A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

What is rule/law on a E Bike to gain your certificate?

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Hey All

I am planning on riding the Way of St James and wondering is there any rule / law that allows me to still get my certificate for completing the St James Way? I hear you can via E Bike but also hear you need to ride only 200 kilometers. Is this only the last 200 or any of the 800 or so kilometers (200 of the 800) I have heard also if you E bike all the way you dont get a certificate.

I want to be honest in Santiago De Compostela office and abide by the rules and laws of the Camino.

Where can I obtain the rules / laws of the Camino please and thanks

Thanks all

Glenn
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Can't speak with any authority about the e-bike issue. But for a Compostela you must complete the final 200km by bike or 100km on foot. Doesn't matter how far you have gone on other stages.
Bradyplus thanks mate :) and i will reply back to your other comment after seeing my dr and physio tomorrow cheers mate :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
For the Compostela you also must state that you did the pilgrimage for religious or spiritual reasons. There is an alternative certificate for those who do the Camino for other than religious reasons. There is also a separate certificate of distance which can be purchased.
 

jony jony

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino Frances ( 2007) Via de la Plata 2016/2017 . Final pilgrimage Sept 2018...Via de la Plata
Hello Pilgrimglen7............i hired a bike , not an e bike , from these people..........www.cyclingthecamino.com........ last year and i read in their brochure that if you hire an E bikes then you would not be entitled to a compostela . I dont know how authoritative their brochure is , but i suppose they gleaned the info from somewhere .
There are other threads on this forum about this issue .

Regards.....John
 
Last edited:

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Where can I obtain the rules / laws of the Camino please and thanks
The pilgrim office in Santiago has a page about the Compostela and what is necessary to receive one. The information does not seem to have been updated to include the latest addition to the list of rules: that one must complete the final 100km or 200km on an officially recognised route. Most people do in any case. I think that for you the key points are to have an officially recognised Credencial (either the cathedral's own or from one of the many national confraternities), to cycle at least the final 200km, and to be sure to have your credencial stamped at least twice per day during the final 200km. That is not difficult: one will almost certainly be given by wherever you sleep, and the other can be from a church, a bar, or almost any business in Spain. Apart from that there really are no "rules/laws" and what unwritten customs and conventions there are are mostly common-sense courtesies towards your fellow pilgrims. https://oficinadelperegrino.com/en/pilgrimage/the-compostela/
 

Pilger99

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
addicted since 1999 (Aragones, CF), lots of caminos in Spain and Portugal since then
Any distance you have a rule is just the minimum. You are allways encouraged to do more.
AFAIK there is no official rule for riding a mule, camel, how to deal with baggage transport, ... and e-bikes. It's still up to you. If you feel guilty or like cheating, then try to get an ordinary bicycle.
You usually don't drive into the pilgrim office to ask for the Compostela, so they rely on your word that you used a bicycle or horse or even walked the last ... km.

There is e-bike and e-bike. One you have to push like any normal push bike, but you get some elektric support up to 25km/h (european version). For these no driving licence is needed. The other type is similar to motorcycles. You don't need to push anymore, but a driving licence and insurance is now required. In any case you need a helmet in Spain.

At least I don't see much advantage of the first kind. You have more weight, you have to look for places to recharge and you are more likely to get it stolen. As with any other push bike you should start near the Pyrenees, to get the feeling of a pilgrimage/voyage. Just 2-3 days for the last 200km would not really be worth it.
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
There was an older thread recently bumped up ... I think by you ... in which our resident pilgrim office volunteer @t2andreo posted about this. There was a lot in it, so you have missed that bit.

I believe he said the kind of e-bike that you have to pedal to charge can qualify. The type of e-bike you plug in and don't pedal does not qualify you for the compostella.

By bike, you must do the final 200 km into Santiago.
 

John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
Not trying to judge, but I am curious. Is a Compostela certificate important if cruising on an ebike? An ebike sounds like a lot of fun and would be an adventure, but it seems more like a motorcycle or car than a walk or cycling.

I would encourage you to just go however you want to travel, enjoy your trip and not worry about the Compostela if they don't offer one. For me, the greatest take-way from the Camino was not the certificate, but the sense of freedom and wandering, times of solitude, times of community and comradery, and accomplishment. Enjoy your Camino.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The interpretation of the existing rules is used. If you are traveling on a bicycle you must cover at least the FINAL 200 km of any approved route into Santiago.

The issue of using an E-bike has been interpreted thusly... If it is a bicycle that REQUIRES pedaling to continue to move forward, even if it has a battery assist, it remains 'legal' for Compostela purposes. The theory is that you must continue to pedal to provide added charging to the battery, or the electro-assisted bicycle eventually becomes a pedal only bike. This applies even if you can remove the battery nightly to top off the charge or to prevent theft of the battery.

OTOH - an electric bicycle that can only be charged and ridden and DOES NOT use a pedal charging or pedal assist system, is considered an electric scooter, and IS NOT approved.

See, simple... Each year when I report for volunteer work, I see more and more of the electrical / battery assisted types of bikes out there. Just don't be tempted to go full electric scooter...

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Dsavid Keyte

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de San Salavador (2015)
Camino de la Costa (2016)
Camino Lebaniego 2017
S
Not trying to judge, but I am curious. Is a Compostela certificate important if cruising on an ebike? An ebike sounds like a lot of fun and would be an adventure, but it seems more like a motorcycle or car than a walk or cycling.

I would encourage you to just go however you want to travel, enjoy your trip and not worry about the Compostela if they don't offer one. For me, the greatest take-way from the Camino was not the certificate, but the sense of freedom and wandering, times of solitude, times of community and comradery, and accomplishment. Enjoy your Camino.
I so agree, the achievement and experience is so much more important, my Spanish Brother in Law, always wanted to do León to Santiago in his elderly SEAT 600d, sadly he died last November without realising his wish
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
As one who has walked six Caminos, including the full Frances twice, I will agree that having that extra torque from an electric motor on the uphill stretches would have been heavenly.
Depends where you apply the torque.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
As one who has walked six Caminos, including the full Frances twice, I will agree that having that extra torque from an electric motor on the uphill stretches would have been heavenly.
You haven't heard of E-Poles? Electrically assisted trekking poles? :p:D
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Where do I buy them? Tell me! Now!
C.E.I. Camino Equipment Incorporated.

The E-Poles don't replace actual walking, they just provide 75% of the effort to each stride. This allows you to walk with only 25% of the energy compared to manual walking.

Imagine, walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona in ONE day; no more messy reservation worries at Orrison or Roncesvalles Alburgue. . . you have so many more lodging options to choose from on your very first day.

You arrive with less risk of shin splints, blisters, ankle twists, and other assorted musculo-skeletal injuries. Plantars Fasciitis is now a thing of the past.

But, wait, there's more. . . . Act now and we'll UPGRADE your E-Poles to our DELUXE model with NO EXTRA CHARGE. So in addition to your power pace perfecter, you will also receive our exclusive automatic Gyroscopic Monitor and Corrector (GMC).

No more tumbles, spills, or falls. If you start to trip or slip, our exclusive GMC will sense your impending doom. Then in a split second, it will automatically move your E-Poles to the proper placement and angle, then power assist you to an upright position.

So, Order Now for only $19.95 ****

*** Batteries, shaft, tips, and hand grips are not included, but are available as optional add ons.
 

malingerer

Active Member
C.E.I. Camino Equipment Incorporated.

The E-Poles don't replace actual walking, they just provide 75% of the effort to each stride. This allows you to walk with only 25% of the energy compared to manual walking.

Imagine, walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona in ONE day; no more messy reservation worries at Orrison or Roncesvalles Alburgue. . . you have so many more lodging options to choose from on your very first day.

You arrive with less risk of shin splints, blisters, ankle twists, and other assorted musculo-skeletal injuries. Plantars Fasciitis is now a thing of the past.

