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What part of Camino would you not do?

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#1
My daughter and I are planning to do the Camino Frances next summer and are just now beginning the planning. We hope to have 21 days to do as much as we can. But obviously this will not be enough time for the whole thing so we are thinking of taking a train or bus for a portion so that we can begin at St Jean and still end in Santiago.
Given that, we are trying to determine which part would be best skipped? Can any of you recommend which portion we should bypass?
Also how much will we need to cut out in order to do this in 3 weeks? We suspect we can cover 20-25 km per day, maybe more. We are regular hikers so we are less concerned about physical ability and more unsure of logistics for the Camino.

Your experience and recommendations would be appreciated.
Rambler
 

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Trudy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2006) Roncesvalles to Leon (2007) Leon to Compostela
#2
Suggested Itinerary

A suggestion is:
walk St Jean to Pamplona - 3 days (sightsee in Pamplona in afternoon)
train to Leon - 2 days for travel and sightseeing
walk Leon to Santiago - 10 to 15 days
Santiago - 2 days sightseeing

You can limit Leon to 1 day for travel and sightseeing, but the wonderful Cathedral often closes at 7pm so you might miss it. There is a lot to see here.

And do spend time in Santiago. It's a wonderful city, and again lots to see.

If you get to Santiago in less than 15 days, then carry on walking to Fisterra and get the bus back.
 
#3
skipping

I rather disagree. We returned two days ago from biking. Admittedly, biking is faster. But if I were to do it again, I would definitely leave out the section between Sahagun and Astorga. Leon happens to be in between, so I suppose you could stop there for a day to visit. But that whole section of the route is along a main road with trucks and cars whizzing past. Really unpleasant. The part from Pamplona to Burgos is difficult, but SO BEAUTIFUL!!!!!!! I will try to get up some pictures as soon as I can.
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
#5
My own inclination would be to do the last 21 days (21x20-25km). This means starting in Burgos and though you will have the meseta as your first half you will have competed all your camino from your start point. Alternatively you could start at home or one of the traditional starting points like Le Puy and St Jean and walk as far as you can and finish the rest another time.

If you want to do the 'best bits' the 'dull' section between Burgos and Astorga is about 10 days, so if left out you could start in St Jean if you have 21 walking days.

Buen Camino
William
 

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#6
Howdy Rambler.
My wife and I have similar time constraints.

Based on excellent advice on this board from Sil, we have decided to walk from Roncesvalles to Burgos (11 days), then take the train to Lugo and the bus to Sarria, and walk from there to Santiago (5 days). We have built in a bit of fudge time, in case of injury, a slower than anticipated pace, or the desire for further exploration in a particular area.

We plan to spend 2 days in Santiago and perhaps make a day trip to Finisterre by bus if we happen to arrive in SdeC a bit early.

Joyce Rupp and others have written about the extraordinary beauty of the sections we have chosen, and although we would much prefer to hoof it the entire way, we are happy with this compromise; and given your plight, it is an option that might work well for you.
 
#7
When considering where to start, I would like to point out something that I had not considered before I started my Camino.

If you skip stages by taking a bus or a train, you will be meeting a whole new group of people each time.

Given the wonderful people that I got to know along the way, if I had limited time, I would skip the beginning and start where ever my time allowed.

This way, you are meeting up with the same people all the time. All of the camino f is beautiful, with each part offering something different, so you can't make a wrong choice about which part to walk. What was really special to me was the relationships that I formed with the other pilgrims. The best part was walking into Santiago and seeing all the familiar faces, it was like homecoming.

Buen Camino :arrow:
Lora
 

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#8
Thanks for all the great feedback. You all are wonderful. Given all the different ideas it is difficult to decide. I have heard that the first part from SJPP is gorgeous and not to miss. So I wanted also to feel like we were starting out as other would start.

But the comment on losing contact with your fellow trvelers is a good one. I will have to keep thinking and pondering.

Other suggestions are welcome.

Thanks.
Rambler
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#9
21 Days Camino

I found that we were like ships that pass in the night! We would meet great people one day and the next day, either they left early or we were faster than them and we never saw them again. I wrote a poem from my journal when we returned home. This is a part of it relating to meeting pilgrims.


