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Luggage Transfer Correos

Weight, and how its discussion is terrifying me.

taigirl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
I'll recognise you both by your beautifully coiffured hairstyles!! Bet you are also Aussies.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
I'll recognise you both by your beautifully coiffured hairstyles!! Bet you are also Aussies.
We are.
Though in a 'previous life' I think Pat was a Thai 'Princess' ;)
 

taigirl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
I knew it. We have the same sense of humour. As well as being awake at the same time.😎
 

gregrobinson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May - July (2019)
I arrive in Spain Apr26, visit cities for 20 days, then begin my Camino from Pamploma May 11-12th.
In my daily life, I walk more than average, and my usual cycle rides are 25miles/40km and up. I've been walking longer lengths preparing for this, and researching what to expect. Probably too much research, as the info and discussions are starting to terrify me. Especially talk about pack weight. The general consensus seems to be 10% of body weight. 10% for me is 21lbs/9.5g. (I understand that is relative as to the actual body makeup). That said, the discussion here about cutting weight has me worried. (someone is even down to 4.5 lbs/2kg) My pack without water is 17lbs/7.7kg. I expect it to be closer to 10% when completed. So my question is, are there average fit people walking with 10% weight OR MORE packs?
Not sure what everyone is carrying in their packs, but mine is 8lbs. The pack itself is about 2.5 lbs and inside I basically have a sleeping bag (spark 1 from Sea2summit - 13 oz), a pair of lightweight pants, shorts, running shorts that can double as a swimsuit, 2 pairs of socks, 2 evening shirts (one long sleeve & one short), water resistant windbreaker type jacket, hat and basic toiletries. I could knock a pound off but I like the sturdiness of the backpack.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Not sure what everyone is carrying in their packs, but mine is 8lbs. The pack itself is about 2.5 lbs and inside I basically have a sleeping bag (spark 1 from Sea2summit - 13 oz), a pair of lightweight pants, shorts, running shorts that can double as a swimsuit, 2 pairs of socks, 2 evening shirts (one long sleeve & one short), water resistant windbreaker type jacket, hat and basic toiletries. I could knock a pound off but I like the sturdiness of the backpack.
Wow, that's light. Is that really all you carry?
No different footwear for the evening?

I'm down to about 13.5 lbs for my next Camino (ex food/water).
I could go lower but I'd need to lose my Umbrella, extra socks (3rd set), sandals, ......
I think there comes a point where the extra weight reduction starts to impact comfort, convenience.
Which of course is a very personal 'trade off' :oops:
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I think there comes a point where the extra weight reduction starts to impact comfort, convenience.
Which of course is a very personal 'trade off' :oops:
I agree. I sometimes wonder if the endless posts about weight reduction have moved from being a practical debate into the realms of fetish and obsession. People who intend to walk in spring or autumn without a sleeping bag or rain wear or a full change of clothes perhaps. A gamble which always strikes me as being as unwise as setting off without adequate insurance.
 

Kaiso

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
I agree. I sometimes wonder if the endless posts about weight reduction have moved from being a practical debate into the realms of fetish and obsession. People who intend to walk in spring or autumn without a sleeping bag or rain wear or a full change of clothes perhaps. A gamble which always strikes me as being as unwise as setting off without adequate insurance.
Kinda why I started the thread. I've now been in Spain for 20 days. What I originally packed was adequate for the south. However, I find the north colder than I expected. I had to purchase some charity shop clothing to suit. My pack is definitely heavier than I hoped. We'll see how I manage. Fortunately some items are consumerables (like sun block) so get lighter as I progress. Hopefully, I'll acclimatize and be able to donate some of the items. I start walking from Pamplona tomorrow.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
What I originally packed was adequate for the south. However, I find the north colder than I expected.
I understand the problem. Within the past hour I have packed my rucksack for a two month long journey to Japan and Australia. Mostly vehicle tourism but I also hope to walk in both countries on routes which will involve camping overnight. I have had to plan for daytime temperatures ranging from about 16C up to 30C and for night-time temperatures as low as 4 or 5C. Also a strong probability of heavy rain. My personal choice to handle that is to take a number of light clothing layers which I can add or remove as necessary. If I had only one destination in mind the choice would be more straightforward and my load probably a little lighter. But I prefer to err on the side of caution and ensure that I have what I need for a safe and comfortable journey even if that adds to the weight of the pack. I have not weighed my pack as knowing the actual figure would not change my packing decisions. I know from experience that the load is well within my own comfort limit. And in any case my plans would not be altered were I to discover that the weight is greater than 10% of my own fairly substantial body mass.
 