But, wait, there's more. . . . Act now and we'll UPGRADE your E-Poles to our DELUXE model with NO EXTRA CHARGE. So in addition to your power pace perfecter, you will also receive our exclusive automatic Gyroscopic Monitor and Corrector (GMC).

No more tumbles, spills, or falls. If you start to trip or slip, our exclusive GMC will sense your impending doom. Then in a split second, it will automatically move your E-Poles to the proper placement and angle, then power assist you to an upright position.

So, Order Now for only $19.95 ****

*** Batteries, shaft, tips, and hand grips are not included, but are available as optional add ons.
thinks" ! could be a godsend for old guys like me with Meniere's disease ! but then you cad you are probably joking! remind me to break your legs as you zoom past!

The Malingerer in malignant mode. :)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
C.E.I. Camino Equipment Incorporated.

The E-Poles don't replace actual walking, they just provide 75% of the effort to each stride. This allows you to walk with only 25% of the energy compared to manual walking.

Imagine, walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona in ONE day; no more messy reservation worries at Orrison or Roncesvalles Alburgue. . . you have so many more lodging options to choose from on your very first day.

You arrive with less risk of shin splints, blisters, ankle twists, and other assorted musculo-skeletal injuries. Plantars Fasciitis is now a thing of the past.

But, wait, there's more. . . . Act now and we'll UPGRADE your E-Poles to our DELUXE model with NO EXTRA CHARGE. So in addition to your power pace perfecter, you will also receive our exclusive automatic Gyroscopic Monitor and Corrector (GMC).

No more tumbles, spills, or falls. If you start to trip or slip, our exclusive GMC will sense your impending doom. Then in a split second, it will automatically move your E-Poles to the proper placement and angle, then power assist you to an upright position.

So, Order Now for only $19.95 ****

*** Batteries, shaft, tips, and hand grips are not included, but are available as optional add ons.
But, wait, there's more. . . . ROFL

Does the $19.95 include international postage? Do they accept PayPal? Visa? Leprechaun gold?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Careful, if Jeff Bezos gets wind of this, the clever folks in the PRC will actually come up with this, as an adaptation of a pogo stick. The physics can be made to work. Look for it to be available on Amazon in about six months.

Imagine a walking assistive device that acts to effectively reduce your felt weight to a fraction of what it is, (like walking in Moon gravity) while lengthening your stride. IMHO, it can be done... it is like the present anti-shock hiking poles with battery assisted hydraulics to push down for you.

You may have accidentally spawned a new product...

And, they would be Camino-legal. Since they do not work if you do not walk, they likely do not run afoul of the rules.

Can I buy stock in the startup company? We NEED Dougfitz in on this.
 
Last edited:

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Careful, if Jeff Bezos gets wind of this, the clever folks in the PRC will actually come up with this as an adaptation of a pogo stick. The physics can be made to work. Look for it to be available on Amazon in about six months.

Imagine a walking assistive device that acts to effectively reduce your felt weight to a fraction of what it is, (like walking in Moon gravity) while lengthening your stride. IMHO, it can be done... it is like the present anti-shock hiking poles with a battery assisted hydraulics to push down for you.

You may have accidentally spawned a new product...

And, they would be Camino-legal. Since they do not work if you do not walk, they likely do not run afoul of the rules.

Can I buy stock in the startup company? We NEED Dougfitz in on this.
And, they would be Camino-legal. Since they do not work if you do not walk, they likely do not run afoul of the rules.

Nice attempt to bring the conversation back to the original posting Tom ✅
 

Keyes

Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CF May-June 2016
Francesco June-July 2017
Francigena July-August 2017
Portuguese July 2018
Plenty of E-scooters cluttering up the sidewalks of Texas. PLEASE take them all away. (But don't clutter the Camino! Just take them away.)
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@davebugg it was lovely to see you return recently-and absolutely delightful to witness your ongoing healing....I always thought of you as immensely helpful - now I need to add cheeky!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@davebugg it was lovely to see you return recently-and absolutely delightful to witness your ongoing healing....I always thought of you as immensely helpful - now I need to add cheeky!
It's good to be back; thank you :)👍
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I suppose the general rule is "If you do some kind of physical effort to get there, the 100/200km rule will apply. If not, the means of transport won't be valid for a certificate." Something like this?

By the way, I laughed at the electric poles. As I cannot adapt to the normal ones, should give those a go - feels like I will go bouncing across the mountains :D
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
By the way, I laughed at the electric poles. As I cannot adapt to the normal ones, should give those a go - feels like I will go bouncing across the mountains :D
No need to just imagine how you would feel anymore. . . no siree, bob. Here at Camino Equipment Incorporated, we can fulfill that wish.

To have that real life 'bounce' to your step, pair our E-Poles with our HelioPack. We eliminated the water bladder and replaced it with an oversized Helium Bladder.

Now, with every stride using our E-poles, you get that incomparable lift that literally puts a Spring in your step. Each step is like walking on air. . because it partly IS walking on air.

And if you order our HelioPack in the next ten minutes, we will also include our Emergency Ballast Kit free of charge. So now, there is no need to worry about those extra breezy days.

HelioPack capacities range from our special Camino Bragging Rights size of 0.05 liters, all the way up to our unique 'Packing My Fears' emergency bivouac size of 510 Liters.

And for those concerned with the environmental impact of Helium, we do offer the option of filling your Helium Bladder with C.U.F. (Compressed Unicorn Farts).
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
And for those concerned with the environmental impact of Helium, we do offer the option of filling your Helium Bladder with C.U.F. (Compressed Unicorn Farts).
I have not laughed so much in days!
I probably sound like a unicorn too due to all the Helium! 😆😆😆😆😆

Do the HelioPack or the CUF quantities follow the 10% rule? I am small, how much Unicorn Fart should I be carrying? Or, how much will be carrying me? Although organic, doesnt it provoke a greenhouse effect? 😂
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I have not laughed so much in days!
I probably sound like a unicorn too due to all the Helium! 😆😆😆😆😆

Do the HelioPack or the CUF quantities follow the 10% rule? I am small, how much Unicorn Fart should I be carrying? Or, how much will be carrying me? Although organic, doesnt it provoke a greenhouse effect? 😂
That's the nice thing about the HelioPacks and the 10% rule; they allow you to load a pack as if you weighed 500 pounds, and it will only feel like you're carrying 10% of the weight of paper-thin fashion model.

So go ahead and load up that hair dryer, curling iron, coffee pot, and mini microwave. You won't notice a thing :)
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
The interpretation of the existing rules is used. If you are traveling on a bicycle you must cover at least the FINAL 200 km of any approved route into Santiago.

The issue of using an E-bike has been interpreted thusly... If it is a bicycle that REQUIRES pedaling to continue to move forward, even if it has a battery assist, it remains 'legal' for Compostela purposes. The theory is that you must continue to pedal to provide added charging to the battery, or the electro-assisted bicycle eventually becomes a pedal only bike. This applies even if you can remove the battery nightly to top off the charge or to prevent theft of the battery.

OTOH - an electric bicycle that can only be charged and ridden and DOES NOT use a pedal charging or pedal assist system, is considered an electric scooter, and IS NOT approved.

See, simple... Each year when I report for volunteer work, I see more and more of the electrical / battery assisted types of bikes out there. Just don't be tempted to go full electric scooter...

Hope this helps.
t2andreo thanks so much for your help in explaining this to me :) hopefully my wife can join me and support me :) muchas gracias mi amigo and buen camino. I plan to go from st jean du port to santiago to muxia and fisterre and back to santiago but what is best to do in what direction from santiago back to santiago? thanks again sir much appreciated mate
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
We NEED Dougfitz in on this.
I have been following this with morbid fascination, worried that I wouldn't be able to get the word 'mate' into every sentence and not appear Australian enough! Now I am embarrassed that my old friends, and @pilgrimglenn7's new found mates, are taking the p**s. How could you do that to a mate? Although I did notice that the female contributors to the thread might be excused from this criticism - they have yet to be honoured with the sobriquet 'mate'.

