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Weight, Heat, Humidity

HBS60

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
August 2024 (planned)
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
It is generally hottest after mid-day. That's why a lot of people get up very early to walk. You may want to limit your mileage due to weather conditions and it is important to drink a lot of water. We try to walk shorter distances and don't walk past 1 pm.

As September wears on into October, it will get cooler, but you are walking in a very hot weather time frame for normal years.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Just a couple things to keep in mind for your successful Camino:

1. You will hit some hot weather, but very reasonable humidity. Like so many of your fellow pilgrims, start early and try to finish early afternoon. I’ve always liked walking just before sunrise when there was still a nice coolness in the air. Try not to walk in the heat of the day!

2. That first day is tough for a couple reasons. It’s long and until the very end, it’s all uphill. Therefore, let me recommend that Express Bourricot transport your pack to Roncesvalles. From there on, you can use JacoTrans when needed. Get your walking legs those first few days without worrying about carrying too much.

3. I know your cPAP machine is a given regarding weight. However, I’d encourage to drop even a few more pounds off your current 22.5. You’ll appreciate the lighter weight on hot days or when the terrain is tough. A few pounds lighter will make a big difference. You won’t need much on the Camino so cull more items out to lighten that load.

4. Hydrate. Hydrate. Hydrate. Always listen to your body. And, don’t forget the sunscreen!

5. Finally, don’t doubt yourself. The CF isn’t easy, but your learning curve will be quite steep. Very quickly you’ll find out what works best for you and you’ll get into your groove. But, be both patient and gentle with yourself.

Buen Camino!
 
Thanks to all!

My first day will be just to Orisson (yes, I made a reservation months ago!), so I hope to do the worst of the climbing early in the morning in the first two days.

I looked at the Jacotrans website and they do list SJPDP and Orrison as pickup places, is this acurrate? I thought it was only in Spain but they even list the specific albergue in SJPDP where I’ll be staying. I imagine that it would be different with Correos, but not Jacotrans if I understand it correctly. I’m sure I’ll figure it out when I get there! I have no preference between Express Burricot or Jacotrans, btw.

I’m glad that the humidity in Spain is better than FL, it is infernal these days around here! No matter how early it is, stepping out of my front door feels like being hit in the face with a wall of moisture. Our summers here is like winters up north, because we are mostly stuck indoors fleeing from the heat, just like up north people are stuck indoors because of the cold.

Since it might take me well into September, it might actually get cooler and perhaps rainier as I approach Santiago, which I hope to reach no later than September 22, so I might wind up climbing the Galicia mountains in cooler weather, but I don’t actually know.

I’m comforted by so many people posting their journeys, even people much older than me and I’m not a spring chicken any longer, so I know it can be done.

Muchas gracias a todos!
 
I’m having my doubts
At this point, you are as prepared as you can be, at least for this time.

I think it is time to ease off on the expectations of yourself. Maybe you won't succeed in walking from SJPP to Santiago. Maybe you'll get sick, injured, taken by aliens, etc., and "fail" your mission. Maybe you will get fed up to the point where you decide to abandon it. You are a grown adult and can deal with this. Coping with the unexpected, and changing plans, are not the same as "failure."

That first day is tough for a couple reasons. It’s long and until the very end, it’s all uphill. Therefore, let me recommend that Express Bourricot transport your pack to Roncesvalles. From there on, you can use JacoTrans when needed. Get your walking legs those first few days without worrying about carrying too much.
I agree with lightening your load on the first 2 days. However, for your day pack, you need a comfortable supportive pack. Maybe it should be your Kestrel, just half-full. Consider having a suitable dry bag or extremely light duffel that will stay closed, so you can send a few kilos in it by transport.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
@HBS60 , in addition to the reassurance and tips offered above, might I point out that most of the time the sun will be behind you - which seems to help me. Psychological ? I don't know.

In terms of coping mechanisms I ensure I've got something salty with me ( nut's), a banana ( potassium)and on a hot day I tend to swap out half a liter of my water for a bottle of Aquarius, which is an electrolyte drink similar to, but nowhere near as sweet as Gatorade. It's not strictly necessary, but I like it !
Others prefer gazpacho - tomatoes are also an excellent natural source of electrolytes. Watermelon, strawberries and yoghurt are also high in electrolytes,

And fresh OJ of course!

All of these help me get through the day and to recover faster.
 
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My first day will be just to Orisson (yes, I made a reservation months ago!), so I hope to do the worst of the climbing early in the morning in the first two days.

I looked at the Jacotrans website and they do list SJPDP and Orrison as pickup places
Orisson states on their website that they will only deal with a company called Donkey Service

 

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I have no experience with weather along the Camino Francés in August and September but I expect the humidity to be low due to our June and July trip.

Due to the political influence of an Austrian immigrant to Germany the time zone for France and Spain, once the same as London's, in the mid 20th century was changed to be the same as Berlin's. This means that León around September 1, about halfway across the CF and about the halfway point of your planned walking time, will have its solar noon about an hour later than Miami's (14:23 vs 13:20 local time DST). This means that you can probably walk an extra hour each day before suffering the same heat as you are used to.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I would simply suggest that every morning before you leave your accommodations that you record the local taxi phone number. I you are exhausted during the day you could contact them to pick you up.

You will fell safer during your Camino.
 
