Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.

What is in the essential first aid kit

DeniseT

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Future:) 01 Jun 2017 SJPDP
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
CaminoSupply.com
Apparel and accessories for your Camino

notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
Sounds fine. I am just scared about what you intend to do with the multi tool!

I only take Compeeds (different sizes), 3M Micropore tape, and a few Elastoplast plasters in case of cuts and scratches. I think the original brands are worth the money, not cheaper 'own brands'.
If I get a bad blister I buy a kilo of salt to make a saline soak.
Some people think Compeeds are the devil's work, but I think they are fine if you don't pull them off aggressively.

I also take antihistamine eye drops everywhere as I am very allergic to pollen and it comes on suddenly.
If you have any illness or special health needs, make a translated explanation of it to show people if needed.
Don't forget a good quality high factor sunscreen.
Pharmacies in Spain are a real pleasure, should you need anything else.
 
Last edited:

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
tea tree oil
fisherman's friend (not essential, but beneficial!)
knee supports
(I also prefer the micropore tape + plaster strips to Compeed)

These along with the panadol and nurofen are all items I have shared with others even if I have not used them myself.

Muslin towel made a great sling for a broken arm.
 

Rick M

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 21)
Your list looks fine. Every day you will walk past a pharmacy in every town of any size, where they have thought of everything a pilgrim might need. All you need to carry is something that you might need immediately: compeed, pain killers, two band-aids, and tape. Don't stock up, or think "just-in-case". I traveled with a guy who was equipped to be a combat medic, his first aid kit was at least 2 kilos. Sure he pulled it out once or twice for others, but he really did not need to carry that much stuff.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop

tillyjones

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances June 2015
VDLP May 2017
del Norte Sept 2018
Just my two cents...but do you NEED those things? In keeping with keeping light (and as you'll learn, every ounce counts) maybe just worry about something you need once you actually need it. i.e. Are you sure you need 8 safety pins? If you come back home with something you didn't use, that was extra weight you carried the whole way.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Antiseptic spray
Small Elastoplast roll
1 sterile compress
A few anti-histamine pills
A few Albuprofen tablets
(By few I mean 2 or 3, enough to get me to the nearest farmacia if needed)
Sun cream
Foot cream (or vaseline)

For the via de la plata in Summer I also bought hydrating powder to add to water (and I used it!)

I would keep the safety pins, they weigh nothing and are very useful to hang your washing.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Year of past OR future Camino
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I can tell the OP is writing regards the Camino Frances in Spain; but pilgrims planning other routes throughout Europe also read this forum. And to them I say: apart from the Camino Frances, one cannot be certain of passing a pharmacy every day. (And in France, the issue is finding an open pharmacy.) In France it can be 3 days; in Germany 2 days, in the Czech Republic, nearly a week.
So in these areas plan on being able to care of yourself in the areas you are most likely to injure: blisters, small cuts, bad scrapes (ie "road rash"). You'll want an irrigator (lightweight syringe), cleanser, antibiotic ointment, gauze pads and some tape, as well as some Kineseoflex tape for strains, sprains, and plantar fasciitis. Plus the usual assortment of pills for pain, allergy, diahrrea, constipation. Some rehydration salts in hot weather are also a good bet.
 

markmcilroy

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances August/Sept 2016
Camino Frances Sept/October 2017
Le Puy to Conques May 2018
Hi there,
I completed the CF in September last year and am going to do it again later this year. Like most mortals on pilgrimage I walked with blisters and only got relief from them by threading them and taking Nurofen. I know threading is controversial but on my first night on the CF I ate dinner with a guy that had done the CF 9 times...so I listened to him.

He threaded his blisters with no problems. However he did use a method of keeping the area as clean and sterile as possible by spraying the area about 3-5 times a day with alcohol (not the drinking type). So early on I bought a 2 very small plastic spray/misting bottles that I would fill with alcohol which was very easy to buy as most food stores and pharmacies sold bottles of alcohol for 2 euros. The spray bottle would only hold about 50-80 mils but this lasted about 5 days of spraying. (The alcohol came in handy for cleaning the odd scrape too).