As for electric poles, I am having plans drawn up for a device that will stimulate the leg muscles should one not press down hard enough on the poles. It would have an adjustable cadence so that if the user should fail to meet the speed target, they would get shocked into speeding up anyway. The sensors to detect a pilgrim about to race you for the last albergue bed are proving more difficult, and they will be a mid-life upgrade (at some cost) for those determined to win the bed race!!
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Not trying to judge, but I am curious. Is a Compostela certificate important if cruising on an ebike? An ebike sounds like a lot of fun and would be an adventure, but it seems more like a motorcycle or car than a walk or cycling.

I would encourage you to just go however you want to travel, enjoy your trip and not worry about the Compostela if they don't offer one. For me, the greatest take-way from the Camino was not the certificate, but the sense of freedom and wandering, times of solitude, times of community and comradery, and accomplishment. Enjoy your Camino.
thanks John H on a few things :) Not judging me and also being encouraging :) I was in a serious car accident may 31 last year and my dr who has done the walk has recommended me to do this by bike in last 2 weeks when i told her i want to do a pilgrimage. She knows i want to ride again and walk /hike again :)
To answer your question we discussed this very question you said why do the camino way of st james. I said i love history culture and travel and its not about the certificate if i get this great added bonus but my objective is to achieve a life time dream of doing a long distance bike ride and completing it :)
I used to do road racing here in australia when i was 16-18 and my dream then was to be on the european country tour circuit especially to win a stage or more in Italy and France. but then a lot happened including last years accident has told me how about a pilgrimage or 2. So my dr said to do this first God willing may next year and then do my other dream of another pilgrimage in germany switzerland france and italy in a few years time. Im 50 now so i know i need to get fitter day by day and even my physiotherapist has wanted to do same trip but by foot. I saw what another has said and i will ask the companies who hire bikes that i need a bike that will let me charge the batter with my legs and also do the last 200 kilometres with out a battery assistance. My dr and physio said i should be able to do this and especially my dr thought it be good for me and have my wife come as my no 1 support :)
Feel free to ask anything and thanks again mate God bless and Buen Camino
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I have been following this with morbid fascination, worried that I wouldn't be able to get the word 'mate' into every sentence and not appear Australian enough! Now I am embarrassed that my old friends, and @pilgrimglenn7's new found mates, are taking the p**s. How could you do that to a mate? Although I did notice that the female contributors to the thread might be excused from this criticism - they have yet to be honoured with the sobriquet 'mate'.

As for electric poles, I am having plans drawn up for a device that will stimulate the leg muscles should one not press down hard enough on the poles. It would have an adjustable cadence so that if the user should fail to meet the speed target,they would get shocked into speeding up anyway. The sensors to detect a pilgrim about to race you for the last albergue bed are proving more difficult, and they will be a mid-life upgrade (at some cost) for those determined to win the bed race!!
thanks mate at Dougfitz :) yes i need a bike when i press the button will get me to the finish line in a few minutes so my wife can do the same camino :)
on a serious note yes i plan to take about 4 weeks with days off on my camino to explore towns and maybe a few easier days but have at least minimum a full day off to rest my body and soul and spirit. And to respect what God has taught me to work 6 days a week.
Buen Camino mate
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
This thread is going to change the course of the forum. In the past we all politely said “don’t be stupid, don’t even think about it” when people asked about hairdryers, evening wear and PJs. Now “which is the best microwave/pot/spatula/kitchen sink?” is going to be a legitimate question!
 

scruffy1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Holy Year from Pamplona 2010, SJPP 2011, Lisbon 2012, Le Puy 2013, Vezelay (partial watch this space!) 2014; 2015 Toulouse-Puenta la Reina (Arles)
I would think, just guessing mind you, that since a vehicle like a moped would not be authorized, an E-bike, green or not, would fall into the same category.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I have been following this with morbid fascination, worried that I wouldn't be able to get the word 'mate' into every sentence and not appear Australian enough! Now I am embarrassed that my old friends, and @pilgrimglenn7's new found mates, are taking the p**s. How could you do that to a mate? Although I did notice that the female contributors to the thread might be excused from this criticism - they have yet to be honoured with the sobriquet 'mate'.

As for electric poles, I am having plans drawn up for a device that will stimulate the leg muscles should one not press down hard enough on the poles. It would have an adjustable cadence so that if the user should fail to meet the speed target, they would get shocked into speeding up anyway. The sensors to detect a pilgrim about to race you for the last albergue bed are proving more difficult, and they will be a mid-life upgrade (at some cost) for those determined to win the bed race!!
Matee? Matette? (Both sound a tad patronising)

As for your device to stimulate leg muscles (Luigi Galvani says: "Been there, done that, you want to see my pet frog?") I've no doubt Dave Bugg Enterprises Inc®(a subsidiary of C.E.I) could dress up some cattle prods with a few scallop shell stickers.

(Apologies to @pilgrimglenn7 - such nonsense as this usually gets confined to the "Not a serious thread" thread but once you open up a can of worms here there's no telling where it will lead).
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I would think, just guessing mind you, that since a vehicle like a moped would not be authorized, an E-bike, green or not, would fall into the same category.
It could if you carried the moped . . .
 
  • Like
Reactions: twh

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Matee? Matette? (Both sound a tad patronising)

As for your device to stimulate leg muscles (Luigi Galvani says: "Been there, done that, you want to see my pet frog?") I've no doubt Dave Bugg Enterprises Inc®(a subsidiary of C.E.I) could dress up some cattle prods with a few scallop shell stickers.

(Apologies to @pilgrimglenn7 - such nonsense as this usually gets confined to the "Not a serious thread" thread but once you open up a can of worms here there's no telling where it will lead).
i dont mind the fun at all :) i need to have more smiles and laughs in my life. Since the car accident life has been really difficult so i appreciate eveyone commenting and others being funny :) its all good :)
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
As for your device to stimulate leg muscles (Luigi Galvani says: "Been there, done that, you want to see my pet frog?")
Sound environmental thinking. Bimetallic trekking poles - one copper, one zinc (or possibly galvanized steel). Just remember to apply liberal quantities of locally-sourced lemon juice to the skin to improve conduction before whacking your calf muscles at every step. If only someone can now demonstrate conclusively that lemon juice is either a deterrent or is actually toxic to bedbugs..... That would be a plus.
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Hello Pilgrimglen7............i hired a bike , not an e bike , from these people..........www.cyclingthecamino.com........ last year and i read in their brochure that if you hire an E bikes then you would not be entitled to a compostela . I dont know how authoritative their brochure is , but i suppose they gleaned the info from somewhere .
There are other threads on this forum about this issue .

Regards.....John
i found it if its battery powered and powered up by your legs you can get your certificate as long as you use your legs only on last 200 kilometers
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Sound environmental thinking. Bimetallic trekking poles - one copper, one zinc (or possibly galvanized steel). Just remember to apply liberal quantities of locally-sourced lemon juice to the skin to improve conduction before whacking your calf muscles at every step. If only someone can now demonstrate conclusively that lemon juice is either a deterrent or is actually toxic to bedbugs..... That would be a plus.
Intrigued (and bored - waiting for a delivery "sometime today") I instantly Googled it:

"4. Lemon juice
It is very easy to create this lemon juice from your own kitchen. Lemon has some astringent properties that can be harmful for most bed bugs. Most insects don't like the aroma of lemon juice. Therefore, you can remove any bed bugs from your home with this ingredient easily. It is recommended that you create your own natural lemon juice before you kill any bed bugs with this ingredient. Lemon juice is believed to be one of the most popular natural bed bug removal products on the marketplace these days.