A few thoughts regarding heat with the background of having walked through France in the July/August heatwave in 2022 and the Frances in a very hot September of 2023:

In 2022, I had about 8 weeks of basically constantly 30-38°C (85-100 F) with no rain. While I do support the "start early, arrive early" on hot days, I find it equally important to take breaks. Even when I feel it getting hot, I still make sure to take breaks in the shade and to not rush through the heat. What also helps me is to actually go inside during breaks if possible. It makes a huge difference sitting in a building (especially those old stone houses in Spain and France) versus just sitting outside in the shade.

The good thing on the Frances is that you do not need to carry a lot of water on most stretches since there are so many fountains and bars. Apart from the weight, fresh cool water is a lot nicer than drinking from the bottle you have been carrying for 5 hours in the heat - ask me how I know. ;) I also second Aquarius on hot days.

I always keep my head covered and I do wear long sleeves and trousers (both loose fitting) to protect myself from the sun.

Lastly, about the weight:
This is so personal and different people are comfortable with different amounts of weight. On the Spanish caminos when sleeing in albergues, I usually carry around 10 kg (incl. 750 ml of water and some snacks) which doesn't feel heavy at all to me and has everything I want and need to bring. No issues with my back, my shoulders or my feet and honestly, I'm not a very athletic person. In France, I carried about 14/15 kg (including camping gear and more food and water) - and I was still fine.

I feel like Camino forums and Facebook groups can give you the impression that carrying anything over 6 kg is basically not doable without hurting yourself, but on the trail itself, I have always met loads of people who were in the 45-50 liter pack, 8-11 kg range and doing just fine.

P.S.: I'll be on the Primitivo in August, so I'm getting prepared to be slow cooked as well. 💪
 
At this point, you are as prepared as you can be, at least for this time.

I think it is time to ease off on the expectations of yourself. Maybe you won't succeed in walking from SJPP to Santiago. Maybe you'll get sick, injured, taken by aliens, etc., and "fail" your mission. Maybe you will get fed up to the point where you decide to abandon it. You are a grown adult and can deal with this. Coping with the unexpected, and changing plans, are not the same as "failure."


I agree with lightening your load on the first 2 days. However, for your day pack, you need a comfortable supportive pack. Maybe it should be your Kestrel, just half-full. Consider having a suitable dry bag or extremely light duffel that will stay closed, so you can send a few kilos in it by transport.
I’m preparing the best I can for something enormous I never thought I’d attempt. I am planning to back off my training the last week or two before starting, to avoid injuring myself and give me time to rest and recover. I’m aware that things can happen, I might not even be able to get there if a hurricane cancels my flight, I’m fine with other things happening, and an alien abduction actually doesn’t sound like such a bad idea given how…interesting…things have been here on planet Earth lately…

@HBS60 , in addition to the reassurance and tips offered above, might I point out that most of the time the sun will be behind you - which seems to help me. Psychological ? I don't know.

In terms of coping mechanisms I ensure I've got something salty with me ( nut's), a banana ( potassium)and on a hot day I tend to swap out half a liter of my water for a bottle of Aquarius, which is an electrolyte drink similar to, but nowhere near as sweet as Gatorade. It's not strictly necessary, but I like it !
Others prefer Gaspacio - tomatoes are also an excellent natural source of electrolytes. Watermelon, strawberries and yoghurt are also high in electrolytes,

And fresh OJ of course!

All of these help me get through the day and to recover faster.
I think the reason having the sun on the back feels better is that the backpack might be protecting us from getting the sun rays full blast. Going east, facing the sun, puts a lot of strain in the eyes even with good sunglasses and hat, we are getting blasted head on with the sun’s fury.
I’ve heard of Aquarius and looking forward to trying it, never heard of Gaspacio, sounds a bit like “gazpacho”, but I’ll never go wrong with OJ!
Orisson states on their website that they will only deal with a company called Donkey Service

View attachment 174235
For a moment I thought you were talking about Express Burricot, since “Burro” is donkey in Spanish, but this seems like a totally different company, and it sounds like Express Burricot won’t work with Orrisson.
I have no experience with weather along the Camino Francés in August and September but I expect the humidity to be low due to our June and July trip.

Due to the political influence of an Austrian immigrant to Germany the time zone for France and Spain, once the same as London's, in the mid 20th century was changed to be the same as Berlin's. This means that León around September 1, about halfway across the CF and about the halfway point of your planned walking time, will have its solar noon about an hour later than Miami's (14:23 vs 13:20 local time DST). This means that you can probably walk an extra hour each day before suffering the same heat as you are used to.
That’s interesting. I knew of the time zone issue and that sunsets are insanely late, but I thought it might be less so the closer they got to the autumn equinox. But one hour later than Miami? I’m on the same time zone!
I would simply suggest that every morning before you leave your accommodations that you record the local taxi phone number. I you are exhausted during the day you could contact them to pick you up.

You will fell safer during your Camino.
That’s an excellent, great idea, never thought of it!
A few thoughts regarding heat with the background of having walked through France in the July/August heatwave in 2022 and the Frances in a very hot September of 2023:

In 2022, I had about 8 weeks of basically constantly 30-38°C (85-100 F) with no rain. While I do support the "start early, arrive early" on hot days, I find it equally important to take breaks. Even when I feel it getting hot, I still make sure to take breaks in the shade and to not rush through the heat. What also helps me is to actually go inside during breaks if possible. It makes a huge difference sitting in a building (especially those old stone houses in Spain and France) versus just sitting outside in the shade.

The good thing on the Frances is that you do not need to carry a lot of water on most stretches since there are so many fountains and bars. Apart from the weight, fresh cool water is a lot nicer than drinking from the bottle you have been carrying for 5 hours in the heat - ask me how I know. ;) I also second Aquarius on hot days.

