt.

This clothing has worked perfectly well for temperatures from 0-38 C.

We always wear long. No shorts or short sleeves. (sleeves can be pulled / rolled up)
Long is warmer in cold weather and wind.
Long offers better sun protection if very hot.

It doesn't require 'over thinking'

Oh, and we have always walked late April to early June. Usually arriving 2nd week of June.

Some years it was really hot with hardly any rain.
Last time (2018) it was cooler with quite a bit of rain.
Our clothing did not change, and worked fine.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage for 2020
I walked this year end of May till beginning of July. Had almost no rain, but sometimes - especially in the mornings - it was windy and cold. I usually don't get cold easily, but I was quite happy that I did bring my warm sweater and a windbreaker to wear most mornings. I did buy a scarf, because my ears sometimes got quite cold because of the wind. Next time I will take a headband with me.


PS Could someone please explain to me what a buff is? I tried to translate it, but didn't find an explanation in my language that would fit in the mentioned context of the original posting. Thanks.
It is also a brand name! Buff. It comes in light merino wool or a cooler fabric for summer.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
A few years ago I walked the Frances from the first week in June to the first week in July.
Rained light to medium on me two times (days). I found my lightweight poncho to be enough. A good lightweight rain jacket would have worked well too. Personally I wouldn't have wanted to wear rain pants.
No need for waterproof footwear at all.
Never got hot. Perhaps in the 80's F at the most. That is perfect in my book. I wore shorts and tech shirts literally everyday.
Never got cold. Cool in the mornings sometimes and in the evenings sometimes. My fleece pullover was enough.
I carried a sleeping bag liner and found it to be enough. Sometimes I put albergue blankets over it.
Didn't have gloves, scarf, neck buff or beanie cap. Wouldn't have needed them.
Did have good hat for the sun. Mostly beautiful sunny days.
You don't need to carry much on a summer Camino. If your pack weighs more than about 12 pounds, you have too much.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves
You won't get a good grip on the weather until you finish your walk. You should go prepared for almost anything, so the weather statistics don't help a lot in picking your gear. The magic word is "layers."I suggest that you collect on your bed...
  1. Walking clothes - Basic walking outfit with lightweight quick dry long pants, and a quick dry or merino t-shirt or tank top. If you really want shorts, add them. I never wear them. Add a long-sleeved shirt (maybe button up) for sun protection or for a bit of warmth during the day.
  2. Medium weight fleece or zip-up sweater (or packable lightweight puffy jacket) for evening warmth. Or use if necessary for starting out on a cool morning.
  3. Rain jacket (wind break and insulation if necessary) or poncho, depending on your personal preference. I take rain pants too, but might not bother if I were going in June.
  4. Light-weight long pants and light weight long sleeve shirt, for the evenings. Either yoga leggings or track pants could be suitable, but consider the weight and how long they take to dry.
  5. Light long underwear pants and t-shirt for sleeping. You can switch with the long sleeve shirt in #4 if it is cold. Or wear both.
  6. 3 pairs extra socks, 2 pairs extra underpants, 1 extra bra
  7. Sandals, crocs or other light footwear for the evenings.
  8. Sunhat, buff or scarf, whichever you want, to add a little warmth if needed. Even a pretty silk one.
  9. I think that most people would not recommend waterproof shoes in June. That doesn't mean you won't get your feet wet, but you will simply deal with it. Even "waterproof" shoes usually aren't in a long and heavy downpour.
  10. I would take a light sleeping bag. Depends on whether you sleep hot or cold.
If weather is unseasonably cold, you put everything on. If it is unseasonably wet, just be sure to save one complete dry outfit for the evenings. If it is unseasonably hot, take most things off, but protect yourself from sunburn.

That's it! :cool:
 
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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days.
Out of curiosity, where are you starting? Depending on the city, you will skip mountains, for example.
And 30 days is very tough for the average walker if you are starting in SJPdP.

As many said above, layers. Take few things that can go on top of each other if it gets cold. Anything out of ordinary you can always buy more clothes.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF last 150 to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2022)
Hi @MaggieQYogini . Lots of good advice here.
The precise clothing items don't matter so much.
But Layers are the key.