When you want to get all benefits from this ingredient, you need to use fresh lemon juice for eliminating bed bugs from your home quickly. It is recommended that you mix your lemon juice with water, in order to reduce any negative side effects of this lemon juice. Small concentration of lemon juice is good enough to get rid of any bed bugs quickly. Most bugs don't like the aroma of lemon juice, especially when this juice is sprayed in several areas in your home."


Mind you, can you trust Google?
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
when the cathedral finally decides to get out of the souvenir business or eliminate the ludicrous "100 km. rule," the Compostela fever will subside and the entire Enhanced Camino Experience business will collapse. Cash in now, folks, while the market is hot!
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
when the cathedral finally decides to get out of the souvenir business or eliminate the ludicrous "100 km. rule," the Compostela fever will subside and the entire Enhanced Camino Experience business will collapse. Cash in now, folks, while the market is hot!
Rebekah Scott thanks for your comment mate :) much appreciated muchas gracias my amigo
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
t2andreo thanks so much for your help in explaining this to me :) hopefully my wife can join me and support me :) muchas gracias mi amigo and buen camino. I plan to go from st jean du port to santiago to muxia and fisterre and back to santiago but what is best to do in what direction from santiago back to santiago? thanks again sir much appreciated mate
I can only suggest that you look here in the forum regarding routes to and from Finisterre, Muxia and Santiago. There is a formal Camino route with very good markings. I have not walked it.

The transportation between towns may be problematic as the volume of pilgrims is low and the distance is not that long, overall. The rental car option might be better for your wife here. Rent from Santiago (Enterprise is at the train station) and return to Santiago would be the cheapest way.

Hope this helps.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Matee? Matette? (Both sound a tad patronising)
Trying to reproduce in writing something that works well in the Australian spoken vernacular is always going to be fraught with the prospect of misunderstanding. The word mate is one of the more strongly gender biased terms, and its use requires care. For example men can call men mate, a man wouldn't do that to a woman, but women might do it to each other, although I rarely hear that. The word can be extended (maaaaate) and be an expression of joy at meeting a friend, or complete derision of someone's stupid idea. It is also a proxy for the rather longer winded 'I have forgotten your name, and even if you tell it to me now I will have forgotten it again before long, so I will save us both the embarrassment of having to formally introduce ourselves, mate!'

As to what one might call a woman, great care is required. 'Love', 'honey' or 'sweetheart' have generally worn out their welcome, as I think, has 'miss'. The standby I use is 'ma'am' when speaking and as the formal salutation on correspondence, but it wouldn't replace 'mate' in other contexts.

Other than the difficulties the word creates as a salutation, it still has great utility. I could say 'a mate of mine and I are going to walk the camino' without creating any confusion, and an Australian would clearly understand that you and the person you are walking with are likely to be the same gender. Saying 'a friend of mine and I are going to walk the camimo' would leave the matter of gender open.

Which is all a long winded way of saying 'matee' or 'matette' aren't likely to be entering the Australian vernacular in the foreseeable future.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I would think, just guessing mind you, that since a vehicle like a moped would not be authorized, an E-bike, green or not, would fall into the same category.
It all comes down to the issue of human motion being required.

If a motor assistive device REQUIRES that you pedal to recharge, top off a charge, prolong a charge, or to help the device along, it would be legal. The issue is that the electric motor in this case only provides an assist, not the primary / sole means of forward motion.

Conversely, if you can merely keep recharging the device without having to pedal to recharge, top off the charge, prolong the charge, etc. the device would be considered a wholly powered scooter, like a moped, Vespa scooter, or electric variant of same. This latter category is NOT legal as it does not require human action and motion to continue to operate.

All this said, the Cathedral authorities have not addressed this issue directly, at least insofar as I am aware. They change the rules from time to time. I only find out about the new policies when I should up to volunteer. I return to work on 6 May.

To date, electric ASSIST bikes have been lumped into the same category as a regular bicycle with gears. One might argue that having variable gearing also provides a mechanical advantage or assist to make pedaling easier. In this context, the electric assist bicycle is a further enhancement of the gearing concept. You STILL have to pedal to move the contraption forward.

Does this make sense?

Hope it helps.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Trying to reproduce in writing something that works well in the Australian spoken vernacular is always going to be fraught with the prospect of misunderstanding. The word mate is one of the more strongly gender biased terms, and its use requires care. For example men can call men mate, a man wouldn't do that to a woman, but women might do it to each other, although I rarely hear that. The word can be extended (maaaaate) and be an expression of joy at meeting a friend, or complete derision of someone's stupid idea. It is also a proxy for the rather longer winded 'I have forgotten your name, and even if you tell it to me now I will have forgotten it again before long, so I will save us both the embarrassment of having to formally introduce ourselves, mate!'

As to what one might call a woman, great care is required. 'Love', 'honey' or 'sweetheart' have generally worn out their welcome, as I think, has 'miss'. The standby I use is 'ma'am' when speaking and as the formal salutation on correspondence, but it wouldn't replace 'mate' in other contexts.

Other than the difficulties the word creates as a salutation, it still has great utility. I could say 'a mate of mine and I are going to walk the camino' without creating any confusion, and an Australian would clearly understand that you and the person you are walking with are likely to be the same gender. Saying 'a friend of mine and I are going to walk the camimo' would leave the matter of gender open.

Which is all a long winded way of saying 'matee' or 'matette' aren't likely to be entering the Australian vernacular in the foreseeable future.
Oh for the simpler, far off, days of 1970s London when just saying the words "Oi, Sheila" in Kangeroo Valley would have half the population turn towards you! 🇦🇺🇳🇿🇬🇧

I'm guessing that the term used by an older generation of Londoners, to whit "China", would be met with blank stares.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Careful, if Jeff Bezos gets wind of this, the clever folks in the PRC will actually come up with this, as an adaptation of a pogo stick. The physics can be made to work. Look for it to be available on Amazon in about six months.

Imagine a walking assistive device that acts to effectively reduce your felt weight to a fraction of what it is, (like walking in Moon gravity) while lengthening your stride. IMHO, it can be done... it is like the present anti-shock hiking poles with battery assisted hydraulics to push down for you.

You may have accidentally spawned a new product...

And, they would be Camino-legal. Since they do not work if you do not walk, they likely do not run afoul of the rules.

Can I buy stock in the startup company? We NEED Dougfitz in on this.
I believe Jeff is already working on shoes that provide the same service. When you step down on them they push you back up for the next step. They are great while you are walking but they are still working out the kinks for stopping (at the end of the day, at bars, or at traffic lights and stop signs).
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Does this make sense?
Not to me, I am afraid.

In this context, the electric assist bicycle is a further enhancement of the gearing concept. You STILL have to pedal to move the contraption forward.
I don't see the use of external (to the person) power source in anything like the same light as the use of gearing. I do understand that the amount of assistance could vary quite significantly between different models, and that there are going to be arrangements and control mechanisms that require the rider to pedal to get any assistance. This would ensure that the rider cannot cruise or coast without some pedalling effort. That said the rider is always going to have available the assistance of a motor.

I would also make the same observation about an earlier generation of bicycles and mopeds powered by small petrol engines. I saw an otherwise conventional bicycle fitted with an engine in 2016 shortly after Sarria. For the relatively short time it took to pass, it disrupted the whole ambience of the path, and in my view should have been banned from using the same path as walkers and conventional cyclists. But otherwise, these appear little different to e-bikes. Does the cathedral distinguish between electric motors and other types of powered bike. Do they allow internal combustion engines of similar output that also require continual pedalling?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The cathedral has not been distinguishing the gradations among e-bikes or other forms of motorization, beyond what I explained. Perhaps they should, but to date they have not entered the fray.

When I have asked in the past, as recently as last summer, the only verbal answer I ever received was that "if you MUST pedal to move forward, it is still okay. If you do not need to ever pedal, as a motor provides all locomotion, then it is not legal." I am paraphrasing slightly but that is a near literal rendition of what management told me.

