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What do you have to take every Camino?

laineylainey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2012, hooked ever since.
As I think about getting out the rucksack from the cupboard under the stairs, I am excited about my VdlP short walk in Easter and the start of another Camino year. But I am also thinking about
my Camino "must haves"; the things that every year come with me no matter what. These are items that have become part of my Camino "costume", the things that signify my temporary transition from my every day non Camino walking persona to another version of myself - my alter ego, Camino peregrina, fearless and unstoppable - well stoppable after about 28K!
So my number one, of my must take list is this hat. I first wore it in 2000 at a wedding and it had a splendid navy bow. In 2012 minus the bow I took it and wore it on my first Camino. For some reason I thought it worked well as a sun protector and it folded up nicely in my rucksack. It has been in my rucksack every year and every Camino since. It is part of my ritual. I also have other items that MUST go on the Camino!! By the way as you can see several years of folding up my beloved hat has taken it's toll!!
What is your "must take"?
 

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mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I, always carried an electric coil which when needed during winter walks was VERY useful!

For example November 2012 at 7 am in El Acebo it was lonely and VERY COLD while waiting for the safety of dawn to continue walking. No other pilgrims had shared the Meson albergue. The day before after a good and copious mountain meal in the bar/restaurant downstairs I had taken a welcome hot shower. The water pressure seemed okay but plunked in the middle of the loo floor a large full water bucket with dipper was a surprise. Was this a new decoration in the Japanese bath-house style? I should have known.

By 7 am there was no running, only dipped, water available in the dorm. Thus a very welcome HOT early morning tea was boiled with the invaluable electric coil (the only 'luxury' in my kit); that single cup tasted especially splendid waiting in the cold for the sunrise!

 
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koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
All my core gear is the same as my typical backpacking kit (less hammock, stove, etc.) plus an extra rotation of clothes.

I guess the big items that're different are my passport, corkscrew, and European power adapters. Oh, and an excitement that dwarfs a weekend in the mountains.
 

laineylainey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2012, hooked ever since.
I, always carried an electric coil which when needed during winter walks was VERY useful!

For example November 2013 at 7 am in El Acebo it was lonely and VERY COLD while waiting for the safety of dawn to continue walking. No other pilgrims had shared the Meson albergue. The day before after a good and copious mountain meal in the bar/restaurant downstairs I had taken a welcome hot shower. The water pressure seemed okay but plunked in the middle of the loo floor a large full water bucket with dipper was a surprise. Was this a new decoration in the Japanese bath-house style? I should have known.

By 7 am there was no running, only dipped, water available in the dorm. Thus a very welcome HOT early morning tea was boiled with the invaluable electric coil (the only 'luxury' in my kit); that single cup tasted especially splendid waiting in the cold for the sunrise!

Thanks @mspath , I have heard from others about this electric device but never realised how small it is.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I regularly try new gear that I think will be better suited to the conditions I am going to face. Winter in southern England and summer in Norway have different demands to spring in Spain, and I expect late spring/early summer in Portugal will be different again.

That said, I have always worn a colourful beanie that I picked up in a rural village in Peru in the early 2000's. It has a couple of faithful companions in my gear list. I collected a couple of wool blend OR tee shirts many years ago that will be going with me this year, as will the now unavailable Scout Shop underpants.

A couple of items that have served faithfully for most of my pilgrimage walks will be placed into semi-retirement this year. My small stash of Mont trekking socks has been depleted, and are no longer on the market. These break all the 'rules' some members here seem fixated on. The are mostly synthetic - no wool at all. And they have a small percentage of cotton in the fibre mix. For this year's pilgrimage, they will be replaced by a lightweight wool blend sock that will be worn with a liner sock.

I have also replaced the Garmin eTrex30 which I have used on every pilgrimage since 2011. After nearly a decade of faithful service it has been replaced by a eTrex32x. There wasn't a really good reason to make this change. The new unit has better battery life, is slightly faster, and has some slightly different functionality that I might use, but whether these were sufficient to put an old friend into retirement was a fine run thing.

Back to things that will be on my list. My final go to item is a Tilley hat, although I have to admit that I now have a selection of three from which to choose, having splashed out at one of the sales while I was in England last December. I would normally use the classic cotton Tilley in summer, but they have a wonderful wool version that I used last year in England. This year is likely to see a return to the cotton version, although the new synthetic fabric version might get to to travel on its first camino.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
I, always carried an electric coil which when needed during winter walks was VERY useful!