I always keep my head covered and I do wear long sleeves and trousers (both loose fitting) to protect myself from the sun.

Lastly, about the weight:
This is so personal and different people are comfortable with different amounts of weight. On the Spanish caminos when sleeing in albergues, I usually carry around 10 kg (incl. 750 ml of water and some snacks) which doesn't feel heavy at all to me and has everything I want and need to bring. No issues with my back, my shoulders or my feet and honestly, I'm not a very athletic person. In France, I carried about 14/15 kg (including camping gear and more food and water) - and I was still fine.

I feel like Camino forums and Facebook groups can give you the impression that carrying anything over 6 kg is basically not doable without hurting yourself, but on the trail itself, I have always met loads of people who were in the 45-50 liter pack, 8-11 kg range and doing just fine.

P.S.: I'll be on the Primitivo in August, so I'm getting prepared to be slow cooked as well. 💪
I think the weight will be fine, except maybe for going up and down mountains. For the most part, I even forget I have the backpack on as far as the weight is concerned, but it does feel harder in the heat. “Slow cooked is exactly how I felt today!

On a related matter, I have a personal blog where I write about all kinds of things, and today I got A Taste of the Camino, not just because of the walking, but because of a little encounter I had today while struggling with the heat. I’m putting the link here, let me know if this is not OK or if I should make a new thread elsewhere. As you can tell, I do like to write a lot, and nobody ever accused me of being a man of few words 😃. Maybe I’ll write a book someday!

 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
For a moment I thought you were talking about Express Burricot, since “Burro” is donkey in Spanish, but this seems like a totally different company, and it sounds like Express Burricot won’t work with Orrisson.
Yes, it's a fairly new company. That notice has been on Orisson's website most of this year.
 
I’m putting the link here, let me know if this is not OK or if I should make a new thread elsewhere.
That is fine to put it where you have. One thing you can do, though is put your blog link into your signature. Click on your username at the top on the menu, and then on Signature. Try to keep your signature to about 3 lines or 350 characters.

Your signature will show up in gray font under every post that you make, for people who are using their computers to view the forum. On phones, the signature might not show unless you turn your phone sideways. Look at the post above (#13) and you can see @trecile 's signature beginning "Eight Caminos between..."
 
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See how you go. I never carried more than a litre of water, but it wasn’t very hot when I was walking.

Also consider shopping your pack when you have long / hard days, it’s going to be hot or you are feeling tired. Your accommodation will help you organise. So long as you do it by 8pm you’re good.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Forget the time zone complications, just think about sunrise and local "solar time". On hotter days try and start walking about 20 minutes before sunrise "local dawn" when you can see just enough to be able to walk without a headlight or flashlight.

Or on really hot days (your perception of hot), leave earlier and use a headlight - they weigh nearly nothing and you should have one anyway for early starts in Albergues.

On the VDLP years ago when the forecast was 40, I started at 4:30 with some wonderful night time views and did a lot of kms before 11 am when it was time to stop and have a cold beer, and maybe then learn about the Spanish timezone just for fun.
 
I'd add two more variables that interract with each other and compund the effects that you've mentioned. The first is the distance for the day and the second is the elevation changes for the day. I find that, for me, elevation changes of 200, 400, and greater than 400 have a bigger effect than the distance. An elevation gain of 400 meters takes about 30% off the distance that I can walk. And a gain of greater than 400 takes about half of my potential distance.
 
Thanks to all!

My first day will be just to Orisson (yes, I made a reservation months ago!), so I hope to do the worst of the climbing early in the morning in the first two days.

I looked at the Jacotrans website and they do list SJPDP and Orrison as pickup places, is this acurrate? I thought it was only in Spain but they even list the specific albergue in SJPDP where I’ll be staying. I imagine that it would be different with Correos, but not Jacotrans if I understand it correctly. I’m sure I’ll figure it out when I get there! I have no preference between Express Burricot or Jacotrans, btw.

I’m glad that the humidity in Spain is better than FL, it is infernal these days around here! No matter how early it is, stepping out of my front door feels like being hit in the face with a wall of moisture. Our summers here is like winters up north, because we are mostly stuck indoors fleeing from the heat, just like up north people are stuck indoors because of the cold.

Since it might take me well into September, it might actually get cooler and perhaps rainier as I approach Santiago, which I hope to reach no later than September 22, so I might wind up climbing the Galicia mountains in cooler weather, but I don’t actually know.

I’m comforted by so many people posting their journeys, even people much older than me and I’m not a spring chicken any longer, so I know it can be done.

Muchas gracias a todos!
Consider paying Express Bourricot (or Donkey Service) to deliver your rucksack containing the CPAP to Refuge Orisson on your first day. While it is only 8.5 km (@ 5 miles) and about 2.5 - 3 hours from the start at SJPdP, it is all UP - a continuous incline. At this time of year, I strongly advise not overdoing it on that first day.

Most folks will agree that, given it's location right out of the proverbial starting blocks, this is the most daunting hill climb of the entire Camino Frances. Sure, there are other, higher and longer mountain climbs. But, by the time you reach them weeks later, you will have attained Camino conditioning.

I have actually seen pilgrims drop out of their entire Camino due to the continuous steep(ish) incline from the walls of SJPdP to Orisson. Once you are at Orisson, the rest of the way to Roncesvalles is relatively easier. You never tasted better cold beer!

Be sure to carry a small pack with more than enough water, sunscreen, a hat with wide brim and also a couple of Buffs. These can be used, wet to provide evaporative cooling to your head, neck, wrists and arms. I usually bring two, folded, one each in my rear hip pockets. I never carry my wallet there anyway.