If you think it is odd not to wear shorts and short sleeves in hot weather.
Take a look ;)

 

Henry B

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
Layering, Layering, Layering is as to Camino clothing as Location, Location, Location is to real estate purchase. Wicking clothing. Sleeping bag liner would suffice. Poncho a must.
All the above have been trusted on Frances last year Portugues this year and will be again on Primitivo next.
BC
 

jimmyc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
In 2015 the weather was perfect. Sometimes cold early morning but warm by 9am. One wet day for the entire walk.
 
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JAO

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept 2018
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
To elaborate on prior posts, walk in what’s most comfortable for you. I saw a woman hiking in a skirt. I walked in leggings mostly. Easy to wash, fast drying. Re shoes, you don’t need big hiking boots with stiff soles. Everyone I saw wearing them had huge blisters. I had La Sportiva light hikers, some people had “ trainers,” most are waterproof, but all will get wet. ( Galicia ).i walked in a drought, but it still rains. Don’t forget a pair of Tevas for night and that you can walk in if your feet are sore. I also posted a change of clothes to myself in Santiago. ( Ivar etc) Also, I bought in Najera, a silky breathable base layer that I used as a sun shirt. I used it daily, for hot sun, then as base layer if cold. The sun will be hot, regardless of temp and people get tanned on one side, since you’re walking west. If you walk in short sleeves, you will have trucker tan. Your handstand face will get tan, so sun cream a must. And a hat, of course! You can get ponchos anywhere, they’re cheap, but should bring one or a light rain jacket. Agree on fleece, the stone churches, albergue are cool even in June. Agree on lightweight sleeping bag ( Helios) Most of all, lay everything out and edit!! You don’t need half of it. Ps good gear stores in Najera, Logroño, Burgos, Astorga. Leon, probably Pamplona, tho I didn’t see one. Some stuff in SJPP, Ponferrada, PortoMarin ( ponchos, etc) Nothing on the Mesata. Farmacias, everywhere so don’t sweat HABAs.
 

Eibhlís

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2000 I walked 300km of the Camino Frances.
2020 I plan to walk the whole 800km.
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
I feel exactly the same! I'm hoping to do the Camino Frances mid June to mid July.
 

Trishagale

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014)
Frances (2017)
I usually walk in April/May. In 2017 I spent 3 days in Logroño as a tourist with my husband and it was around 40C every day. As we drove out I watched the pilgrims struggling in the heat and I was so glad it was not me!
 

wildrover

thewildrover
Camino(s) past & future
2015 april c/f. vdlp feb 2016. Norte / primitivo Sep 2016. C/f 12/16. Vdlp 12/17. 12/18. Lana 02/19.
A few years ago I walked the Frances from the first week in June to the first week in July.
Rained light to medium on me two times (days). I found my lightweight poncho to be enough. A good lightweight rain jacket would have worked well too. Personally I wouldn't have wanted to wear rain pants.
No need for waterproof footwear at all.
Never got hot. Perhaps in the 80's F at the most. That is perfect in my book. I wore shorts and tech shirts literally everyday.
Never got cold. Cool in the mornings sometimes and in the evenings sometimes. My fleece pullover was enough.
I carried a sleeping bag liner and found it to be enough. Sometimes I put albergue blankets over it.
Didn't have gloves, scarf, neck buff or beanie cap. Wouldn't have needed them.
Did have good hat for the sun. Mostly beautiful sunny days.
You don't need to carry much on a summer Camino. If your pack weighs more than about 12 pounds, you have too much.
Perfecto!
 

Jamieb

Member
I walked this past summer June 6-July 9. Weather was great. It was cool in the beginning - wore my pants and layers on top; slept in a sleeping bag liner - most nights were comfortable, on the cool nights I would layer up or throw my jacket over me.

After day 5 or so, I wore my shorts every day and extra layers on top - just peel the layers off as the day went on. About Mid June Spain was hit with a "heat wave" - it got into the 80's and depending on what section of the trail you were on (limited shade or pavement walking, etc) it felt much hotter. The sun is intense - be sure to use sunscreen. I wore a bamboo fiber long sleeve for sun protection - it was lightweight, cool enough to wear alone on the hot days and it also provided an extra warm layer on the cooler days.