For example November 2013 at 7 am in El Acebo it was lonely and VERY COLD while waiting for the safety of dawn to continue walking. No other pilgrims had shared the Meson albergue. The day before after a good and copious mountain meal in the bar/restaurant downstairs I had taken a welcome hot shower. The water pressure seemed okay but plunked in the middle of the loo floor a large full water bucket with dipper was a surprise. Was this a new decoration in the Japanese bath-house style? I should have known.

By 7 am there was no running, only dipped, water available in the dorm. Thus a very welcome HOT early morning tea was boiled with the invaluable electric coil (the only 'luxury' in my kit); that single cup tasted especially splendid waiting in the cold for the sunrise!

The coil and a stainless steel mug for coffee or minute soup. And the mug can go on a cooker in an albergue when when all cooking pots (full of pasta or soup) have been taken to various tables and not brought back. I also bring instant coffee from France because I do not like Spanish instant coffee.

And then of course my umbrella/parasol! Hatless under the umbrella catching in my hair even the slightest breeze - bliss!
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
As I think about getting out the rucksack from the cupboard under the stairs, I am excited about my VdlP short walk in Easter and the start of another Camino year. But I am also thinking about
my Camino "must haves"; the things that every year come with me no matter what. These are items that have become part of my Camino "costume", the things that signify my temporary transition from my every day non Camino walking persona to another version of myself - my alter ego, Camino peregrina, fearless and unstoppable - well stoppable after about 28K!
So my number one, of my must take list is this hat. I first wore it in 2000 at a wedding and it had a splendid navy bow. In 2012 minus the bow I took it and wore it on my first Camino. For some reason I thought it worked well as a sun protector and it folded up nicely in my rucksack. It has been in my rucksack every year and every Camino since. It is part of my ritual. I also have other items that MUST go on the Camino!! By the way as you can see several years of folding up my beloved hat has taken it's toll!!
What is your "must take"?
I have a particular waterproof jacket, by Rab, which is quite venerable. I have a fine collection of others, but this one is reserved now for ‘walking in Spain’, nice and soft, long enough and with perfectly positioned pockets both inside and out to suit my habits.
I carry my passport, cash, credencial etc in a pouch on a lanyard round my neck which (in turn) fits into an inside jacket pocket, on the other side a Brierley-sized guidebook and iPhone sit comfortably. A place for everything and everything in its place.

More trivially I have four pre-tied loops of strong nylon string. Two tiny, two longer.

I usually stay in private rooms and - where they have such luxuries - the wardrobe will have hookless coat hangers. The two tiny loops, with some ingenuity , are used to deploy coat hangers over the bath or shower for drying washing. The longer ones for securing the room key to my trousers and for suspending my phone on charge if the socket is too distant. They weigh a couple of grammes.

And a corkscrew!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2009), Camino Frances (2012), Via de la Plata (2013) and Camino del Norte planned for May, 2015
Now that is good....🤗
If you lose it, it is impossible to replace en Camino (I know). I wandered up the Camino Francés last year...and already it was admired and appreciated in the laundry at Roncesvalles. All bowls etc were in use...but the plug allowed me to use a vacant sink. The biggie for me is being able to stop up a shower that could be a BATH if only a stopper were available.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
My Ultralite PackTowl (https://www.packtowl.com/ultralite/ultralite.html). It is my luxury item. It has a slightly stiff texture the first couple of times you use it, but then it softens up nicely. Super absorbent but dries fast. I know: it's totally weird to get excited about a towel, but I just love it and can't leave without it.
I also love my Packtowl Ultralite. The texture is different than most other lightweight microfiber towels, and I definitely prefer it. And it's the lightest weight full size towel that I've found - only 3.4 ounces/100 grams. And now I see from your link that they come in pretty prints! So tempting...
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I don't know if and when I'll be able to walk another Camino, but when I do, you can bet I'll bring a 35mm SLR camera, be it film or digital.
That's my big luxury item this summer. A proper "weatherproof", micro 4/3 mirrorless digital camera with 14-150mm lens. My wife just calls it my latest toy.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
Ah! I had not thought of that! Will bring mine too on my next camino - april if all goes to plan....
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
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More trivially I have four pre-tied loops of strong nylon string. Two tiny, two longer.