But there is no bicycle inspector outside the office greeting and inspecting all arriving cyclists to tell them if their camino was valid or not. We may be many things at the Pilgrim Office, but stupid ain't among them. Let me put it this way, it is not a function I would ever want to do.

Personally, while I do appreciate the benefits of the electric ASSIST bicycles, were I king, I would ban all e-bikes as a development too far. IMHO they reduce the effort required, and make light of the traditional seriousness of the Camino.

Then again, I am a purist at heart. I would prefer that NO bicycles or other self propelled but mechanical wheeled means of transport be approved, with the SOLE exception of a wheelchair for a disabled person.

But, this isn't going to happen. So, bicycles remain legitimate as do pogo sticks, push scooters, and any other form of human locomotion that requires a human to make an effort to cause it to move forward.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
Not trying to judge, but I am curious. Is a Compostela certificate important if cruising on an ebike? An ebike sounds like a lot of fun and would be an adventure, but it seems more like a motorcycle or car than a walk or cycling.

I would encourage you to just go however you want to travel, enjoy your trip and not worry about the Compostela if they don't offer one. For me, the greatest take-way from the Camino was not the certificate, but the sense of freedom and wandering, times of solitude, times of community and comradery, and accomplishment. Enjoy your Camino.
I can honestly say that riding a e-bike isn't easy! All it does it take the pressure off your knees and helps you get up the hills better. At 71, I was ready to leave my cycling days behind me then friends (older than me) said they found their e-bikes mean they could still enjoy the sport. My doctor also advised me that if I didn't want to end up having a knee operation, I should seriously consider an e-bike.

You still have to work very hard and it doesn't mean you simply sit on the bike and let it do all the work. Although I admit to having seen quite a few people doing just that on a level road! The idea is to pedal without the motor turned on until you get to a hill when you then turn it on and find you don't end up getting off the bike after all! Although even then if the hill is steep, you have to get off and push a bit. If you're lucky enough to have invested in a bike that has "walk assist" even that becomes easier.
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
The cathedral has not been distinguishing the gradations among e-bikes or other forms of motorization, beyond what I explained. Perhaps they should, but to date they have not entered the fray.

When I have asked in the past, as recently as last summer, the only verbal answer I ever received was that "if you MUST pedal to move forward, it is still okay. If you do not need to ever pedal, as a motor provides all locomotion, then it is not legal." I am paraphrasing slightly but that is a near literal rendition of what management told me.

But there is no bicycle inspector outside the office greeting and inspecting all arriving cyclists to tell them if their camino was valid or not. We may be many things at the Pilgrim Office, but stupid ain't among them. Let me put it this way, it is not a function I would ever want to do.

Personally, while I do appreciate the benefits of the electric ASSIST bicycles, were I king, I would ban all e-bikes as a development too far. IMHO they reduce the effort required, and make light of the traditional seriousness of the Camino.

Then again, I am a purist at heart. I would prefer that NO bicycles or other self propelled but mechanical wheeled means of transport be approved, with the SOLE exception of a wheelchair for a disabled person.

But, this isn't going to happen. So, bicycles remain legitimate as do pogo sticks, push scooters, and any other form of human locomotion that requires a human to make an effort to cause it to move forward.

Hope this helps.
Sadly, it is attitudes like this that force me to realise that I have to give up my yearning to ride the Camino, which I did in 2013 on a normal bike, using my new e-bike. I had to invest in one because my doctor told me to either give up what was a wonderful way of keeping fit if I wanted to avoid knee surgery. It seems funny that people on horses and motorbikes are seen as valid when it comes to making their way along the Camino, yet those using an e-bike (which, believe me, is still not an easy mode of transport - see my reply to John H. above) is frowned upon.

I am a very patient person and tend to believe that everybody has a right to their own choices in life. It just cuts to the core when I realise that I may come across attitudes like this because I would do anything to avoid such negative feelings being directed at me. So I am giving up on my plans to use my newly acquired e-bike in Spain this year.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
I am a very patient person and tend to believe that everybody has a right to their own choices in life. It just cuts to the core when I realise that I may come across attitudes like this because I would do anything to avoid such negative feelings being directed at me. So I am giving up on my plans to use my newly acquired e-bike in Spain this year.
I am sorry to read this. It sounds as if you have carefully thought through your own particular abilities and needs and had decided on a journey built around them. A decision made for what appear to be sound reasons and in good conscience. Why throw that away because of some interpretations of "rules" which only apply to you if you choose to let them? On my second Camino I met members of a German coach party on a parish pilgrimage from Bavaria. One woman was quite angry with me and told me that solo walkers like myself were tourists and not proper pilgrims: she and her friends were the real pilgrims because they travelled together in an officially organised church group supervised by a priest who said mass daily and led them in prayers and spiritual meditations. Walking played no part in her understanding of what 'pilgrimage' meant. Although I did not share her judgment on myself and other walkers I was more than ready to accept that she was as much a pilgrim as myself. I have often thought and have frequently stated that the 100km/200km rule and other subsequent conditions for receiving a Compostela are a serious mistake in judgment on the part of the cathedral: something which encourages a fixation with trivial details, "cheating" and an over-emphasis on the physical challenges of a journey rather than the spiritual focus. If you do not build your plans around the Compostela rules why should they determine how you make your pilgrimage?
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
I am sorry to read this. It sounds as if you have carefully thought through your own particular abilities and needs and had decided on a journey built around them. A decision made for what appear to be sound reasons and in good conscience. Why throw that away because of some interpretations of "rules" which only apply to you if you choose to let them? On my second Camino I met members of a German coach party on a parish pilgrimage from Bavaria. One woman was quite angry with me and told me that solo walkers like myself were tourists and not proper pilgrims: she and her friends were the real pilgrims because they travelled together in an officially organised church group supervised by a priest who said mass daily and led them in prayers and spiritual meditations. Walking played no part in her understanding of what 'pilgrimage' meant. Although I did not share her judgment on myself and other walkers I was more than ready to accept that she was as much a pilgrim as myself. I have often thought and have frequently stated that the 100km/200km rule and other subsequent conditions for receiving a Compostela are a serious mistake in judgment on the part of the cathedral: something which encourages a fixation with trivial details, "cheating" and an over-emphasis on the physical challenges of a journey rather than the spiritual focus. If you do not build your plans around the Compostela rules why should they determine how you make your pilgrimage?
I agree, Bradypus. Sadly, we all come across people who are quick to judge throughout our lives. It's just that I do tend to try and avoid such situations myself. I'm a peacemaker and believe that all of us are on a spiritual path, whether we are aware or not.

I have to admit that I was totally confused as to why anyone would think that someone walking a Camino wasn't as much a true pilgrim as they, themselves, were. I might even venture to say that perhaps she lashed out because you made here feel guilty because she wasn't prepared to take on the hardships of making a long walk herself. That is her perception and I don't suppose anyone can make her see differently - only life and experience can do that. She probably regretted what she had said to you once she dwelled upon it.

Our first ride of the Camino started from Bayonne and then onto St John Pied de Port and eventually arriving in Santiago. It took us 22 days. We stuck mainly to the road because much of the trail was narrow in parts and best left to those walking. We learned very early on that if you're walking you can easily forget your surroundings and all that is going on around you, so a bike suddenly appearing behind you can be very frightening.

I started the ride with a yearning to enjoy an epic, mammoth route. And I ended up having a whole new understanding of myself. Even my husband has changed - he's a whole new, nicer person 😆. We are thinking of walking from St John Pied de Port to Pamplona (without the bikes). Although I have knee problems and a bunion so we were also thinking it might be better instead to ride from Santander along the Del Norte route. Only time will tell.

I love your avatar, by the way.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
It seems funny that people on horses and motorbikes are seen as valid when it comes to making their way along the Camino,
Hi..