So I sprayed the blistered area before threading and was able to spray the thread and needle before surgery and also sprayed the areas during the day and evening. I did not get any infections at all. As the time of year when I walked the days were very hot ie 39 degrees no tapes or plasters stayed on for long but I did spray the area then apply betadine ointment and then put my socks on with no tape or plasters.

I will be packing the spray bottles again this year.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
I am a workplace first aider. You should note that tea tree oil is a folk remedy. It is also not currently advised by first aid training organisations to put antiseptic or alcohol on new cuts and wounds, just to clean with water or saline, soap if available, or an alcohol free wipe. I strongly disagree with threading blisters but I don't want this thread to turn into another debate on amateur surgery. Please do your own research on this from reputable medical sources.
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
W

whariwharangi

Guest
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief

Huge (5 ibs at least) roll of duct tape and you don't need anything else.
 

tillyjones

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances June 2015
VDLP May 2017
del Norte Sept 2018
I see no-one replied about the book. It definitely adds weight. And you absolutely could get by without one, but I could see it being a bit un-nerving not to have some reference as to where you are and where you're going. Maybe condense into a (really small print) cheat sheet.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
When I was a kid, my dad had (in fact still has) an American book called The Book of Camping and Woodcraft by Horace Kephart - a 1970 reprint of a book originally written in 1921. How I devoured that book, as a young girl with thoughts of adventure. My favourite bit was a lurid description of boiling up birch sap with bear grease and repeatedly 'glazing' oneself in it from head to toe 'for the season', which I assume means they did not wash once they set off hunting and exploring and whatnot. I also loved the bit about digging out 'jiggers', which were fearful insects that burrowed under the toe nails of the unwary. Sometimes all the talk of blisters and bed bugs on this forum reminds me of it. Happy days....
 
Last edited:

AbbyDee

Court Jester
Year of past OR future Camino
In celebration of the 35th anniversary of my 25th year, I will begin my Camino in September 2017
Your list looks fine. Every day you will walk past a pharmacy in every town of any size, where they have thought of everything a pilgrim might need. All you need to carry is something that you might need immediately: compeed, pain killers, two band-aids, and tape. Don't stock up, or think "just-in-case". I traveled with a guy who was equipped to be a combat medic, his first aid kit was at least 2 kilos. Sure he pulled it out once or twice for others, but he really did not need to carry that much stuff.


Perhaps that was his "mission" for want of a better term, on the Camino, was to be ready to assist others when needed, and the weight he carried was his "sacrifice". People carry all sorts of things on Pilgrimage: Some carry huge crucifixes, others walk barefoot; in this season of Lent, people give up all sorts of things from sweets to television. The late violinist Oliver Schroer

Now, I don't know this man, or his motivations, but being a medic was part of him, his identity. The Late violinist Oliver Schroer brought his violin.

 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.
D

Deleted member 56069

Guest
Compeed strips was a life saver on Camino 1 & 2...but not as much anymore since I had my Merrill's on Camino 3 and had zero blisters. Good to have as I helped a few along the way last year.
 

Hutton24

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances October 2013
Camino Frances April 2017
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief


Panadol and compede
 

Rick M

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April ('16,'18, '19, 21)
Perhaps that was his "mission" for want of a better term, on the Camino, was to be ready to assist others when needed, and the weight he carried was his "sacrifice". People carry all sorts of things on Pilgrimage: Some carry huge crucifixes, others walk barefoot; in this season of Lent, people give up all sorts of things from sweets to television. The late violinist Oliver Schroer

Now, I don't know this man, or his motivations, but being a medic was part of him, his identity. The Late violinist Oliver Schroer brought his violin.