I usually stay in private rooms and - where they have such luxuries - the wardrobe will have hookless coat hangers. The two tiny loops, with some ingenuity , are used to deploy coat hangers over the bath or shower for drying washing. The longer ones for securing the room key to my trousers and for suspending my phone on charge if the socket is too distant. They weigh a couple of grammes.

And a corkscrew!
Now those loops are a brillant idea! Will copy you!

Had forgotten to mention my corkscrew - screwpull, the best and very light.

And the tinyest Swiss Army knife for its miniature scissors which cut so well, even a strong nylon string and are excellent for unpicking a seam. And are good for the rest of its parts: tiny blade, tiny screw driver, tiny tweezers(? can’t think of the word) and normal size tooth pick.
Now I come to think of it, I doubt very much whether the Swiss army uses these scissors, but they are part of the series....

I also love my Packtowl Ultralite. The texture is different than most other lightweight microfiber towels, and I definitely prefer it. And it's the lightest weight full size towel that I've found - only 3.4 ounces/100 grams. And now I see from your link that they come in pretty prints! So tempting...
Yes, I was seduced by the pretty print!
 

Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
I am fascinated by the need to carry a corkscrew. Not critical, just amazed. If I still smoked, it would be a cigarette lighter! Ok, have thought through my stuff: a small cotton neck scarf. Soak it, and what blessed relief!
I tour with a theatre company for work, so I'm travelling most of the time. The one thing I always end up buying if I don't bring it with me is a corkscrew/bottle opener!
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
swiss army knife with wine opener
I used to buy Swiss Army knives as I always gave mine away at the end of a camino. I didn't want to check my backpack, even going home. I had to start my winter Camino this year in Pamplona thinking I would buy a new knife there. I went to Caminoteca and found a very inexpensive knife with enough blades and (I think) a corkscrew for about 7 euros. I rarely ever drink so I don't need one. I saw it in a few places along the way while I was walking. If you really only use a knife like this on the Camino it is a very good bargain. I checked on the Caminoteca website but it wasn't listed. If anyone reads this and wants one they were located across from the cash register in front of the store.
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Now I come to think of it, I doubt very much whether the Swiss army uses these scissors, but they are part of the series....
That's the part I use the most on my mini-knife. More than all the other items combined.
 

Mary Doll

Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Camino Francés SJPDP to Finisterre planned for June 2020
My Ultralite PackTowl (https://www.packtowl.com/ultralite/ultralite.html). It is my luxury item. It has a slightly stiff texture the first couple of times you use it, but then it softens up nicely. Super absorbent but dries fast. I know: it's totally weird to get excited about a towel, but I just love it and can't leave without it.
I also love my Packtowl Ultralite. The texture is different than most other lightweight microfiber towels, and I definitely prefer it. And it's the lightest weight full size towel that I've found - only 3.4 ounces/100 grams. And now I see from your link that they come in pretty prints! So tempting...
Now you’ve got me excited as this is the towel I’ve bought for my Camino in June. I haven’t tried it yet but glad to see it getting positive reviews.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Now you’ve got me excited as this is the towel I’ve bought for my Camino in June. I haven’t tried it yet but glad to see it getting positive reviews.
Make sure that you wash it several times before you use it. And try it out at home to make sure that it works for you. That goes for everything that you put in your backpack.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I am fascinated by the need to carry a corkscrew. Not critical, just amazed. If I still smoked, it would be a cigarette lighter! Ok, have thought through my stuff: a small cotton neck scarf. Soak it, and what blessed relief!
I did not think about having a corkscrew on the Camino until a communal dinner at an albergue in which we had two bottles of wine but no corkscrew to open them with. Nobody in the albergue had one.
 

Mary Doll

Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Camino Francés SJPDP to Finisterre planned for June 2020
Make sure that you wash it several times before you use it. And try it out at home to make sure that it works for you. That goes for everything that you put in your backpack.
Thanks for the tip Trecile. I’ll wash it a few times and then I’ll start using it as my gym towel to see how well it works for me. The clothes I’m taking are all things I’ve had and worn for a while. I need to buy a new pair of Salomon shoes but as this will be my third pair I already know they suit my feet. I’ve replaced my beloved Lowe Alpine pack with an Osprey which is significantly lighter so hoping that works for me but I’ve plenty of time to gradually add weight to it and see how it works on long hikes. I can always go back to the Lowe Alpine if I don’t like it.
 

