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What do you do on a rest day

Bedspring

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
June 2024
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios


I presume you mean Hornillos del Camino?
My preference was always to walk shorter days and then book a private room to relax.
I go to a restaurant and will have a decent menu del dia and some wine to match.

On shorter days I watch some mindless tv :) in my room, sit somewhere in the shade on a terrace or visit local sights.
In a couple of days you will reach Fromista that has a gorgeous church to visit.

 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
I have done both. On rest days, I always choose a city with more interesting things to check out; whether a castle, museum or whatever, so I think spending an extra night coming up in Leon could be worth it for you. Like others have said, taking a short day prior before an interesting, smaller town can often be enough, too.
Once you give yourself the little luxury of a private room with "en suite", you may become a bit spoiled😉 and opt for using them more often.
 
When I first walked the CF, I was so excited every morning to get on the trail and start walking again. I probably should have taken a rest day or two, but I didn’t. Since then, I have started building in a short walking day here and there. That has allowed me to leave a bit later in the morning, walk a ways (usually 10 km or so, and then stop early for a relaxing lunch, like the folks above mentioned, and a leisurely rest of the day at my next stop. For me, just walking part of a traditional stage offers plenty of rest and breaks up the pattern many of us get into. And, go ahead and pamper yourself by getting a private room for the night. I know Fromista was mentioned above. Carrión de Los Condes could also be another nice place for a longer break. Buen Camino!
 
I usually opt for a short walk (10km sounds good) and a nice room. This gives time for a few errands and perhaps one place to look at, followed by a good menu de dia and a restorative siesta. A drink in the plaza followed by a mass in the local church, and an interesting meal, then to bed and up again the next day.

I found that a two-night stay broke my rythym too much. I would make two exceptions; a break in Estella after a week of the Frances, to give one's body a break after the intesnive first week; and Leon, which has two very interesting museums, the Sierra Pambley near the cathedral, which gives a great view into Alfonsine Spain, and the Basilica of San Isidro, which will take you back eight centuries with fabrics and frescoes etc.

But really, your body will tell you when it needs a break. And it will somewhere. Hang out in the plaza and wave cheerily at exhausted pilgrims as they arrive.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
It depends on if you need actual rest or not.
I'm also in the camp of preferring short walking days to full rest days, but early on my Camino this year I caught a cold, and spent two nights in one town and actually rested. I followed that with a short day while I was still recovering.
 
I usually think of "rest day" as Camino lingo for two nights in one location. I've never (yet) needed a true day to actually rest, recuperate or recover. For me they have been just a break for some relaxed time to sightsee in a city where a half day isn't enough. That said, I am always eager to start walking again the day after.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
I walked 43 days in April and May and I needed my rest days, we took 2 but could have taken 2 more if needed. 20 days in we took an extra day in Burgos. I rested my sore knee, did laundry, went to the Cathedral (again). My buddy got a needed massage for his aching back. We found restaurants with different food (Korean & Ramen noodles). We took another day in Astorga, May Day so quite quiet. Did go to the Spa, definitely helped my still sore knee. We finally did what I call walking rest day, short days. 10k from Triacastela to Samos and then 17k to Sarria. The reward there was a nap and just chilling. I guess what you do really depends upon where you are, how long you’ve been on the Camino and what you really want to do, sometimes doing nothing is just right. Hope this helps, if you have time, take a day or 2 and consider the walking rest as others have suggested.
 
It depends on if you need actual rest or not.
I'm also in the camp of preferring short walking days to full rest days, but early on my Camino this year I caught a cold, and spent two nights in one town and actually rested. I followed that with a short day while I was still recovering.
I did exactly the same. I was sick, and after making my way across the Meseta, mostly in truly horrible weather, I reached Leon, spent 2 nights there mainly in bed. The next day walked to Virgen del Camino. I should have stopped earlier when I first got sick.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
@Bedspring if you feel the need to take a short day or rest day, stop and take care of you.

I second the recommendation of Carrion los Condes for a short/rest day. It has all the services you need, and plenty to explore as well, if you feel like it. There is also a nice park to relax in. I had a wonderful menu del dia at the restaurant at the Hostal Le Corte. The rooms there were highly recommended by friends who stayed.