Now all that could have been true........but its not ;). He was part of the "family", and I came to know him well. He carried a 20 kilo pack. It was the same pack he took on all of is travels, including a trek trough Africa as well as southeast Asia. He had a complete pharmacy in there. Fortunately, the incidence of malaria is minimal on the Frances, but he had pills just in case. He did no research at all on the camino as far as I could tell, other than downloading a set of maps to his GPS. He was also a very robust gentleman, and carried that pack without a complaint the entire distance.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Scan the book as a pdf and put it on your phone ;)

I think first aid kits will vary a lot person to person. Maybe depends on what you are prone to.
And I started with Achilles Tendonitis so I needed a few things to keep that under control.
I took a fair bit of preventative stuff..... i.e. never got blisters.

As well as my prescription meds.......... my first aid kit included.

Lavender oil (burns and sunburn) Did use for sunburn
Betadine antiseptic. (never needed)
A needle for popping blisters (never needed it) I would take a sterile scalpel blade next time.
Water Puri tabs. A couple just in case I need to use stream water (I did use them)
Anti Histamine tabs (insect bites swell up on me) Did use them
Panadol (painkiller) (replenish as I went. Needed for Achilles Tendonitis)
Nurofen (anti inflammatory) (replenish as I went. Needed for Achilles Tendonitis)
A couple of Hi Strength prescription pain killers (given by my doctor in case I needed to 'walk out' to medical care) (Never needed)
Vaseline for daily foot treatment (replenished along the way)
6 Bandaids
Sheeps Wool. (awesome to prevent blisters)
Small bottle insect repellent (they love to eat me)
Immodium tabs for diarrhoea. (used once as I had 10 kms still to go and got hit with Delhi Belly!)
Foot and shin strapping tape. (replenished along the way)
And lastly, Duct Tape wrapped around my hiking poles. Used to fix all manner of things, including shins when I ran out of strapping tape!

What would I add or delete next time? Probably take the same.
I would just aim for smaller packets/quantities to save space/weight.

Note. No commercial interest.
You'll find details of Hikers Wool on this page. http://robscamino.com/foot-care/
I ended up giving away loads of it and all those who used it said it worked wonders!
 
Last edited:
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief


Strictly speaking, IMHO, the multi-tool ought to be in your pocket, where it can be rapidly acquired for any number of tasks, without having to retrieve your first aid kit from your rucksack. In addition to the nasty-sharp tiny scissor, there is a bottle opener, a pair of pliers, a zip puller hook, a file, and one or two small screwdrivers.

These tiny multi-tools do everything a larger, heavier pocketknife (e.g. Swiss Army knife) can do, EXCEPT it does not have a cutting blade on it. THAT is why it is TSA legal.

I fly with mine all the time. Ironically, the first and only time it was confiscated by airport security was in Delhi, India on the way back to the US. I have flown through Europe and North America with this in my pocket many times. I always present it for inspection at security so I can demonstrate that is has no cutting edge when asked. Most of the security folks appreciate this.

Also, and slightly off the first aid topic. When checking luggage, I always use thin neon-hued, day-glo colored wire ties to secure my luggage zippers and rucksack buckles. I obtain them in my local DIY store. On arrival, if the specified color tie is not in place, I DO NOT touch my bag on the conveyor.

Instead, I obtain some official or local security person in the bag reclaim area to approach the bag. You can appreciate the value of this if arriving in a country that follows the "dearth to drug smuggler" rule. Only once we together validate that my bag was not tampered with, but perhaps searched by the TSA, do I claim the bag and depart. In over 30 yeas of doing this, I only had the need to use the security person once...in Malaysia... Nuff said...

Final point on first-aid kit components; each person has individual maladies and conditions that argue for carrying more, or less, or different items. Plan accordingly. Your list looks fine - for YOU. That said, the list submitted by Robo, above, is IMHO better. I carry many of the same items. However, some things, like the immodium and pain NSAIDs ride with my other medications, in my toiletry sack. Everyone has their personal style.

Also, I second the suggestion for taking a pair of semi-sterile examination gloves. I do, and have attended to serious issues with other pilgrims over the years. I was grateful to have the gloves, as hand-washing is not always readily possible.