Walking poles are also a very good idea. You can obtain Buffs and poles at SJPdP with ease.

Hope this helps.

Tom
 
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I would simply suggest that every morning before you leave your accommodations that you record the local taxi phone number. I you are exhausted during the day you could contact them to pick you up.

You will fell safer during your Camino.
You can also use a service app such as FreeNow, which appears to be quite popular in most of Europe.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Soak your hat in every fountain. Use your umbrella. Go slowly. Buen Camino
I'm doing tests with a "sunbrella" right now, and it's making a HUGE difference for how hot and drained I feel. The sunbrella might be the single most important item I bring with me come September. I might just leave the walking poles behind in favour of the 'brella.
 
I'm doing tests with a "sunbrella" right now, and it's making a HUGE difference for how hot and drained I feel. The sunbrella might be the single most important item I bring with me come September. I might just leave the walking poles behind in favour of the 'brella.
No need to leave poles behind. There are many ways to attach an umbrella to a backpack making it handsfree. I personally use the Euroschrim handsfree umbrella sold by Ivar in the Forum store.

 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
If your budget allows, some options to consider:
1. Consider a travel CPAP machine, as it is lighter and more compact.
2. Consider backpack transport and carry a small, lightweight, waterproof day pack
3. Do part of your training in parking garages in the evening to get some hill training.
4. Consider shorter stages, if time and budget allow.
5. Enjoy yourself and the experience.

Buen Camino.
 
No need to leave poles behind. There are many ways to attach an umbrella to a backpack making it handsfree. I personally use the Euroschrim handsfree umbrella sold by Ivar in the Forum store.

I'm aware of the handsfree possibilities (I'm trying several of them myself), but I meant for the purpose of overall weight-reduction. And, unfortunately, shipping the umbrella to North America is cost-prohibitive (and doesn't actually seem to be an option in the forum store -- it merely lists pick-up at Ivar's bricks-'n-mortar store [I presume] as an option).

Anyways, yeah. Sunbrellas are awesome.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I'm aware of the handsfree possibilities (I'm trying several of them myself), but I meant for the purpose of overall weight-reduction. And, unfortunately, shipping the umbrella to North America is cost-prohibitive (and doesn't actually seem to be an option in the forum store -- it merely lists pick-up at Ivar's bricks-'n-mortar store [I presume] as an option).

Anyways, yeah. Sunbrellas are awesome.

For those in the US who do want to order one, they are available direct from Euroschirm.

 
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
The terrain is difficult on the Frances. We walked it in April this year. We thought we were prepared as we could handle long distances (15-18 miles) quite easily, however we really struggled with the rocky terrain as it was much more of a factor than we had considered. So do lots of hill and uneven surface, and stairs for climbing training. The descent into Zubiri is brutal.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
Another option especially to start is walk every other day and don’t carry your pack to start . I have been over the hills to Roncevalles 5 time and never easy, ever. Be sure to have a rest day first in SJPP to relax and get over jet lag. Better to go too easy than a hard way.
 
Yes, I agree about hills. Everything on the CF is on a hill it seems. I will probably never start in SJPDP again and if I do I will go through Valcarlos where I can break the day more evenly.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
For those in the US who do want to order one, they are available direct from Euroschirm.

I purchased a sun umbrella for my Camino last year and wound up not taking it due to weight, and I didn't think it would be that hot in May. I'm headed back to Ponferrado and hiking to Santiago again towards the later part of September through early October.

Does anyone have a recommendation for a Hands-Free Umbrella Holder that they've used with an Osprey backpack?

Thanks in advance!

Keith
 
Fortunately, you won't be dealing the the high humidity of Florida!
Just as well you're doing the CF. The humidity here on the coast around Valencia is very similar to the tropics - easily 90%. And I agree with HBS60... It makes training pretty unpleasant.
 
The terrain is difficult on the Frances.

Roncevalles 5 time and never easy, ever.
These can only be personal perceptions and relevant to each person's walking experience and other matters. For example, if you have started walking from Le Puy that is different from starting "cold" at St Jean. - starting in a fully fit condition from Le Puy makes the jaunt over the Pyrenees a delightful low stress experience, as well as the rest of the way to Santiago
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Thanks again for all the helpful feedback.

Today, I walked 4 miles (at around 3 miles/hr) through my neighborhood, with plenty of shady spots, I didn’t need to deploy my sun umbrella. I still need to figure out a way of efficiently attaching it to the backpack, as I’m clumsy with all those straps, hooks, etc, but yesterday it did make a difference. It just takes a lot of fumbling and cursing, but better to get the hang of it now than waiting until I’m in the Meseta.

I should have mentioned that we are undergoing a heat wave here in FL, and it’s been extremely oppressive. It seems we are also getting a dust storm from the Sahara, (yes, sometimes we get those) so today the sky was extremely hazy, so I imagine the air quality wasn’t great. Even breathing was difficult, and I don’t have any breathing issues that I know of. It was just nasty today. Not the best day for a training walk.

I plan to take a break from walking tomorrow and recalibrate my walking training. The pack weight doesn’t bother me all that much, other that sometimes I would feel something poking my back from whatever I might have packed incorrectly. I definitely will use the luggage transport if needed. I’m currently doing “dress rehearsals”, trying different ways of packing things, as the distribution of items can make a difference. I do have 3 dry bags that helps keep things organized, and it seems easier to pack along the cPAP machine. Also, I am winging this, because I have zero experience, but I’m hoping that as I walk the Camino, I’ll figure it out.