laineylainey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2012, hooked ever since.
Thanks for the tip Trecile. I’ll wash it a few times and then I’ll start using it as my gym towel to see how well it works for me. The clothes I’m taking are all things I’ve had and worn for a while. I need to buy a new pair of Salomon shoes but as this will be my third pair I already know they suit my feet. I’ve replaced my beloved Lowe Alpine pack with an Osprey which is significantly lighter so hoping that works for me but I’ve plenty of time to gradually add weight to it and see how it works on long hikes. I can always go back to the Lowe Alpine if I don’t like it.
Love my Lowe alpine but do think I should get a lighter osprey.
Also like you, I have just ordered a Packtowl as my own microfiber towel is a bit embarrassingly small 🥴. Thanks to @Jarrad for mentioning it 😘
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Thanks for the tip Trecile. I’ll wash it a few times and then I’ll start using it as my gym towel to see how well it works for me. The clothes I’m taking are all things I’ve had and worn for a while. I need to buy a new pair of Salomon shoes but as this will be my third pair I already know they suit my feet. I’ve replaced my beloved Lowe Alpine pack with an Osprey which is significantly lighter so hoping that works for me but I’ve plenty of time to gradually add weight to it and see how it works on long hikes. I can always go back to the Lowe Alpine if I don’t like it.
Also try out soaps, shampoos, etc
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
As I think about getting out the rucksack from the cupboard under the stairs, I am excited about my VdlP short walk in Easter and the start of another Camino year. But I am also thinking about
my Camino "must haves"; the things that every year come with me no matter what. These are items that have become part of my Camino "costume", the things that signify my temporary transition from my every day non Camino walking persona to another version of myself - my alter ego, Camino peregrina, fearless and unstoppable - well stoppable after about 28K!
So my number one, of my must take list is this hat. I first wore it in 2000 at a wedding and it had a splendid navy bow. In 2012 minus the bow I took it and wore it on my first Camino. For some reason I thought it worked well as a sun protector and it folded up nicely in my rucksack. It has been in my rucksack every year and every Camino since. It is part of my ritual. I also have other items that MUST go on the Camino!! By the way as you can see several years of folding up my beloved hat has taken it's toll!!
What is your "must take"?
Vaseline for my feet
 

henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
I did not think about having a corkscrew on the Camino until a communal dinner at an albergue in which we had two bottles of wine but no corkscrew to open them with. Nobody in the albergue had one.
if you’re ever in that dreadful situation again, you can carefully push a cork into a full bottle of wine, usually the handle of a spoon will do it.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
if you’re ever in that dreadful situation again, you can carefully push a cork into a full bottle of wine, usually the handle of a spoon will do it.
If that will do it why bother carrying a cork screw in the first place?

The funniest situation I have come across re corkscrews or rather lack of them: the bottle came not with a screw top, but with a cork. No corkscrew in the albergue (albergue to be avoided - first after Merida on the VdlP I think.) So this young Swede undscrewed a screw of the spare folded beds and managed to open our bottle.....
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
if you’re ever in that dreadful situation again, you can carefully push a cork into a full bottle of wine, usually the handle of a spoon will do it.
From what I remember nobody wanted to do that. I believe they said would taint the taste or something. I think somebody went outside and obtained a corkscrew nearby, but I also have a memory of a young peregrina opening a bottle using a shoe as padding for the bottle as she held it horizontal and gently beat it against a stone wall and the cork popped out about an inch and it was then slowly worked out. It was one of the two.
We did end up having a wonderful meal and wine with it. For sure any future pilgrims out there reading this who anticipate a lot of communal meals and or just plain local vino consumption, either bring a lightweight corkscrew with you or purchase one as soon as you can upon arrival. Do not depend upon the albergue kitchens to have one.
I do remember being in disbelief that we were in the heart of Spanish wine country and not a corkscrew amongst us....water, water everywhere...but not a drop to drink lol
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
My hat, closely followed by~
1. My 'foot bag,' IOW, the bag of stuff I use twice a day to keep my feet happy. Especially paper tape, lambs' wool, and omnifix.
2. The Altus
3. A sleeping bag
4. Toiletries are minimal...soap, toothbrush & toothpaste, and sunscreen come every time...
5. One change of clothes
6. Shoes and socks. Always too many pairs of socks. I have to get over that. :rolleyes: 🙃
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
I always bring my "parcho" - homemade poncho/parka. Only weighs 7.2 ounces, and has full zip front and full long loose sleeves.
I made it from a kit from Quest Outfitters.

This parcho of yours looks very good for people who like ponchos - have just looked it up.