I stayed at an apartment, Loft Carrion, which has everything you need. A supermarket is right next door. The host was lovely and very helpful. Recommended without hesitation.
 
It all depends. If everything is ok (no bad blisters, bad muscles, or bad anything elses), I just kick back and enjoy the town/city that I'm in. If something is amiss, I'll have to spend the time at whatever pharmacia, doctor, or practicioner that can help make it right. I usually only spend one rest day, but some cities are really worth a second day if there are significant sites to see or a culture to admire.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
We usually plan a rest day to coincide with a bigger town with a few things to see/do. We book a nice hotel for the two nights, go to a laundromat and give a proper wash to everything but what we are standing in. After that we wander, see whatever is to be seen, maybe visit a sports shop if new socks or a t-shirt seems warranted, maybe browse a pharmacy for footcare. We are very partial to coffees/beer/ wine sitting people watching. Add a more leisurely breakfast than usual and nice dinner, happy out.
 
I've never actually taken a rest day. The closest thing was years after walking various routes I walked the Francés again and did a short stage from Mansilla de las Mulas to León so that I had time to visit the Cathedral.

I enjoy city visits but not especially during a Camino but then again I live in Europe so I have the opportunity to do so without spending a fortune. I can imagine if you live far away and may not be back that you might want to take in some sights during your walk.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I very rarely spend two nights in one place. A rest day for me is a short day with an early lunch.
I agree. By the time most of us will need a rest day we have been able to walk longer distances with less fatigue. I usually walk two 10k days. I will take my time having breakfast. Have my pan tostada and coffee and then a second coffee. Walk and if I can stop again after 5k or so I will. They arrive in the next village and relax for the day. A couple of hours of walking, some coffees and snacks and then lots of do nothing.
 
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
Most rest days are taken in larger cities. I would recommend a shorter day before, see the highlights, then walk to a small village beyond. Lodging will be easier, You'll have a jump on the packs that form leaving the cities and two good nights sleep (often interrupted by revelers in the cities).
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
I take tourist stops. Big town with lots to sightsee, so I am still walking a lot. I usually take a hotel so I don’t have to be back by 10pm.
 
As mentioned yesterday, you could stop in Fromista, there are some very good restaurant serving the menu del dia plus the town is a good place to chill, I would also second Carrion and suggest San Zoila, it is definitely an upscale place to stay plus it has a first class restaurant. Then there is always Boadilla which has a lovely, serene courtyard, sculpture garden and pool, Eduardo and his family not only have a first class albergue but he also manages a hotel next door with ensuite bathrooms.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Rest day? My rest days are also activity days just doing something different. Burgos, Leon and Astorga are good stops with things to do and see as well as refuel, restock and take in some history and culture
 
So, we plan ahead and, therefore, mostly know where we will stop. My sister is 84 so having rest days are not optional. If it’s in high season, we bring our bathing suits, and we try to swim, rest, watch a video on Netflix (IPad), play cards. We carry miniature cards and play rummy frequently and, of course, talk to other pilgrims. Most rest days we make it a point to dine out (not just eat a meal) because we have time to do so and so we may splurge a bit. I also try to periodically elevate my feet and sometimes ice sore places. No sight seeing.
 
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I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
I'm not a camino veteren. I haven't gone yet. 20 days til lift off! But am planning rest days and being a regular old tourist. I am about to book a van tour that visits wineries and includes a lunch (out of Pamplona.) I am also planning on splurging on a Michelin star restaurant outside of Najera (very reasonably priced compared to one I did in London several years ago. Like 1/5th of the price...) at the super groovy hotel Marques de Riscal designed by architect Frank Gehry. Other cities I'm going to visit the cathedrals and sites, do real laundry in machines and NOT eat pilgrim meals which look to be tiresome. I am trying for the albergues most nights but my rest days I hope to at least have a private room or even an en suite room to decompress and get better rest.

I have a special goal to visit every church I can and light a candle for my grandma and my friend Tara who have both passed.

Can you all tell that I'm a foodie? :D And regarding Frank Gehry. His stuff is weird. And sadly his building in my city is downright ugly! (The MoPOP museum at Seattle Center) But sometimes I like his buildings and he is an alumni of my school, so I have a love/hate for his work.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
A selection of Camino Jewellery
You must mean the castle in Castrojerez?
I loved Castrojerez and after arriving and getting situated where we were staying, I hiked up to that awesome castle with my two sons. The views of the town from that high vantage point and the vistas beyond made for a special incredible memory for me.
 