We meet different pilgrims every day
Memories of those met before fade away
Are they ahead or behind? Who can say?
El Camino de Santiago

Logrono, Najera, San Juan de Ortega,
San Anton, Fromista and Mansilla Mayor
Orbigo, Astorga, Villafranca del Bierzo
El Camino de Santiago

My mind switches off - I’m walking quite fast
I am part of the landscape, of present and past
Have I been here before - in a previous life?
El camino de Santiago
 
#10
Rambler said:
My daughter and I are planning to do the Camino Frances next summer and are just now beginning the planning. We hope to have 21 days to do as much as we can. But obviously this will not be enough time for the whole thing so we are thinking of taking a train or bus for a portion so that we can begin at St Jean and still end in Santiago.
Given that, we are trying to determine which part would be best skipped? Can any of you recommend which portion we should bypass?
Also how much will we need to cut out in order to do this in 3 weeks? We suspect we can cover 20-25 km per day, maybe more. We are regular hikers so we are less concerned about physical ability and more unsure of logistics for the Camino.

Your experience and recommendations would be appreciated.
Rambler
You could walk from Leon to Santiago in 21 days at your leisure and enjoy every minute of it. I did and I am not an experienced hiker. Don't listen to those who say that this or that part of the camino is boring. Every step is a new adventure. You will find, if your experience is anything like mine, that it is the people you meet that makes the camino so special. It is difficult and there are downsides. You will have to draw on inner resources that you didn't know you had but when you return home, you will realise that you have experienced something very special.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#11
21 days

How wonderful that you can walk with your daughter! I'm sure it is going to be magical experience for you both.
I am a Rambler and know that some ramblers prefer to walk in the mountains whilst others prefer to tramp along coast-lines.
I don't think that there are any 'boring' sections on the camino frances (except, perhaps, the places where you have to walk through industrial back yards and waste dumps to get into the city).
I would agree with Klarita that the most scenic parts fall within the first 10 days or so from St Jean to around Burgos - and then the last 10 days from around Astorga or O'Cebreiro.
I loved the meseta in spring (am told its a bit of a dust bowl in autumn and bleak in winter) but I am not planning on missing it in September!
It is difficult to answer wanna-be pilgrims when they ask "where should we walk if we only have limited time" (you don't want them to miss any parts of it) so I always tell them that if I only had 21 days to walk -and might not be able to come back again - I would walk the first 10 days and then, if I wanted a Compostela, walk from at least Sarria so that I could have spend a couple of days in Santiago.
Pilgrim blessing on whichever parts you walk!
 

patchcop

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Camino Rhineland (Wuppertal - Cologne)
2013 Camino Frances (Burgos - Santiago)
2013 Camino Finisterre (Santiago - Finisterre - Muxia)
2013 Camino Rhineland (Cologne - Aachen)
#12
Why start in SJPdP and skip a whole bunch of the Camino? I've done the Camino Frances last year (may-june) and started in Burgos. All in all I needed 20 days to SdC, with bad weather, three days bad body condition but walking every day. The most silence and psychical experience I had in the Meseta, so don't listen to anybody who will let you know that you should skip the Meseta. No matter when or where I started my daily walk, I found a bed every night. Buen Camino!!
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
#13
I get very exasperated with comments about the Meseta being the least interesting part of the Camino. For your first visit to Spain and the Camino, this would be a nice and gentle introduction. The walking is relatively easy, there are enough villages for you to stop and rest in, and, best of all, because so many think the Meseta is flat and boring and therefore skip it, it tends to be less crowded. All in all, I think this would a gentle introduction to the Camino. I pass on a comment a friend made on my first Camino "the Camino is like a mobile village". By skipping bits it may not be as easy to get that sense of "village" or of a long distance walk / pilgrimage. Like others have said, give yourself time in Santiago. I think it is important to take time:- to see the city, to greet friends arriving (and to say goodbye), and most importantly to reflect on your experience! Janet
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
#14
The original post was made in June 2007 re a proposed 2009 Camino but the poster didn't (at least on this thread) tell us of her final decision. What's intriguing me is that in Rambler's profile info on her Camino's past and present she notes the Camino 2008 with her daughter but also a predicted one in 2014 with her son. Don't you think it would be interesting (from a point of 'closure';) ) if Rambler could let us know of her final route choice for her June 2008 journey and also for the 2014 Camino with her son (also if they are going to walk in Summer again or change to another season)....and of course (some of the ) the reasons and outcomes of those choices for herself and her children?
 