Being an umbrella woman I made a semi-poncho for myself which covers pack, shoulders and arms, but has no front. Four tapes across the front gap stop the thing from flapping in the wind - so together with my umbrella I am protected from the rain and can breathe. And when the ground is wet I have something to sit on for my picnic....
 

Jim Stinson

ibrew4u
Camino(s) past & future
5/2015 CF
4/2017 CF
5/2019 CF fr Astorga
9/2019 CF fr Astorga
I did not think about having a corkscrew on the Camino until a communal dinner at an albergue in which we had two bottles of wine but no corkscrew to open them with. Nobody in the albergue had one.
When in such a predicament, you can push the knife blade straight down the center of the cork, and slowly twist. Once the cork “breaks“ free of the sides, slowly pull up while twisting and the cork will come out on the blade.
 

Lacroix

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2020)
My hat, closely followed by~
1. My 'foot bag,' IOW, the bag of stuff I use twice a day to keep my feet happy. Especially paper tape, lambs' wool, and omnifix.
2. The Altus
3. A sleeping bag
4. Toiletries are minimal...soap, toothbrush & toothpaste, and sunscreen come every time...
5. One change of clothes
6. Shoes and socks. Always too many pairs of socks. I have to get over that. :rolleyes: 🙃
What is The Altus?
How many pairs of socks are too many for you?
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte 10, Primitivo 13, Plata 14+15, Salvador 16, Torres 17, Portugues 18, Mozarabe 19
When in such a predicament, you can push the knife blade straight down the center of the cork, and slowly twist. Once the cork “breaks“ free of the sides, slowly pull up while twisting and the cork will come out on the blade.
Never heard of this before, so I will try it out. But still carry my corkscrew - much easier, especially since I do not carry a big knife....
 

Barney12

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2021
Thanks for the tip Trecile. I’ll wash it a few times and then I’ll start using it as my gym towel to see how well it works for me. The clothes I’m taking are all things I’ve had and worn for a while. I need to buy a new pair of Salomon shoes but as this will be my third pair I already know they suit my feet. I’ve replaced my beloved Lowe Alpine pack with an Osprey which is significantly lighter so hoping that works for me but I’ve plenty of time to gradually add weight to it and see how it works on long hikes. I can always go back to the Lowe Alpine if I don’t like it.
 

Barney12

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2021
Just out of interest.. what size Osprey are you looking at? Im thinking around 30 to 35 litres… I know... has been mentioned before but its always interesting to read the replies!! Thanks!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
A large size (40 litre) ultralight pack liner - inside which I put my (30 litre) backpack each night to keep it safe from bedbugs. Does not rustle like plastic, lasts forever, weighs nothing, and it is seals the pack up completely.
 

antaresncz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (Leon:2003-Roncesvalles:2010-few days:2015), Primitivo (2014), Norte (2016), Invierno (2020)
A pillow cover (that smells like home) and handmade rosemary alcohol with some essentials oils (it keeps away all bugs and also smells good!).
I think I should take a wine opener... I never took one but always needed!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
For me - underwear and trousers. (I know for some people that would seem to be extra weight, more than is necessary). Oh, and I guess a passport and credencial. All of those are absolutely necessary.

Now if we get into the "nice to haves", the list could go on: a shirt, socks, maybe an extra set of clothes or two, a hat, a towel, shoes, hiking sandals, hiking poles, a towel, a sleeping liner...
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
For me - underwear and trousers. (I know for some people that would seem to be extra weight, more than is necessary). Oh, and I guess a passport and credencial. All of those are absolutely necessary.

Now if we get into the "nice to haves", the list could go on: a shirt, socks, maybe an extra set of clothes or two, a hat, a towel, shoes, hiking sandals, hiking poles, a towel, a sleeping liner...
Odd . . . the TSA turned me away the day I walked into security wearing only underwear and trousers. Everyone else was starting so much I double checked to make sure I put them on in the right order.
 
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henrythedog

Loved and fed by David
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, (Madrid 2019 partial - retired hurt!) (more planned)
From what I remember nobody wanted to do that. I believe they said would taint the taste or something. I think somebody went outside and obtained a corkscrew nearby, but I also have a memory of a young peregrina opening a bottle using a shoe as padding for the bottle as she held it horizontal and gently beat it against a stone wall and the cork popped out about an inch and it was then slowly worked out. It was one of the two.
We did end up having a wonderful meal and wine with it. For sure any future pilgrims out there reading this who anticipate a lot of communal meals and or just plain local vino consumption, either bring a lightweight corkscrew with you or purchase one as soon as you can upon arrival. Do not depend upon the albergue kitchens to have one.
I do remember being in disbelief that we were in the heart of Spanish wine country and not a corkscrew amongst us....water, water everywhere...but not a drop to drink lol
The quality of wine I drink on Camino would withstand a bit of cork contamination.