Could you elaborate a bit on what you meant about motorbikes being viewed as valid on the Camino?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Sadly, it is attitudes like this that force me to realise that I have to give up my yearning to ride the Camino, which I did in 2013 on a normal bike, using my new e-bike. I had to invest in one because my doctor told me to either give up what was a wonderful way of keeping fit if I wanted to avoid knee surgery. It seems funny that people on horses and motorbikes are seen as valid when it comes to making their way along the Camino, yet those using an e-bike (which, believe me, is still not an easy mode of transport - see my reply to John H. above) is frowned upon.

I am a very patient person and tend to believe that everybody has a right to their own choices in life. It just cuts to the core when I realise that I may come across attitudes like this because I would do anything to avoid such negative feelings being directed at me. So I am giving up on my plans to use my newly acquired e-bike in Spain this year.
To clarify, an e-bike, that requires that you pedal and have the battery assist, is LEGAL for qualifying for a Compostela.

Please do not, not do a Camino as you plan. Nothing is changing anytime soon. Use the e-bike. A lot of other bicycling pilgrims are doing so.

Have a great Camino.
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I call eveyone mate no matter who it is :) even my wife and shes american and she calls me mate :) i call my mother mate and my step dad mate. My dad was called mate before he died over 12 years ago. No matter where i am say mate :) now i might say bro brother or sis or sister its just me :) u can call me anything you want but i am happy to say these to people when i get on the pilgrimage and i will also say muchas gracias or my amiga and expecially buen camino :) i will learn basic spanish before coming cause where ever i travel i like to learn some language as people from that land appreciate it you are trying to be more understanding and respectful to them and yes a smile goes a long way too :) cheers mates :)
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I am sorry to read this. It sounds as if you have carefully thought through your own particular abilities and needs and had decided on a journey built around them. A decision made for what appear to be sound reasons and in good conscience. Why throw that away because of some interpretations of "rules" which only apply to you if you choose to let them? On my second Camino I met members of a German coach party on a parish pilgrimage from Bavaria. One woman was quite angry with me and told me that solo walkers like myself were tourists and not proper pilgrims: she and her friends were the real pilgrims because they travelled together in an officially organised church group supervised by a priest who said mass daily and led them in prayers and spiritual meditations. Walking played no part in her understanding of what 'pilgrimage' meant. Although I did not share her judgment on myself and other walkers I was more than ready to accept that she was as much a pilgrim as myself. I have often thought and have frequently stated that the 100km/200km rule and other subsequent conditions for receiving a Compostela are a serious mistake in judgment on the part of the cathedral: something which encourages a fixation with trivial details, "cheating" and an over-emphasis on the physical challenges of a journey rather than the spiritual focus. If you do not build your plans around the Compostela rules why should they determine how you make your pilgrimage?
thanks mate :) i try my best not to let people judge me but i know when i do this but thats their choice. My gp dr recommended i do this not the bike ride i had planned to do cause the dr said i have done what u are planning outside of fisterre to muxia back to santiago but if dr has time this year will do it later this year. I am so glad I have this dr because they are a really caring for my needs never done wrong by me and has now been working with me in getting back in shape for a better life ( serious car accident changed me in so many ways ) so dr thought it be nice to do this as i love history and hiking the outdoors biking also., I used to do lots of sports and was fit but now i am never going to be as fit as i was but said the dr look take 5 weeks to do from SJJP to Santiago to Fisterre by mountain bike then go to Muxia then onto Santiago to finish. But both dr and massage therapist / physiotherapist said lets gauge it by next 8 months and see if u can use a mountain bike or a e bike. I know e bikes are heavier much heavier but i want to listen to my medical team and my own body what i can handle. At the moment i am thinking no motor and ride last 200 ks but am thinking mountain bike last 200 k;s and e bike the other 800 or even e bike the lot and get over the hills and do up to 30-40ks a day stay in a private room like a hostal or where ever i can recharge the bike. But in saying that i hear its hard to get it re charged and I know my back and knees want last me to do a lot of pushing a 50-60lb e bike.

But in regards to being a pilgrim i believe you are more correct than that german lady told you. We personally are all pilgrims and children of God and we are all on a journey and different levels of that journey. I have been in many "valleys' and not many mountain tops since my papa (father) passed away 12/1/2 years ago
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
But in regards to being a pilgrim i believe you are more correct than that german lady told you.
I think the problem was a sort of tunnel vision. If her own choices and definitions were self-evidently correct then anything else must equally obviously be "wrong". It is not an uncommon attitude. Sometimes it may come from defensiveness about one's own decisions - a pre-emptive attack to forestall possible criticism. At other times I suspect simple arrogance and a lack of humility. We see it here on the forum often enough when people fail to make any distinction between their personal opinions and universal truths and instead make pronouncements of unquestionable "fact" on everything from footwear to bedbug prevention to daily stages and the choice of guidebook :rolleyes:
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I think the problem was a sort of tunnel vision. If her own choices and definitions were self-evidently correct then anything else must equally obviously be "wrong". It is not an uncommon attitude. Sometimes it may come from defensiveness about one's own decisions - a pre-emptive attack to forestall possible criticism. At other times I suspect simple arrogance and a lack of humility. We see it here on the forum often enough when people fail to make any distinction between their personal opinions and universal truths and instead make pronouncements of unquestionable "fact" on everything from footwear to bedbug prevention to daily stages and the choice of guidebook :rolleyes:
agree mate im starting to see that in my questions
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
In the end, it is your personal Camino, and your wife's of course. You both will accomplish it however you are able to do so. You SHOULD do so without any feeling of self-recrimination or guilt for 'not doing it the correct way.' There is no, one correct way to do a Camino.

If you cover the distance, however you can, and document it using the credential and stamps ' sellos as appropriate, you DO qualify for documentation of that accomplishment. If you walk or cycle (even on an e-bike) and cover the final 100/200 km to Santiago on any approved route, you get the Compostela. If you are a tourist, whether you flew, drove, swam, sailed, or parachuted in, you can ask for a Certificate of Welcome. They look similar, are in Latin or Spanish and look good when framed...

Usually, no one goes away unhappy. If your expectations are reasonable, your realization will be equally satisfying.

Hope this helps,
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
I call eveyone mate no matter who it is :) even my wife and shes american and she calls me mate :) i call my mother mate and my step dad mate. My dad was called mate before he died over 12 years ago. No matter where i am say mate :) now i might say bro brother or sis or sister its just me :) u can call me anything you want but i am happy to say these to people when i get on the pilgrimage and i will also say muchas gracias or my amiga and expecially buen camino :) i will learn basic spanish before coming cause where ever i travel i like to learn some language as people from that land appreciate it you are trying to be more understanding and respectful to them and yes a smile goes a long way too :) cheers mates :)
🤣 When I once said to my son "you and your mate", meaning his girlfriend (now his wife) he went ballistic and told me it sounded like I saw her as his bricky friend.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
I call eveyone mate no matter who it is :) even my wife and shes american and she calls me mate :) i call my mother mate and my step dad mate. My dad was called mate before he died over 12 years ago. No matter where i am say mate :) now i might say bro brother or sis or sister its just me :) u can call me anything you want but i am happy to say these to people when i get on the pilgrimage and i will also say muchas gracias or my amiga and expecially buen camino :) i will learn basic spanish before coming cause where ever i travel i like to learn some language as people from that land appreciate it you are trying to be more understanding and respectful to them and yes a smile goes a long way too :) cheers mates :)
Here I call everyone 'mate' too. Though where I grew up in England it was 'duck' or 'ducky'! In some areas it is 'love' (Cheers love), even between males. Confuses some people but I love these regional things!

Buen camino ducky!
Davey
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
But there is no reason you can't ride the camino on your new e-bike. It just may or may not qualify you for the particular piece of paper.
While it might be nice to have the Compostela at the end of the journey, it isn't really all about that, is it. I reason with myself and tell myself that I don't need a piece of paper to qualify what I have achieved. Back in 2013, when I used a smashing Boardman bike (not an e-bike) to ride the Camino de Santiago, the journey was really daunting and much, much harder than anything I had ever undertaken before. And receiving the Compostela on reaching Santiago seemed the perfect ending. But I'd have been just as happy simply to reach Santiago after such a magical few weeks without receiving it.