W

whariwharangi

Guest
#15
The part of the camino I would not do ...

The part where I skip a section and take a bus.

From a psychological point of view it breaks the trip into two caminos. Only have 21 days? Start in Burgos.

As for the Meseta ... though I was distressed that its bald blankness has been intruded upon by all those wind turbines ... its still not a place to avoid.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#17
I would skip the parts where my knee or feet hurt terribly, or where I was getting soaked by a cold rain and wind. ;)
I would do and have done.
However, for a 21 day Camino, I would prefer to start nearer Santiago, perhaps Astorga or further back at Leon, or even further back at Burgos and walk the magnificent Meseta. This could depend on your physical ability.
Although I have fully walked the Camino several times, I have also taken a bus on several other occasions and, frankly, it's not the same. At least for me! Anne
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
#18
I would do and have done.
However, for a 21 day Camino, I would prefer to start nearer Santiago, perhaps Astorga or further back at Leon, or even further back at Burgos and walk the magnificent Meseta. This could depend on your physical ability.
Although I have fully walked the Camino several times, I have also taken a bus on several other occasions and, frankly, it's not the same. At least for me! Anne
Can we ever be free of our expectations of ourselves? Like many others, I have taken the bus when I have had heat exhaustion, blisters, etc. I have been unhappy with myself for doing this, and each time, endeavor to not do it again. It's irrational, of course, and speaks more to my expectations of myself (more than I expect of others). It doesn't ruin my camino, and my disappointment is gone by the time I get to Santiago. I comfort myself by remembering that I also walked caminos without transportation. Strange, aren't we, about what we tell ourselves to feel better.... or is it just me?
 

Canucks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances, SJPDP to Santiago (2013), Le Puy to SJPDP (2014)
#19
I would skip the parts where my knee or feet hurt terribly, or where I was getting soaked by a cold rain and wind. ;)
I guess I should clarify.....I didn't skip these, but I would recommend others do, if they are looking for something to skip.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#20
I would start in Burgos. The Meseta is a gentle introduction to walking long distances each day. It is magnificent and powerfully beautiful, and puts your head in the right place for pilgrim-ing. Once you hit the mountains you are in good physical and mental condition, you have your little support network. You can relax into your pilgrim experience, and not stress-out over the sometimes-wacky last 100 km.
You´re not just sight-seeing, you are a pilgrim!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Full CF 2014.
Planning Portuguese for June/July 2016
Start our Ingles on Sept 28th 2017...:-)
#22
My daughter and I are planning to do the Camino Frances next summer and are just now beginning the planning. We hope to have 21 days to do as much as we can. But obviously this will not be enough time for the whole thing so we are thinking of taking a train or bus for a portion so that we can begin at St Jean and still end in Santiago.
Given that, we are trying to determine which part would be best skipped? Can any of you recommend which portion we should bypass?
Also how much will we need to cut out in order to do this in 3 weeks? We suspect we can cover 20-25 km per day, maybe more. We are regular hikers so we are less concerned about physical ability and more unsure of logistics for the Camino.

Your experience and recommendations would be appreciated.
Rambler
This is uncannily similar to what we have just come back from ! We started at St JPP on April 26th with great intentions to walk all but the Mesata section due to time concerns of only 4 weeks! My wife twisted a knee on day 2 down into Zubiri! we carried on in a more steady way for 4 more days till Estella! The next two days would have included steep descents that we felt she wasn't quite repaired for! But there is a direct bus to Logronio (45 mins and only $4.75)... so we arrived there at 8:45 to continue. We got steadily better and better and and walked into Burgos where we had planned to get the train to Shahgun to miss the first 3-4 days of the Mesata. This worked fine for us as we missed what would have been a very hot, dry section!! We finished in Santiago on May 20th, day before my birthday and spent 3 wonderful days there, including a coach trip to Finnesterra for the Zero Km photo and Stamp! I hope you get from "your" Camino all we got from ours!!! AjD camino 2014 302.jpg
 