I'm not a camino veteren. I haven't gone yet. 20 days til lift off! But am planning rest days and being a regular old tourist. I am about to book a van tour that visits wineries and includes a lunch (out of Pamplona.) I am also planning on splurging on a Michelin star restaurant outside of Najera (very reasonably priced compared to one I did in London several years ago. Like 1/5th of the price...) at the super groovy hotel Marques de Riscal designed by architect Frank Gehry. Other cities I'm going to visit the cathedrals and sites, do real laundry in machines and NOT eat pilgrim meals which look to be tiresome. I am trying for the albergues most nights but my rest days I hope to at least have a private room or even an en suite room to decompress and get better rest.

I have a special goal to visit every church I can and light a candle for my grandma and my friend Tara who have both passed.

Can you all tell that I'm a foodie? :D And regarding Frank Gehry. His stuff is weird. And sadly his building in my city is downright ugly! (The MoPOP museum at Seattle Center) But sometimes I like his buildings and he is an alumni of my school, so I have a love/hate for his work.
The winery that Gehry designed is closer to Logrono. There are some great tours of Rioja out of there. The foodie thing will come with a little research, there are some major places to have menu del dia all along the Camino. I won't even begin to name names because it is a moveable feast from town to town and the top names change year to year.
 
I loved Castrojerez and after arriving and getting situated where we were staying, I hiked up to that awesome castle with my two sons. The views of the town from that high vantage point and the vistas beyond made for a special incredible memory for me.
The history of the place is incredible. One can only imagine what it was like watching the Romans from that vantage point moving gold and other minerals through the region.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
This morning I woke at 7am, set off after a shower and breakfast and walked 25k, but took in two churches and two cafes, and have arrived in a town where I will spend the full day tomorrow, and continue onwards the day after.
Thanks for all the advice
 
The winery that Gehry designed is closer to Logrono. There are some great tours of Rioja out of there. The foodie thing will come with a little research, there are some major places to have menu del dia all along the Camino. I won't even begin to name names because it is a moveable feast from town to town and the top names change year to year.
I will research, thanks!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I'm not a camino veteren. I haven't gone yet. 20 days til lift off! But am planning rest days and being a regular old tourist. I am about to book a van tour that visits wineries and includes a lunch (out of Pamplona.) I am also planning on splurging on a Michelin star restaurant outside of Najera (very reasonably priced compared to one I did in London several years ago. Like 1/5th of the price...) at the super groovy hotel Marques de Riscal designed by architect Frank Gehry. Other cities I'm going to visit the cathedrals and sites, do real laundry in machines and NOT eat pilgrim meals which look to be tiresome. I am trying for the albergues most nights but my rest days I hope to at least have a private room or even an en suite room to decompress and get better rest.

I have a special goal to visit every church I can and light a candle for my grandma and my friend Tara who have both passed.

Can you all tell that I'm a foodie? :D And regarding Frank Gehry. His stuff is weird. And sadly his building in my city is downright ugly! (The MoPOP museum at Seattle Center) But sometimes I like his buildings and he is an alumni of my school, so I have a love/hate for his work.
You may find this thread useful: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...restaurant-on-the-camino-frances.85211/?amp=1
 
The winery that Gehry designed is closer to Logrono. There are some great tours of Rioja out of there. The foodie thing will come with a little research, there are some major places to have menu del dia all along the Camino. I won't even begin to name names because it is a moveable feast from town to town and the top names change year to year.
I never knew about this hotel and winery at the time I walked the Frances, but it looks right out of a storybook.
Screenshot_20240618-151548~2.png
I love you saying "a moveable feast" (book title by Hemingway). It's the first time I have read those words to describe our eating while on the Camino, and they are so appropriate!
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
@TheRealPixie - when you are in Atapuerca you'll have to eat at Como Sapiens - I was so disappointed that it was closed the day that I was there.