Pilger99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
I sometimes wonder if the endless posts about weight reduction have moved from being a practical debate into the realms of fetish and obsession....
I prefer to carry something heavier on the back with a good fitting backpack (e.g. 10kg), than much lesser weight in some uncomfortable manner.
Sometimes I walk with a very light foldable backpack (30l, 250g). If that little thing is not filled with some weight and volume (3kg,more than half full), it is not comfortable! On the other hand much more than 5kg only on the shoulders results in remarkable pain. Walking with no backpack but with something heavy in the pockets or a water bottle in the hand is also closer to hell than heaven to me.

It's probably just me and my surroundings: Most people appear to have 10++kg overweight. Why should they spend so much efford in reducing the backpack weight? Packing a bit more and reducing body weight instead looks more desirable.

The idea of "you can buy anything when you need it" is somehow true for longterm weather changes, but if you get cold or wet and you have no dry clothes at one day, the next shop is often a day ahead. The size that spaniards refer to as "extra large" is usually only M(edium), so real XL is hardly available (or press-fitting). Same with shoes. These would not even fit if I shed of 50kg of my body ;).
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Most people appear to have 10++kg overweight. Why should they spend so much efford in reducing the backpack weight? Packing a bit more and reducing body weight instead looks more desirable.
I hope I can explain this a little bit to clarify the differing issues involved. I apologize if I muddy things up too much :)

The dynamics of how the weight of body mass is carried is different and is not interchangeable with the dynamics of carrying external weight, including a backpack. For instance, while a heavy pack OR heavy body weight is hard on the joints of the lower leg and knees, a heavy pack can add additional torsional stresses which do not happen from body weight.

That same principal holds true with shoulder, neck, lower back and core muscle involvements. Losing weight is a great idea and will help reduce certain risks for musculoskeletal injury. But losing weight does not help with the separate issues which a heavy backpack creates. The ideal is to lose both body weight and backpack weight.
 
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Dandabika

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed GR65 (2016)
While the weight can be carried, I would not classify 17 pounds as exceptionally light :)
I walked the GR65 Compostelle in 2016, The Norte, Primitivo, and part of the Frances in 2017, and the GR70 Stepenson Route in 2018. Exceptionally light is less than 17 pounds. When you are down to that weight with food for 3 meals on board and at least one litre of water you probably aren't equipped for freezing or heavy rain or sleeping on a floor somewhere. The Norte, Primitivo and Stevenson are a heck of a lot more challenging than the the Frances because albergues are far apart and the mountain ranges and the altitudes make it cold and wet and in my case 2 blizzards in May. Many of the villages on Primitivo have no foods to offer plus on weekends you'll be hard pressed to find anything to eat or to buy anything, so you have to carry a minimum of 3 meals or 5 meals when walking during Saturday to Monday because nothing is open on weekends. The other problem is timing; if you arrive in a town that has supplies during their closed hours you are out of luck. When there are supplies you buy what there is. If you're fussy you won't be happy along this these trails. High tech trail foods are not available in any of the stores that I stocked up at. 5 meals (more like substantial snacks with dried sausage plus bread and fruit or veggies) and in my case plus one and a half litre of water weigh at least 6 pounds. So do the math: 17 pounds is very light.
 