I’m starting to experience self-doubt, which I imagine is normal for a newbie. The doubt is mostly about the fact that I walked “only” 4 miles, so how could I walk 1-12-15 miles??? Then again, never in my life have I walked that far with a backpack in oppressive heat. I also hope that as I meet people in the Camino, we can start watching out for each other, and I can always summon help if needed. Walk 4 miles with frequent rest stops, hydrate, then a longer break, then another 4 miles, no need to rush.

The learning curve is as steep as going up the Pyrenees! With the help from y’all, I’ll do my best to accomplish this journey!
 
It's enough for today. Thats 6.4 km! You're almost to Orrison already!

Plus there's a coffee place to stop right before the steepest part of that stretch. Take a break and then push on.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I’m starting to experience self-doubt, which I imagine is normal for a newbie
Start easy and build up your kms over the first week or 2. Don't over do it at the beginning. You might not even finish at Santiago but in the big picture of life that is less important than damaging your body and mind by overdoing it
 
What about those really big gear ties you see at sports stores?
 
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
1st Camino Aug 27--CF--extreme heat
2nd Camino June--CF--extreme heat
3rd Camino Sept 28--CF--extreme heat until mid Oct then still bad heat
4th Camino--mid May-CF--still too hot for me
5th Camino--Jackpot on the Camino Portuguese -- April 10 of this year--fabulous weather--really cool in AM, though it did heat up by about 12, though less than previous years and I started at sun up. Also realized my back could no longer carry my pack. I felt fabulously free and happy.

As I get older, I abhor the heat and it saps all of my energy. My goal is to try to never hike or travel in hot weather
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
Where in Florida do you live? My wife and I are from South Florida and will be doing our Camino starting in SJPP in mid September. Yes it’s definitely hot and humid here in Florida so we always need to be careful and prepared.
 
What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
Weather is CERTAINLY something you cannot predict on the Camino. There are sometimes heat waves late in the fall and very cold, wet days in August.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
I froze in the evening and morning at O Cebreiro in August!
On the Sanabres in May, on the hilltop with the swing, I was wetting a bandana and wiping my forehead. It was hot. Later I met someone who was corresponding with someone ahead of us on the camino. She sent him a picture of that same hilltop a week before I was there and there was 3 inches of snow.
 
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Where in Florida do you live? My wife and I are from South Florida and will be doing our Camino starting in SJPP in mid September. Yes it’s definitely hot and humid here in Florida so we always need to be careful and prepared.
I’m in Orlando. I’ll take the new Brightline train to Miami and fly out to Madrid in August.
 
We will fly out of Orlando to Paris, spend a couple of nights there then train to SJPP for our Camino in mid September. Be safe out there.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
You have only alluded that you are older and on medications, but not much info on age, weight and medical issues. You are in Orlando, so presumably you are walking on level ground. 22 lbs on level ground over 4 miles is really nothing for a healthy person, but you also have issues without the pack in heat. There are magnitudes of difference between level ground and hill hiking.

My first suggestion is to get a full physical plus exam from cardio-pulminary specialist. You could have a heart condition that actually makes it dangerous for you to do extended walking up hills. You may have a condition whereby your body's heat regulating mechanisms are not functioning properly. You may have underlying conditions such as long Covid, Lymes, etc, which interfere with stamina, etc.

If you are generally OK, I also suggest you find hills, bridges and/or tall buildings that you can train by walking up stairs/inclines to get elevation training.

You suggest you might stop training for a week or two prior to the CF. There is not much time left at this point, so best to continue training right up to the day you leave. Best to get injured here than Spain. The Camino is pretty tame, but there is a world of difference between the terrain in Spain and the Orlando plain. Strength and stamina are required for hill climbing, and the same are required, PLUS good muscle coordination, on long rocky slippery descents.

Don't get too wrapped up in going through Orisson and Napoleon pass. The Valcarlos route is easier and with much more shade. The albergue in Valcarlos and dinner at the restaurant down the street is much nicer and considerably less expensive than Orisson, plus much easier to reserve a bed. In fact, the last 3 times I stayed was with 2, then 0, then with 1 other pilgrim in the whole albergue.

I would say good luck, but that is for gamblers. It is really about preparation, planning and training.

Buen Camino
 
You have only alluded that you are older and on medications, but not much info on age, weight and medical issues. You are in Orlando, so presumably you are walking on level ground. 22 lbs on level ground over 4 miles is really nothing for a healthy person, but you also have issues without the pack in heat. There are magnitudes of difference between level ground and hill hiking.

My first suggestion is to get a full physical plus exam from cardio-pulminary specialist. You could have a heart condition that actually makes it dangerous for you to do extended walking up hills. You may have a condition whereby your body's heat regulating mechanisms are not functioning properly. You may have underlying conditions such as long Covid, Lymes, etc, which interfere with stamina, etc.

If you are generally OK, I also suggest you find hills, bridges and/or tall buildings that you can train by walking up stairs/inclines to get elevation training.

You suggest you might stop training for a week or two prior to the CF. There is not much time left at this point, so best to continue training right up to the day you leave. Best to get injured here than Spain. The Camino is pretty tame, but there is a world of difference between the terrain in Spain and the Orlando plain. Strength and stamina are required for hill climbing, and the same are required, PLUS good muscle coordination, on long rocky slippery descents.