I hope this helps.
 

Playful Dread

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Way (Porto - Santiago - Finisterre) June/July 2015
Portuguese Way (Lisbon - Santiago - Finisterre) May/June 2017
First Camino, I took a basic first aid pouch with comped plus some Anadin and paracetamol

I personally didn't need any of it! But I did however need to buy an orthopaedic bandage/sleeve for my ankle and plenty of sports drink's (Powerade) during and after a period or sickness and diarrhoea that I had. (I didn't fathom out exactly why that was at the time, but think it was a mixture or heat exhaustion and a very dodgy piece of 'cooked' ham!)

This Camino I'll be taking some electrolyte salts (in tablet form!) and again I still have the orthopaedic bandage/sleeve for my ankle that I wore in 2015.

I guess from experience on my first Camino I've added things this time that I probably wouldn't of thought of back then. But I reckon Sod's Law will show it's face again this year too!
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Kt tape for plantar faciitis and St-John's Wart oil for blister care and prevention. Electroyte tablets, lip balm with SPF. Advil and Volatren pills.
 

AbbyDee

Court Jester
Year of past OR future Camino
In celebration of the 35th anniversary of my 25th year, I will begin my Camino in September 2017
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief

Lessee, my list is still undevelopment:

Bandaids
compeed blister patches
Voltaren emugel, (left to my own devices, I prefer a heat generating ointment, but they can be rather "pungent" so not everyone appreciates them)
antiseptic ointment
Tensor brace for right ankle. (gives me problems now and again)
Ibprophen
Aleve
 

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
.
I typically wound up being the "team medic" on our group wilderness adventures. My first aid kit reflects this, so I'll not be holding it up as a model. :)

What I suggest is that you, or anyone for that matter, take the time to identify the most likely occurrences and mishaps as well as those things that are unique to you and your state of health. Put the two together and use the resulting list as the focal point for selecting the contents of your kit -- what to include and what to leave out. (I cannot take non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen, aka "Camino candy". :()

If you have questions or concerns about whether to include an item, use the following process. First, identify the injury, illness or problem the item would be used on. Second, do a two-part assessment of said issue: [a] the probability of its happening (high, medium, low), and the seriousness if it does (high, medium, low).

For example, a pilgrim who is allergic to bee-stings plans to walk the CF in late September. The probability of being stung is low, but the seriousness of any such sting is extremely high. Therefore, said pilgrim should probably include the appropriate medicines and instruct a walking partner in how to use it.

====================

One other thing: for any "questionable" item, identify if something else you will be carrying can also fulfill the need. Example: triangular bandages have very many uses, but a shemagh or scarf are effective substitutes.
 
Camino Portugués Digital Guide Image
I update my digital guides frequently, for FREE for all purchases up to one year!
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

Nanc

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
I needed only the following- though my experience on CF in September was based on MY body, shoes, weather etc which is unique to me and may not be what you experience
1) 8 safety pins a TREASURE for hanging laundry on the line!
2) paper tape- 1" best preventative for blisters ever, every potential hot spot got taped, no blisters
blister shield- to each their own- provided the glide needed with out then negatives of moisture products like Vaseline etc- to each their own
3) small pair of scissors-
4) compeed like gel patch for those hotter spots
5) bought electrolyte tablets- critical on the hotter days- (I don't like sugary sports drinks). Recommend bring them as I only found them in 2 hiking pilgrim stores and the rest of the time the pharmacies sold large packets meant for 2 L bottles , could be torn open and partially used but I was always worried re messes, plus ones from home taste better!
6) I brought travel packages of diphenhydramine, acetaminophen, ibuprofen gave more away than I used but that tells you someone else DID need them and didn't have them.
7) small saline tube to rinse eyes or wounds etc
figured athletic tape could substitute for elastic ankle wrap if needed, never used telfa or gauze
though a "what if" is not good packing for fear- BUT if you are 5 km from the next place and NOT every village has supplies!
what do you need to get to the next place?
just MHO
nanc
 