I had one full day of walking in hard rain - I used a rain jacket, the only part of me that was dry was my core area - everything was wet, even had a pack cover and just about everything in my pack with the exception of dirty clothing in my dry sack was damp/wet.

The one piece of clothing I was most grateful for was my packable puffy jacket, it originally was in my "maybe" pile of clothing and decided to pack it at the last minute - so glad I did - I wore that just about every day, mostly early in the morning and at night after the sun went down and some nights I draped it over myself as I slept.
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Hi Maggie -

Welcome to the Forum! There’s so much terrific advice here - you’ll be totally prepared in every way if you take on board the tips given here.

My contribution is to recommend you bring a wide-brimmed hat with a firm brim and a cord to secure the hat under your chin. The floppy, foldable hats don’t cope with the windy days - the brims flop around and your face doesn’t get the sun protection it needs. I can recommend the Tilley hat with the wide brim. On really hot days I would first dunk my head in the village fountains (practically everywhere) and I wore the hat with a filmy long scarf which I also wet and draped over my head and stuck the hat on top. I draped the soaked scarf over my shoulders and arms and wrapped the ends of the scarf around the tops of my hiking poles. On those blisteringly hot days on the Meseta this practice kept me cool for ages and sunburn-free. I used sunscreen liberally too of course.

On the one rainy day I experienced this year I wore the hat with my Sea-to-Summit poncho. The wide brim kept the rain off my face. As the hat’s made of a water-resistant fabric it stayed pretty dry.

It hand washes really well and it still looks as good as it did on the day I bought it.

The hat has been a great investment and I hope it will join me on many more caminos.

Buen Camino Maggie!

Cheers from Oz -
Jenny
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Thank you for sharing your story! Sounds like a sleeping bag and rain jacket definitely came in handy for parts of your trip and I'm glad they worked out for you.

That said, I'd rather err on the side of packing less weight from the outset: even the lightest of sleeping bags is heavier and takes up more room than I want to carry, and I don't want to have to pack something I'm only going to be using for a scant handful of nights or in a "just in case" scenario. (I know that things can be sent ahead and/or left behind if not needed, but I'd rather not have to worry about that to begin with.)

So it's going to be a sleep sack for me, with the option of wearing some lightweight but warm layers to sleep in should temperatures require towards the beginning of my trip. And I'll probably end up taking both a poncho and a light travel rain jacket, since the latter doesn't add much weight to my pack and will come in handy on those occasions when wearing a poncho might be less desirable (like when walking around a town or city without my backpack on a drizzly evening or rest day.)

Appreciate the insight and good wishes - and hope this discussion will be helpful to @MaggieQYogini too! :)
Noooo Lol! Take a poncho OR a rain jacket 😁
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (May-June 2020)
Noooo Lol! Take a poncho OR a rain jacket 😁
Ha, I realized as I was writing that bit about taking both that I would send at least a few gram-shavers here into hysterics 😂 But in all seriousness - my travel rain jacket weighs less than my poncho does and comes in handy for different situations. The poncho is for when I'm walking in the rain and need something that provides an additional layer of protection for my pack. And the jacket is for when I'm walking around a city or town sans pack and want to look a little more put-together. Consider it one of those "luxury items" that everyone is entitled to at least one or two of ... er, right? 😉
 

MaggieQYogini

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
End of May to June, 2020
Out of curiosity, where are you starting? Depending on the city, you will skip mountains, for example.
And 30 days is very tough for the average walker if you are starting in SJPdP.

As many said above, layers. Take few things that can go on top of each other if it gets cold. Anything out of ordinary you can always buy more clothes.