Don't get too wrapped up in going through Orisson and Napoleon pass. The Valcarlos route is easier and with much more shade. The albergue in Valcarlos and dinner at the restaurant down the street is much nicer and considerably less expensive than Orisson, plus much easier to reserve a bed. In fact, the last 3 times I stayed was with 2, then 0, then with 1 other pilgrim in the whole albergue.

I would say good luck, but that is for gamblers. It is really about preparation, planning and training.

Buen Camino
Thanks for the feedback, much appreciated!

I’m currently aged 64. I’m 5’8” (1.72m) and weigh 170 lbs (77 Kg)-I hope I made those conversions correctly. I have mild sleep apnea (AHI on diagnosis was 9, which is a lot lower than friends that run much higher numbers, my cPAP is set at 7 with current AHI’s usually 0-1’s). I am insulin resistant, with fasting glucose in the pre-diabetic range, but with normal HgA1cs (5.6-5.7%), taking dapagliflozin which was started for a questionably slightly elevated creatinine which has normalized since then. I was training weight lifting at a local gym last year, and i had a cardiology see me prior to starting, I had an echo and a treadmill, all good. I stopped the weight lifting in April when my trainer quit the gym, but since then I’ve been focusing on walking as much as possible. I have BPH controlled on medications.

I’ve gone on hikes with American Pilgrims through rough terrain, and trekking poles definitely helped. I can see how easy it would be to slip, trip, fall, so I hope the poles will help lower the probability of that happening.

Today it was less humid, 87 F degrees, 59%, much more tolerable. Looking at my weather app, it seems that the temperatures and humidity in various regions along the Camino are somewhat milder, and the humidity better. I’ve been checking these number at times in Spain notorious for being hotter. I’m an early riser, so I should be able to get up and going early on, before it gets too hot.

There’s a multilevel parking lot not far from my home, so I’ve been using it for hill climbing.

I hope this gives you a better picture of my current status. I haven’t exactly been a couch potato, but I’m trying to be careful as I’ve never tried anything like this. I plan on going at my own slow pace, and have people around me in case I run into problems. There’s also Jacotrans, which is good to use if I see it’s too much of a struggle. I wouldn’t attempt something like this on a more remote route where it would be much harder to summon help, and if I have to cut my trip short, so be it. Hopefully, it won’t come to that, but I wont’ know if I can do this unless I try.

Thanks for the supportive feedback!
 
Thanks for the feedback, much appreciated!

I’m currently aged 64. I’m 5’8” (1.72m) and weigh 170 lbs (77 Kg)-I hope I made those conversions correctly. I have mild sleep apnea (AHI on diagnosis was 9, which is a lot lower than friends that run much higher numbers, my cPAP is set at 7 with current AHI’s usually 0-1’s). I am insulin resistant, with fasting glucose in the pre-diabetic range, but with normal HgA1cs (5.6-5.7%), taking dapagliflozin which was started for a questionably slightly elevated creatinine which has normalized since then. I was training weight lifting at a local gym last year, and i had a cardiology see me prior to starting, I had an echo and a treadmill, all good. I stopped the weight lifting in April when my trainer quit the gym, but since then I’ve been focusing on walking as much as possible. I have BPH controlled on medications.

I’ve gone on hikes with American Pilgrims through rough terrain, and trekking poles definitely helped. I can see how easy it would be to slip, trip, fall, so I hope the poles will help lower the probability of that happening.

Today it was less humid, 87 F degrees, 59%, much more tolerable. Looking at my weather app, it seems that the temperatures and humidity in various regions along the Camino are somewhat milder, and the humidity better. I’ve been checking these number at times in Spain notorious for being hotter. I’m an early riser, so I should be able to get up and going early on, before it gets too hot.

There’s a multilevel parking lot not far from my home, so I’ve been using it for hill climbing.

I hope this gives you a better picture of my current status. I haven’t exactly been a couch potato, but I’m trying to be careful as I’ve never tried anything like this. I plan on going at my own slow pace, and have people around me in case I run into problems. There’s also Jacotrans, which is good to use if I see it’s too much of a struggle. I wouldn’t attempt something like this on a more remote route where it would be much harder to summon help, and if I have to cut my trip short, so be it. Hopefully, it won’t come to that, but I wont’ know if I can do this unless I try.

Thanks for the supportive feedback!
Wow HBS60! You certainly seem to be training and planning more than the average Peregrino. Physically I am an inch shorter, a few months younger and will be be 170 lbs by my upcoming September Camino. My sister's boyfriend is my age, weight and height, but due to conditions he faced in the military, career in home building and beyond, his cardio/respiratory problems preclude him from even doing a 5 mile hike in temperate conditions. Just shows how similar while different we all can be. Having done numerous Caminos in Sept/Oct, I lean toward starting in late September or late April these days. That is because northern Spain can be so absolutely hot from July through the end of September....and I have lived in Florida, Charleston and presently in humid MD. That being said, on Camino, I seem to be infused with tremendous spiritual and physical energy. I wish the same for you, and I will pray for your successful Camino.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Those sound like some pretty bad conditions for backpack weight training - - but you do also need some prep training for being out in the Sun.

The Sun and humidity during the day sound like a decent parallel for the exertion on a Camino, so that maybe at that time you could worry less about the weight carrying aspects.

Maybe do some backpack training stuff in the mornings or evenings before or after the heat of the day ?

As to your CPAP machine, it's clearly some significant volume and weight - - but most of the Francès is at higher altitude with good clean air, so your need for it here may potentially be less than it is in Florida. Obviously, consult your doctor about this detail, and not some random internet chap.