Last edited:

notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
A lot of people are mentioning rehydration / electrolyte sachets. These are all well and good and recommended for kids. Here are DIY alternatives for adults who can't be bothered carrying them:

Bad Tummy:
Backpackers in countries where 'Delhi Belly' is rampant swear by the cure of 'Fat Coke and Crackers'. Fat meaning not Diet, but the sugar-bomb red label cola, preferably allowed to go flat and a bit tepid. Crackers meaning plain, fatless, slightly salty water biscuits. Two days of rest and consuming only these will sort out your bad tummy. It's better to do this if you can, than carry on and take Imodium, which only 'keeps the badness in'.

Too Much Sun/Dehydration:
Spain has a lovely sugary sour canned drink called Kas Limón which is available everywhere: get one that hasn't been in the fridge, tip in a quarter teaspoon of salt and stir. The salt and lemon go well together in a kind of margarita way.

Just don't forget to brush your teeth afterwards!
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
bought electrolyte tablets- critical on the hotter days- (I don't like sugary sports drinks). Recommend bring them as I only found them in 2 hiking pilgrim stores and the rest of the time the pharmacies sold large packets meant for 2 L bottles , could be torn open and partially used but I was always worried re messes, plus ones from home taste better!
What brand of electrolyte tablets do you recommend?
 

Alicemc

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, March 2017
Bearing in mind that there are pharmacies everywhere I would cut any "just in case" and focus on what you are are likely to use often or unable to buy easily. For instance, I take Voltaon tablets due to ankle & knee issues but only brought two tabs (20) with me. Turns out you need a GP prescription to buy these in Spain and the gel just isn't strong enough for me :( as suggested above, also bring a GP letter advising ALL medication you intend to take with you- helps with buying more & not having it confiscated.
 

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
Via Francigena 2019
tea tree oil
.

I thoroughly agree with the efficacy of this oil .
It is almost magical in its antiseptic properties and has many other varied and useful applications .

I am a workplace first aider. You should note that tea tree oil is a folk remedy.

Ti tree oil can hardly be lumped into the '' folk remedy '' or ' Weasel juice ' categories , it is currently a recognised clinical treatment for tropical ulcers and the Necrotising Fasciitis often associated with the bite of the Australian Wolf or White tailed spider . So for use as a treatment for and as a prophylactic against bacterial infection it is very suitable for use on the Camino .
It is unfortunate that some natural treatments are dismissed out of hand simply because they are not made by Johnson and Johnson and the like .
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

Alicemc

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, March 2017
I thoroughly agree with the efficacy of this oil .
It is almost magical in its antiseptic properties and has many other varied and useful applications .



Ti tree oil can hardly be lumped into the '' folk remedy '' or ' Weasel juice ' categories , it is currently a recognised clinical treatment for tropical ulcers and the Necrotising Fasciitis often associated with the bite of the Australian Wolf or White tailed spider . So for use as a treatment for and as a prophylactic against bacterial infection it is very suitable for use on the Camino .
It is unfortunate that some natural treatments are dismissed out of hand simply because they are not made by Johnson and Johnson and the like .
Currently using Tea Tree oil as an antiseptic, treating pimples, reducing itching from bites... It's an Aussie all-rounder!
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
>
Use tea tree out of patriotism by all means, but it doesn't have lot of scientific research backing it up. When I say folk remedy I mean just that - its use is based on ordinary people's beliefs about it. It doesn't imply that it's either useful or no use. And just because something is used to treat necrosis, it doesn't follow that it is useful for preventing infection in fresh wounds. Maggots are used for necrosis too, but I don't rush to the angling shop whenever I cut myself.
 