Buen Camino!
I'll starting at SJPD for the full Camino Frances. I have no time constrains. Really appreciate all the helpful advice.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
Everything at it’s lightest, no more than 8kg. Shorts, cycle shorts (with no padding, to prevent thigh rash), very lightweight t-shirts, trainers will get most use, trekking shoes in the rain. Avoid hottest part of day if possible. Start earlyish. Always walk in the shade, always wear sunscreen, carry a bit of water and a medical standard filter straw. Happy Christmas 🙏😊👍🏼
 

MaggieQYogini

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
End of May to June, 2020
Everything at it’s lightest, no more than 8kg. Shorts, cycle shorts (with no padding, to prevent thigh rash), very lightweight t-shirts, trainers will get most use, trekking shoes in the rain. Avoid hottest part of day if possible. Start earlyish. Always walk in the shade, always wear sunscreen, carry a bit of water and a medical standard filter straw. Happy Christmas 🙏😊👍🏼
Thank you!! What is a medical standard filter straw??
 

mikulre

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2019)
I walked from May 13 till June 13 of this year. I saw temps in the 90s across Mesata and snow on O Cebreiro on June 6. Most days I saw lows around 50 and highs in the upper 70s. A lot like the California central coast. I only needed my sleeping bag at the municipal albergue in O Cebreiro where they had no heat. Otherwise a liner would have been fine. I brought two pairs of hiking shorts and one pair of hiking pants which converted to shorts. I had two light weight t shirts for hiking and one cotton blend long sleeve shirt for evenings. I had a rain jacket and a poncho for weather and warmth. I wish I had brought a fleece for evenings because I was usually cold while walking around town after hiking. A fleece would have also been handy for a handful of cold mornings however usually warmth wasn’t an issue while hiking. You’re cold for the first 15 minutes then you start peeling off layers. 90% of the time I hiked in shorts and that was fine. Medium thickness merino socks were a must. Sandals for walking around during the evenings were also important although you will want the option to wear them with socks when it’s cold.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
See attached photo. Will fit any standard plastic bottle if stuck, river water, puddle etc......
You have had to resort to drinking river or puddle water while walking the Camino? If so, which route? I have walked the Frances and Portugues multiple times and have never even come close to having to drink anything but clean, potable water from fountains, cafes etc.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I'll starting at SJPD for the full Camino Frances. I have no time constrains. Really appreciate all the helpful advice.
That is nice. I walked the Frances once with no strict time schedule to adhere to. Can be an advantage. If the weather starts to take a turn for the very bad, once can simply not walk that day or shorten one's walking distance that day.
buen Camino
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
You have had to resort to drinking river or puddle water while walking the Camino? If so, which route? I have walked the Frances and Portugues multiple times and have never even come close to having to drink anything but clean, potable water from fountains, cafes etc.
Just as a back-up! Same as you water has not been a problem. However, I have always used a Brita filter water bottle. Advice is, that it is not good enough to prevent cyto.. Having caught this parasite somehow, I will be using a medical grade filter on all tap water. My personal choice.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
Something not necessary on the Camino.
BC SY
Would hope it ‘not necessary’, however, I will do everything not to get crypto. again. A personal choice, just in case!
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
Would hope it ‘not necessary’, however, I will do everything not to get crypto. again. A personal choice, just in case!
The chance of contracting Crypto in Spain, especially when sticking to 'potable' water sources, is minuscule!
BC SY
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
The chance of contracting Crypto in Spain, especially when sticking to 'potable' water sources, is minuscule!
BC SY
Yes my dear S, but I did, and suffered for 4weeks. As I said, a personal choice. There are many things that are ‘not necessary’ judging by the size of some rucksacks. This is a very light, cheap protection IF it were ever needed.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
Yes my dear S, but I did, and suffered for 4weeks. As I said, a personal choice. There are many things that are ‘not necessary’ judging by the size of some rucksacks. This is a very light, cheap protection IF it were ever needed.
The first signs and symptoms of cryptosporidium infection, which usually appear within a week after infection, might include:
  • Watery diarrhea.
  • Dehydration.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • Weight loss.
  • Stomach cramps or pain.
  • Fever.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The first signs and symptoms of cryptosporidium infection, which usually appear within a week after infection, might include:
  • Watery diarrhea.
  • Dehydration.
  • Lack of appetite.
  • Weight loss.
  • Stomach cramps or pain.
  • Fever.
  • Nausea.
  • Vomiting.
Where/How do you think that you contracted it?
One could always buy bottled water if they had any doubts about water safety.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
Where/How do you think that you contracted it?
One could always buy bottled water if they had any doubts about water safety.
If only I knew! Symptoms take 2wks to emerge! Lol, yes of course. But, what would you do if you were desperate for water?? This is JUST AN ALTERNATIVE (that I have)! BC PC
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
This is way off-topic for the OP. I'm not entirely clear how we got from climate to alimentary canal infections. The weather will of course be what it is. And history and forecasts are available from the usual sources.