Anyway, if it's for medical needs, most Albergues that do not accept pack transport tend to make exceptions for medical gear, though you would need to contact them with the details etc.
 
Wow HBS60! You certainly seem to be training and planning more than the average Peregrino. Physically I am an inch shorter, a few months younger and will be be 170 lbs by my upcoming September Camino. My sister's boyfriend is my age, weight and height, but due to conditions he faced in the military, career in home building and beyond, his cardio/respiratory problems preclude him from even doing a 5 mile hike in temperate conditions. Just shows how similar while different we all can be. Having done numerous Caminos in Sept/Oct, I lean toward starting in late September or late April these days. That is because northern Spain can be so absolutely hot from July through the end of September....and I have lived in Florida, Charleston and presently in humid MD. That being said, on Camino, I seem to be infused with tremendous spiritual and physical energy. I wish the same for you, and I will pray for your successful Camino.
Thanks!
I’ve been inspired by all those You Tube videos of folk much older than us that have accomplished this. I also joined the American Pilgrims and also was encouraged by older folk, so I know it’s doable.
I looked into my medications and the dapagliflozin can cause thirst and dehydration, to it’s good for me to keep it in mind, i might take my dose later in the day after my walk and see if it makes a difference. Being that my numbers are mild as they are, I might be able to skip a day here and there. BTW, I’m also a retired doc. I retired 7 years ago and I haven’t kept up with all the latest stuff but I do retain the basics. You are absolutely correct, we are all different and that’s what makes life challenging…and interesting.
Buen Camino to you as well!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Personally, I would try to walk about five miles every day, not necessarily with your backpack. Get used to the daily walking and add your pack occasionally. You can continue with five miles a day until you leave - no reason to back off a week before since five miles a day isn't an excessive distance.
 
Personally, I would try to walk about five miles every day, not necessarily with your backpack. Get used to the daily walking and add your pack occasionally. You can continue with five miles a day until you leave - no reason to back off a week before since five miles a day isn't an excessive distance.
Good to know! That seems doable!
 
Good to know! That seems doable!
I made the suggestion because it's fairly certain that you will be walking every day (aside from an occasional rest day) on the Camino, so that's the most important thing to be trained for. But you will have the option of sending your pack or part of its contents ahead if necessary.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I made the suggestion because it's fairly certain that you will be walking every day (aside from an occasional rest day) on the Camino, so that's the most important thing to be trained for. But you will have the option of sending your pack or part of its contents ahead if necessary.
I’ve been walking 1-2 miles) every day (except for illness, storms, or travel) every single day for the last 4-5 years. Even on mornings that I don’t feel like walking, I wind up giving in to the urge to get out of my door, like something automatic comes over me.
 
Doc, except for maybe a blister or two I don't think you are going to have any problems at all. Enjoy the geraniums in the villages this time of year. Buen Camino
 
I’ve been walking 1-2 miles) every day (except for illness, storms, or travel) every single day for the last 4-5 years
That's great that you have the walking habit! Now you just need to increase your daily mileage a bit.

Before my first Camino I walked 5 miles daily, then set aside 5 days when I walked 10 miles (with a lunch break) for 4 consecutive days, then a 15 mile day after that. I did this to know how I, and my feet would hold up walking a long distance day after day. I only carried my backpack on the 15 mile day, and never had any problem carrying my pack on the Camino.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
That's great that you have the walking habit! Now you just need to increase your daily mileage a bit.

Before my first Camino I walked 5 miles daily, then set aside 5 days when I walked 10 miles (with a lunch break) for 4 consecutive days, then a 15 mile day after that. I did this to know how I, and my feet would hold up walking a long distance day after day. I only carried my backpack on the 15 mile day, and never had any problem carrying my pack on the Camino.
For the last month, I’ve been walking 3 miles/day, sometimes 6. More recently I started walking with the backpack, doing 4-5 miles/day, but it’s been more of a struggle because of the heat and humidity. The weight itself doesn’t seem to be that much of a deal, overheating 🥵 definitely is. I’m planning just to go to Orrison the first day, hopefully the nest day to Roncesvalles won’t be as hard. I then have reservations to Zubiri for the following day, but I think by then I’ll have an idea on how much I need to recalibrate. After that, everything is a blank slate, and I only reserved at these 3 places because I’ve bee told repeatedly to do so, but I have from August 11 to September 22 (plus a couple days to get to Madrid so I can fly back on the 24th). So, I think I can be very flexible, slow down, take a rest day here and there if needed.
 
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Doc, except for maybe a blister or two I don't think you are going to have any problems at all. Enjoy the geraniums in the villages this time of year. Buen Camino
Thanks, sir! No need to call me “doc”, that’s a past life for me. Thanks for the encouragement!
 
The doubts are inevitable, but know that this journey is doable... I walked the Norte last year in mostly 35 degree heat, carrying my full sized CPAP and weighing in at around 265lbs starting weight... I trained for a couple of months before heading to Spain, starting at 6 km once or twice a week and increasing 3 kms a week, and made sure that I included one weekend of back to back 21km walks to be sure that I could do this... The biggest acclimation was walking on completely flat land here in southern Ontario vs. the hills along the northern coast of Spain.... There is a real difference in training along ground that you walk constantly at home, vs walking fresh discovery along the caminos, taking in all the sights and experiences along the way... The miles will pass quickly in Spain, and be sure to stop and drink a Radler (beer/lemonade mix at only 2.5% alcohol) at least once a day... tastes great, refreshing and full of electrolytes... If it is very hot outside, drink as much water as you can, starting when you get up right until you go to bed at night... If you put aside your insecurities and let yourself be carried by the camino, you will surely find that the camino will provide all you need, and everything will fall into place as it should... Just do it!....
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Update:
So far, so good! I walked 5 miles (8 Km) yesterday, and 7 miles (11.2 Km) today, both with a 22 lb backpack. Yesterday the humidity was 82% when I started at 8:30 AM with the temp at 81F (27.2 C), by the time I finished the temp was 91 F (32C) and the humidity was 59%. Today I started earlier at 6:15 AM, the temperature was 74 F (23.3 C) and the humidity was a whopping 99%, by the time I finished, the temperature was 86 F (30 C) and the humidity was down to 74%. Both times, I deployed my solar umbrella early on, instead of waiting to be overheated before pulling it out, and that made a big difference.