Last edited:

Charles Zammit

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra 2017
GR70 France 2018
Via Francigena 2019
Hardly patriotisim , simply an observation of the recognised Clinical usages of this oil .
One such study ; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19709334
A US based one just so I won't appear to be too Nationalistic , there are many proven Australian Clinical studies as well .
I think that your questioning of this treatment is responsible and quite reasonable, I am not a fan of the false hope given by patent and questionable preparations , especially in the treatment of otherwise serious ailments either .
Ti Tree oil many have its origins in ' Folk Medicine ' , as has Asprin , both are now proven to be more than faith remedies .
 

Nanc

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (Sept 2016)
SDC/ Finesterre/ Muxia (2016)
unfortunately I can't remember the brand. I THOUGHT it was poweraid like the drinks but I can't find that in any of the catalogs to confirm , sorry , my first batch came from the Pilgrim store in SJPDP
 

AbbyDee

Court Jester
Year of past OR future Camino
In celebration of the 35th anniversary of my 25th year, I will begin my Camino in September 2017
Hardly patriotisim , simply an observation of the recognised Clinical usages of this oil .
One such study ; https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19709334
A US based one just so I won't appear to be too Nationalistic , there are many proven Australian Clinical studies as well .
I think that your questioning of this treatment is responsible and quite reasonable, I am not a fan of the false hope given by patent and questionable preparations , especially in the treatment of otherwise serious ailments either .
Ti Tree oil many have its origins in ' Folk Medicine ' , as has Asprin , both are now proven to be more than faith remedies .


I for one, will no write off tea tree oil because of its "folk Medicine" origins. There are many things that Scientific research is starting to take a second look at these days particularly in light of the fact that there are a lot of strains of bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics.
 
Camino Portugués Digital Guide Image
I update my digital guides frequently, for FREE for all purchases up to one year!
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.

Shades of Narnia

Sandi, Shades of Narnia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis, 2014
Camino Portuguese 2015
Camino Francis, 2016 & Hospitalera in Viana Spain
(etc)
After 3 Caminos I can honestly say mine is truly a BASIC first aid kit; a few anti-inflammatory pills, a roll of paper tape, 10 grams of lambs wool ( available from Camino Marketplace) and a roll of gauze & iodine to share with pilgrims that haven't brought wool ;). That's it.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016
A lot of people are mentioning rehydration / electrolyte sachets. These are all well and good and recommended for kids. Here are DIY alternatives for adults who can't be bothered carrying them:

Bad Tummy:
Backpackers in countries where 'Delhi Belly' is rampant swear by the cure of 'Fat Coke and Crackers'. Fat meaning not Diet, but the sugar-bomb red label cola, preferably allowed to go flat and a bit tepid. Crackers meaning plain, fatless, slightly salty water biscuits. Two days of rest and consuming only these will sort out your bad tummy. It's better to do this if you can, than carry on and take Imodium, which only 'keeps the badness in'.

Too Much Sun/Dehydration:
Spain has a lovely sugary sour canned drink called Kas Limón which is available everywhere: get one that hasn't been in the fridge, tip in a quarter teaspoon of salt and stir. The salt and lemon go well together in a kind of margarita way.

Just don't forget to brush your teeth afterwards!
For all the time I've spent in India, I kept Pepto Bismol at the ready, as I did on my 2015 Camino. Fortunately never had to use it in Spain, but did give some to other pilgrims who were quite surprised how quickly they got relief from upset tummies.
 

Shades of Narnia

Sandi, Shades of Narnia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis, 2014
Camino Portuguese 2015
Camino Francis, 2016 & Hospitalera in Viana Spain
(etc)
For all the time I've spent in India, I kept Pepto Bismol at the ready, as I did on my 2015 Camino. Fortunately never had to use it in Spain, but did give some to other pilgrims who were quite surprised how quickly they got relief from upset tummies.

MovinMaggie, hello! Our 2015 Hospitaleros training seems long ago; did you ever get to volunteer? I was at Viana last September....wonderful experience! Stay well fondly sandi
 
CaminoSupply.com
Apparel and accessories for your Camino
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

Stivandrer

Perambulating & Curious. Rep stravaiging offender
Year of past OR future Camino
I´ve got Camino plans until 2042,
- or till I fall flat on my face, whichever comes first !!
first aid kit simplex
plus 2 seperate satchets of blister remedy packs,
trace mineral drops ( electrolyte)
japanese pepermint oil for upset tummy
Mentholatum ( tiger balm lite) for sore points at callous skin....
 