#24
This is uncannily similar to what we have just come back from ! We started at St JPP on April 26th with great intentions to walk all but the Mesata section due to time concerns of only 4 weeks! My wife twisted a knee on day 2 down into Zubiri! we carried on in a more steady way for 4 more days till Estella! The next two days would have included steep descents that we felt she wasn't quite repaired for! But there is a direct bus to Logronio (45 mins and only $4.75)... so we arrived there at 8:45 to continue. We got steadily better and better and and walked into Burgos where we had planned to get the train to Shahgun to miss the first 3-4 days of the Mesata. This worked fine for us as we missed what would have been a very hot, dry section!! We finished in Santiago on May 20th, day before my birthday and spent 3 wonderful days there, including a coach trip to Finnesterra for the Zero Km photo and Stamp! I hope you get from "your" Camino all we got from ours!!! AjD View attachment 10472
Fantastic pic.
 

yeslets

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 29th, 2014 - May 29th, 2014
#25
My daughter and I are planning to do the Camino Frances next summer and are just now beginning the planning. We hope to have 21 days to do as much as we can. But obviously this will not be enough time for the whole thing so we are thinking of taking a train or bus for a portion so that we can begin at St Jean and still end in Santiago.
Given that, we are trying to determine which part would be best skipped? Can any of you recommend which portion we should bypass?
Also how much will we need to cut out in order to do this in 3 weeks? We suspect we can cover 20-25 km per day, maybe more. We are regular hikers so we are less concerned about physical ability and more unsure of logistics for the Camino.

Your experience and recommendations would be appreciated.
Rambler
I bypassed the section from Sahagun to Astorga, but I stopped in Leon for two days. The few days before Burgos (after Logrono) I would recommend skipping as it is largely through vineyards along the interstate.
 

Charrito

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
#26
I would NEVER do the Camino Francés again, especially those last 100 kilometres or so from Sarria. It was like rush hour in a big city!

Go for the Camino Portugués or the Inglés instead! Very few pilgrims, beautiful scenery, great places to stop, and you'll enjoy it much more. Just my opinion, of course.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
#27
I bypassed the section from Sahagun to Astorga, but I stopped in Leon for two days. The few days before Burgos (after Logrono) I would recommend skipping as it is largely through vineyards along the interstate.
In 2008 we ended up deciding to walk from Leon to Finisterre, and it worked out very well. Did not have to bypass anything.
My son and I leave today for the Camino and on this one we are planning StPP to Longrono and then a train or car to Astorga or Ponferrada, depending on how things go. This will provide new experiences for me and him a chance to see much of the best parts of the Frances.

Rambler
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#28
If you have to skip anything, yet still want to start in SJPP and finish in Santiago, I would say skip that section walking into Burgos and skip the Meseta.
The last section walking into Burgos is urban and industry and concrete.
The Meseta is cool and all, but not as scenic as most of the rest of the Camino. It's not all that bad to walk. Someone once told me it was a "psychological frontier". Ummm, no. Just a flat part of the Camino. You would have to try really hard to let that section play on your mind. It's not that bad.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#30
If you have to skip anything, yet still want to start in SJPP and finish in Santiago, I would say skip that section walking into Burgos and skip the Meseta.
The last section walking into Burgos is urban and industry and concrete.
The Meseta is cool and all, but not as scenic as most of the rest of the Camino. It's not all that bad to walk. Someone once told me it was a "psychological frontier". Ummm, no. Just a flat part of the Camino. You would have to try really hard to let that section play on your mind. It's not that bad.
I beg to differ. The alternate walk into Burgos , all along the river is as nice as it gets. You totally avoid any paved roads for about 8 Kms, until you practically arrive set the bridge that crosses the river and takes you directly to the main square in front of the Cathedral.
The first part of the Meseta is certainly not flat. Not at all. Basically until you almost reach Sahagun, the Camino is undulated, not to mention the stiff climb out of Castrojeriz. Anne
 
Camino(s) past & future
completed May/June (2013), Le Puy to Santiago May-Jul 2018
#31
knowing what I know now I would skip the arriving but then again I can see how that would be hard if I didn't know.
That is so true for me too a that meant the end and 1 year later it still sorrows me
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#32
I would NEVER do the Camino Francés again, especially those last 100 kilometres or so from Sarria. It was like rush hour in a big city!

Go for the Camino Portugués or the Inglés instead! Very few pilgrims, beautiful scenery, great places to stop, and you'll enjoy it much more. Just my opinion, of course.
Yeah, that last 100 km can be a bit crowded, but I wouldn't have that discourage anyone from doing the Camino Frances for the first time, or multiple times.
Besides, some interesting people in those last 100 km's.
 