Which brings us to water-borne "discomforts". Given that the usual method of transmission is faecal contamination of water, food or "hand-to-mouth", identifying the original source is always tricky. Buying bottled water offers no protection if the bottler, delivery driver or vendor didn't wash their hands after taking a crap; nor does it protect you from lavatory door handles or any other door handle or hand-grip that has been contaminated by the incontinent or uncaring. Other sources of Cryptosporidium infection are widely available.

Most of us will not even notice we have been infected: we'll take the variance in digestive comfort as all part of normal. Like our lovely Bed-bugs its yet another organism long associated with Homo-Sapiens, and for some it can be a really uncomfortable experience. Simple, basic hygiene practice will reduce the risk of infection. Nothing eliminates it, even a gadget "guaranteed" to eliminate 99.9% of infection transmissions.

So, if you are planning on drinking from streams, ponds and puddles the recommended product may come in handy. Though it might be better to plan your water intake to avoid the necessity. Drink a Litre before you start, carry a Litre, and ask nicely for a refill if required. The chances of encountering infection from an authorised water source (rather than the bottle its in ;)) has a very large number of 9's after the decimal point. The trick, if ever there was one, is never to arrive at a water source with a full water bottle and never to leave a water source without drinking a Litre.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
This is way off-topic for the OP. I'm not entirely clear how we got from climate to alimentary canal infections. The weather will of course be what it is. And history and forecasts are available from the usual sources.

Which brings us to water-borne "discomforts". Given that the usual method of transmission is faecal contamination of water, food or "hand-to-mouth", identifying the original source is always tricky. Buying bottled water offers no protection if the bottler, delivery driver or vendor didn't wash their hands after taking a crap; nor does it protect you from lavatory door handles or any other door handle or hand-grip that has been contaminated by the incontinent or uncaring. Other sources of Cryptosporidium infection are widely available.

Most of us will not even notice we have been infected: we'll take the variance in digestive comfort as all part of normal. Like our lovely Bed-bugs its yet another organism long! 😊👍🏼 associated with Homo-Sapiens, and for some it can be a really uncomfortable experience. Simple, basic hygiene practice will reduce the risk of infection. Nothing eliminates it, even a gadget "guaranteed" to eliminate 99.9% of infection transmissions.

So, if you are planning on drinking from streams, ponds and puddles the recommended product may come in handy. Though it might be better to plan your water intake to avoid the necessity. Drink a Litre before you start, carry a Litre, and ask nicely for a refill if required. The chances of encountering infection from an authorised water source (rather than the bottle its in ;)) has a very large number of 9's after the decimal point. The trick, if ever there was one, is never to arrive at a water source with a full water bottle and never to leave a water source without drinking a Litre.
Love the tone and entertainment in your post
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
A lot of people come to this forum who have never walked the Camino, and have never undertaken any type of long distance walk or hike of any kind. They are completely inexperienced in what's needed to do a walk like the Camino, or what it is like to do it. They do not know the terrain, the wildlife, what food is available etc, and also potable water sources available. So any advice thrown out there is taken quite to heart, even if it is advice not necessarily accurate in terms of what is needed to walk the Camino as opposed to what the advice giver likes to bring, and it is not a necessity. Things such as expensive pieces of kit. The backpacks and sleeping bags that costs hundreds of euros. GPS units and "bedbug" resistant sleeping sacks. Water purification units would fall under that as well. You say it is needed and some people reading it will have in their mind the drinking water available along the Frances is putrid and germ ridden, when in fact it is not. That is just one example. That being said I suppose it is important to just stick to the facts about walking the Camino.
 