I ate there in 2015. I was surprised that such a "posh" restaurant with linen tablecloths served pilgrim meals. It was a true highlight experience and the food was definitely "a cut above" the norm. I felt humbled and definitely underdressed and the only other person eating early was another pilgrim.
Screenshot_20240618-152703~2.png
 
Put me in the crowd that plays tourist on my rest days. I did suffer from blisters so tried "reasonably' not to walk much...at least a lot less that I would've if I was "whole"
Museums, Cathedrals, Forts, Parks..... you name it
 
I've only had a couple of rest days over 2 Caminos. Fir me, just a chance to gently slow down. Have a leisurely morning, spend time reflecting on my experience so far. A chance to sort & organise photos, do some journalling, maybe some sketching. Just take in what it means to be on the opposite side of the world, in a different country & culture, & "feel" the passage of pilgrims over so many hundreds of years. Much of this I do when walking, but pausing specifically for this, without the new input of each step, just adds to embracing the magnitude & specialness of what I am doing. A short day can offer similar time. I love EVERY day.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hello, a first time pilgrim
I walked the Camino Francis SJPDP to Santiago. 40 days total, began April 10 a Wednesday arrived Santiago on a Saturday, day 39 and rested to next day Sunday May 20.
I planned in advance to rest on each Sunday. I did not walk extensively on a Sunday. My plan was to try to live like a local on those days. This included visiting/sitting in the town/city square or Plaza Mayor, attending a church service and a meal after.
These days included chatting to locals and pilgrims, enjoying children playing, enjoying music and singing.
Rest days were Puente La Reina (outstanding kindness at the Albergue, glorious choir singing, taken my church members to meet the padre for an individual blessing), Belorado (outstanding kindness at the Albergue, on the eve witnessed a festival lunch at the Albergue, glorious singing, witnessed a baptism), Carrion de Los Condes, (outstanding kindness at the Albergue, on the eve listened to an organ practice, including sitting next to the organist, Sunday evening listened to the angelic singing of the nuns) Astorga (visited the Cathedral), Triacastela (outstanding kindness at the Albergue, attended local service with again glorious singing, Santiago de Compostela (visited the Cathedral, enjoyed glorious solo singing in Gregorian chant style)
These are some of the thoughts around taking rest days.
Regards Andrew Phillips
 
What do I do on a rest day?
Sleep in (a little)
Laundry (a lot) and dry everything!
Walk around with no backpack but carrying valuables of course. we "rested" in Pamplona, Burgos, Leon, Ponferrada, Villafranca del Bierzo which was more or less once a week.
Check out the exit of the town for the next stage of the camino.
In one town we got a haircut, in another I bought a soft-shell jacket as it was getting colder.
 
I loved Castrojerez and after arriving and getting situated where we were staying, I hiked up to that awesome castle with my two sons. The views of the town from that high vantage point and the vistas beyond made for a special incredible memory for me.
And the climb out of Castrojerez the next morning and the view from the top is another reward. 😎
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Sorry to hear that but, it's the Camino, weatherize you get what it has to offer day to day. Up that hill in the mud had to be great.
 

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In other words, a tour day, not really a day of rest. 😉
I agree it is a tour day. I think I have perfected the meaning of a rest day after honing this skill for 70 years. Get up, have a coffee and breakfast, space out and relax and maybe chat with some locals in the bar or in front of the bar, I try to stay in a private albergue for a rest day so I can leave my backpack. Maybe walk around for just a bit. Find a park or a nice square. Have another coffee or postre. As soon as possible go back and take a little snooze if I can. Get up and repeat until bedtime. But like I said earlier. I usually just do two really short days. I can still get to the place I am stopping early enough to vegetate quite well.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Sorry to hear that but, it's the Camino, weatherize you get what it has to offer day to day. Up that hill in the mud had to be great.
Well, it wasn't pelting rain until a bit later. Here is looking back on Castrojerez. I actually never had muddy shoes, just squishing water out my trail runners most of the day.
Screenshot_20240619-145139~2.png
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
For me, I spend 2 nights (starting with 1 full day of walking). Last time I did this, I spent 2 nights in a nice but reasonably priced hotel (I wanted to be alone, not leave during the day, and just be incognito in my own room. It was in a town that was big enough that there were things I could do for a few hours the next day.
I was physically exhausted, so on my day off, I rested and slept a lot, but still had a few hours to really look around (I went to a great museum), relax at a cafe, and eat some great food.

I think most have also had short days, especially if we got to a town early to see some of the sights there. I consider this a "short day".
 