Liz Ward

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Walking Camino from St Jean to Santiage in Sept. 2016. Will meet my husband in Astorga and he will walk the last part with me.
hello again, Thankyou for all your hints and support, just got to sort out my first aid kit, and another light weight shirt .
Do I really need a map book????

what is in the very light weight essential first aid kit
So far
My tiny awesome little Gerber multi tool
Strapping tape
8 safety pins
Couple Small sachets of antiseptic
Compede blister bandaids
Panadol
Nurofen
Anything else , packing light light light my knees and back are the focus on pain relief

I think everyone has weighed in with lots of great ideas. I too will say the pharmacies were very well equipped and knowledgeable. At one pharmacy a woman on the staff actually threaded my blister and dressed it. One thing I will add. I developed a nasty shin splint after my 2nd week. The pharmacy did have the nylon stocking type of compression socks but they were useless. My husband met me in Leon and brought me two athletic compression sleeves that worked a miracle. I was pain free the rest of the way to Santiago. If you have a tendency to get shin splints it might be a good preventive to wear/bring compression sleeves with you.

Liz Ward
 

brian560

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF, VdlP 2016, Port. Central, Norte , Port. Coastal (2018).San Salvador and Primitivo (2019)
Sounds fine. I am just scared about what you intend to do with the multi tool!

I only take Compeeds (different sizes), 3M Micropore tape, and a few Elastoplast plasters in case of cuts and scratches. I think the original brands are worth the money, not cheaper 'own brands'.
If I get a bad blister I buy a kilo of salt to make a saline soak.
Some people think Compeeds are the devil's work, but I think they are fine if you don't pull them off aggressively.

I also take antihistamine eye drops everywhere as I am very allergic to pollen and it comes on suddenly.
If you have any illness or special health needs, make a translated explanation of it to show people if needed.
Don't forget a good quality high factor sunscreen.
Pharmacies in Spain are a real pleasure, should you need anything else.
Yes, they are and pharmacy staff usually speak some English
 

DeniseT

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Future:) 01 Jun 2017 SJPDP
Oh I have already used my multi tool for calluses, trimming and filing nails, it's pretty damn good, even a little knife to cut apples, did great on my calluses.
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

Shades of Narnia

Sandi, Shades of Narnia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis, 2014
Camino Portuguese 2015
Camino Francis, 2016 & Hospitalera in Viana Spain
(etc)
After 3 Caminos I can honestly say mine is truly a BASIC first aid kit; a few anti-inflammatory pills, a roll of paper tape, 10 grams of lambs wool ( available from Camino Marketplace) and a roll of gauze & iodine to share with pilgrims that haven't brought wool ;). That's it.
And Vasaline!!
 

DeniseT

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Future:) 01 Jun 2017 SJPDP
Vaseline usages -
??????????????
Why does everyone use so much Vaso... Chaffing... I haven't chaffed yet should I expect to...
My feet, getting pretty rough and tough with my awesome long walks in prep at home..
And is it just pure Vaso in a tub you talk about ???
 

Shades of Narnia

Sandi, Shades of Narnia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis, 2014
Camino Portuguese 2015
Camino Francis, 2016 & Hospitalera in Viana Spain
(etc)
Vaseline usages -
??????????????
Why does everyone use so much Vaso... Chaffing... I haven't chaffed yet should I expect to...
My feet, getting pretty rough and tough with my awesome long walks in prep at home..
And is it just pure Vaso in a tub you talk about ???

Regular Vasoline...I pack it in from home and find that it conditions the skin of my feet and must accommodate some of the friction going on during a long walk. Three Caminos; 1 blister 2 weird nails total.
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 100 ratings
Downloads
15,072
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,722
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,565
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top