Now that I'm in my 80th decade (only just, mind) I find my body won't do the things it once did so effortlessly. It was really a case of give up anything adventurous or find a way around it. I actually picked up my new e-bike today - just in time for a gloriously sunny Easter weekend - and am hoping my husband is right when he tells me that now I'll be able to keep up with him! The darn thing still needs peddling and only makes it easier to get over the hills. That'll do me.

We are still contemplating riding the Del Norte and I would almost certainly use the e-bike. But I have to admit that I would never knowingly annoy others, and will always try to be patient with those who might not see me as a true pilgrim - in my heart, I know I am.
 

Davey Boyd

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Seven Compostelas in Three years and counting......
Please use a bell on your bikes, sometimes us walkers are away with the fairies and don't hear you coming from behind! And sometimes we can be annoying by zig-zagging down steep descents to save our knees. If I hear you coming I will gladly move over for you.

And of course you are pilgrims. (I actually think it is harder by bike - but then I have a habit of falling off regularly)!

Buen Camino!
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
@davebugg it was lovely to see you return recently-and absolutely delightful to witness your ongoing healing....I always thought of you as immensely helpful - now I need to add cheeky!
Very definitely Cheeky and Very entertaining.
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
Please use a bell on your bikes, sometimes us walkers are away with the fairies and don't hear you coming from behind! And sometimes we can be annoying by zig-zagging down steep descents to save our knees. If I hear you coming I will gladly move over for you.

And of course you are pilgrims. (I actually think it is harder by bike - but then I have a habit of falling off regularly)!

Buen Camino!
I find it hard to understand why bikes aren't sold with a bell as standard. And I agree with you that a bell is crucial particularly when you are sharing the space with others, whether on bikes or not. We have a local path through from a main road to the church and people take their dogs for walks along there. I think our bells get used along this path more than anywhere else! And we are always aware that a dog may come dashing out along the meadow in front of us. Having respect for everybody leads to harmony and we often get a wave and a smile from someone when we've warned them that we are approaching on our bikes.

I love seeing pilgrims "away with the fairies" because it means they are enjoying the moment or literally being one with their surrounding. It makes your heart sing to see such uninhibited joy.
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Here I call everyone 'mate' too. Though where I grew up in England it was 'duck' or 'ducky'! In some areas it is 'love' (Cheers love), even between males. Confuses some people but I love these regional things!

Buen camino ducky!
Davey
Thanks Ducky Mate Davey :) Buen Camino
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
While it might be nice to have the Compostela at the end of the journey, it isn't really all about that, is it. I reason with myself and tell myself that I don't need a piece of paper to qualify what I have achieved. Back in 2013, when I used a smashing Boardman bike (not an e-bike) to ride the Camino de Santiago, the journey was really daunting and much, much harder than anything I had ever undertaken before. And receiving the Compostela on reaching Santiago seemed the perfect ending. But I'd have been just as happy simply to reach Santiago after such a magical few weeks without receiving it.

Now that I'm in my 80th decade (only just, mind) I find my body won't do the things it once did so effortlessly. It was really a case of give up anything adventurous or find a way around it. I actually picked up my new e-bike today - just in time for a gloriously sunny Easter weekend - and am hoping my husband is right when he tells me that now I'll be able to keep up with him! The darn thing still needs peddling and only makes it easier to get over the hills. That'll do me.

We are still contemplating riding the Del Norte and I would almost certainly use the e-bike. But I have to admit that I would never knowingly annoy others, and will always try to be patient with those who might not see me as a true pilgrim - in my heart, I know I am.
yes u are a true pilgrim mate :) and i am really proud of you being active and getting around :) even though u are young at heart u still are enjoying life :) my late grand father stopped playing tennis at age 90 and only did since he really badly injured his upper arm and shoulder in a car accident ( he was a passenger) he passed away at age 101 and 6 months and his brother died 3 months younger than him at 101 and 3 months and their younger brother was 95 unfortunatley my father died at 69
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Please use a bell on your bikes, sometimes us walkers are away with the fairies and don't hear you coming from behind! And sometimes we can be annoying by zig-zagging down steep descents to save our knees. If I hear you coming I will gladly move over for you.

And of course you are pilgrims. (I actually think it is harder by bike - but then I have a habit of falling off regularly)!

Buen Camino!
buen camino ducky :) yes the company i contacted have a bell already on the bike but if it didnt i would get one or buy a horn :) i used to do road racing cycling eveyone knew i was coming as i had a horn :) and yes i would be a polite pilgrim and helpful :)
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I find it hard to understand why bikes aren't sold with a bell as standard. And I agree with you that a bell is crucial particularly when you are sharing the space with others, whether on bikes or not. We have a local path through from a main road to the church and people take their dogs for walks along there. I think our bells get used along this path more than anywhere else! And we are always aware that a dog may come dashing out along the meadow in front of us. Having respect for everybody leads to harmony and we often get a wave and a smile from someone when we've warned them that we are approaching on our bikes.

I love seeing pilgrims "away with the fairies" because it means they are enjoying the moment or literally being one with their surrounding. It makes your heart sing to see such uninhibited joy.
i agree mate :) i dont want to be away with the fairies and bump into another pilgrim on a walk or other bike but worse a horse. I have enough injuries i dont want any more

yes for me its a dream come true to do a long distance bike ride and complete it :) when i raced my bike from 1985-1988 i dreamed of winning the tour de france but then i knew i couldnt so i said i be dreaming i win the mountain jersey and then down to win at least 1 mountain stage :) now its a dream to do cycling holidays where i can and still take my beautiful supportive wife where ever i go and we still enjoy our roadtrips as long as my back and legs can hold out and neck :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
www.cyclingsofties.blog
Camino de Santiago, 2013
i agree mate :) i dont want to be away with the fairies and bump into another pilgrim on a walk or other bike but worse a horse. I have enough injuries i dont want any more

yes for me its a dream come true to do a long distance bike ride and complete it :) when i raced my bike from 1985-1988 i dreamed of winning the tour de france but then i knew i couldnt so i said i be dreaming i win the mountain jersey and then down to win at least 1 mountain stage :) now its a dream to do cycling holidays where i can and still take my beautiful supportive wife where ever i go and we still enjoy our roadtrips as long as my back and legs can hold out and neck :)
I still enjoy cycling with my husband (he used to race in his youth - oh, such a long time ago). Often when some youngster sails passed us I comfort myself with knowing he or she's got at least 40 year's on us 🤣. And I say to my husband "in our next life, dear"...
 

Mick McQueen

https://www.facebook.com/groups/
Camino(s) past & future
I am escorting the Roll of Honour (Afghanistan) on Camino France on 20 May from SJPDP
The Roll of Honour details the 41 young Australians who died on Active Service in Afghanistan. In the centenary of the ANZAC’s, the Roll of Honour will be escorted to 41 prominent places and events around the World, laying 41 Poppies at each location.
thinks" ! could be a godsend for old guys like me with Meniere's disease ! but then you cad you are probably joking! remind me to break your legs as you zoom past!

The Malingerer in malignant mode. :)
With SERC medication Ménière’s disease is a thing of the past, must take it for a month three times a day to have any affect and must be taken for two years before you can reduce to two tablets a day.
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I still enjoy cycling with my husband (he used to race in his youth - oh, such a long time ago). Often when some youngster sails passed us I comfort myself with knowing he or she's got at least 40 year's on us 🤣. And I say to my husband "in our next life, dear"...
yes i agree and you could do a mr bean in his movie with his time in france and race past the peloton :)
 

Nev Sheather

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking now (2017)
Hey All

I am planning on riding the Way of St James and wondering is there any rule / law that allows me to still get my certificate for completing the St James Way? I hear you can via E Bike but also hear you need to ride only 200 kilometers. Is this only the last 200 or any of the 800 or so kilometers (200 of the 800) I have heard also if you E bike all the way you dont get a certificate.