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
Treat myself to a proper meal, sightsee, people watch, watch the Euro 2024?
 
I think sometimes one does not realise how tired you can be.

I sometimes still think like I’m in my 20’s, which causes Mrs HtD to repeatedly explain reality to me; but I’ll still carry on waking at dark o’clock and walking 30+k/day like it is normal.

Once in a while I find it helpful to get a private room, fully hydrate, turn off the alarm and let nature take its course.

Never have I failed to be up and about in time for something still regarded as breakfast, but that extra couple of hours with a natural awakening makes a huge difference.

As to what to do with the day - other than laundry, recycling, shopping - how about chatting to the locals? Most folks Spanish can be improved; especially if they’ve got none.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Once in a while I find it helpful to get a private room, fully hydrate, turn off the alarm and let nature take its coucourse
Lol... I had a day off in Burgos and booked me a 2-night stay in a private room.
It was truly something else to wake up on that "off" morning somewhere around 9:00AM feeling "lazy" 😁
 
When I was taking rest days on my first few Caminos, I did it backwards, arriving where I would take the rest day and checking into the albergue, and then checking into a hotel the next day, instead of walking on for my "rest day". It was what seemed obvious and natural. But I eventually discovered that it was, as I wrote above, backwards. If you do as I did, on the night before your rest day, when you don't have to walk tomorrow, you will still have to be in the albergue going to bed early and won't be able to enjoy the nightlife (or eat a proper cena in a restaurant) wherever you are because there will be the albergue curfew. The next morning, you'll be up and out early with all of your fellow pilgrims waking you up and the albergue kicking you out when you have nowhere to go, and hours before check in at your hotel. That night, when you have freedom, you'll want to get to bed early so you are rested for the next, post-rest-day's walk. And you will want to be up and early out of the hotel to get walking.

On the other hand, if you do the reverse, you can enjoy the evening of your arrival knowing that you can sleep in at your hotel. The next day you can relax and check into the albergue, meet the new cohort of pilgrims you will be joining, and be set up in the albergue for the next day's walk.

Take it from me, it works much better that way.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
@David Tallan - I see what you are saying but for me, that still would be an unnecessary hustle. I would much rather book 2 nights in whatever establishment I chose (if it is albergue I'd make sure I have a private room and ability to freely move about; i.e. an entry door that I could open with no issues and without disturbing any other folks) and just forgeddabousit.
dont have to check out/check (back) in and\or move between 2 establishments
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornillos

To me rest days are essential as active days. Rest days are the perfect opportunity for my body to recharge, while my mind takes a break from the hustle and bustle, and my soul finds a moment of reflection. I have spent an entire day unwinding from the world. I stayed in my room, curled up with Netflix, enjoyed some delicious yogurt and granola, and took hot showers whenever I felt like it. On another rest day, I decided to play the tourist, exploring cathedrals, town squares, and simply lounging in the sunlit grass.
 
I am thinking I should take a rest day.
Maybe book a hostal for a couple of nights, have a room to myself, and not walk at all
Or maybe walk just 10km, and a hostal for one night.
What do you do on rest days.
Also any preferred locations?
I am beyond Hornollios
Oh gosh! So many possibilities! Sleep in. Visit cultural sites, of which there are MANY. Go to the local markets and just linger and enjoy and talk and people watch. Journal. Stock up on any supplies you're running low on. Explore local food items and eateries. Hang out in plazas that have people playing music in them. I purposely took a rest day every week or so because I saw that suggested as a way to avoid overuse injuries, etc. I got to savor the Camino and the places more because I did that.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
@TheRealPixie - when you are in Atapuerca you'll have to eat at Como Sapiens - I was so disappointed that it was closed the day that I was there.

That place was SO good! We ended up there quite by accident and had no idea it was a destination restaurant. What a treat!
 
A rest day, with a room of your own? Seize the moment.

Take a long shower, or even a bath.
Stay up late and have dinner at 10. That is, at a proper Spanish dinner-times
Sleep in.
Take care of your personal grooming - feet, and other parts.
Reorganize your pack.
Do laundry at an actual laundromat
Take a siesta.
Go to a local bar (not a pilgrim bar) and chat with the locals.
Take another long shower.
Go to bed early (if you can).
Rejoin the Camino.
 

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