I also had a tortilla de patatas (I made a point on learning how to cook one) and cafe con leche, trying to replicate what I might find in the road. I felt energized and didn’t even stop on some of my usual rest stops. I did have a couple issues with the umbrella, as the rod presses against my collarbone, making it uncomfortable, but eventually I got it solved, but this delayed me longer than I wanted, and it was starting to get warm. I also been having some hip pain (not the joint, the upper outer gluteal area, which curiously got better on its own after I stopped to fumble with the umbrella, when I resumed walking it was fine.

It was starting to feel uncomfortably warm towards the end, but I know that deploying the umbrella early on made a difference. Also, I’m on a medication that makes me prone to dehydration, so I skipped it so I would take it later in the day.

So I tried to replicate a Camino day, except that there’s no mountains around here, just the parking garage ramp and stairs of a local store, but I make a point of climbing up and down them. These are steep so at least it helps me train my climbing muscles.

I went home, showered, had lunch, had a nap, and I would have been able to continue but decided not to push it too much too soon.

Tomorrow I’ll take a rest day, to avoid injuring myself. Easy does it!

My previous long distance walking was 6 miles, without a backpack, so I think I outdid myself, and I’m making some progress…
 
As I am trying to prepare for the Camino, I find myself realizing that these 3 variables could make a huge difference in my ability to walk the Camino.

Weight. Unfortunately, I have the bulky cPAP machine which necessitates a larger (hence heavier) backpack. It doesn’t help that I’m on several medications which are also bulky. I mentioned a few days ago that I’ll be carrying 22.5 lbs, but the weight itself doesnt’ seem to be that much of a problem, at least for short distances. My backpack fits well, and it’s actually easy for me to forget that I have it on, but…

I’m walking in the FL heat, and what I think it’s worse, the humidity. This morning, I started my training walk at 79 F degrees, with a humidity of 95%. It was 8:00 AM. I definitely felt I was backpacking trough a sauna. I walked about 2 miles, with just a little bit of aches and pains, but nothing horrible, being mindful of drinking water and taking a couple of 10 minute breaks. After 2 miles, I stopped at a park, used their restroom, and sat on a picnic table for a good half hour. It was already 9:30 AM, and the temperature was up to 82 F degrees, and the humidity was a bit lower but still high at 88%. I started to head back, with 2 miles back it would be a total of 4 miles, easy peasy, I thought.

It was a struggle. Earlier in the day I was headed west, with the sun in my back. Now I was headed east, with the sun on my face. I could sense that it was much more of a struggle, and I needed to stop much more frequently. I have a hiking umbrella, so I deployed it, which helped a little bit, but I am still struggling to learn how to attach it without it wobbling all over the place. I refilled my water bottle twice at a couple water fountains I found, and I took a long break at a bench that was on a nice shady spot, took off the backpack and rested. I put water on a handkerchief and dabbed my face, which also helped.

I finally made it to my starting point, but the way back seemed much harder than earlier in the day. By then it was 11:27 AM, the temperature was 88F degrees and the humidity was 68%.

While I’m used to the FL heat, I’m not used to carry a backpack in these temperatures. Checking my weather app, I see that the temps in Spain seem to be cooler than here, but more importantly, the humidity is much, much lower, around 20-30%. I’m hoping that this lower humidity will help, because otherwise I’m having my doubts. I do think that the backpack weight is not that much of an issue, although I’ll certainly look for things to jettison, as well keeping Jacotrans in mind. Nothing can be done about the weather, but I do know other pilgrims have done the Camino successfully even in the summer. And yes, I know I need to leave earlier than 8 AM, but still, given the long distances, I will be walking for several hours, so the issue will come up anyway. One other variable is that when I’m just going one way as I will in the Camino, I could simply stop when I need to stop, but today, I HAD to turn around and walk back so I could get into my car. Maybe I should have rested longer, but then the day would have become even hotter. Good thing I had water and was able to find shady places. So it is as I’m learning what I’ll deal with when I actually walk the Camino.

What’s the experience with temps/humidity during August/September in the Camino?
Hi I am a similar C-pap user and have walked 4 Caminos including the longer Via del plata. I have had dental clinic make a top and bottom appliance for sleep apnea. It fits over your top and bottom teeth and is adjustable to advance your lower jaw position opening your airway. Weighs a negligible amount, ounces, and solves the problem for me …. No snoring your bunk mates will be pleased. think athletic sports teeth guard.
Buen Camino David
 
I wouldn’t worry too much about the distances.

It seems daunting at first when you’re used to walking 5 km on average to think about walking 20ish km every day for a month. But remember: this is your only job on the camino. This is all you do.

You can take a break every hour if you need to. Which I do oftentimes, including shoes off and socks off (unless I’m in a bar, obviously).
 
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