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davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I walked the GR65 Compostelle in 2016, The Norte, Primitivo, and part of the Frances in 2017, and the GR70 Stepenson Route in 2018. Exceptionally light is less than 17 pounds. When you are down to that weight with food for 3 meals on board and at least one litre of water you probably aren't equipped for freezing or heavy rain or sleeping on a floor somewhere. The Norte, Primitivo and Stevenson are a heck of a lot more challenging than the the Frances because albergues are far apart and the mountain ranges and the altitudes make it cold and wet and in my case 2 blizzards in May. Many of the villages on Primitivo have no foods to offer plus on weekends you'll be hard pressed to find anything to eat or to buy anything, so you have to carry a minimum of 3 meals or 5 meals when walking during Saturday to Monday because nothing is open on weekends. The other problem is timing; if you arrive in a town that has supplies during their closed hours you are out of luck. When there are supplies you buy what there is. If you're fussy you won't be happy along this these trails. High tech trail foods are not available in any of the stores that I stocked up at. 5 meals (more like substantial snacks with dried sausage plus bread and fruit or veggies) and in my case plus one and a half litre of water weigh at least 6 pounds. So do the math: 17 pounds is very light.
First: We are on a Forum thread about walking the Camino Frances, NOT a GR route or backpacking trips into a mountainous wilderness crossing the badlands of the Arctic tundra. So the Camino Frances is the frame of reference here.

Second: I've thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and the Colorado Trail. I do hundreds of miles of backpacking at altitudes above 3000 meters in the Cascades, Rockies and Sierras every year. I will carry gear and food for 10 days between resupply points with a total backpack weight of 22 pounds. My backpacking and mountaineering experience is extensive, which is one reason that I try to help folks that are new to carrying a pack on their backs for distance walking, even if it is a daily village to village walk.

So while 17 pounds is 'light' for a multi-day backpacking trip, it is not 'very light'. And it most certainly is not 'very light' for a village to village Camino walk.
 

gregrobinson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May - July (2019)
Wow, that's light. Is that really all you carry?
No different footwear for the evening?

I'm down to about 13.5 lbs for my next Camino (ex food/water).
I could go lower but I'd need to lose my Umbrella, extra socks (3rd set), sandals, ......
I think there comes a point where the extra weight reduction starts to impact comfort, convenience.
Which of course is a very personal 'trade off' :oops:
Sorry, I need to update my info. While in Pamplona on my way to SJPDP I got rid of a few things. I slept 2 nights in albuergues and it was stifling hot with all the bodies. I sent my sleeping bag forward, along with the extra thick socks. And without the sleeping bag, I didn't need the 25 ltr pack with internal frame. I bought a 20 liter frameless pack that weighs about 6 oz. I put my new fully loaded pack on the scale at the pilgrims office in SJPDP and it was 4.5lbs. That's lbs, not kilos. 2 days ago in Logrono I threw a few items in the trash, so probably only 4 lbs now. I just slept in my silk liner last night. You don't need what you think you need. One pair of lightweight evening clothes and one pair of day\walking clothes. A toothbrush, toothpaste and travel shampoo. That's pretty much it.


I picked up a pair of Keen sandals and had a great walk today, 13 miles, no socks, no blisters... Gonna keep walking in them and if it works out I may send my Altra Lone Peaks to Ivar to hold. The daily schedule is: get dressed, walk, stop for bfast, walk, walk, stop for coffee, reach destination, shower, take nap, eat\drink, go to bed. Repeat... Not much room for extra stuff.
 