I want to be honest in Santiago De Compostela office and abide by the rules and laws of the Camino.

Where can I obtain the rules / laws of the Camino please and thanks

Thanks all

Glenn
If you ride an ebike, it's like riding a motorbike all the way. Do you really think you should get a Certificate???
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
If you ride an ebike, it's like riding a motorbike all the way. Do you really think you should get a Certificate???
Nev Sheather no i dont think i should :) for me mate i wont be riding a e bike that is like a motor bike to take me from st jean to santiago. If i did ride an e bike as i have mentioned on here a lot it would be a e bike that is powered by legs to charge the battery and only need for hills and other places but ride it without the battery on for last 200 kilometres if i was going to try get a certificate.

The last thing on my mind is gain a certificate it as i have said a number of times i am there for a trip of a lifetime and to see the christian side of things and its history and culture and food and to help other pilgrims on their journey and to take my wife also.

I have also said on here i will be and also torn between a e bike and mountain bike but leaning to the mountain bike due to time and less injuries. I have mentioned on here a number of times that i have been through a serious car accident and my dr/gp has walked most of what i plan to ride and is helping me with my physio massage therapist a plan of fitness so i can mountain bike the trails i plan to do and work out how long i should take. It started off with 3 weeks to do now its 5 weeks with rest days on friday afternoon all day saturday and half of sundays and maybe some days in between them depends on how my body talks to me.

Thanks for your comment :) Buen Camino
 

Army.Bagpiper

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2021
Please excuse the long winded comment.
It was not meant to be directed at any one individual, but was a general thought.

Hope that everyone has a safe and wonderful journey!

Deseandoles un buen camino,
jeff
 
Last edited:

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
I wonder. My uneducated thoughts were that originally, pilgrimages were done from the door of one's home, and were a journey with an intentional, spiritual intention behind the pilgrimage. It may have been as a spiritual petition, or as a penance. Thus, with those motives in mind, I can see some going by horse back, but my uneducated thought is that the vast majority went by foot on their pilgrimages. There was a distinct purpose. If one wants to summit Everest, summit Everest, challenge yourself. Climb x. y. or z peak. Go from point A to point B. But, again, my uneducated thought is that pilgrimages such as The Camino, were something intentionally completed with a whole different purpose, thus the Compostella. This seems likely to me (again, my very uneducated thoughts) to follow that pilgrimages were something of a religious nature. Therefore, it makes sense to my uneducated mind, that this would possibly be why there is a question as to the motive for the journey. Was it religious or recreational. Does a recreational walk make it any less difficult? It may, or may not, depending each individual's physical state. Does it make it anymore or less significant. My uneducated thoughts is that "yes, it does" and, "No, it does not." Personally, I think that the original spirit of the pilgrimage was one of a religious nature, so my uneducated thought is for that reason, "Yes, it makes a difference." However, again for those who want to make the trip to make a trip to a renown or known place, great, make it. Cut another notch on the belt, or make a special note of it, and take a photograph or make the special occasion in some wonderful and unforgettable fashion. But, personally, my uneducated opinion is that a person who gives "religious" as the motive simply to obtain the Compostella, well, I wonder...perhaps those individuals should do some internal reflection on pilgrimages, and what they are all about. If those who make them with no religious intent are fine with telling someone or an office that they made the trip with religious intentions in order to obtain the Compostella, in the original intent in which they are offered, well, all the best to them. I just have to wonder though, as a person who is religious, how does that sit with one's conscience after words?

In the Army, we used to laugh about people who would get caught doing the dumbest of things, like wearing a Ranger Tab or some other military qualification on their uniform to which a person was not entitled to. In the service, those who wore things on their uniforms, which they were not entitled to were known as "PX / BX / Clothing Sales Rangers." It was just incredible and unthinkable to most Soldiers that others would simply, and quite literally, walk into the clothing sales store, where uniform items were sold, and buy whatever item it was, and put it on their uniforms. In conversations about these individuals who eventually, are always caught, (and always had to answer some uncomfortable questions afterwards) the rest of us, and especially those who had earned the particular award which the other had chosen to simply put on their uniform, simply wondered why a person felt like they had to do that. Was it because they had such low self esteem that they wanted others to take notice of them? What was it? Were they a person who had a need to have others think great things about them? Why would someone put themselves in that inevitable position of one day someone asking, "Hey, how did you get or how did you earn that?"

Personally, I am Catholic and therefore, I personally believe in the Last Judgement. I do not want to have to give an accounting for being a "PX Ranger." I think that my personal choice, when I make my pilgrimage during the next jubilee year, it will be the entire route, and for personal religious reasons by foot. I too hope to be able to obtain a Compostella, so that I might have it to recall the journey, the pains and the joys of my personal journey and hope the merits, whatever they may be, may be an acceptable offering to Him.

Whatever your motives, may you have a safe and wonderful journey!

Deseandoles un buen camino,
jeff
thanks Jeff for your long comment and message. Not to offend you but i dont want to question you but you said my uneducated thougts a lot.
As some said to me when i first mentioned i want to go on a pilgrimage they said a true pilgrims wears clothing like a ancient monk walks barefeet and has a walking pole and not carry water or buy water and food but relies on the goodness of others on their journey.

I am wondering no offense why you said all that you said?

We all are on a journey and being a pilgrim in the ways as we ourselves understand why be a pilgrim and why go on a pilgrimage.

For me its not the idea of a compastella or a certificate but that is an added bonus but I am there as i have given reasons before. I am also there to do a life time dream to visit Spain and do a walk or for me bike ride on the way of St James. I wish i could walk it but i cant. I will struggle as it is with a bike but God willing i will achieve a life time dream with Gods help :) and my wife in a support vehicle as she cant walk or bike or even motor bike the distances.

Thanks again for your comment

Buen Camino and all the best for you too :) God bless you in all that you do now and plan to do :)
 

Army.Bagpiper

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2021
thanks Jeff for your long comment and message. Not to offend you but i dont want to question you but you said my uneducated thougts a lot.
As some said to me when i first mentioned i want to go on a pilgrimage they said a true pilgrims wears clothing like a ancient monk walks barefeet and has a walking pole and not carry water or buy water and food but relies on the goodness of others on their journey.

I am wondering no offense why you said all that you said?

We all are on a journey and being a pilgrim in the ways as we ourselves understand why be a pilgrim and why go on a pilgrimage.

For me its not the idea of a compastella or a certificate but that is an added bonus but I am there as i have given reasons before. I am also there to do a life time dream to visit Spain and do a walk or for me bike ride on the way of St James. I wish i could walk it but i cant. I will struggle as it is with a bike but God willing i will achieve a life time dream with Gods help :) and my wife in a support vehicle as she cant walk or bike or even motor bike the distances.

Thanks again for your comment

Buen Camino and all the best for you too :) God bless you in all that you do now and plan to do :)
Greetings! No, no offense taken. No offense meant. I did not keep in mind that the comment would be taken as a reply to your original post. Although it was not meant to be, and I see how it would appear to have been and for that I apologize for the confusion.

j
 

pilgrimglenn7

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
st james way and portugese
Greetings! No, no offense taken. No offense meant. I did not keep in mind that the comment would be taken as a reply to your original post. Although it was not meant to be, and I see how it would appear to have been and for that I apologize for the confusion.

j
I try to answer all comments relating to my questions. Thanks no problem
 

OLDER threads on this topic


Book your lodging here

Booking.com


Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 41 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 146 14.8%
  • May

    Votes: 248 25.2%
  • June

    Votes: 76 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 20 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 16 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 285 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 118 12.0%
  • November

    Votes: 12 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.5%
Top