Charrito

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés
Portugués
Portugués Var. Esp.
Fisterra
Inglés
Invierno
Norte
Sanabrés
Primitivo
#33
Yeah, that last 100 km can be a bit crowded, but I wouldn't have that discourage anyone from doing the Camino Frances for the first time, or multiple times.
Besides, some interesting people in those last 100 km's.
I didn't say that I wouldn't recommend people doing the Camino Frances, just that I found it too crowded during the last four or five stages, which meant that it was more difficult to enjoy. I'm really glad I did it, and I think it's probably the best Camino to do as your first, before branching out to the less well-known (and less crowded) ones.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#34
If you intend to walk the camino, Walk the Camino. All of it. Industry, hills, valleys, the ugly bits, the flat boring stuff. Even if you have the best reasons in the world, if you pick and choose and skip and edit, you might end up with a nice pretty scenic holiday, but you are cheating yourself out of something wonderful.
This is not a popular opinion, but so be it.
You want to be a pilgrim, you walk the path.
 

Monk Moses

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept. 2014
#35
If you intend to walk the camino, Walk the Camino. All of it. Industry, hills, valleys, the ugly bits, the flat boring stuff. Even if you have the best reasons in the world, if you pick and choose and skip and edit, you might end up with a nice pretty scenic holiday, but you are cheating yourself out of something wonderful.
This is not a popular opinion, but so be it.
You want to be a pilgrim, you walk the path.
Amen, Rebekah!
 

Angelo

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances- SJPdP to SdC (Aug-Sept. '14)
Camino Portugues (May '15)
Camino de Madrid (April '17)
Camino Inglés (April '17)
#36
If you have to skip anything, yet still want to start in SJPP and finish in Santiago, I would say skip that section walking into Burgos and skip the Meseta.
The last section walking into Burgos is urban and industry and concrete.
The Meseta is cool and all, but not as scenic as most of the rest of the Camino. It's not all that bad to walk. Someone once told me it was a "psychological frontier". Ummm, no. Just a flat part of the Camino. You would have to try really hard to let that section play on your mind. It's not that bad.
Hi Mark,
Thanks for your sage advice. By skipping those stages, how many days would be saved? I am doing the Camino Frances on 25/08/14 but only allocated 35 days.
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
#37
Hi Mark,
Thanks for your sage advice. By skipping those stages, how many days would be saved? I am doing the Camino Frances on 25/08/14 but only allocated 35 days.
I suppose you would save 4-5 days, depending on he person.
I think that you can probably do the entire Camino Frances in 35 days. It should not be a problem starting in SJPP and within 34 additional days arriving in Santiago.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#38
If you intend to walk the camino, Walk the Camino. All of it. Industry, hills, valleys, the ugly bits, the flat boring stuff. Even if you have the best reasons in the world, if you pick and choose and skip and edit, you might end up with a nice pretty scenic holiday, but you are cheating yourself out of something wonderful.
This is not a popular opinion, but so be it.
You want to be a pilgrim, you walk the path.
Could not agree more. And I say this from the perspective of a now often tourigrino. But I've been, and sometimes still am, a pilgrim. There is a difference. It's life changing.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#39
If you intend to walk the camino, Walk the Camino. All of it. Industry, hills, valleys, the ugly bits, the flat boring stuff. Even if you have the best reasons in the world, if you pick and choose and skip and edit, you might end up with a nice pretty scenic holiday, but you are cheating yourself out of something wonderful.
This is not a popular opinion, but so be it.
You want to be a pilgrim, you walk the path.
And - who said you HAVE to Start in SJPP? Choose a place further down the line and start from there. Forget about the glory of the so- called crossing of the Pyrenees, or the so called thrill of saying that you crossed the border between France and Spain on foot. ( maybe this is because it's not allowed to cross between the US and Canada or Mexico on foot - well maybe if you were an illegal immigrant you might)! But for a European, crossing the border, any border, is normal. Forget about this fictitious Camino Family, that you hope to meet your first day on the Camino. Believe me, you will meet up with Pilgrims wherever you are on the Camino - and walk with them, for the time required. I totally agree with Rebekah, walk it all, the good, the bad and the ugly from where you can reasonably start in your given time available. Anne
 
Camino(s) past & future
completed May/June (2013), Le Puy to Santiago May-Jul 2018
#40
Hi Mark,
Thanks for your sage advice. By skipping those stages, how many days would be saved? I am doing the Camino Frances on 25/08/14 but only allocated 35 days.
I walked St Jean PdP to Santiago in 30 days in May/June 2013. With 35 days allocated you'll have plenty of time. Just relax, have fun and pick up your gear and go.
 