Somewhere near Foncebadon I repaired to the local hostal for a couple of scoops of tinto.
I paid for the first two glasses, then decided I might as well just have the rest of the bottle (don’t judge me, I’d had a hard day).

the proprietor gave me the bottle and a 60c refund, the local per-bottle price being only a fraction more than the non-local price per glass.

I think I had become an honorary local by happily chomping through the jar of pickled chillis on the bar all evening to the astonishment of women and children and the undisguised admiration of the local hombres.

Needless to say my wine of choice was far from being a ‘reserva’.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
I am fascinated by the need to carry a corkscrew. Not critical, just amazed. If I still smoked, it would be a cigarette lighter! Ok, have thought through my stuff: a small cotton neck scarf. Soak it, and what blessed relief!
Of course you HAVE to have a corkscrew!!! 😄😉
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
My fav is a bar of lush soap for hair, body and clothes. Another Camino essential for me.
Yeah... I used Lush (and loved it) until I saw it had loads of stuff in it I didn’t really approve of.
So.... I ordered other bar shampoos, more ‘ecological’....
Glad to say I tried them before going caminoing 😅 Horrid, made my hair feel as if I had poured olive oil on it and rubbed it in and left it there! - and that would have been a better option I think 😅

All this to say, try it before you go!
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
As I think about getting out the rucksack from the cupboard under the stairs, I am excited about my VdlP short walk in Easter and the start of another Camino year. But I am also thinking about
my Camino "must haves"; the things that every year come with me no matter what. These are items that have become part of my Camino "costume", the things that signify my temporary transition from my every day non Camino walking persona to another version of myself - my alter ego, Camino peregrina, fearless and unstoppable - well stoppable after about 28K!
So my number one, of my must take list is this hat. I first wore it in 2000 at a wedding and it had a splendid navy bow. In 2012 minus the bow I took it and wore it on my first Camino. For some reason I thought it worked well as a sun protector and it folded up nicely in my rucksack. It has been in my rucksack every year and every Camino since. It is part of my ritual. I also have other items that MUST go on the Camino!! By the way as you can see several years of folding up my beloved hat has taken it's toll!!
What is your "must take"?
Humility
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
Yeah... I used Lush (and loved it) until I saw it had loads of stuff in it I didn’t really approve of.
So.... I ordered other bar shampoos, more ‘ecological’....
Glad to say I tried them before going caminoing 😅 Horrid, made my hair feel as if I had poured olive oil on it and rubbed it in and left it there! - and that would have been a better option I think 😅

All this to say, try it before you go!
A brand sold in the north of Spain, Chimbo, comes with me for hair, body and clothes. There are other brands. I think it is known as jabon de lagarto.
Here is what happened when `I put the list of ingredients into deepl.com:
Lizard Soap Ingredients

The anatomy of these soaps is accompanied by elements such as: caustic soda (caustic hydroxide to make fabrics or detergents), vegetable oil or animal fat, infusions of oats or other essence (for the smell) and some liquid, the latter providing the shape and color of Lizard Soap.

The materials in this product are so simple that people can make it from the comfort of their home.

The duration of this soap is usually longer than common soaps on the market. Moreover, its properties not only help to fight stains, but also collaborate in the progress of personal hygiene (hands, face, hair).

The exact ingredients of the commercial version of this product can be found here.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)
 

C.C.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
an S hook - hang my backpack, my dry cloths on the shower door (there is never more than one) 3505133_L.jpg
and a muslin baby receiving blanket (best lightweight towel, dries in a flash) - borrowed it from my grandson - he's not getting it back after three Caminos images.jpg
 

Kathy Cocquyt

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct 2016
I sewed a flat envelope size zippered sleve in my sleeping bag around my knee area. Inside at night I had my passport,money and tiny flash light. I traveled alone and always felt secure. Also wouldnt go without a sorong. Brought a empty plastic butter container for leftovers and can through out when you don't want it. Saving grace....knee high nylons. Wore them under my socks....NO Blisters 800KM no blisters. I learned that trick from this Forum.
 
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