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domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. Next: Gd St Bernard to Rome
Sorry, I need to update my info. While in Pamplona on my way to SJPDP I got rid of a few things. I slept 2 nights in albuergues and it was stifling hot with all the bodies. I sent my sleeping bag forward, along with the extra thick socks. And without the sleeping bag, I didn't need the 25 ltr pack with internal frame. I bought a 20 liter frameless pack that weighs about 6 oz. I put my new fully loaded pack on the scale at the pilgrims office in SJPDP and it was 4.5lbs. That's lbs, not kilos. 2 days ago in Logrono I threw a few items in the trash, so probably only 4 lbs now. I just slept in my silk liner last night. You don't need what you think you need. One pair of lightweight evening clothes and one pair of day\walking clothes. A toothbrush, toothpaste and travel shampoo. That's pretty much it.


I picked up a pair of Keen sandals and had a great walk today, 13 miles, no socks, no blisters... Gonna keep walking in them and if it works out I may send my Altra Lone Peaks to Ivar to hold. The daily schedule is: get dressed, walk, stop for bfast, walk, walk, stop for coffee, reach destination, shower, take nap, eat\drink, go to bed. Repeat... Not much room for extra stuff.
What, no hairdryer???! 😀 ;)
Joke apart, (sorry), I do like to have something against the rain, either a poncho, an umbrella or a rain jacket... (The poncho and the umbrella being the heaviest items). Oh and a towel, a very small one.
Enjoy the rest of your Camino 🙂
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe (01/2019)
*Derry-SANT (09/2019)?
There also seems to be a competition to have the world's smallest pack. If I carried a 35L pack it would be impossible to fit it to my frame and I would have issues with weight on shoulders no matter the weight
I wouldn't say it's a competition, simply individual choice and the beauty about comitting to a lower capacity pack is that it focuses attention more when choosing gear. The Osprey 22 litre pack that I carry comes in a range of sizes and can be adjusted to fit body frame therefore increase in litre capacity is not always necessary or correlates to requirement for bigger body frame.

My latest pack is an Osprey Aether Pro 70L.
My set up for my next Camino is weighing in just under 5kg.
Based on a large version of your 70 litre pack the unladen weight is around 1.8kg and your laden weight comes in at 3.2 kg?

But you need to be better than average-fit to enjoy your whole journey.
I would say that everyone and anyone can do their own camino, it's more about listening to your body and don't have to be better than average fit, whatever that means!
The charging cable that came with my phone is 12gm. I got a shorter one that is 7gm. Cut the labels of clothes etc
Cutting labels off clothes and shortening cables... really!?

Respectfully calling you out on these points as your information may influence other people who are reading this thread. I would say take with you what you need and not what you want and the Camino will show each of us what we really need on the Way!
 
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gregrobinson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May - July (2019)
What, no hairdryer???! 😀 ;)
Joke apart, (sorry), I do like to have something against the rain, either a poncho, an umbrella or a rain jacket... (The poncho and the umbrella being the heaviest items). Oh and a towel, a very small one.
Enjoy the rest of your Camino 🙂

What, no hairdryer???! 😀 ;)
Joke apart, (sorry), I do like to have something against the rain, either a poncho, an umbrella or a rain jacket... (The poncho and the umbrella being the heaviest items). Oh and a towel, a very small one.
Enjoy the rest of your Camino 🙂
I wish I had enough hair to need a hairdryer...
 

lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
<---This mane? I cut it off for the Camino. I lost about 15 lbs of gravitational pull off my body when I did. I know have full range of motion in my neck. (Not joking lol) And I no longer need a hairdryer! 😂

Seriously don't freak out. There are all kind of baggage services these days. If you're pack is too much you can send it ahead daily. If that becomes costly you can buy something lighter-weight when you're there and send your heavier pack to Santiago for pick-up when you get there. Yes you might have to pay extra fees on the plane ride home for checking one of the bags but it may be cost-effective if you add up sending your pack forward daily. From what I've learned on the forum over the years is that nothing is written in stone.

We are not meant to live in fear. Fear not. Just walk in faith that each day will be a wonderful experience and if it proves to be harder than expected, more challenging than you bargained for, you can at least get comfort because you are doing something MEANINGFUL, even if you don't understand the why of it. Buen Camino!
 

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