#41
I beg to differ. The alternate walk into Burgos , all along the river is as nice as it gets. You totally avoid any paved roads for about 8 Kms, until you practically arrive set the bridge that crosses the river and takes you directly to the main square in front of the Cathedral.
The first part of the Meseta is certainly not flat. Not at all. Basically until you almost reach Sahagun, the Camino is undulated, not to mention the stiff climb out of Castrojeriz. Anne
Where does this alternative route start,sounds ideal.
 

CaminoKris2013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2014)
#42
If you intend to walk the camino, Walk the Camino. All of it. Industry, hills, valleys, the ugly bits, the flat boring stuff. Even if you have the best reasons in the world, if you pick and choose and skip and edit, you might end up with a nice pretty scenic holiday, but you are cheating yourself out of something wonderful.
This is not a popular opinion, but so be it.
You want to be a pilgrim, you walk the path.
I agree, Rebekah, but you also don't have to do the Camino all at once either. Yes, for those that are coming longer distances (US, Australia, and other non-European countries), you may feel you need to do the whole thing, but don't bind yourself to covering too many km per day. One thing I found that was coming from a very level and flat landscape, a Camino KM is very different than a measurement I learned in school. 1 km in Spain does NOT equal 0.6 miles!


Sent from my iPhone using Camino de Santiago Forum
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#43
Where does this alternative route start,sounds ideal.
I think it's just before you get to the airport where you pass under a road. You have to be sharp eyed. I was actively looking for it second time round to avoid the nightmare of the road, but still missed it and ended up crossing a field to get onto it.
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#44
All of this is like asking which part of your body should you have amputated. For what it's worth I'd go for a different route (probably the Portuguese), or start in Burgos to end in Santiago (further on to end in Finisterre). We're talking about summer so all major routes should have sufficient facilities and company for a great bus-free Camino.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#45
I think first Camino should be the Frances if you are a pilgrim - and 35 days is plenty. I've walked from SJPDP in less including rest days. Anyway, Spanish tradition is to start at Roncesvalles - which gives you even more time.
 

Angelo

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances- SJPdP to SdC (Aug-Sept. '14)
Camino Portugues (May '15)
Camino de Madrid (April '17)
Camino Inglés (April '17)
#46
Hi Guys ( Mark, bismith, Kanga, Anna, Kris)

Thanks for all the input. You guys are great!.. Much appreciated from a newbie pilgrim who has limited time due to work commitments. I commence from SJPdP on 28/05, with an overnight stay at Orisson.. then I will take my time and enjoy myself. I will listen to my body and the distances I can cover may vary... one sure step at a time. I am pretty fit but injuries can surely make one feel human. I have read somewhere in the forum that "to go far one has to walk slowly". I'm sure I won't run out of time and be able to get to Santiago well before my flight back home via Madrid.

Cheers!
 

Angelo

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances- SJPdP to SdC (Aug-Sept. '14)
Camino Portugues (May '15)
Camino de Madrid (April '17)
Camino Inglés (April '17)
#47
I meant 25th of August, pardon me!:oops:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Will be starting at SJPDP on the 16th May 2014
#48
The part I am not looking forward to is the leaving part


Sent from my iPhone using Camino de Santiago Forum mobile app
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#49
Where does this alternative route start,sounds ideal.
Hi Bernard,
It took me ages to find a post that I made years back, so check out my posting under Alternate route into Burgos. You can read all about it there. And do check out the photo! Anne
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2015
#51
My daughter and I are planning to do the Camino Frances next summer and are just now beginning the planning. We hope to have 21 days to do as much as we can. But obviously this will not be enough time for the whole thing so we are thinking of taking a train or bus for a portion so that we can begin at St Jean and still end in Santiago.
Given that, we are trying to determine which part would be best skipped? Can any of you recommend which portion we should bypass?
Also how much will we need to cut out in order to do this in 3 weeks? We suspect we can cover 20-25 km per day, maybe more. We are regular hikers so we are less concerned about physical ability and more unsure of logistics for the Camino.

Your experience and recommendations would be appreciated.
Rambler
Can you let me know how you did your camino? I plan on going next May and on,y have 3 weeks
 

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