Paul Corrin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2017)
Santiago-Muxia-Fisterra (2017)
Porto-Santiago (2018)
Ferrol-Santiago (2019
A lot of people come to this forum who have never walked the Camino, and have never undertaken any type of long distance walk or hike of any kind. They are completely inexperienced in what's needed to do a walk like the Camino, or what it is like to do it. They do not know the terrain, the wildlife, what food is available etc, and also potable water sources available. So any advice thrown out there is taken quite to heart, even if it is advice not necessarily accurate in terms of what is needed to walk the Camino as opposed to what the advice giver likes to bring, and it is not a necessity. Things such as expensive pieces of kit. The backpacks and sleeping bags that costs hundreds of euros. GPS units and "bedbug" resistant sleeping sacks. Water purification units would fall under that as well. You say it is needed and some people reading it will have in their mind the drinking water available along the Frances is putrid and germ ridden, when in fact it is not. That is just one example. That being said I suppose it is important to just stick to the facts about walking the Camino.
That’s quite right there are so many things that are ‘not necessary’! Each individual will have their own list. I have never walked with more than 6kg. This when ready, with water. As someone who has caught crypto on a Camino, I will carry a filtration straw with me. I really don’t care what anyone else thinks. Oh, and in the same arena, these days it certainly is not necessary to carry a shell!
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
Did CF in June/July 2019. Cold in morning-50's-60's-(I'm from FL). Warms up by 9ish. Hot during the day and hot as hell in the albergues. Get's cold at around 3-4 in the morning. I used a liner. I had a Columbia jacket that worked for rain and cold with a built-in hoodie that hides in the collar. I also took a small umbrella. Used it primarily as a parasol. I used two pairs of Columbia zip-off pants, so I had pants and shorts. I took a long sleeve and short sleeve shirt and two buffs. Buffs work great!. You can see what I'm wearing here:

As others have stated, you can pick up anything that you feel you need while on the Camino.
 
Last edited:

McSherry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Part) - 2019
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
We hiked the Sarria to SdeC to Sarria starting about June 11 of this year. The highs each day were in the 60’s (F). Each morning a sweatshirt or light jacket was needed briefly (usually in the 40’s F). We had one day of heavy rain and wind. We had rain ponchos and they worked well enough.

The main advice would be to dress in layers you can shed or add to. Pack light. If you need something,you can find it in one of the towns (I scrambled to get a decent sweatshirt just before we started).

That all said...it’s the weather, and your results could be completely different!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino francés, Camino portugués (Tui), Pilgrims Welcome Office, hospitalero 8 times
I haven't read the ~100 replies to this but… we cannot talk about the weather next June. We can't realistically talk about the weather beyond about 4 or 5 days out. What you are asking about is climate. Please see:
https://americanpilgrims.org/online-resources/#weather-climate

Click on the "Climate" links for whatever cities you're interested in. Your "weather" will be what you see plus or minus some unknown error band. ¡Buena suerte!
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!
I walked it in June 2017. Very quick answers:

buff?? - Yes, absolutely. So versatile.
Scarf?? - No.
Raincoat ? Or poncho ? - A good poncho was fine for us.
Waterproof shoes or no? - You'll probably get rain in Galicia but not much elsewhere, doesn't seem necessary.
Sleeping bag or liner ? - Liner.
Shorts or no?? - Yes, you'll be walking in over 30 degrees Celsius some days.
Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? - Not exactly my speciality. :)
Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves - short sleeves.
 

Kumi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Hi, I've spent a lot of time planning my June 2020 Camino. Newbie here! As excited as I am, also getting frustrated and overwhelmed as there is just so much info there. And yet, i still don't have a good grip on the weather in June. I'll start walking June 1st and hoping to take no more than 30 days. How cold does it get in the morning or night? How hot does it get during the day. The list of things to buy or not buy frustrates me: buff?? Scarf?? Raincoat ? Or poncho ? Waterproof shoes or no? Sleeping bag or liner ? Shorts or no?? Yoga leggings or tracking pants ? Long sleeve shirt to hike in or short sleeves Etc... Head hurts! Maybe I'm just thinking too much!

I'm from Southern California. Folks who actually did it in June, I'd love to hear from you, granted weather do change from year to year. But your experience will really help me mentally prepare and aiding my shopping and packing for my Camino. Thank you!!!
I hear ya...I will be walking then also, following... totally understand about the head hurting...lol ugh.!
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
biarritzdon Weather 31
T Weather 13
klarita Weather 2
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